Dictionary Of The English Language "To"
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To
prep.
• The preposition to primarily indicates approach and arrival, motion made in the direction of a place or thing and attaining it, access; and also, motion or tendency without arrival; movement toward; — opposed to from.
• Hence, it indicates motion, course, or tendency toward a time, a state or condition, an aim, or anything capable of being regarded as a limit to a tendency, movement, or action; as, he is going to a trade; he is rising to wealth and honor.
• In a very general way, and with innumerable varieties of application, to connects transitive verbs with their remoter or indirect object, and adjectives, nouns, and neuter or passive verbs with a following noun which limits their action. Its sphere verges upon that of for, but it contains less the idea of design or appropriation; as, these remarks were addressed to a large audience; let us keep this seat to ourselves; a substance sweet to the taste; an event painful to the mind; duty to God and to our parents; a dislike to spirituous liquor.
• As sign of the infinitive, to had originally the use of last defined, governing the infinitive as a verbal noun, and connecting it as indirect object with a preceding verb or adjective; thus, ready to go, i.e., ready unto going; good to eat, i.e., good for eating; I do my utmost to lead my life pleasantly. But it has come to be the almost constant prefix to the infinitive, even in situations where it has no prepositional meaning, as where the infinitive is direct object or subject; thus, I love to learn, i.e., I love learning; to die for one's country is noble, i.e., the dying for one's country. Where the infinitive denotes the design or purpose, good usage formerly allowed the prefixing of for to the to; as, what went ye out for see? (Matt. xi. 8).
• In many phrases, and in connection with many other words, to has a pregnant meaning, or is used elliptically.
• Extent; limit; degree of comprehension; inclusion as far as; as, they met us to the number of three hundred.
• Effect; end; consequence; as, the prince was flattered to his ruin; he engaged in a war to his cost; violent factions exist to the prejudice of the state.
• Apposition; connection; antithesis; opposition; as, they engaged hand to hand.
• Accord; adaptation; as, an occupation to his taste; she has a husband to her mind.
• Comparison; as, three is to nine as nine is to twenty-seven; it is ten to one that you will offend him.
• Addition; union; accumulation.
• Accompaniment; as, she sang to his guitar; they danced to the music of a piano.
• Character; condition of being; purpose subserved or office filled.
Toad
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of batrachians belonging to the genus Bufo and allied genera, especially those of the family Bufonidae. Toads are generally terrestrial in their habits except during the breeding season, when they seek the water. Most of the species burrow beneath the earth in the daytime and come forth to feed on insects at night. Most toads have a rough, warty skin in which are glands that secrete an acrid fluid.
Toadeater
n.
• A fawning, obsequious parasite; a mean sycophant; a flatterer; a toady.
Toadfish
n.
(Zool.) Any marine fish of the genus Batrachus, having a large, thick head and a wide mouth, and bearing some resemblance to a toad. The American species (Batrachus tau) is very common in shallow water. Called also oyster fish, and sapo.
• The angler.
• A swellfish.
Toadflax
n.
(Bot.) An herb (Linaria vulgaris) of the Figwort family, having narrow leaves and showy orange and yellow flowers; — called also butter and eggs, flaxweed, and ramsted.
Toadhead
n.
(Zool.) The golden plover.
Toadish
a.
• Like a toad.
Toadlet
n.
• A small toad.
Toadstone
n.
(Min.) A local name for the igneous rocks of Derbyshire, England; — said by some to be derived from the German todter stein, meaning dead stone, that is, stone which contains no ores.
• Bufonite, formerly regarded as a precious stone, and worn as a jewel. See Bufonite.
Toadstool
n.
(Bot.) A name given to many umbrella-shaped fungi, mostly of the genus Agaricus. The species are almost numberless. They grow on decaying organic matter.
Toady
n.
• A mean flatterer; a toadeater; a sycophant.
• A coarse, rustic woman.
v. t.
• To fawn upon with mean sycophancy.
Toadyism
n.
• The practice of meanly fawning on another; base sycophancy; servile adulation.
Toast
v. t.
• To dry and brown by the heat of a fire; as, to toast bread.
• To warm thoroughly; as, to toast the feet.
• To name when a health is proposed to be drunk; to drink to the health, or in honor, of; as, to toast a lady.
n.
• Bread dried and browned before a fire, usually in slices; also, a kind of food prepared by putting slices of toasted bread into milk, gravy, etc.
• A lady in honor of whom persons or a company are invited to drink; — so called because toasts were formerly put into the liquor, as a great delicacy.
• Hence, any person, especially a person of distinction, in honor of whom a health is drunk; hence, also, anything so commemorated; a sentiment, as "The land we live in," "The day we celebrate," etc.
Toaster
n.
• One who toasts.
• A kitchen utensil for toasting bread, cheese, etc.
Toasting
• a. & n. from Toast, v.
Toastmaster
n.
• A person who presides at a public dinner or banquet, and announces the toasts.
Toat
n.
• The handle of a joiner's plane.
Tobacco
n.
(Bot.) An American plant (Nicotiana Tabacum) of the Nightshade family, much used for smoking and chewing, and as snuff. As a medicine, it is narcotic, emetic, and cathartic. Tobacco has a strong, peculiar smell, and an acrid taste.
• The leaves of the plant prepared for smoking, chewing, etc., by being dried, cured, and manufactured in various ways.
Tobacconing
n.
• Smoking tobacco.
Tobacconist
n.
• A dealer in tobacco; also, a manufacturer of tobacco.
• A smoker of tobacco.
Tobine
n.
• A stout twilled silk used for dresses.
Tobit
n.
• A book of the Apocrypha.
Toboggan
n.
• A kind of sledge made of pliable board, turned up at one or both ends, used for coasting down hills or prepared inclined planes; also, a sleigh or sledge, to be drawn by dogs, or by hand, over soft and deep snow.
v. i.
• To slide down hill over the snow or ice on a toboggan.
Toccata
n.
(Mus.) An old form of piece for the organ or harpsichord, somewhat in the free and brilliant style of the prelude, fantasia, or capriccio.
Tocher
n.
• Dowry brought by a bride to her husband.
Tockay
n.
(Zool.) A spotted lizard native of India.
Toco
n.
(Zool.) A toucan (Ramphastos toco) having a very large beak. See Illust. under Toucan.
Tocology
n.
• The science of obstetrics, or midwifery; that department of medicine which treats of parturition.
Tocororo
n.
(Zool.) A cuban trogon (Priotelus temnurus) having a serrated bill and a tail concave at the end.
Tocsin
n.
• An alarm bell, or the ringing of a bell for the purpose of alarm.
Tod
n.
• A bush; a thick shrub; a bushy clump.
• An old weight used in weighing wool, being usually twenty-eight pounds.
• A fox; — probably so named from its bushy tail.
v. t. & i.
• To weigh; to yield in tods.
Toddle
v. i.
• To walk with short, tottering steps, as a child.
n.
• A toddling walk.
Toddler
n.
• One who toddles; especially, a young child.
Toddy
n.
• A juice drawn from various kinds of palms in the East Indies; or, a spirituous liquor procured from it by fermentation.
• A mixture of spirit and hot water sweetened.
Tody
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of small insectivorous West Indian birds of the genus Todus. They are allied to the kingfishers.
Toe
n.
(Anat.) One of the terminal members, or digits, of the foot of a man or an animal.
(Zool.) The fore part of the hoof or foot of an animal.
• Anything, or any part, corresponding to the toe of the foot; as, the toe of a boot; the toe of a skate.
(Mach.) The journal, or pivot, at the lower end of a revolving shaft or spindle, which rests in a step.
• A lateral projection at one end, or between the ends, of a piece, as a rod or bolt, by means of which it is moved.
• A projection from the periphery of a revolving piece, acting as a cam to lift another piece.
v. t.
• To touch or reach with the toes; to come fully up to; as, to toe the mark.
v. i.
• To hold or carry the toes (in a certain way).
Toed
a.
• Having (such or so many) toes; — chiefly used in composition; as, narrow-toed, four-toed.
(Carp.) Having the end secured by nails driven obliquely, said of a board, plank, or joist serving as a brace, and in general of any part of a frame secured to other parts by diagonal nailing.
Toft
n.
• A knoll or hill.
• A grove of trees; also, a plain.
(O. Eng. Law) A place where a messuage has once stood; the site of a burnt or decayed house.
Toftman
n.
• The owner of a toft. See Toft, 3.
Tofus
n.
• Tophus.
(Min.) Tufa. See under Tufa, and Toph.
Toga
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) The loose outer garment worn by the ancient Romans, consisting of a single broad piece of woolen cloth of a shape approaching a semicircle. It was of undyed wool, except the border of the toga praetexta.
Togated
a.
• Dressed in a toga or gown; wearing a gown; gowned.
Toged
a.
• Togated.
Together
adv.
• In company or association with respect to place or time; as, to live together in one house; to live together in the same age; they walked together to the town.
• In or into union; into junction; as, to sew, knit, or fasten two things together; to mix things together.
• In concert; with mutual cooperation; as, the allies made war upon France together.
Toggery
n.
• Clothes; garments; dress; as, fishing toggery.
Toggle
n.
(Naut.) A wooden pin tapering toward both ends with a groove around its middle, fixed transversely in the eye of a rope to be secured to any other loop or bight or ring; a kind of button or frog capable of being readily engaged and disengaged for temporary purposes.
(Mach.) Two rods or plates connected by a toggle joint.
Toght
a.
• Taut.
Togue
n.
(Zool.) The namaycush.
Tohew
v. t.
• To hew in pieces.
Toil
n.
• A net or snare; any thread, web, or string spread for taking prey; — usually in the plural.
v. i.
• To exert strength with pain and fatigue of body or mind, especially of the body, with efforts of some continuance or duration; to labor; to work.
v. t.
• To weary; to overlabor.
• To labor; to work; — often with out.
n.
• Labor with pain and fatigue; labor that oppresses the body or mind, esp. the body.
Toiler
n.
• One who toils, or labors painfully.
Toilet
n.
• A covering of linen, silk, or tapestry, spread over a table in a chamber or a dressing room.
• A dressing table.
• Act or mode of dressing, or that which is arranged in dressing; attire; dress; as, her toilet is perfect.
Toilette
n.
• See Toilet, 3.
Toilful
a.
• Producing or involving much toil; laborious; toilsome; as, toilful care.
Toilinette
n.
• A cloth, the weft of which is of woolen yarn, and the warp of cotton and silk, — used for wistcoats.
Toilless
a.
• Free from toil.
Toilsome
a.
• Attended with toil, or fatigue and pain; laborious; wearisome; as, toilsome work.
Toise
n.
• An old measure of length in France, containing six French feet, or about 6.3946 French feet.
Tokay
n.
(Bot.) A grape of an oval shape and whitish color.
• A rich Hungarian wine made from Tokay grapes.
Token
n.
• Something intended or supposed to represent or indicate another thing or an event; a sign; a symbol; as, the rainbow is a token of God's covenant established with Noah.
• A memorial of friendship; something by which the friendship of another person is to be kept in mind; a memento; a souvenir.
• Something given or shown as a symbol or guarantee of authority or right; a sign of authenticity, of power, good faith, etc.
• A piece of metal intended for currency, and issued by a private party, usually bearing the name of the issuer, and redeemable in lawful money. Also, a coin issued by government, esp. when its use as lawful money is limited and its intrinsic value is much below its nominal value.
(Med.) A livid spot upon the body, indicating, or supposed to indicate, the approach of death.
(Print.) Ten and a half quires, or, commonly, 250 sheets, of paper printed on both sides; also, in some cases, the same number of sheets printed on one side, or half the number printed on both sides.
(Ch. of Scot.) A piece of metal given beforehand to each person in the congregation who is permitted to partake of the Lord's Supper.
(Mining) A bit of leather having a peculiar mark designating a particular miner. Each hewer sends one of these with each corf or tub he has hewn.
v. t.
• To betoken.
Tokened
a.
• Marked by tokens, or spots; as, the tokened pestilence.
Tokenless
a.
• Without a token.
Tokin
n.
• A tocsin.
Tol
v. t.
(Law) To take away. See Toll.
Tola
n.
• A weight of British India. The standard tola is equal to 180 grains.
Tolane
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon, C14H10, related both to the acetylene and the aromatic series, and produced artificially as a white crystalline substance; — called also diphenyl acetylene.
Tolbooth
n.
• See Tollbooth.
Told
• imp. & p. p. of Tell.
Tole
v. t.
• To draw, or cause to follow, by displaying something pleasing or desirable; to allure by some bait.
Toledo
n.
• A sword or sword blade made at Toledo in Spain, which city was famous in the 16th and 17th centuries for the excellence of its weapons.
Tolerable
a.
• Capable of being borne or endured; supportable, either physically or mentally.
• Moderately good or agreeable; not contemptible; not very excellent or pleasing, but such as can be borne or received without disgust, resentment, or opposition; passable; as, a tolerable administration; a tolerable entertainment; a tolerable translation.
Tolerabolity
n.
• The quality or state of being tolerable.
Tolerance
n.
• The power or capacity of enduring; the act of enduring; endurance.
• The endurance of the presence or actions of objectionable persons, or of the expression of offensive opinions; toleration.
(Med.) The power possessed or acquired by some persons of bearing doses of medicine which in ordinary cases would prove injurious or fatal.
Tolerant
a.
• Inclined to tolerate; favoring toleration; forbearing; ingulgent.
Tolerate
v. t.
• To suffer to be, or to be done, without prohibition or hindrance; to allow or permit negatively, by not preventing; not to restrain; to put up with; as, to tolerate doubtful practices.
Toleration
n.
• The act of tolerating; the allowance of that which is not wholly approved.
• Specifically, the allowance of religious opinions and modes of worship in a state when contrary to, or different from, those of the established church or belief.
• Hence, freedom from bigotry and severity in judgment of the opinions or belief of others, especially in respect to religious matters.
Toll
v. t.
(O. Eng. Law) To take away; to vacate; to annul.
v. t.
• To draw; to entice; to allure. See Tole.
• To cause to sound, as a bell, with strokes slowly and uniformly repeated; as, to toll the funeral bell.
• To strike, or to indicate by striking, as the hour; to ring a toll for; as, to toll a departed friend.
• To call, summon, or notify, by tolling or ringing.
v. i.
• To sound or ring, as a bell, with strokes uniformly repeated at intervals, as at funerals, or in calling assemblies, or to announce the death of a person.
n.
• The sound of a bell produced by strokes slowly and uniformly repeated.
n.
• A tax paid for some liberty or privilege, particularly for the privilege of passing over a bridge or on a highway, or for that of vending goods in a fair, market, or the like.
(Sax. & O. Eng. Law) A liberty to buy and sell within the bounds of a manor.
• A portion of grain taken by a miller as a compensation for grinding.
v. i.
• To pay toll or tallage.
• To take toll; to raise a tax.
v. t.
• To collect, as a toll.
Tollable
a.
• Subject to the payment of toll; as, tollable goods.
Tollage
n.
• Payment of toll; also, the amount or quantity paid as toll.
Tollbooth
n.
• A place where goods are weighed to ascertain the duties or toll.
• In Scotland, a burgh jail; hence, any prison, especially a town jail.
v. t.
• To imprison in a tollbooth.
Toller
n.
• A toll gatherer.
n.
• One who tolls a bell.
Tolletane
a.
• Of or pertaining to Toledo in Spain; made in Toledo.
Tollgate
n.
• A gate where toll is taken.
Tollhouse
n.
• A house occupied by a receiver of tolls.
Tollman
n.
• One who receives or collects toll; a toll gatherer.
Tolmen
n.
• See Dolmen.
Tolsester
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A toll or tribute of a sextary of ale, paid to the lords of some manors by their tenants, for liberty to brew and sell ale.
Tolsey
n.
• A tollbooth; also, a merchants' meeting place, or exchange.
Tolt
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A writ by which a cause pending in a court baron was removed into a country court.
Toltec
n.
(Ethnol.) One of a race which formerly occupied Mexico.
Tolu
n.
• A fragrant balsam said to have been first brought from Santiago de Tolu, in New Granada. See Balsam of Tolu, under Balsam.
Toluate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of any one of the toluic acids.
Toluene
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon, C6H5.CH3, of the aromatic series, homologous with benzene, and obtained as a light mobile colorless liquid, by distilling tolu balsam, coal tar, etc.; — called also methyl benzene, phenyl methane, etc.
Toluenyl
n.
(Chem.) Tolyl.
Toluic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, one of three metameric acids, CH3.C6H4.CO2H, which are related to toluene and analogous to benzoic acids. They are white crystalline substances, and are called respectively orthotoluic acid, metatoluic acid, and paratoluic acid.
Toluid
n.
(Chem.) A complex double tolyl and toluidine derivative of glycocoll, obtained as a white crystalline substance.
Toluidine
n.
(Chem.) Any one of three metameric amido derivatives of toluene analogous to aniline, and called respectively orthtoluidine, metatoluidine, and paratoluidine; especially, the commonest one, or paratoluidine, which is obtained as a white crystalline substance.
Toluric
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, any one of three isomeric crystalline acids, C9H10ON.CO2H, which are toluyl derivatives of glycocoll.
Tolutation
n.
• A pacing or ambling.
Toluyl
n.
(Chem.) Any one of the three hypothetical radicals corresponding to the three toluic acids.
Toluylene
n.
(Chem.) Same as Stilbene.
• Sometimes, but less properly, tolylene.
Tolyl
n.
(Chem.) The hydrocarbon radical, CH3.C6H4, regarded as characteristic of certain compounds of the aromatic series related to toluene; as, tolyl carbinol.
Tolylene
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon radical, C6H4.(CH2)2, regarded as characteristic of certain toluene derivatives.
Tolypeutine
n.
(Zool.) The apar.
Tom
n.
• The knave of trumps at gleek.
Tomahawk
n.
• A kind of war hatchet used by the American Indians. It was originally made of stone, but afterwards of iron.
v. t.
• To cut, strike, or kill, with a tomahawk.
Tomaley
n.
• The liver of the lobster, which becomes green when boiled; — called also tomalline.
Toman
n.
• A money of account in Persia, whose value varies greatly at different times and places. Its average value may be reckoned at about two and a half dollars.
Tomato
n.
(Bot.) The fruit of a plant of the Nightshade family (Lycopersicum esculentun); also, the plant itself. The fruit, which is called also love apple, is usually of a rounded, flattened form, but often irregular in shape. It is of a bright red or yellow color, and is eaten either cooked or uncooked.
Tomb
n.
• A pit in which the dead body of a human being is deposited; a grave; a sepulcher.
• A house or vault, formed wholly or partly in the earth, with walls and a roof, for the reception of the dead.
• A monument erected to inclose the body and preserve the name and memory of the dead.
v. t.
• To place in a tomb; to bury; to inter; to entomb.
Tombac
n.
(Metal.) An alloy of copper and zinc, resembling brass, and containing about 84 per cent of copper; — called also German, or Dutch, brass. It is very malleable and ductile, and when beaten into thin leaves is sometimes called Dutch metal. The addition of arsenic makes white tombac.
Tombester
n.
• A female dancer.
Tombless
a.
• Destitute of a tomb.
Tomboy
n.
• A romping girl; a hoiden.
Tombstone
n.
• A stone erected over a grave, to preserve the memory of the deceased.
Tomcat
n.
• A male cat, especially when full grown or of large size.
Tomcod
n.
(Zool.) A small edible American fish (Microgadus tomcod) of the Codfish family, very abundant in autumn on the Atlantic coast of the Northen United States; — called also frostfish. See Illust. under Frostfish.
• The kingfish. See Kingfish (a).
• The jack. See 2d Jack, 8. (c).
Tome
n.
• As many writings as are bound in a volume, forming part of a larger work; a book; — usually applied to a ponderous volume.
Tomelet
n.
• All small tome, or volume.
Tomentose
a.
(Bot. & Zool.) Covered with matted woolly hairs; as, a tomentose leaf; a tomentose leaf; a tomentose membrane.
Tomentum
n.
(Bot.) The closely matted hair or downy nap covering the leaves or stems of some plants.
Tometous
a.
• Tomentose.
Tomfool
n.
• A great fool; a trifler.
Tomfoolery
n.
• Folly; trifling.
Tomium
n.
(Zool.) The cutting edge of the bill of a bird.
Tomjohn
n.
• A kind of open sedan used in Ceylon, carried by a single pole on men's shoulders.
Tommy
n.
• Bread, — generally a penny roll; the supply of food carried by workmen as their daily allowance.
• A truck, or barter; the exchange of labor for goods, not money.
Tomnoddy
n.
(Zool.) A sea bird, the puffin.
• A fool; a dunce; a noddy.
Tomopteris
n.
(Zool.) A genus of transparent marine annelids which swim actively at the surface of the sea. They have deeply divided or forked finlike organs (parapodia). This genus is the type of the order, or suborder, Gymnocopa.
Tomorn
adv.
• To-morrow.
Tomorrow
adv.
• On the day after the present day; on the next day; on the morrow.
n.
• The day after the present; the morrow.
Tompion
n.
• A stopper of a cannon or a musket. See Tampion.
(Mus.) A plug in a flute or an organ pipe, to modulate the tone.
• The iron bottom to which grapeshot are fixed.
Tompon
n.
• An inking pad used in lithographic printing.
Tomrig
n.
• A rude, wild, wanton girl; a hoiden; a tomboy.
Tomtit
n.
(Zool.) A titmouse, esp. the blue titmouse.
• The wren.
Ton
• pl. of Toe.
n.
(Zool.) The common tunny, or house mackerel.
n.
• The prevailing fashion or mode; vogue; as, things of ton.
n.
(Com.) A measure of weight or quantity.
• The weight of twenty hundredweight.
(Naut. & Com.) Forty cubic feet of space, being the unit of measurement of the burden, or carrying capacity, of a vessel; as a vessel of 300 tons burden.
(Naut. & Com.) A certain weight or quantity of merchandise, with reference to transportation as freight; as, six hundred weight of ship bread in casks, seven hundred weight in bags, eight hundred weight in bulk; ten bushels of potatoes; eight sacks, or ten barrels, of flour; forty cubic feet of rough, or fifty cubic feet of hewn, timber, etc.
Tonality
n.
(Mus.) The principle of key in music; the character which a composition has by virtue of the key in which it is written, or through the family relationship of all its tones and chords to the keynote, or tonic, of the whole.
Toncanet
n.
(Zool.) A small toucan.
Tone
n.
• Sound, or the character of a sound, or a sound considered as of this or that character; as, a low, high, loud, grave, acute, sweet, or harsh tone.
(Rhet.) Accent, or inflection or modulation of the voice, as adapted to express emotion or passion.
• A whining style of speaking; a kind of mournful or artificial strain of voice; an affected speaking with a measured rhythm ahd a regular rise and fall of the voice; as, children often read with a tone.
(Mus.) A sound considered as to pitch; as, the seven tones of the octave; she has good high tones.
• The larger kind of interval between contiguous sounds in the diatonic scale, the smaller being called a semitone as, a whole tone too flat; raise it a tone.
• The peculiar quality of sound in any voice or instrument; as, a rich tone, a reedy tone.
• A mode or tune or plain chant; as, the Gregorian tones.
(Med.) That state of a body, or of any of its organs or parts, in which the animal functions are healthy and performed with due vigor.
(Physiol.) Tonicity; as, arterial tone.
• State of mind; temper; mood.
• Tenor; character; spirit; drift; as, the tone of his remarks was commendatory.
• General or prevailing character or style, as of morals, manners, or sentiment, in reference to a scale of high and low; as, a low tone of morals; a tone of elevated sentiment; a courtly tone of manners.
• The general effect of a picture produced by the combination of light and shade, together with color in the case of a painting; — commonly used in a favorable sense; as, this picture has tone.
v. t.
• To utter with an affected tone.
• To give tone, or a particular tone, to; to tune. See Tune, v. t.
(Photog.) To bring, as a print, to a certain required shade of color, as by chemical treatment.
Toned
a.
• Having (such) a tone; — chiefly used in composition; as, high-toned; sweet-toned.
Toneless
a.
• Having no tone; unmusical.
Tonga
n.
(Med.) A drug useful in neuralgia, derived from a Fijian plant supposed to be of the aroid genus Epipremnum.
Tongkang
n.
(Naut.) A kind of boat or junk used in the seas of the Malay Archipelago.
Tongo
n.
• The mangrove; — so called in the Pacific Islands.
Tongs
n. pl.
• An instrument, usually of metal, consisting of two parts, or long shafts, jointed together at or near one end, or united by an elastic bow, used for handling things, especially hot coals or metals; — often called a pair of tongs.
Tongue
n.
(Anat.) an organ situated in the floor of the mouth of most vertebrates and connected with the hyoid arch.
• The power of articulate utterance; speech.
• Discourse; fluency of speech or expression.
• Honorable discourse; eulogy.
• A language; the whole sum of words used by a particular nation; as, the English tongue.
• Speech; words or declarations only; — opposed to thoughts or actions.
• A people having a distinct language.
(Zool.) The lingual ribbon, or odontophore, of a mollusk.
• The proboscis of a moth or a butterfly.
• The lingua of an insect.
(Zool.) Any small sole.
• That which is considered as resembing an animal's tongue, in position or form.
• A projection, or slender appendage or fixture; as, the tongue of a buckle, or of a balance.
• A projection on the side, as of a board, which fits into a groove.
• A point, or long, narrow strip of land, projecting from the mainland into a sea or a lake.
• The pole of a vehicle; especially, the pole of an ox cart, to the end of which the oxen are yoked.
• The clapper of a bell.
(Naut.) A sort piece of rope spliced into the upper part of standing backstays, etc.; also. the upper main piece of a mast composed of several pieces.
(Mus.) Same as Reed,
n.
v. t.
• To speak; to utter.
• To chide; to scold.
(Mus.) To modulate or modify with the tongue, as notes, in playing the flute and some other wind instruments.
• To join means of a tongue and grove; as, to tongue boards together.
v. i.
• To talk; to prate.
(Mus.) To use the tongue in forming the notes, as in playing the flute and some other wind instruments.
Tonguebird
n.
• The wryneck.
Tongued
a.
• Having a tongue.
Tonguefish
n.
(Zool.) A flounder (Symphurus plagiusa) native of the southern coast of the United States.
Tongueless
a.
• Having no tongue.
• Hence, speechless; mute.
• Unnamed; not spoken of.
Tonguelet
n.
• A little tongue.
Tonguester
n.
• One who uses his tongue; a talker; a story-teller; a gossip.
Tongueworm
n.
(Zool.) Any species of Linguatulina.
Tonguy
a.
• Ready or voluble in speaking; as, a tonguy speaker.
Tonic
a.
• Of or relating to tones or sounds; specifically (Phon.), applied to, or distingshing, a speech sound made with tone unmixed and undimmed by obstruction, such sounds, namely, the vowels and diphthongs, being so called by Dr. James Rush (1833) " from their forming the purest and most plastic material of intonation."
• Of or pertaining to tension; increasing tension; hence, increasing strength; as, tonic power.
(Med.) Increasing strength, or the tone of the animal system; obviating the effects of debility, and restoring heatly functions.
n.
(Phon.) A tonic element or letter; a vowel or a diphthong.
(Mus.) The key tone, or first tone of any scale.
(Med.) A medicine that increases the srength, and gives vigor of action to the system.
Tonical
a.
• Tonic.
Tonicicty
n.
(Physiol.) The state of healty tension or partial contraction of muscae fibers while at rest; tone; tonus.
Tonight
adv.
• On this present or coming night.
• On the last night past.
n.
• The present or the coming night; the night after the present day.
Tonite
n.
• An explosive compound; a preparation of gun cotton.
Tonnage
n.
• The weight of goods carried in a boat or a ship.
• The cubical content or burden of a vessel, or vessels, in tons; or, the amount of weight which one or several vessels may carry. See Ton, n. (b).
• A duty or impost on vessels, estimated per ton, or, a duty, toll, or rate payable on goods per ton transported on canals .
• The whole amount of shipping estimated by tons; as, the tonnage of the United States. See Ton.
Tonne
n.
• A tun.
Tonnihood
n.
(Zool.) The female of the bullfinch; — called also tonyhoop.
Tonnish
a.
• In the ton; fashionable; modish.
Tonometer
n.
(Physics.) An instrument for determining the rate of vibrations in tones.
(Physiol.) An apparatus for studying and registering the action of various fluids and drugs on the excised heart of lower animals.
• An instrument for measuring tension, esp. that of the eyeball.
Tonometry
n.
• The act of measuring with a tonometer; specifically (Med.), measurement of tension, esp. the tension of the eyeball.
Tonophant
n.
(Physics.) A modification of the kaleidophon, for showing composition of acoustic vibrations. It consists of two thin slips of steel welded together, their length being adjystable by a screw socket.
Tonous
a.
• Abounding in tone or sound.
Tonsil
n.
(Anat.) One of the two glandular organs situated in the throat at the sides of the fauces. The tonsils are sometimes called the almonds, from their shape.
Tonsilar
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the tonsils; tonsilitic.
Tonsile
a.
• Capable of being clipped.
Tonsilitic
a.
(Anat.) Tonsilar.
Tonsilitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the tonsil; quinsy.
Tonsilotome
n.
(Surg.) An instrument for removing the tonsils.
Tonsilotomy
n.
(Surg.) The operation of removing the tonsil, or a portion thereof.
Tonsor
n.
• A barber.
Tonsorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a barber, or shaving.
Tonsure
n.
• The act of clipping the hair, or of shaving the crown of the head; also, the state of being shorn.
(R. C. Ch.) The first ceremony used for devoting a person to the service of God and the church; the first degree of the clericate, given by a bishop, abbot, or cardinal priest, consisting in cutting off the hair from a circular space at the back of the head, with prayers and benedictions; hence, entrance or admission into minor orders.
• The shaven corona, or crown, which priests wear as a mark of their order and of their rank.
Tonsured
a.
• Having the tonsure; shaven; shorn; clipped; hence, bald.
Tontine
n.
• An annuity, with the benefit of survivorship, or a loan raised on life annuities with the benefit of survivorship. Thus, an annuity is shared among a number, on the principle that the share of each, at his death, is enjoyed by the survivors, until at last the whole goes to the last survivor, or to the last two or three, according to the terms on which the money is advanced. Used also adjectively; as, tontine insurance.
Tonus
n.
(Physiol.) Tonicity, or tone; as, muscular tonus.
Tony
n.
• A simpleton.
Too
adv.
• Over; more than enough; — noting excess; as, a thing is too long, too short, or too wide; too high; too many; too much.
• Likewise; also; in addition.
Took
• imp. of Take.
Tool
n.
• An instrument such as a hammer, saw, plane, file, and the like, used in the manual arts, to facilitate mechanical operations; any instrument used by a craftsman or laborer at his work; an implement; as, the tools of a joiner, smith, shoe-maker, etc.; also, a cutter, chisel, or other part of an instrument or machine that dresses work.
• A machine for cutting or shaping materials; — also called machine tool.
• Hence, any instrument of use or service.
• A weapon.
• A person used as an instrument by another person; — a word of reproach; as, men of intrigue have their tools, by whose agency they accomplish their purposes.
v. t.
• To shape, form, or finish with a tool.
• To drive, as a coach.
Tooling
n.
• Work perfomed with a tool.
Toom
a.
• Empty.
v. t.
• To empty.
Toon
• pl. of Toe.
n.
(Bot.) The reddish brown wood of an East Indian tree (Cedrela Toona) closely resembling the Spanish cedar; also. the tree itself.
Toonwood
n.
(Bot.) Same as Toon.
Toot
v. i.
• To stand out, or be prominent.
• To peep; to look narrowly.
v. t.
• To see; to spy.
v. i.
• To blow or sound a horn; to make similar noise by contact of the tongue with the root of the upper teeth at the beginning and end of the sound; also, to give forth such a sound, as a horn when blown.
v. t.
• To cause to sound, as a horn, the note being modified at the beginning and end as if by pronouncing the letter t; to blow; to sound.
Tooter
n.
• One who toots; one who plays upon a pipe or horn.
Tooth
n.
(Anat.) One of the hard, bony appendages which are borne on the jaws, or on other bones in the walls of the mouth or pharynx of most vertebrates, and which usually aid in the prehension and mastication of food.
• Fig.: Taste; palate.
• Any projection corresponding to the tooth of an animal, in shape, position, or office; as, the teeth, or cogs, of a cogwheel; a tooth, prong, or tine, of a fork; a tooth, or the teeth, of a rake, a saw, a file, a card.
• A projecting member resembling a tenon, but fitting into a mortise that is only sunk, not pierced through.
• One of several steps, or offsets, in a tusk. See Tusk.
(Nat. Hist.) An angular or prominence on any edge; as, a tooth on the scale of a fish, or on a leaf of a plant
(Bot.) one of the appendages at the mouth of the capsule of a moss. See Peristome.
(Zool.) Any hard calcareous or chitinous organ found in the mouth of various invertebrates and used in feeding or procuring food; as, the teeth of a mollusk or a starfish.
v. t.
• To furnish with teeth.
• To indent; to jag; as, to tooth a saw.
• To lock into each other. See Tooth, n., 4.
Toothache
n.
(Med.) Pain in a tooth or in the teeth; odontalgia.
Toothback
n.
(Zool.) Any notodontian.
Toothbill
n.
(Zool.) A peculiar fruit-eating ground pigeon (Didunculus strigiostris) native of the Samoan Islands, and noted for its resemblance, in several characteristics, to the extinct dodo. Its beak is stout and strongly hooked, and the mandible has two or three strong teeth toward the end. or ts color is chocolate red. Called also toothbilled pigeon, and manu-mea.
Toothbrush
n.
• A brush for cleaning the teeth.
Toothdrawer
n.
• One whose business it is to extract teeth with instruments; a dentist.
Toothed
a.
• Having teeth; furnished with teeth.
(Bot. & Zool.) Having marginal projecting points; dentate.
Toothful
a.
• Toothsome.
Toothing
n.
• The act or process of indenting or furnishing with teeth.
(Masonry) Bricks alternately projecting at the end of a wall, in order that they may be bonded into a continuation of it when the remainder is carried up.
Toothless
a.
• Having no teeth.
Toothlet
n.
• A little tooth, or like projection.
Toothleted
a.
• Having a toothlet or toothlets; as, a toothleted leaf.
Toothpick
n.
• A pointed instument for clearing the teeth of substances lodged between them.
Toothpicker
n.
• A toothpick.
Toothshell
n.
(Zool.) Any species of Dentalium and allied genera having a tooth-shaped shell. See Dentalium.
Toothsome
a.
• Grateful to the taste; palable.
Toothwort
n.
(Bot.) A plant whose roots are fancied to resemble teeth, as certain plants of the genus Lathraea, and various species of Dentaria. See Coralwort.
Toothy
a.
• Toothed; with teeth.
Toozoo
n.
• The ringdove.
Top
n.
• A child's toy, commonly in the form of a conoid or pear, made to spin on its point, usually by drawing off a string wound round its surface or stem, the motion being sometimes continued by means of a whip.
(Rope Making) A plug, or conical block of wood, with longitudital grooves on its surface, in which the strands of the rope slide in the process of twisting.
n.
• The highest part of anything; the upper end, edge, or extremity; the upper side or surface; summit; apex; vertex; cover; lid; as, the top of a spire; the top of a house; the top of a mountain; the top of the ground.
• The utmost degree; the acme; the summit.
• The highest rank; the most honorable position; the utmost attainable place; as, to be at the top of one's class, or at the top of the school.
• The chief person; the most prominent one.
• The crown of the head, or the hair upon it; the head.
• The head, or upper part, of a plant.
(Naut.) A platform surrounding the head of the lower mast and projecting on all sudes. It serves to spead the topmast rigging, thus strengheningthe mast, and also furnishes a convenient standing place for the men aloft.
(Wool Manuf.) A bundle or ball of slivers of comkbed wool, from which the noils, or dust, have been taken out.
• Eve; verge; point.
• The part of a cut gem between the girdle, or circumference, and the table, or flat upper surface.
• Top-boots.
v. i.
• To rise aloft; to be eminent; to tower; as, lofty ridges and topping mountains.
• To predominate; as, topping passions.
• To excel; to rise above others.
v. t.
• To cover on the top; to tip; to cap; — chiefly used in the past participle.
• To rise above; to excel; to outgo; to surpass.
• To rise to the top of; to go over the top of.
• To take off the or upper part of; to crop.
• To perform eminently, or better than before.
(Naut.) To raise one end of, as a yard, so that that end becomes higher than the other.
Toparch
n.
• The ruler or principal man in a place or country; the governor of a toparchy.
Toparchy
n.
• A small state, consisting of a few cities or towns; a petty country governed by a toparch; as, Judea was formerly divided into ten toparchies.
Topau
n.
(Zool.) The rhinocerous bird (a).
Topaz
n.
(Min.) A mineral occurring in rhombic prisms, generally yellowish and pellucid, also colorless, and of greenesh, bluish, or brownish shades. It sometimes occurs massive and opaque. It is a fluosilicate of alumina, and is used as a gem.
(Zool.) Either one of two species of large, brilliantly colored humming birds of the Topaza, of South America and the West Indies.
Topazolite
n.
(Min.) A topaz-yellow variety of garnet.
Topcoat
n.
• An outer coat; an overcoat.
Tope
n.
• A moundlike Buddhist sepulcher, or memorial monument. often erected over a Buddhish relic.
n.
• A grove or clumb of trees; as, a toddy tope.
n.
(Zool.) A small shark or dogfish (Galeorhinus, or Galeus, galeus), native of Europe, but found also on the coasts of California and Tasmania; — called also toper, oil shark, miller's dog, and penny dog.
(Zool.) The wren.
v. i.
• To drink hard or frequently; to drink strong or spiritous liquors to excess.
Toper
n.
• One who topes, or drinks frequently or to excess; a drunkard; a sot.
Topet
n.
(Zool.) The European crested titmouse.
Topful
a.
• Full to the top, ore brim; brimfull.
Topgallant
a.
(Naut.) Situated above the topmast and below the royal mast; designatb, or pertaining to, the third spars in order from the deck; as, the topgallant mast, yards, braces, and the like. See Illustration of Ship.
• Fig.: Highest; elevated; splendid.
n.
(Naut.) A topgallant mast or sail.
• Fig.: Anything elevated or splendid.
Toph
n.
(Min.) kind of sandstone.
Tophaceous
a.
• Gritty; sandy; rough; stony.
Tophet
n.
• A place lying east or southeast of Jerusalem, in the valley of Hinnom.
Tophin
n.
(Min.) Same as Toph.
Tophus
n.
(Med.) One of the mineral concretions about the joints, and in other situations, occurring chiefly in gouty persons. They consist usually of urate of sodium; when occurring in the internal organs they are also composed of phosphate of calcium.
(Min.) Calcareous tufa.
Topiarian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the ornamental cutting and trimming of trees, hedges, etc.; practicing ornamental gardening.
Topiary
a.
• Of or pertaining to ornamental gardening; produced by cutting, trimming, etc.; topiarian.
Topic
n.
• One of the various general forms of argument employed in probable as distinguished from demonstrative reasoning, — denominated by Aristotle to`poi (literally, places), as being the places or sources from which arguments may be derived, or to which they may be referred; also, a prepared form of argument, applicable to a great variety of cases, with a supply of which the ancient rhetoricians and orators provided themselves; a commonplace of argument or oratory.
• A treatise on forms of argument; a system or scheme of forms or commonplaces of argument or oratory; as, the Topics of Aristotle.
• An argument or reason.
• The subject of any distinct portion of a discourse, or argument, or literary composition; also, the general or main subject of the whole; a matter treated of; a subject, as of conversation or of thought; a matter; a point; a head.
(Med.) An external local application or remedy, as a plaster, a blister, etc.
a.
• Topical.
Topical
a.
• Of or pertaining to a place; limited; logical application; as, a topical remedy; a topical claim or privilege.
(Rhet. & logic) Pertaining to, or consisting of, a topic or topics; according to topics.
• Resembling a topic, or general maxim; hence, not demonstrative, but merely probable, as an argument.
Topically
adv.
• In a topical manner; with application to, or limitation of, a particular place or topic.
Topknot
n.
• A crest or knot of feathers upon the head or top, as of a bird; also, an orgamental knot worn on top of the head, as by women.
(Zool.) A small Europen flounder (Rhoumbus punctatus). The name is also applied to allied species.
Topless
a.
• Having no top, or no visble fop; hence, fig.: very lofty; supreme; unequaled.
Topman
n.
• See Topsman, 2.
(Naut.) A man stationed in the top.
Topmast
n.
(Naut.) The second mast, or that which is next above the lower mast, and below the topgallant mast.
Topmost
a.
• Highest; uppermost; as, the topmost cliff; the topmost branch of a tree.
Topographer
n.
• One who is skilled in the science of topography; one who describes a particular place, town, city, or tract of land.
Topographist
n.
• A topographer.
Topography
n.
• The description of a particular place, town, manor, parish, or tract of land; especially, the exact and scientific delineation and description in minute detail of any place or region.
Topology
n.
• The art of, or method for, assisting the memory by associating the thing or subject to be remembered with some place.
Toponomy
n.
• The designation of position and direction.
Toppescent
a.
• Becoming torpid or numb.
Toppiece
n.
• A small wig for the top of the head; a toupee.
Topping
a.
• Rising above; surpassing.
• Hence, assuming superiority; proud.
• Fine; gallant.
n.
• The act of one who tops; the act of cutting off the top.
(Naut.) The act of raising one extremity of a spar higher than the other.
• That which comes from hemp in the process of hatcheling.
Toppingly
adv.
• In a topping or proud manner.
a.
• Same as Topping, a., 3.
Topple
v. i.
• To fall forward; to pitch or tumble down.
v. t.
• To throw down; to overturn.
Topsail
n.
(Naut.) In a square-rigged vessel, the sail next above the lowermost sail on a mast. This sail is the one most frequently reefed or furled in working the ship. In a fore-and-aft rigged vessel, the sail set upon and above the gaff. See Cutter, Schooner, Sail, and Ship.
Topsman
n.
• The chief drover of those who drive a herd of cattle.
• The uppermost sawyer in a saw pit; a topman.
Topsoil
n.
• The upper layer of soil; surface soil.
Topsoiling
n.
(Engin.) The act or art of taking off the top soil of land before an excavation or embankment is begun.
Topstone
n.
• A stone that is placed on the top, or which forms the top.
Topsyturvy
adv.
• In an inverted posture; with the top or head downward; upside down; as, to turn a carriage topsy-turvy.
Toque
n.
• A kind of cap worn in the 16th century, and copied in modern fashions; — called also toquet.
(Zool.) A variety of the bonnet monkey.
Toquet
n.
• See Toque, 1.
Tor
n.
• A tower; a turret.
• High-pointed hill; a rocky pinnacle.
Torbernite
n.
(Min.) A mineral occurring in emerald-green tabular crystals having a micaceous structure. It is a hydrous phosphate of uranium and copper. Called also copper uranite, and chalcolite.
Torc
n.
• Same as Torque, 1.
Torch
n.
• A light or luminary formed of some combustible substance, as of resinous wood; a large candle or flambeau, or a lamp giving a large, flaring flame.
Torchbearer
n.
• One whose office it is to carry a torch.
Torcher
n.
• One who gives light with a torch, or as if with a torch.
Torchlight
n.
• The light of a torch, or of torches. Also adjectively; as, a torchlight procession.
Torchwood
n.
(Bot.) The inflammable wood of certain trees (Amyris balsamifera, A. Floridana, etc.); also, the trees themselves.
Torchwort
n.
(Bot.) The common mullein, the stalks of which, dipped in suet, anciently served for torches. Called also torch, and hig-taper.
Tore
• imp. of Tear.
n.
• The dead grass that remains on mowing land in winter and spring.
n.
(Arch.) Same as Torus.
(Geom.) The surface described by the circumference of a circle revolving about a straight line in its own plane.
• The solid inclosed by such a surface; — sometimes called an anchor ring.
Toreador
n.
• A bullfighter.
Toret
n.
• A Turret.
n.
• A ring for fastening a hawk's leash to the jesses; also, a ring affixed to the collar of a dog, etc.
Toreumatography
n.
• A description of sculpture such as bas-relief in metal.
Toreumatology
n.
• The art or the description of scupture such as bas-relief in metal; toreumatography.
Toreutic
a.
(Sculp.) In relief; pertaining to sculpture in relief, especially of metal; also, pertaining to chasing such as surface ornamentation in metal.
Torgoch
n.
• The saibling.
Torilto
n.
(Zool.) A species of Turnix (Turnix sylvatica) native of Spain and Northen Africa.
Torinese
a.
• Of or pertaining to Turin.
n. sing. & pl.
• A native or inhabitant of Turin; collectively, the people of Turin.
Torment
n.
(Mil. Antiq.) An engine for casting stones.
• Extreme pain; anguish; torture; the utmost degree of misery, either of body or mind.
• That which gives pain, vexation, or misery.
v. t.
• To put to extreme pain or anguish; to inflict excruciating misery upon, either of body or mind; to torture.
• To pain; to distress; to afflict.
• To tease; to vex; to harass; as, to be tormented with importunities, or with petty annoyances.
• To put into great agitation.
Tormenter
n.
• One who, or that which, torments; a tormentor.
• An executioner.
Tormentful
a.
• Full of torment; causing, or accompainied by, torment; excruciating.
Tormentil
n.
(Bot.) A rosaceous herb (Potentilla Tormentilla), the root of which is used as a powerful astringent, and for alleviating gripes, or tormina, in diarrhea.
Tormenting
a.
• Causing torment; as, a tormenting dream.
Tormentise
n.
• Torture; torment.
Tormentor
n.
• One who, or that which, torments; one who inflicts penal anguish or tortures.
(Agric.) An implement for reducing a stiff soil, resembling a harrow, but running upon wheels.
Tormentress
n.
• A woman who torments.
Tormentry
n.
• Anything producing torment, annoyance, or pain.
Tormina
n. pl.
(Med.) acute, colicky pains; gripes.
Torminous
a.
(Med.) Affected with tormina; griping.
Torn
• p. p. of Tear.
Tornado
n.
• A violent whirling wind; specifically (Meteorol.), a tempest distinguished by a rapid whirling and slow progressive motion, usually accompaned with severe thunder, lightning, and torrents of rain, and commonly of short duration and small breadth; a small cyclone.
Tornaria
n.
(Zool.) The peculiar free swimming larva of Balanoglossus. See Illust. in Append.
Torose
a.
• Cylindrical with alternate swellings and contractions; having the surface covered with rounded prominences.
Torosity
n.
• The quality or state of being torose.
Torous
a.
• Torose.
Torpedinous
a.
• Of or pertaining to a torpedo; resembling a torpedo; exerting a benumbing influence; stupefying; dull; torpid.
Torpedo
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of elasmobranch fishes belonging to Torpedo and allied genera. They are related to the rays, but have the power of giving electrical shocks. Called also crampfish, and numbfish. See Electrical fish, under Electrical.
• An engine or machine for destroying ships by blowing them up.
• A quantity of explosives anchored in a channel, beneath the water, or set adrift in a current, and so arranged that they will be exploded when touched by a vessel, or when an electric circuit is closed by an operator on shore.
• A kind of small submarine boat carrying an explosive charge, and projected from a ship against another ship at a distance, or made self-propelling, and otherwise automatic in its action against a distant ship.
(Mil.) A kind of shell or cartridge buried in earth, to be exploded by electricity or by stepping on it.
(Railroad) A kind of detonating cartridge or shell placed on a rail, and exploded when crushed under the locomotive wheels, — used as an alarm signal.
• An explosive cartridge or shell lowered or dropped into a bored oil well, and there exploded, to clear the well of obstructions or to open communication with a source of supply of oil.
• A kind of firework in the form of a small ball, or pellet, which explodes when thrown upon a hard object.
v. t.
• to destroy by, or subject to the action of, a torpedo.
Torpent
a.
• Having no motion or activity; incapable of motion; benumbed; torpid.
Torpescence
n.
• The quality or state or being torpescent; torpidness; numbness; stupidity.
Torpid
a.
• Having lost motion, or the power of exertion and feeling; numb; benumbed; as, a torpid limb.
• Dull; stupid; sluggish; inactive.
Torpidity
n.
• Same as Torpidness.
Torpidly
adv.
• In a torpid manner.
Torpidness
n.
• The qualityy or state of being torpid.
Torpify
v. t.
• To make torpid; to numb, or benumb.
Torpitude
n.
• Torpidness.
Torpor
n.
• Loss of motion, or of the motion; a state of inactivity with partial or total insensibility; numbness.
• Dullness; sluggishness; inactivity; as, a torpor of the mental faculties.
Torporific
a.
• Tending to produce torpor.
Torquate
a.
(Zool.) Collared; having a torques, or distinct colored ring around the neck.
Torquated
a.
• Having or wearing a torque, or neck chain.
Torque
n.
• A collar or neck chain, usually twisted, especially as worn by ancient barbaric nations, as the Gauls, Germans, and Britons.
(Mech.) That which tends to produce torsion; a couple of forces.
(Phys. Science) A turning or twisting; tendency to turn, or cause to turn, about an axis.
Torqued
a.
• Wreathed; twisted.
(Her.) Twisted; bent; — said of a dolphin haurient, which forms a figure like the letter S.
Torques
n.
(Zool.) A cervical ring of hair or feathers, distinguished by its color or structure; a collar.
Torrefaction
n.
• The act or process of torrefying, or the state of being torrefied.
Torrefy
v. t.
• To dry by a fire.
(Metal.) To subject to scorching heat, so as to drive off volatile ingredients; to roast, as ores.
(Pharm.) To dry or parch, as drugs, on a metallic plate till they are friable, or are reduced to the state desired.
Torrent
n.
• A violent stream, as of water, lava, or the like; a stream suddenly raised and running rapidly, as down a precipice.
• Fig.: A violent or rapid flow; a strong current; a flood; as, a torrent of vices; a torrent of eloquence.
a.
• Rolling or rushing in a rapid stream.
Torricellian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Torricelli, an Italian philosopher and mathematician, who, in 1643, discovered that the rise of a liquid in a tube, as in the barometer, is due to atmospheric pressure. See Barometer.
Torrid
a.
• Parched; dried with heat; as, a torrid plain or desert.
• Violenty hot; drying or scorching with heat; burning; parching.
Torridity
n.
• Torridness.
Torridness
n.
• The quality or state of being torrid or parched.
Torril
n.
• A worthless woman; also, a worthless horse.
Torrock
n.
(Zool.) A gull.
Torsal
n.
(Carp.) A torsel.
Torse
n.
(Her.) A wreath.
(Geom.) A developable surface. See under Developable.
Torsel
n.
(Carp.) A plate of timber for the end of a beam or joist to rest on.
Torsibillty
n.
• The tendency, as of a rope, to untwist after being twisted.
Torsion
n.
• The act of turning or twisting, or the state of being twisted; the twisting or wrenching of a body by the exertion of a lateral force tending to turn one end or part of it about a longitudinal axis, while the other is held fast or turned in the opposite direction.
(Mech.) That force with which a thread, wire, or rod of any material, returns, or tends to return, to a state of rest after it has been twisted; torsibility.
Torsional
a.
• Of or pertaining to torsion; resulting from torsion, or the force with which a thread or wire returns to a state of rest after having been twisted round its axis; as, torsional force.
Torsk
n.
(Zool.) The cusk. See Cusk.
• The codfish. Called also tusk.
Torso
n.
• The human body, as distinguished from the head and limbs; in sculpture, the trunk of a statue, mutilated of head and limbs; as, the torso of Hercules.
Tort
n.
• Mischief; injury; calamity.
(Law) Any civil wrong or injury; a wrongful act (not involving a breach of contract) for which an action will lie; a form of action, in some parts of the United States, for a wrong or injury.
a.
• Stretched tight; taut.
Torta
n.
(Metal.) a flat heap of moist, crushed silver ore, prepared for the patio process.
Torteau
n.
(Her.) A roundel of a red color.
Torticollis
n.
(Med.) See Wryneck.
Tortile
a.
• Twisted; wreathed; coiled.
Tortility
n.
• The quality or state of being tortile, twisted, or wreathed.
Tortilla
n.
• An unleavened cake, as of maize flour, baked on a heated iron or stone.
Tortion
n.
• Torment; pain.
Tortious
a.
• Injurious; wrongful.
(Law) Imploying tort, or privat injury for which the law gives damages; involing tort.
Tortiously
adv.
(Law) In a tortous manner.
Tortive
a.
• Twisted; wreathed.
Tortoise
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of reptiles of the order Testudinata.
(Rom. Antiq.) Same as Testudo, 2.
• having a color like that aof a toroise's shell, black with white and orange spots; — used mostly to describe cats of that color.
n.
• a tortoise-shell cat.
Tortricid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to Tortix, or the family Tortricidae.
Tortrix
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small moths of the family Tortricidae, the larvae of which usually roll up the leaves of plants on which they live; — also called leaf roller.
(Zool.) A genus of tropical short-tailed snakes, which are not venomous. One species (Tortrix scytalae) is handsomely banded with black, and is sometimes worn alive by the natives of Brazil for a necklace.
Tortulous
a.
(Nat. Hist.) Swelled out at intervals like a knotted cord.
Tortuose
a.
• Wreathed; twisted; winding.
Tortuoslty
n.
• the quality or state of being tortuous.
Tortuous
a.
• Bent in different directions; wreathed; twisted; winding; as, a tortuous train; a tortuous train; a tortuous leaf or corolla.
• Fig.: Deviating from rectitude; indirect; erroneous; deceitful.
• Injurious: tortious.
(Astrol.) Oblique; — applied to the six signs of the zodiac (from Capricorn to Gemini) which ascend most rapidly and obliquely.
Torturable
a.
• Capable of being tortured.
Torture
n.
• Extreme pain; anguish of body or mind; pang; agony; torment; as, torture of mind.
• Especially, severe pain inflicted judicially, either as punishment for a crime, or for the purpose of extorting a confession from an accused person, as by water or fire, by the boot or thumbkin, or by the rack or wheel.
• The act or process of torturing.
v. t.
• To put to torture; to pain extremely; to harass; to vex.
• To punish with torture; to put to the rack; as, to torture an accused person.
• To wrest from the proper meaning; to distort.
• To keep on the stretch, as a bow.
Torturer
n.
• One who tortures; a tormentor.
Torturingly
adv.
• So as to torture.
Torturous
a.
• Involving, or pertaining to, torture.
Torula
n.
(Biol.) A chain of special bacteria. (b) A genus of budding fungi. Same as Saccharomyces. Also used adjectively.
Torulaform
a.
(Biol.) Having the appearance of a torula; in the form of a little chain; as, a torulaform string of micrococci.
Torulose
a.
(Bot.) Same as Torose.
Torulous
a.
• Same as Torose.
Torus
n.
(Arch.) A lage molding used in the bases of columns. Its profile is semicircular. See Illust. of Molding.
(Zool.) One of the ventral parapodia of tubicolous annelids. It usually has the form of an oblong thickening or elevation of the integument with rows of uncini or hooks along the center. See Illust. under Tubicolae.
(Bot.) The receptacle, or part of the flower on which the carpels stand.
(Geom.) See 3d Tore, 2.
Torved
a.
• Stern; grim. See Torvous.
Torvity
a.
• Sourness or severity of countenance; sterness.
Torvous
a.
• Sour of aspect; of a severe countenance; stern; grim.
Tory
n.
(Eng.Politics) A member of the conservative party, as opposed to the progressive party which was formerly called the Whig, and is now called the Liberal, party; an earnest supporter of exsisting royal and ecclesiastical authority.
(Amer. Hist.) One who, in the time of the Revolution, favored submitting tothe claims of Great Britain against the colonies; an adherent tothe crown.
a.
• Of ro pertaining to the Tories.
Toryism
n.
• The principles of the Tories.
Toscatter
v. t.
• To scatter in pieces; to divide.
Tose
v. t.
• To tease, or comb, as wool.
Tosh
a.
• Neat; trim.
Toshred
v. t.
• To cut into shreads or pieces.
Toss
• , v. t. [imp. & p. p. Tossed (); (less properly Tost ); p. pr. & vb. n. Tossing.] 1. To throw with the hand; especially, to throw with the palm of the hand upward, or to throw upward; as, to toss a ball.
• To lift or throw up with a sudden or violent motion; as, to toss the head.
• To cause to rise and fall; as, a ship tossed on the waves in a storm.
• To agitate; to make restless.
• Hence, to try; to harass.
• To keep in play; to tumble over; as, to spend four years in tossing the rules of grammar.
v. i.
• To roll and tumble; to be in violent commotion; to write; to fling.
• To be tossed, as a fleet on the ocean.
n.
• A throwing upward, or with a jerk; the act of tossing; as, the toss of a ball.
• A throwing up of the head; a particular manner of raising the head with a jerk.
Tossel
n.
• See Tassel.
Tosser
n.
• Ohe who tosser.
Tossily
adv.
• In a tossy manner.
Tossing
n.
• The act of throwing upward; a rising and falling suddenly; a rolling and tumbling.
(Mining) A process which consists in washing ores by violent agitation in water, in order to separate the lighter or earhy particles; — called also tozing, and treloobing, in Cornwall.
• A process for refining tin by dropping it through the air while melted.
Tosspot
n.
• A toper; one habitually given to strong drink; a drunkard.
Tossy
a.
• Tossing the head, as in scorn or pride; hence, proud; contemptuous; scornful; affectedly indifferent; as, a tossy commonplace.
Tost
• imp. & p. p. of Toss.
Tosto
a.
(Mus.) Quick; rapid.
Toswink
v. i.
• To labor excessively.
Tot
n.
• Anything small; — frequently applied as a term of endearment to a little child.
• A drinking cup of small size, holding about half a pint.
• A foolish fellow.
Tota
n.
(Zool.) The grivet.
Total
a.
• Whole; not divided; entire; full; complete; absolute; as, a total departure from the evidence; a total loss.
n.
• The whole; the whole sum or amount; as, these sums added make the grand total of five millions.
Totality
n.
• The quality or state of being total; as, the totality of an eclipse.
• The whole sum; the whole quantity or amount; the entirety; as, the totalityof human knowledge.
Totalize
v. t.
• To make total, or complete;to reduce to completeness.
Totally
adv.
• In a total manner; wholly; entirely.
Totalness
n.
• The quality or state of being total; entireness; totality.
Tote
v. t.
• To carry or bear; as, to tote a child over a stream; — a colloquial word of the Southern States, and used esp. by negroes.
n.
• The entire body, or all; as, the whole tote.
Totear
v. t.
• To tear or rend in pieces.
Totem
n.
• A rude picture, as of a bird, beast, or the like, used by the Nord American Indians as a symbolic designation, as of a family or a clan.
Totemic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a totem, or totemism.
Totemism
n.
• The system of distinguishing families, clans, etc., in a tribe by the totem.
• Superstitious regard for a totem; the worship of any real or imaginary object; nature worship.
Totemist
n.
• One belonging to a clan or tribe having a totem.
Toter
n.
(Zool.) The stone roller. See Stone roller (a), under Stone.
Totipalmate
a.
(Zool.) Having all four toes united by a web;-said of certain sea birds, as the pelican and the gannet. See Illust. under Aves.
Totipalmi
n.pl.
(Zool.) A division of swimming birds including those that have totipalmate feet.
Totipresence
n.
• Omnipresence.
Totipresent
a.
• Omnipresence.
Totly
v. i.
• To walk in a wavering, unsteady manner; to toddle; to topple.
Totter
v. i.
• To shake so as to threaten a fall; to vacillate; to be unsteady; to stagger; as,an old man totters with age.
• To shake; to reel; to lean; to waver.
Totterer
n.
• One who totters.
Totteringly
adv.
• In a tottering manner.
Tottery
a.
• Trembling or vaccilating, as if about to fall; unsteady; shaking.
Tottlish
a.
• Trembling or tottering, as if about to fall; un steady.
Totty
a.
• Unsteady; dizzy; tottery.
Toty
a.
• Totty.
n.
• A sailor or fisherman;-so called in some parts of the Pacific.
Toucan
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of fruit-eating birds of tropical America belonging to Ramphastos, Pteroglossus, and allied genera of the family Ramphastidae. They have a very large, but light and thin, beak, often nearly as long as the body itself. Most of the species are brilliantly colored with red, yellow, white, and black in striking contrast.
(Astronom.) A modern constellation of the southern hemisphere.
Touch
v. t.
• To come in contact with; to hit or strike lightly against; to extend the hand, foot, or the like, so as to reach or rest on.
• To perceive by the sense of feeling.
• To come to; to reach; to attain to.
• To try; to prove, as with a touchstone.
• To relate to; to concern; to affect.
• To handle, speak of, or deal with; to treat of.
• To meddle or interfere with; as, I have not touched the books.
• To affect the senses or the sensibility of; to move; to melt; to soften.
• To mark or delineate with touches; to add a slight stroke to with the pencil or brush.
• To infect; to affect slightly.
• To make an impression on; to have effect upon.
• To strike; to manipulate; to play on; as, to touch an instrument of music.
• To perform, as a tune; to play.
• To influence by impulse; to impel forcibly.
• To harm, afflict, or distress.
• To affect with insanity, especially in a slight degree; to make partially insane; — rarely used except in the past participle.
(Geom.) To be tangent to. See Tangent, a.
• To lay a hand upon for curing disease.
v. i.
• To be in contact; to be in a state of junction, so that no space is between; as, two spheres touch only at points.
• To fasten; to take effect; to make impression.
• To treat anything in discourse, especially in a slight or casual manner; — often with on or upon.
(Naut) To be brought, as a sail, so close to the wind that its weather leech shakes.
n.
• The act of touching, or the state of being touched; contact.
(Physiol.) The sense by which pressure or traction exerted on the skin is recognized; the sense by which the properties of bodies are determined by contact; the tactile sense. See Tactile sense, under Tactile.
• Act or power of exciting emotion.
• An emotion or affection.
• Personal reference or application.
• A stroke; as, a touch of raillery; a satiric touch; hence, animadversion; censure; reproof.
• A single stroke on a drawing or a picture.
• Feature; lineament; trait.
• The act of the hand on a musical instrument; bence, in the plural, musical notes.
• A small quantity intermixed; a little; a dash.
• A hint; a suggestion; slight notice.
• A slight and brief essay.
• A touchstone; hence, stone of the sort used for touchstone.
• Hence, examination or trial by some decisive standard; test; proof; tried quality.
(Mus.) The particular or characteristic mode of action, or the resistance of the keys of an instrument to the fingers; as, a heavy touch, or a light touch, also, the manner of touching, striking, or pressing the keys of a piano; as, a legato touch; a staccato touch.
(Shipbilding) The broadest part of a plank worked top and but (see Top and but, under Top, n.), or of one worked anchor-stock fashion (that is, tapered from the middle to both ends); also, the angles of the stern timbers at the counters.
(Football) That part of the field which is beyond the line of flags on either side.
• A boys' game; tag.
Touchable
a.
• Capable of being touched; tangible.
Touchback
n.
(G) The act of touching the football down by a player behind his own goal line when it received its last impulse from an opponent; — distinguished from safety touchdown.
Touchdown
n.
(Football) The act of touching the football down behind the opponents' goal .
Touchhole
n.
• The vent of a cannot or other firearm, by which fire is communicateed to the powder of the charge.
Touchily
adv.
• In a touchy manner.
Touchiness
n.
• The quality or state of being touchy peevishness; irritability; irascibility.
Touching
a.
• Affecting; moving; pathetic; as, a touching tale.
prep.
• Concerning; with respect to.
n.
• The sense or act of feeling; touch.
Touchstone
n.
(Min.) Lydian stone; basanite; — so called because used to test the purity of gold and silver by the streak which is left upon the stone when it is rubbed by the metal. See Basanite.
• Any test or criterion by which the qualities of a thing are tried.
Touchwood
n.
• Wood so decayed as to serve for tinder; spunk, or punk.
• Dried fungi used as tinder; especially, the Polyporus igniarius.
Touchy
a.
• Peevish; irritable; irascible; techy; apt to take fire.
Tough
a.
• Having the quality of flexibility without brittleness; yielding to force without breaking; capable of resisting great strain; as, the ligaments of animals are remarkably tough.
• Not easily broken; able to endure hardship; firm; strong; as, tough sinews.
• Not easily separated; viscous; clammy; tenacious; as, tough phlegm.
• Stiff; rigid; not flexible; stubborn; as, a tough bow.
• Severe; violent; as, a tough storm.
Toughen
v. i.&t.
• To grow or make tough, or tougher.
Toughish
a.
• Tough in a slight degree.
Toughly
adv.
• In a tough manner.
Toughness
n.
• The quality or state of being tough.
Touite
n.
• The wood warbler.
Toupettit
n.
(Zool.) The crested titmouse.
Tour
n.
• A tower.
n.
• A going round; a circuit; hence, a journey in a circuit; a prolonged circuitous journey; a comprehensive excursion; as, the tour of Europe; the tour of France or England.
• A turn; a revolution; as, the tours of the heavenly bodies.
(Mil.) anything done successively, or by regular order; a turn; as, a tour of duty.
v. i.
• To make a tourm; as, to tour throught a country.
Tour
v. t.
• To toot a horn.
Touraco
n.
(Zool.) Same as Turacou.
Tourbillion
n.
• An ornamental firework which turns round, when in the air, so as to form a scroll of fire.
Tourist
n.
• One who makes a tour, or performs a journey in a circuit.
Tourmaline
n.
(Min.) A mineral occurring usually in three-sided or six-sided prisms terminated by rhombohedral or scalenohedral planes. Black tourmaline (schorl) is the most common variety, but there are also other varieties, as the blue (indicolite), red (rubellite), also green, brown, and white. The red and green varieties when transparent are valued as jewels.
Tourn
n.
• A spinning wheel.
(O.Eng.Law) The sheriff's turn, or court.
Tournament
n.
• A mock fight, or warlike game, formerly in great favor, in which a number of combatants were engaged, as an exhibition of their address and bravery; hence, figuratively, a real battle.
• Any contest of skill in which there are many contestents for championship; as, a chess tournament.
Tournery
n.
• Work turned on a lathe; turnery. See Turnery.
Tourney
n.
• A tournament.
v. i.
• To perform in tournaments; to tilt.
Tourniquet
n.
(Surg.) An instrument for arresting hemorrhage. It consists essentially of a pad or compress upon which pressure is made by a band which is tightened by a screw or other means.
Tournois
n.
• A former French money of account worth 20 sous, or a franc. It was thus called in distinction from the Paris livre, which contained 25 sous.
Tournure
n.
• Turn; contour; figure.
• Any device used by women to expand the skirt of a dress below the waist; a bustle.
Touse
n.
• A pulling; a disturbance.
Tousel
v. t.
• Same as Tousle.
Touser
n.
• One who touses.
Tousle
v. t.
• To put into disorder; to tumble; to touse.
Tout
n
• The anus.
Tout
v. t.
• To act as a tout. See 2d Tout.
• To ply or seek for customers.
n.
• One who secretly watches race horses which are in course of training, to get information about their capabilities, for use in betting.
Touter
n.
• One who seeks customers, as for an inn, a public conveyance, shops, and the like: hence, an obtrusive candidate for office.
Touze
v.t & i.
• See Touse.
Tow
n.
• The coarse and broken part of flax or hemp, separated from the finer part by the hatchel or swingle.
v. t.
• To draw or pull through the water, as a vessel of any kind, by means of a rope.
n.
• A rope by which anything is towed; a towline, or towrope.
• The act of towing, or the state of being towed;-chiefly used in the phrase, to take in tow, that is to tow.
• That which is towed, or drawn by a towline, as a barge, raft, collection of boats, ect.
Towage
n.
• The act of towing.
• The price paid for towing.
Towall
n.
• A towel.
Toward
a.
• Approaching; coming near.
• Readly to do or learn; compliant with duty; not froward; apt; docile; tractable; as, a toward youth.
• Ready to act; forward; bold; valiant.
Towardliness
n.
• The quality or state of being towardly; docility; tractableness.
Towardly
a.
• Same as Toward, a., 2.
Towardness
n.
• Quality or state of being toward.
Towards
prep. & adv.
• See Toward.
Towboat
n.
• A vessel constructed for being towed, as a canal boat.
• A steamer used for towing other vessels; a tug.
Towel
n.
• A cloth used for wiping, especially one used for drying anything wet, as the person after a bath.
v. t.
• To beat with a stick.
Toweling
n.
• Cloth for towels, especially such as is woven in long pieces to be cut at will, as distinguished from that woven in towel lengths with borders, etc.
Tower
n.
(Arch.) A mass of building standing alone and insulated, usually higher than its diameter, but when of great size not always of that proportion.
• A projection from a line of wall, as a fortification, for purposes of defense, as a flanker, either or the same height as the curtain wall or higher.
• A structure appended to a larger edifice for a special purpose, as for a belfry, and then usually high in proportion to its width and to the height of the rest of the edifice; as, a church tower.
• A citadel; a fortress; hence, a defense.
• A headdress of a high or towerlike form, fashionable about the end of the seventeenth century and until 1715; also, any high headdress.
• High flight; elevation.
v. i.
• To rise and overtop other objects; to be lofty or very high; hence, to soar.
v. t.
• To soar into.
Towered
a.
• Adorned or defended by towers.
Towering
a.
• Very high; elevated; rising aloft; as, a towering height.
• Hence, extreme; violent; surpassing.
Towery
a.
• Having towers; adorned or defended by towers.
Towhee
n.
(Zool.) The chewink.
Towilly
n.
(Zool.) The sanderling; — so called from its cry.
Towline
n.
(Naut.) A line used to tow vessels; a towrope.
Town
n.
• Formerly: (a) An inclosure which surrounded the mere homestead or dwelling of the lord of the manor. (b) The whole of the land which constituted the domain. (c) A collection of houses inclosed by fences or walls.
• Any number or collection of houses to which belongs a regular market, and which is not a city or the see of a bishop.
• Any collection of houses larger than a village, and not incorporated as a city; also, loosely, any large, closely populated place, whether incorporated or not, in distinction from the country, or from rural communities.
• The body of inhabitants resident in a town; as, the town voted to send two representatives to the legislature; the town voted to lay a tax for repairing the highways.
• A township; the whole territory within certain limits, less than those of a country.
• The court end of London;-commonly with the.
• The metropolis or its inhabitants; as, in winter the gentleman lives in town; in summer, in the country.
• A farm or farmstead; also, a court or farmyard.
Towned
a.
• Having towns; containing many towns.
Townhall
n.
• A public hall or building, belonging to a town, where the public offices are established, the town council meets, the people assemble in town meeting, etc.
Townhouse
n.
• A building devoted to the public used of a town; a townhall.
Townish
a
• Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of a town; like the town.
Townless
a.
• Having no town.
Townlet
n.
• A small town.
Townpeople
n.
• The inhabitants of a town or city, especially in distinction from country people; townsfolk.
Townsfolk
n.
• The people of a town; especially, the inhabitants of a city, in distinction from country people; townspeople.
Township
n.
• The district or territory of a town.
• In surveys of the public land of the United States, a division of territory six miles square, containing 36 sections.
• In Canada, one of the subdivisions of a county.
Townsman
n.
• An inhabitant of a town; one of the same town with another.
• A selectman, in New England. See Selectman.
Towpath
n.
• A path traveled by men or animals in towing boats; — called also towing path.
Towrope
n.
• A rope used in towing vessels.
Towser
n.
• A familiar name for a dog.
Towy
a.
• Composed of, or like, tow.
Toxicant
n.
• A poisonous agent or drug, as opium; an intoxicant.
Toxicological
a.
• Of or pertaining to toxicology.
Toxicologist
n.
• One versed in toxicology; the writer of a treatise on poisons.
Toxicology
n.
• The science which treats of poisons, their effects, antidotes, and recignition; also, a discourse or treatise on the science.
Toxicomania
n.
(Med.) Toxiphobia.
(Med.) An insane desire for intoxicating or poisonous drugs, as alcohol or opium.
Toxifera
n.pl.
(Zool.) Same as Toxoglossa.
Toxiphobia
n.
(Med.) An insane or greatly exaggerated dread of poisons.
Toxodon
n.
(Paleon.) A gigantic extinct herbivorous mammal from South America, having teeth bent like a bow. It is the type of the order Toxodonta.
Toxodonta
n.pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct order of Mammalia found in the South American Tertiary formation. The incisor teeth were long and curved and provided with a persistent pulp. They are supposed to be related both to the rodents and ungulates. Called also Toxodontia.
Toxoglossa
n.pl.
(Zool.) A division of marine gastropod mollusks in which the radula are converted into poison fangs. The cone shells (Conus), Pleurotoma, and Terebra, are examples. See Illust. of Cone, n., 4, Pleurotoma, and Terebra.
Toxophilite
n.
• A lover of archery; one devoted to archery.
Toxotes
n.
(Zool.) A genus of fishes comprising the archer fishes. See Archer fish.
Toy
n.
• A plaything for children; a bawble.
• A thing for amusement, but of no real value; an article of trade of little value; a trifle.
• A wild fancy; an odd conceit; idle sport; folly; trifling opinion.
• Amorous dalliance; play; sport; pastime.
• An old story; a silly tale.
• A headdress of linen or woolen, that hangs down over the shoulders, worn by old women of the lower classes; — called also toy mutch.
v. i.
• To dally amorously; to trifle; to play.
v. t.
• To treat foolishly.
Toyear
adv.
• This year.
Toyer
n.
• One who toys; one who is full of trifling tricks; a trifler.
Toyful
a.
• Full of trifling play.
Toyhouse
n.
• A house for children to play in or to play with; a playhouse.
Toyingly
adv.
• In a toying manner.
Toyish
a
• Sportive; trifling; wanton.
• Resembling a toy.
Toyman
n.
• One who deals toys.
Toyshop
n.
• A shop where toys are sold.
Toysome
a.
• Disposed to toy; trifling; wanton.
Toze
v. t.
• To pull violently; to touse.
Tozy
a.
• Soft, like wool that has been teased.
Trabea
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A toga of purple, or ornamented with purple horizontal stripes. — worn by kings, consuls, and augurs.
Trabeated
a.
(Arch.) Furnished with an entablature.
Trabeation
n.
(Arch.) Same as Entablature.
Trabecula
n.
(Anat.) A small bar, rod, bundle of fibers, or septal membrane, in the framework of an organ part.
Trabecular
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to a trabecula or trabeculae; composed of trabeculae.
Trabeculate
a.
(Bot.) Crossbarred, as the ducts in a banana stem.
Trabu
n.
(Zool.) Same as Trubu.
Trace
n.
• One of two straps, chains, or ropes of a harness, extending from the collar or breastplate to a whiffletree attached to a vehicle or thing to be drawn; a tug.
n.
• A mark left by anything passing; a track; a path; a course; a footprint; a vestige; as, the trace of a carriage or sled; the trace of a deer; a sinuous trace.
(Chem.&Min.) A very small quantity of an element or compound in a given substance, especially when so small that the amount is not quantitatively determined in an analysis;-hence, in stating an analysis, often contracted to tr.
• A mark, impression, or visible appearance of anything left when the thing itself no longer exists; remains; token; vestige.
(Descriptive Geom.&Persp.) The intersection of a plane of projection, or an original plane, with a coordinate plane.
(Fort.) The ground plan of a work or works.
v. t.
• To mark out; to draw or delineate with marks; especially, to copy, as a drawing or engraving, by following the lines and marking them on a sheet superimposed, through which they appear; as, to trace a figure or an outline; a traced drawing.
• To follow by some mark that has been left by a person or thing which has preceded; to follow by footsteps, tracks, or tokens.
• Hence, to follow the trace or track of.
• To copy; to imitate.
• To walk over; to pass through; to traverse.
v. i.
• To walk; to go; to travel.
Traceable
a.
• Capable of being traced.
Tracer/y
n.
(Arch.) Ornamental work with rambled lines.
• The decorative head of a Gothic window.
• A similar decoration in some styles of vaulting, the ribs of the vault giving off the minor bars of which the tracery is composed.
Tracer
n.
• One who, or that which, traces.
Trachea
n.
(Anat.) The windpipe. See Illust. of Lung.
(Zool.) One of the respiratory tubes of insects and arachnids.
(Bot.) One of the large cells in woody tissue which have spiral, annular, or other markings, and are connected longitudinally so as to form continuous ducts.
Tracheal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the trachea; like a trachea.
Trachearia
n.pl.
(Zool.) A division of Arachnida including those that breathe only by means of tracheae. It includes the mites, ticks, false scorpions, and harvestmen.
Tracheary
a.
• Tracheal; breathing by means of tracheae.
n.
(Zool.) One of the Trachearia.
Tracheata
n.pl.
(Zool.) An extensive division of arthropods comprising all those which breathe by tracheae, as distinguished from Crustacea, which breathe by means of branchiae.
Tracheate
a.
(Zool.) Breathing by means of tracheae; of or pertaining to the Tracheata.
n.
(Zool.) Any arthropod having tracheae; one of the Tracheata.
Tracheid
n.
(Bot.) A wood cell with spiral or other markings and closed throughout, as in pine wood.
Tracheitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the trachea, or windpipe.
Trachelidan
n.
(Zool.) Any one of a tribe of beetles (Trachelides) which have the head supported on a pedicel. The oil beetles and the Cantharides are examples.
Trachelipod
n.
(Zool.) One of the Trachelipoda.
Trachelipoda
n.pl.
(Zool.) An extensive artificial group of gastropods comprising all those which have a spiral shell and the foot attached to the base of the neck.
Trachelipodous
a.
(Zool.) Having the foot united with the neck; of or pertainingto the Trachelipoda.
Trachelobranchiate
a.
(Zool.) Having the gills situated upon the neck; — said of certain mollusks.
Trachelorrhaphy
n.
(Med.) The operation of sewing up a laceration of the neck of the uterus.
Trachenchyma
n.
(Bot.) A vegetable tissue consisting of tracheae.
Tracheobranchia
n.
(Zool.) One of the gill-like breathing organs of certain aquatic insect larvae. They contain tracheal tubes somewhat similar to those of other insects.
Tracheobronchial
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining both to the tracheal and bronchial tubes, or to their junction; — said of the syrinx of certain birds.
Tracheocele
n.
(Med.) Goiter.
• A tumor containing air and communicating with the trachea.
Tracheophonae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of passerine birds having the syrinx at the lower end of the trachea.
Tracheoscopy
n.
(Med.) Examination of the interior of the trachea by means of a mirror.
Tracheotomy
n.
(Surg.) The operation of making an opening into the windpipe.
Trachinoid
a.
(Zool.) Of, pertaining to, or like, Trachinus, a genus of fishes which includes the weevers. See Weever.
Trachitis
n.
(Med.) Tracheitis.
Trachycarpous
a.
(Bot.) Rough-fruited.
Trachymedusae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of acalephs in which the development is direct from the eggs, without a hydroid stage. Some of the species are parasitic on other medusae.
Trachyspermous
a.
(Bot.) Rough-seeded.
Trachystomata
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of tailed aquatic amphibians, including Siren and Pseudobranchus. They have anterior legs only, are eel-like in form, and have no teeth except a small patch on the palate. The external gills are persistent through life.
Trachyte
n.
(Geol.) An igneous rock,usually light gray in color and breaking with a rough surface. It consists chiefly of orthoclase feldspar with sometimes hornblende and mica.
Trachytic
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, trachyte.
Trachytoid
a.
(Min.) Resembling trachyte; — used to define the structure of certain rocks.
Tracing
n.
• The act of one who traces; especially, the act of copying by marking on thin paper, or other transparent substance, the lines of a pattern placed beneath; also, the copy thus producted.
• A regular path or track; a course.
Track
n.
• A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.
• A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or beast; trace; vestige; footprint.
(Zool.) The entire lower surface of the foot;-said of birds, ect.
• A road; a beaten path.
• Course; way; as, the track of a comet.
• A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, ect.
(Raolroad) The permanent way; the rails.
• A tract or area, as of land.
v. t.
• To follow the tracks or traces of; to pursue by following the marks of the feet; to trace; to trail; as, to track a deer in the snow.
(Naut.) To draw along continuously, as a vessel, by a line, men or animals on shore being the motive power; to tow.
Trackage
n.
• The act of tracking, or towing, as a boat; towage.
Tracker
n.
• One who, or that which, tracks or pursues, as a man or dog that follows game.
(Mus.) In the organ, a light strip of wood connecting (in path) a key and a pallet, to communicate motion by pulling.
Trackless
a.
• Having no track; marked by no footsteps; untrodden; as, a trackless desert.
Trackmatter
n.
(Railroad) One who has charge of the track; —called also roadmaster.
Trackscout
n.
• See Trackschuyt.
Tract
n.
• A written discourse or dissertation, generally of short extent; a short treatise, especially on practical religion.
n.
• Something drawn out or extended; expanse.
• A region or quantity of land or water, of indefinite extent; an area; as, an unexplored tract of sea.
• Traits; features; lineaments.
• The footprint of a wild beast.
• Track; trace.
• Treatment; exposition.
• Continuity or extension of anything; as, the tract of speech.
• Continued or protracted duration; length; extent.
(R. C. Ch.) Verses of Scripture sung at Mass, instead of the Alleluia, from Septuagesima Sunday till the Saturday befor Easter;-so called because sung tractim,or without a break, by one voice, instead of by many as in the antiphons.
v. t.
• To trace out; to track; also, to draw out; to protact.
Tractability
n.
• The quality or state of being tractable or docile; docility; tractableness.
Tractable
a.
• Capable of being easily led, taught, or managed; docile; manageable; governable; as, tractable children; a tractable learner.
• Capable of being handled; palpable; practicable; feasible; as, tractable measures.
Tractarian
n.
(Ch. of England) One of the writers of the Oxford tracts, called "Tracts for the Times," issued during the period 1833-1841, in which series of papers the sacramental system and authority of the Church, and the value of tradition, were brought into prominence. Also, a member of the High Church party, holding generally the principles of the Tractarian writers; a Puseyite.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Tractarians, or their principles.
Tractarianism
n.
(Ch. of England) The principles of the Tractarians, or of those persons accepting the teachings of the "Tracts for the Times."
Tractate
n.
• A treatise; a tract; an essay.
Tractation
n.
• Treatment or handling of a subject; discussion.
Tractator
n.
• One who writes tracts; specif., a Tractarian.
Tractile
a.
• Capable of being drawn out in length; ductile.
Tractility
n.
• The quality of being tractile; ductility.
Traction
n.
• The act of drawing, or the state of being drawn; as, the traction of a muscle.
• Specifically, the act of drawing a body along a plane by motive power, as the drawing of a carriage by men or horses, the towing of a boat by a tug.
• Attraction; a drawing toward.
• The adhesive friction of a wheel on a rail, a rope on a pulley, or the like.
Tractite
n.
• A Tractarian.
Tractitious
a.
• Treating of; handling.
Tractive
a.
• Serving to draw; pulling; attracting; as, tractive power.
Tractor
n.
• That which draws, or is used for drawing.
(Med.) Two small, pointed rods of metal, formerly used in the treatment called Perkinism.
Tractoration
n.
• See Perkinism.
Tractory
n.
(Geom.) A tractrix.
Tractrix
n.
(Geom.) A curve such that the part of the tangent between the point of tangency and a given straight line is constant; — so called because it was conceived as described by the motion of one end of a tangent line as the other end was drawn along the given line.
Trad
• imp. of Tread.
Trade
n.
• A track; a trail; a way; a path; also, passage; travel; resort.
• Course; custom; practice; occupation; employment.
• Business of any kind; matter of mutual consideration; affair; dealing.
• Specifically: The act or business of exchanging commodities by barter, or by buying and selling for money; commerce; traffic; barter.
• The business which a person has learned, and which he engages in, for procuring subsistence, or for profit; occupation; especially, mechanical employment as distinguished from the liberal arts, the learned professions, and agriculture; as, we speak of the trade of a smith, of a carpenter, or mason, but not now of the trade of a farmer, or a lawyer, or a physician.
• Instruments of any occupation.
• A company of men engaged in the same occupation; thus, booksellers and publishers speak of the customs of the trade, and are collectively designated as the trade.
• The trade winds.
• Refuse or rubbish from a mine.
v. i.
• To barter, or to buy and sell; to be engaged in the exchange, purchase, or sale of goods, wares, merchandise, or anything else; to traffic; to bargain; to carry on commerce as a business.
• To buy and sell or exchange property in a single instance.
• To have dealings; to be concerned or associated; — usually followed by with.
v. t.
• To sell or exchange in commerce; to barter.
• imp. of Tread.
Traded
a.
• Professional; practiced.
Tradeful
a.
• Full of trade; busy in traffic; commercial.
Tradeless
a.
• Having no trade or traffic.
Trader
n.
• One engaged in trade or commerce; one who makes a business of buying and selling or of barter; a merchant; a trafficker; as, a trader to the East Indies; a country trader.
• A vessel engaged in the coasting or foreign trade.
Tradescantia
n.
(Bot.) A genus including spiderwort and Wandering Jew.
Tradesfolk
n.
• People employed in trade; tradesmen.
Tradesman
n.
• One who trades; a shopkeeper.
• A mechanic or artificer; esp., one whose livelihood depends upon the labor of his hands.
Tradespeople
n.
• People engaged in trade; shopkeepers.
Tradeswoman
n.
• A woman who trades, or is skilled in trade.
Trading
a.
• Carrying on trade or commerce; engaged in trade; as, a trading company.
• Frequented by traders.
• Venal; corrupt; jobbing; as, a trading politician.
Tradition
n.
• The act of delivering into the hands of another; delivery.
• The unwritten or oral delivery of information, opinions, doctrines, practices, rites, and customs, from father to son, or from ancestors to posterity; the transmission of any knowledge, opinions, or practice, from forefathers to descendants by oral communication, without written memorials.
• Hence, that which is transmitted orally from father to son, or from ancestors to posterity; knowledge or belief transmitted without the aid of written memorials; custom or practice long observed.
(Theol.) An unwritten code of law represented to have been given by God to Moses on Sinai.
• That body of doctrine and discipline, or any article thereof, supposed to have been put forth by Christ or his apostles, and not committed to writing.
v. t.
• To transmit by way of tradition; to hand down.
Traditional
a.
• Of or pertaining to tradition; derived from tradition; communicated from ancestors to descendants by word only; transmitted from age to age without writing; as, traditional opinions; traditional customs; traditional expositions of the Scriptures.
• Observant of tradition; attached to old customs; old-fashioned.
Traditionalist
n.
• An advocate of, or believer in, traditionalism; a traditionist.
Traditionally
adv.
• In a traditional manner.
Traditionarily
adv.
• By tradition.
Traditionary
a.
• Traditional.
n.
• One, among the Jews, who acknowledges the authority of traditions, and explains the Scriptures by them.
Traditionlism
n.
• A system of faith founded on tradition; esp., the doctrine that all religious faith is to be based solely upon what is delivered from competent authority, exclusive of rational processes.
Traditive
a.
• Transmitted or transmissible from father to son, or from age, by oral communication; traditional.
Traditor
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A deliverer; — a name of infamy given to Christians who delivered the Scriptures, or the goods of the church, to their persecutors to save their lives.
Traduce
v. t.
• To transfer; to transmit; to hand down; as, to traduce mental qualities to one's descendants.
• To translate from one language to another; as, to traduce and compose works.
• To increase or distribute by propagation.
• To draw away; to seduce.
• To represent; to exhibit; to display; to expose; to make an example of.
• To expose to contempt or shame; to represent as blamable; to calumniate; to vilify; to defame.
Traducement
n.
• The act of traducing; misrepresentation; ill-founded censure; defamation; calumny.
Traducent
a.
• Slanderous.
Traducer
n.
• One who traduces; a slanderer; a calumniator.
• One who derives or deduces.
Traducian
n.
• A believer in traducianism.
Traducianism
n.
(Theol.) The doctrine that human souls are produced by the act of generation; — opposed to creationism, and infusionism.
Traducible
a.
• Capable of being derived or propagated.
• Capable of being traduced or calumniated.
Traducingly
adv.
• In a traducing manner; by traduction; slanderously.
Traduct
v. t.
• To derive or deduce; also, to transmit; to transfer.
n.
• That which is traducted; that which is transferred; a translation.
Traduction
n.
• Transmission from one to another.
• Translation from one language to another.
• Derivation by descent; propagation.
• The act of transferring; conveyance; transportation.
• Transition.
(Logic) A process of reasoning in which each conclusion applies to just such an object as each of the premises applies to.
Traductive
a.
• Capable of being deduced; derivable.
Traffic
v. i.
• To pass goods and commodities from one person to another for an equivalent in goods or money; to buy or sell goods; to barter; to trade.
• To trade meanly or mercenarily; to bargain.
v. t.
• To exchange in traffic; to effect by a bargain or for a consideration.
n.
• Commerce, either by barter or by buying and selling; interchange of goods and commodities; trade.
• Commodities of the market.
• The business done upon a railway, steamboat line, etc., with reference to the number of passengers or the amount of freight carried.
Trafficable
a.
• Capable of being disposed of in traffic; marketable.
Trafficker
n.
• One who traffics, or carries on commerce; a trader; a merchant.
Trafficless
a.
• Destitute of traffic, or trade.
Tragacanth
n.
• A kind of gum procured from a spiny leguminous shrub (Astragalus gummifer) of Western Asia, and other species of Astragalus. It comes in hard whitish or yellowish flakes or filaments, and is nearly insoluble in water, but slowly swells into a mucilaginous mass, which is used as a substitute for gum arabic in medicine and the arts. Called also gum tragacanth.
Tragedian
n.
• A writer of tragedy.
• An actor or player in tragedy.
Tragedienne
n.
• A woman who plays in tragedy.
Tragedious
a.
• Like tragedy; tragical.
Tragedy
n.
• A dramatic poem, composed in elevated style, representing a signal action performed by some person or persons, and having a fatal issue; that species of drama which represents the sad or terrible phases of character and life.
• A fatal and mournful event; any event in which human lives are lost by human violence, more especially by unauthorized violence.
Tragic
n.
• A writer of tragedy.
• A tragedy; a tragic drama.
Tragopan
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of Asiatic pheasants of the genus Ceriornis. They are brilliantly colored with a variety of tints, the back and breast are usually covered with white or buff ocelli, and the head is ornamented with two bright-colored, fleshy wattles. The crimson tragopan, or horned pheasant (C. satyra), of India is one of the best-known species.
Tragus
n.
(Anat.) The prominence in front of the external opening of the ear. See Illust. under Ear.
Trail
v. t.
• To hunt by the track; to track.
• To draw or drag, as along the ground.
(Mil.) To carry, as a firearm, with the breech near the ground and the upper part inclined forward, the piece being held by the right hand near the middle.
• To tread down, as grass, by walking through it; to lay flat.
• To take advantage of the ignorance of; to impose upon.
v. i.
• To be drawn out in length; to follow after.
• To grow to great length, especially when slender and creeping upon the ground, as a plant; to run or climb.
n.
• A track left by man or beast; a track followed by the hunter; a scent on the ground by the animal pursued; as, a deer trail.
• A footpath or road track through a wilderness or wild region; as, an Indian trail over the plains.
• Anything drawn out to a length; as, the trail of a meteor; a trail of smoke.
• Anything drawn behind in long undulations; a train.
• Anything drawn along, as a vehicle.
• A frame for trailing plants; a trellis.
• The entrails of a fowl, especially of game, as the woodcock, and the like; — applied also, sometimes, to the entrails of sheep.
(Mil.) That part of the stock of a gun carriage which rests on the ground when the piece is unlimbered. See Illust. of Gun carriage, under Gun.
• The act of taking advantage of the ignorance of a person; an imposition.
Trailer
n.
• One who, or that which, trails.
• A part of an object which extends some distance beyond the main body of the object; as, the trailer of a plant.
Trailing
• a. & vb. n. from Trail.
Train
v. t.
• To draw along; to trail; to drag.
• To draw by persuasion, artifice, or the like; to attract by stratagem; to entice; to allure.
• To teach and form by practice; to educate; to exercise; to discipline; as, to train the militia to the manual exercise; to train soldiers to the use of arms.
• To break, tame, and accustom to draw, as oxen.
(Hort.) To lead or direct, and form to a wall or espalier; to form to a proper shape, by bending, lopping, or pruning; as, to train young trees.
(Mining) To trace, as a lode or any mineral appearance, to its head.
v. i.
• To be drilled in military exercises; to do duty in a military company.
• To prepare by exercise, diet, instruction, etc., for any physical contest; as, to train for a boat race.
n.
• That which draws along; especially, persuasion, artifice, or enticement; allurement.
• Hence, something tied to a lure to entice a hawk; also, a trap for an animal; a snare.
• That which is drawn along in the rear of, or after, something; that which is in the hinder part or rear.
• That part of a gown which trails behind the wearer.
(Mil.) The after part of a gun carriage; the trail.
• The tail of a bird.
• A number of followers; a body of attendants; a retinue; a suite.
• A consecution or succession of connected things; a series.
• Regular method; process; course; order; as, things now in a train for settlement.
• The number of beats of a watch in any certain time.
• A line of gunpowder laid to lead fire to a charge, mine, or the like.
• A connected line of cars or carriages on a railroad.
• A heavy, long sleigh used in Canada for the transportation of merchandise, wood, and the like.
(Rolling Mill) A roll train; as, a 12-inch train.
Trainable
a.
• Capable of being trained or educated; as, boys trainable to virtue.
Trainband
n.
• A band or company of an organized military force instituted by James I. and dissolved by Charles II.; — afterwards applied to the London militia.
Trainbearer
n.
• One who holds up a train, as of a robe.
Trainel
n.
• A dragnet.
Trainer
n.
• One who trains; an instructor; especially, one who trains or prepares men, horses, etc., for exercises requiring physical agility and strength.
• A militiaman when called out for exercise or discipline.
Training
n.
• The act of one who trains; the act or process of exercising, disciplining, etc.; education.
Trainy
a.
• Belonging to train oil.
Traipse
v. i.
• To walk or run about in a slatternly, careless, or thoughtless manner.
Trait
n.
• A stroke; a touch.
• A distinguishing or marked feature; a peculiarity; as, a trait of character.
Traiteur
n.
• The keeper of an eating house, or restaurant; a restaurateur.
Traitor
n.
• One who violates his allegiance and betrays his country; one guilty of treason; one who, in breach of trust, delivers his country to an enemy, or yields up any fort or place intrusted to his defense, or surrenders an army or body of troops to the enemy, unless when vanquished; also, one who takes arms and levies war against his country; or one who aids an enemy in conquering his country. See Treason.
• Hence, one who betrays any confidence or trust; a betrayer.
a.
• Traitorous.
v. t.
• To act the traitor toward; to betray; to deceive.
Traitoress
n.
• A traitress.
Traitorly
a.
• Like a traitor; treacherous; traitorous.
Traitorous
a.
• Guilty of treason; treacherous; perfidious; faithless; as, a traitorous officer or subject.
• Consisting in treason; partaking of treason; implying breach of allegiance; as, a traitorous scheme.
Traitory
n.
• Treachery.
Traitress
n.
• A woman who betrays her country or any trust; a traitoress.
Traject
v. t.
• To throw or cast through, over, or across; as, to traject the sun's light through three or more cross prisms.
n.
• A place for passing across; a passage; a ferry.
• The act of trajecting; trajection.
• A trajectory.
Trajection
n.
• The act of trajecting; a throwing or casting through or across; also, emission.
• Transposition.
Trajectory
n.
• The curve which a body describes in space, as a planet or comet in its orbit, or stone thrown upward obliquely in the air.
Tralation
n.
• The use of a word in a figurative or extended sense; ametaphor; a trope.
Tralatition
n.
• A change, as in the use of words; a metaphor.
Tralatitious
a.
• Passed along; handed down; transmitted.
• Metaphorical; figurative; not literal.
Tralatitiously
• , adv. In a tralatitious manner; metephorically.
Tralineate
v. i.
• To deviate; to stray; to wander.
Tralucency
n.
• Translucency; as, the tralucency of a gem.
Tralucent
a.
• Translucent.
Tram
n.
• A four-wheeled truck running on rails, and used in a mine, as for carrying coal or ore.
• The shaft of a cart.
• One of the rails of a tramway.
• A car on a horse railroad.
n.
• A silk thread formed of two or more threads twisted together, used especially for the weft, or cross threads, of the best quality of velvets and silk goods.
Tramble
v. t.
(Mining) To wash, as tin ore, with a shovel in a frame fitted for the purpose.
Trammel
n.
• A kind of net for catching birds, fishes, or other prey.
• A net for confining a woman's hair.
• A kind of shackle used for regulating the motions of a horse and making him amble.
• Fig.: Whatever impedes activity, progress, or freedom, as a net or shackle.
• An iron hook of various forms and sizes, used for handing kettles and other vessels over the fire.
(Mech.) An instrument for drawing ellipses, one part of which consists of a cross with two grooves at right angles to each other, the other being a beam carrying two pins (which slide in those grooves), and also the describing pencil.
• A beam compass. See under Beam.
v. t.
• To entangle, as in a net; to catch.
• To confine; to hamper; to shackle.
Trammeled
a.
(Man.) Having blazes, or white marks, on the fore and hind foot of one side, as if marked by trammels; — said of a horse.
Trammeler
n.
• One who uses a trammel net.
• One who, or that which, trammels or restrains.
Tramming
n.
(Silk Manuf.) The act or process of forming trams. See 2d Tram.
Tramontane
a.
• Lying or being beyond the mountains; coming from the other side of the mountains; hence, foreign; barbarous.
n.
• One living beyond the mountains; hence, a foreigner; a stranger.
Tramp
v. t.
• To tread upon forcibly and repeatedly; to trample.
• To travel or wander through; as, to tramp the country.
• To cleanse, as clothes, by treading upon them in water.
v. i.
• To travel; to wander; to stroll.
n.
• A foot journey or excursion; as, to go on a tramp; a long tramp.
• A foot traveler; a tramper; often used in a bad sense for a vagrant or wandering vagabond.
• The sound of the foot, or of feet, on the earth, as in marching.
• A tool for trimming hedges.
• A plate of iron worn to protect the sole of the foot, or the shoe, when digging with a spade.
Tramper
n.
• One who tramps; a stroller; a vagrant or vagabond; a tramp.
Trample
v. t.
• To tread under foot; to tread down; to prostrate by treading; as, to trample grass or flowers.
• Fig.: To treat with contempt and insult.
v. i.
• To tread with force and rapidity; to stamp.
• To tread in contempt; — with on or upon.
n.
• The act of treading under foot; also, the sound produced by trampling.
Trampler
n.
• One who tramples; one who treads down; as, a trampler on nature's law.
Trampoose
v. i.
• To walk with labor, or heavily; to tramp.
Tramroad
n.
• A road prepared for easy transit of trams or wagons, by forming the wheel tracks of smooth beams of wood, blocks of stone, or plates of iron.
Tramway
n.
• Same as Tramroad.
• A railway laid in the streets of a town or city, on which cars for passengers or for freight are drawn by horses; a horse railroad.
Tranation
n.
• The act of swimming over.
Trance
n.
• A tedious journey.
• A state in which the soul seems to have passed out of the body into another state of being, or to be rapt into visions; an ecstasy.
(Med.) A condition, often simulating death, in which there is a total suspension of the power of voluntary movement, with abolition of all evidences of mental activity and the reduction to a minimum of all the vital functions so that the patient lies still and apparently unconscious of surrounding objects, while the pulsation of the heart and the breathing, although still present, are almost or altogether imperceptible.
v. t.
• To entrance.
• To pass over or across; to traverse.
v. i.
• To pass; to travel.
Trancscendent
n.
• That which surpasses or is supereminent; that which is very excellent.
Trancscendental
a.
• Supereminent; surpassing others; as, transcendental being or qualities.
(Philos.) In the Kantian system, of or pertaining to that which can be determined a priori in regard to the fundamental principles of all human knowledge. What is transcendental, therefore, transcends empiricism; but is does not transcend all human knowledge, or become transcendent. It simply signifies the a priori or necessary conditions of experience which, though affording the conditions of experience, transcend the sphere of that contingent knowledge which is acquired by experience.
• Vaguely and ambitiously extravagant in speculation, imagery, or diction.
Tranect
n.
• A ferry.
Trangram
n.
• Something intricately contrived; a contrived; a puzzle.
Trannel
n.
(Naut.) A treenail.
Tranquil
a.
• Quiet; calm; undisturbed; peaceful; not agitated; as, the atmosphere is tranquil; the condition of the country is tranquil.
Tranquillity
n.
• The quality or state of being tranquil; calmness; composure.
Tranquilly
adv.
• In a tranquil manner; calmly.
Tranquilness
n.
• Quality or state of being tranquil.
Transact
v. t.
• To carry through; to do; perform; to manage; as, to transact commercial business; to transact business by an agent.
v. i.
• To conduct matters; to manage affairs.
Transaction
n.
• The doing or performing of any business; management of any affair; performance.
• That which is done; an affair; as, the transactions on the exchange.
(Civil Law) An adjustment of a dispute between parties by mutual agreement.
Transactor
n.
• One who transacts, performs, or conducts any business.
Transalpine
a.
• Being on the farther side of the Alps in regard to Rome, that is, on the north or west side of the Alps; of or pertaining to the region or the people beyond the Alps; as, transalpine Gaul; — opposed to cisalpine.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of a country beyond the Alps, that is, out of Italy.
Transanimate
v. t.
• To animate with a soul conveyed from another body.
Transanimation
n.
• The conveyance of a soul from one body to another.
Transatlantic
a.
• Lying or being beyond the Atlantic Ocean.
• Crossing the Atlantic Ocean.
Transaudient
a.
• Permitting the passage of sound.
Transcalency
n.
• The quality or state of being transcalent.
Transcalent
a.
• Pervious to, or permitting the passage of, heat.
Transcend
v. t.
• To rise above; to surmount; as, lights in the heavens transcending the region of the clouds.
• To pass over; to go beyond; to exceed.
• To surpass; to outgo; to excel; to exceed.
v. i.
• To climb; to mount.
• To be transcendent; to excel.
Transcendent
a.
• Very excellent; superior or supreme in excellence; surpassing others; as, transcendent worth; transcendent valor.
(Kantian Philos.) Transcending, or reaching beyond, the limits of human knowledge; — applied to affirmations and speculations concerning what lies beyond the reach of the human intellect.
Transcendental
n.
• A transcendentalist.
Transcendentalism
n.
(Kantian Philos.) The transcending, or going beyond, empiricism, and ascertaining a priori the fundamental principles of human knowledge.
• Ambitious and imaginative vagueness in thought, imagery, or diction.
Transcendentalist
n.
• One who believes in transcendentalism.
Transcendentality
n.
• The quality or state of being transcendental.
Transcendentally
adv.
• In a transcendental manner.
Transcendently
adv.
• In a transcendent manner.
Transcendentness
n.
• Same as Transcendence.
Transcension
n.
• The act of transcending, or surpassing; also, passage over.
Transcerporate
v. i.
• To transmigrate.
Transcolate
v. t.
• To cause to pass through a sieve or colander; to strain, as through a sieve.
Transcolation
n.
• Act of transcolating, or state of being transcolated.
Transcontinental
a.
• Extending or going across a continent; as, a transcontinental railroad or journey.
Transcriber
n.
• One who transcribes, or writes from a copy; a copier; a copyist.
Transcript
n.
• That which has been transcribed; a writing or composition consisting of the same words as the original; a written copy.
• A copy of any kind; an imitation.
• A written version of what was said orally; as, a transcript of a trial.
Transcriptive
a.
• Done as from a copy; having the style or appearance of a transcription.
Transcripttion
n.
• The act or process of transcribing, or copying; as, corruptions creep into books by repeated transcriptions.
• A copy; a transcript.
(Mus.) An arrangement of a composition for some other instrument or voice than that for which it was originally written, as the translating of a song, a vocal or instrumental quartet, or even an orchestral work, into a piece for the piano; an adaptation; an arrangement; — a name applied by modern composes for the piano to a more or less fanciful and ornate reproduction on their own instrument of a song or other piece not originally intended for it; as, Listzt's transcriptions of songs by Schubert.
Transcur
v. i.
• To run or rove to and fro.
Transcurrence
n.
• A roving hither and thither.
Transcursion
n.
• A rambling or ramble; a passage over bounds; an excursion.
Transdialect
v. t.
• To change or translate from one dialect into another.
Transduction
n.
• The act of conveying over.
Transe
n.
• See Trance.
Transelementation
n.
(Eccl.) Transubstantiation.
Transenne
n.
• A transom.
Transept
n.
(Arch.) The transversal part of a church, which crosses at right angles to the greatest length, and between the nave and choir. In the basilicas, this had often no projection at its two ends. In Gothic churches these project these project greatly, and should be called the arms of the transept. It is common, however, to speak of the arms themselves as the transepts.
Transexion
n.
• Change of sex.
Transfeminate
v. t.
• To change into a woman, as a man.
Transfer
v. t.
• To convey from one place or person another; to transport, remove, or cause to pass, to another place or person; as, to transfer the laws of one country to another; to transfer suspicion.
• To make over the possession or control of; to pass; to convey, as a right, from one person to another; to give; as, the title to land is transferred by deed.
• To remove from one substance or surface to another; as, to transfer drawings or engravings to a lithographic stone.
n.
• The act of transferring, or the state of being transferred; the removal or conveyance of a thing from one place or person to another.
(Law) The conveyance of right, title, or property, either real or personal, from one person to another, whether by sale, by gift, or otherwise.
• That which is transferred.
• A picture, or the like, removed from one body or ground to another, as from wood to canvas, or from one piece of canvas to another.
• A drawing or writing printed off from one surface on another, as in ceramics and in many decorative arts.
(Mil.) A soldier removed from one troop, or body of troops, and placed in another.
(Med.) A pathological process by virtue of which a unilateral morbid condition on being abolished on one side of the body makes its appearance in the corresponding region upon the other side.
Transferability
n.
• The quality or state of being transferable.
Transferable
a.
• Capable of being transferred or conveyed from one place or person to another.
• Negotiable, as a note, bill of exchange, or other evidence of property, that may be conveyed from one person to another by indorsement or other writing; capable of being transferred with no loss of value; as, the stocks of most public companies are transferable; some tickets are not transferable.
Transferee
n.
• The person to whom a transfer in made.
Transference
n.
• The act of transferring; conveyance; passage; transfer.
Transferography
n.
• The act or process of copying inscriptions, or the like, by making transfers.
Transferrence
n.
• See Transference.
Transferrer
n.
• One who makes a transfer or conveyance.
Transferrible
a.
• Capable of being transferred; transferable.
Transfigurate
v. t.
• To transfigure; to transform.
Transfiguratien
n.
• A change of form or appearance; especially, the supernatural change in the personal appearance of our Savior on the mount.
(Eccl.) A feast held by some branches of the Christian church on the 6th of August, in commemoration of the miraculous change above mentioned.
Transfigure
v. t.
• To change the outward form or appearance of; to metamorphose; to transform.
• Especially, to change to something exalted and glorious; to give an ideal form to.
Transfix
v. t.
• To pierce through, as with a pointed weapon; to impale; as, to transfix one with a dart.
Transfixion
n.
• The act of transfixing, or the state of being transfixed, or pierced.
Transfluent
a.
• Flowing or running across or through; as, a transfluent stream.
(Her.) Passing or flowing through a bridge; — said of water.
Transflux
n.
• A flowing through, across, or beyond.
Transforate
v. t.
• To bore through; to perforate.
Transform
v. t.
• To change the form of; to change in shape or appearance; to metamorphose; as, a caterpillar is ultimately transformed into a butterfly.
• To change into another substance; to transmute; as, the alchemists sought to transform lead into gold.
• To change in nature, disposition, heart, character, or the like; to convert.
(Math.) To change, as an algebraic expression or geometrical figure, into another from without altering its value.
v. i.
• To be changed in form; to be metamorphosed.
Transformable
a.
• Capable of being transformed or changed.
Transformation
n.
• The act of transforming, or the state of being transformed; change of form or condition.
(Biol.) Any change in an organism which alters its general character and mode of life, as in the development of the germ into the embryo, the egg into the animal, the larva into the insect (metamorphosis), etc.; also, the change which the histological units of a tissue are prone to undergo. See Metamorphosis.
(Physiol.) Change of one from of material into another, as in assimilation; metabolism; metamorphosis.
(Alchemy) The imagined possible or actual change of one metal into another; transmutation.
(Theol.) A change in disposition, heart, character, or the like; conversion.
(Math.) The change, as of an equation or quantity, into another form without altering the value.
Transformative
a.
• Having power, or a tendency, to transform.
Transformer
n.
• One who, or that which, transforms. Specif. (Elec.), an apparatus for producing from a given electrical current another current of different voltage.
Transformism
n.
(Biol.) The hypothesis, or doctrine, that living beings have originated by the modification of some other previously existing forms of living matter; — opposed to abiogenesis.
Transfreight
v. i.
• To transfrete.
Transfretation
n.
• The act of passing over a strait or narrow sea.
Transfrete
v. i.
• To pass over a strait or narrow sea.
Transfund
v. t.
• To pour from one vessel into another; to transfuse.
Transfuse
v. t.
• To pour, as liquid, out of one vessel into another; to transfer by pouring.
Transfusible
a.
• Capable of being transfused; transferable by transfusion.
Transfusion
n.
• The act of transfusing, or pouring, as liquor, out of one vessel into another.
(Med.) The act or operation of transferring the blood of one man or animal into the vascular system of another; also, the introduction of any fluid into the blood vessels, or into a cavity of the body from which it can readily be adsorbed into the vessels; intrafusion; as, the peritoneal transfusion of milk.
Transfusive
a.
• Tending to transfuse; having power to transfuse.
Transgress
v. t.
• To pass over or beyond; to surpass.
• Hence, to overpass, as any prescribed as the imit of duty; to break or violate, as a law, civil or moral.
• To offend against; to vex.
v. i.
• To offend against the law; to sin.
Transgression
n.
• The act of transgressing, or of passing over or beyond any law, civil or moral; the violation of a law or known principle of rectitude; breach of command; fault; offense; crime; sin.
Transgressional
a.
• Of pertaining to transgression; involving a transgression.
Transgressive
a.
• Disposed or tending to transgress; faulty; culpable. -
Transgressively
adv.
Transgressor
n.
• One who transgresses; one who breaks a law, or violates a command; one who violates any known rule or principle of rectitude; a sinner.
Transhape
v. t.
• To transshape.
Tranship
v. t.
• Same as Transship.
Transhipment
n.
• Same as Transshipment.
Transhuman
a.
• More than human; superhuman.
Transhumanize
v. t.
• To make more than human; to purity; to elevate above humanity.
Transient
a.
• Passing before the sight or perception, or, as it were, moving over or across a space or scene viewed, and then disappearing; hence, of short duration; not permanent; not lasting or durable; not stationary; passing; fleeting; brief; transitory; as, transient pleasure.
• Hasty; momentary; imperfect; brief; as, a transient view of a landscape.
• Staying for a short time; not regular or permanent; as, a transient guest; transient boarders.
n.
• That which remains but for a brief time.
Transire
n.
(End. Law) A customhouse clearance for a coasting vessel; a permit.
Transit
n.
• The act of passing; passage through or over.
• The act or process of causing to pass; conveyance; as, the transit of goods through a country.
• A line or route of passage or conveyance; as, the Nicaragua transit.
(Astron.) The passage of a heavenly body over the meridian of a place, or through the field of a telescope.
• The passage of a smaller body across the disk of a larger, as of Venus across the sun's disk, or of a satellite or its shadow across the disk of its primary.
• An instrument resembling a theodolite, used by surveyors and engineers; — called also transit compass, and surveyor's transit.
v. t.
(Astron.) To pass over the disk of (a heavenly body).
Transition
n.
• Passage from one place or state to another; charge; as, the transition of the weather from hot to cold.
(Mus.) A direct or indirect passing from one key to another; a modulation.
(Rhet.) A passing from one subject to another.
(Biol.) Change from one form to another.
Transitional
a.
• Of or pertaining to transition; involving or denoting transition; as, transitional changes; transitional stage.
Transitionary
a.
• Transitional.
Transitive
a.
• Having the power of making a transit, or passage.
• Effected by transference of signification.
(Gram.) Passing over to an object; expressing an action which is not limited to the agent or subject, but which requires an object to complete the sense; as, a transitive verb, for example, he holds the book.
Transitorily
adv.
• In a transitory manner; with brief continuance.
Transitoriness
n.
• The quality or state of being transitory; speedy passage or departure.
Transitory
a.
• Continuing only for a short time; not enduring; fleeting; evanescent.
Translatable
a.
• Capable of being translated, or rendered into another language.
Translate
v. t.
• To bear, carry, or remove, from one place to another; to transfer; as, to translate a tree.
• To change to another condition, position, place, or office; to transfer; hence, to remove as by death.
• To remove to heaven without a natural death.
(Eccl.) To remove, as a bishop, from one see to another.
• To render into another language; to express the sense of in the words of another language; to interpret; hence, to explain or recapitulate in other words.
• To change into another form; to transform.
(Med.) To cause to remove from one part of the body to another; as, to translate a disease.
• To cause to lose senses or recollection; to entrance.
v. i.
• To make a translation; to be engaged in translation.
Translation
n.
• The act of translating, removing, or transferring; removal; also, the state of being translated or removed; as, the translation of Enoch; the translation of a bishop.
• The act of rendering into another language; interpretation; as, the translation of idioms is difficult.
• That which is obtained by translating something a version; as, a translation of the Scriptures.
(Rhet.) A transfer of meaning in a word or phrase, a metaphor; a tralation.
(Metaph.) Transfer of meaning by association; association of ideas.
(Kinematics) Motion in which all the points of the moving body have at any instant the same velocity and direction of motion; — opposed to rotation.
Translatitious
a.
• Metaphorical; tralatitious; also, foreign; exotic.
Translative
a.
• tropical; figurative; as, a translative sense.
Translator
n.
• One who translates; esp., one who renders into another language; one who expresses the sense of words in one language by equivalent words in another.
(Teleg.) A repeating instrument.
Translatorship
n.
• The office or dignity of a translator.
Translatory
a.
• Serving to translate; transferring.
Translatress
n.
• A woman who translates.
Translavation
n.
• A laving or lading from one vessel to another.
Transliterate
v. t.
• To express or represent in the characters of another alphabet; as, to transliterate Sanskrit words by means of English letters.
Transliteration
n.
• The act or product of transliterating, or of expressing words of a language by means of the characters of another alphabet.
Translocation
n.
• removal of things from one place to another; substitution of one thing for another.
Translucent
a.
• Transmitting rays of light without permitting objects to be distinctly seen; partially transparent.
• Transparent; clear.
Translucently
adv.
• In a translucent manner.
Translucid
a.
• Translucent.
Translunary
a.
• Being or lying beyond the moon; hence, ethereal; — opposed to sublunary.
Transmarine
a.
• Lying or being beyond the sea.
Transmeate
v. t.
• To pass over or beyond.
Transmeation
n.
• The act of transmeating; a passing through or beyond.
Transmew
v. t. & i.
• To transmute; to transform; to metamorphose.
Transmigrant
a.
• Migrating or passing from one place or state to another; passing from one residence to another.
n.
• One who transmigrates.
Transmigrate
v. i.
• To pass from one country or jurisdiction to another for the purpose of residence, as men or families; to migrate.
• To pass from one body or condition into another.
Transmigration
n.
• The act of passing from one country to another; migration.
• The passing of the soul at death into another mortal body; metempsychosis.
Transmigrator
n.
• One who transmigrates.
Transmigratory
a.
• Passing from one body or state to another.
Transmissibility
n.
• The quality of being transmissible.
Transmissible
a.
• Capable of being transmitted from one to another; capable of being passed through any body or substance.
Transmission
n.
• The act of transmitting, or the state of being transmitted; as, the transmission of letters, writings, papers, news, and the like, from one country to another; the transmission of rights, titles, or privileges, from father to son, or from one generation to another.
(Law) The right possessed by an heir or legatee of transmitting to his successor or successors any inheritance, legacy, right, or privilege, to which he is entitled, even if he should die without enjoying or exercising it.
Transmissive
a.
• Capable of being transmitted; derived, or handed down, from one to another.
Transmit
v. t.
• To cause to pass over or through; to communicate by sending; to send from one person or place to another; to pass on or down as by inheritance; as, to transmit a memorial; to transmit dispatches; to transmit money, or bills of exchange, from one country to another.
• To suffer to pass through; as, glass transmits light; metals transmit, or conduct, electricity.
Transmittal
n.
• Transmission.
Transmittance
n.
• Transmission.
Transmitter
n.
• One who, or that which, transmits; specifically, that portion of a telegraphic or telephonic instrument by means of which a message is sent; — opposed to receiver.
Transmittible
a.
• Capable of being transmitted; transmissible.
Transmogrification
n.
• The act of transmogrifying, or the state of being transmogrified; transformation.
Transmogrify
v. t.
• To change into a different shape; to transform.
Transmove
v. t.
• To move or change from one state into another; to transform.
Transmutability
n.
• The quality of being transmutable.
Transmutable
a.
• Capable of being transmuted or changed into a different substance, or into into something of a different form a nature; transformable.
Transmutation
n.
• The act of transmuting, or the state of being transmuted; as, the transmutation of metals.
(Geom.) The change or reduction of one figure or body into another of the same area or solidity, but of a different form, as of a triangle into a square.
(Biol.) The change of one species into another, which is assumed to take place in any development theory of life; transformism.
Transmutationist
n.
• One who believes in the transmutation of metals or of species.
Transmute
v. t.
• To change from one nature, form, or substance, into another; to transform.
Transmuter
n.
• One who transmutes.
Transmutual
a.
• Reciprocal; commutual.
Transnatation
n.
• The act of swimming across, as a river.
Transnature
v. t.
• To transfer or transform the nature of.
Transom
n.
(Arch.) A horizontal crossbar in a window, over a door, or between a door and a window above it. Transom is the horizontal, as mullion is the vertical, bar across an opening. See Illust. of Mullion.
(Naut.) One of the principal transverse timbers of the stern, bolted to the sternpost and giving shape to the stern structure; — called also transsummer.
(Gun.) The piece of wood or iron connecting the cheeks of some gun carriages.
(Surg.) The vane of a cross-staff.
(Railroad) One of the crossbeams connecting the side frames of a truck with each other.
Transpadane
a.
• Lying or being on the further side of the river Po with reference to Rome, that is, on the north side; — opposed to cispadane.
Transpalatine
a.
(Anat.) Situated beyond or outside the palatine bone; — said of a bone in the skull of some reptiles.
Transpare
v. t. & i.
• To be, or cause to be, transparent; to appear, or cause to appear, or be seen, through something.
Transparence
n.
• The quality or state of being transparent; transparency.
Transparency
n.
• The quality or condition of being transparent; transparence.
• That which is transparent; especially, a picture painted on thin cloth or glass, or impressed on porcelain, or the like, to be viewed by natural or artificial light, which shines through it.
Transparent
a.
• Having the property of transmitting rays of light, so that bodies can be distinctly seen through; pervious to light; diaphanous; pellucid; as, transparent glass; a transparent diamond; — opposed to opaque.
• Admitting the passage of light; open; porous; as, a transparent veil.
Transpass
v. t.
• To pass over; as, Alexander transpassed the river.
v. i.
• To pass by; to pass away.
Transpassable
a.
• Capable of being transpassed, or crossed over.
Transpatronize
v. t.
• To transfer the patronage of.
Transpeciate
v. t.
• To change from one species to another; to transform.
Transpicuous
a.
• Transparent; pervious to the sight.
Transpierce
v. t.
• To pierce through; to penetrate; to permeate; to pass through.
Transpirable
a.
• Capable of being transpired, or of transpiring.
Transpiration
n.
(Physiol.) The act or process of transpiring or excreting in the form of vapor; exhalation, as through the skin or other membranes of the body; as, pulmonary transpiration, or the excretion of aqueous vapor from the lungs. Perspiration is a form of transpiration.
(bot.) The evaporation of water, or exhalation of aqueous vapor, from cells and masses of tissue.
(Physics) The passing of gases through fine tubes, porous substances, or the like; as, transpiration through membranes.
Transpiratory
a.
• Of or relating to transpiration.
Transpire
v. i.
(Physiol.) To pass off in the form of vapor or insensible perspiration; to exhale.
(Bot.) To evaporate from living cells.
• To escape from secrecy; to become public; as, the proceedings of the council soon transpired.
• To happen or come to pass; to occur.
v. t.
(Physiol.) To excrete through the skin; to give off in the form of vapor; to exhale; to perspire.
(Bot.) To evaporate (moisture) from living cells.
Transplace
v. t.
• To remove across some space; to put in an opposite or another place.
Transplant
v. t.
• To remove, and plant in another place; as, to transplant trees.
• To remove, and settle or establish for residence in another place; as, to transplant inhabitants.
Transplantation
n.
• The act of transplanting, or the state of being transplanted; also, removal.
(Surg.) The removal of tissues from a healthy part, and the insertion of them in another place where there is a lesion; as, the transplantation of tissues in autoplasty.
(Surg.) The removal of a bodily organ or of tissues from one person, and the insertion of them into another person to replace a damaged organ or tissue; as, the transplantation of a heart, kidney, or liver.
Transplanter
n.
• One who transplants; also, a machine for transplanting trees.
Transplendency
n.
• Quality or state of being transplendent.
Transplendent
a.
• Resplendent in the highest degree.
Transport
v. t.
• To carry or bear from one place to another; to remove; to convey; as, to transport goods; to transport troops.
• To carry, or cause to be carried, into banishment, as a criminal; to banish.
• To carry away with vehement emotion, as joy, sorrow, complacency, anger, etc.; to ravish with pleasure or ecstasy; as, music transports the soul.
n.
• Transportation; carriage; conveyance.
• A vessel employed for transporting, especially for carrying soldiers, warlike stores, or provisions, from one place to another, or to convey convicts to their destination; — called also transport ship, transport vessel.
• Vehement emotion; passion; ecstasy; rapture.
• A convict transported, or sentenced to exile.
Transportability
n.
• The quality or state of being transportable.
Transportable
a.
• Capable of being transported.
• Incurring, or subject to, the punishment of transportation; as, a transportable offense.
Transportal
n.
• Transportation; the act of removing from one locality to another.
Transportance
n.
• Transportation.
Transportant
a.
• Transporting; avishing; as, transportant love.
Transportation
n.
• The act of transporting, or the state of being transported; carriage from one place to another; removal; conveyance.
• Transport; ecstasy.
Transported
a.
• Conveyed from one place to another; figuratively, carried away with passion or pleasure; entranced.
Transporter
n.
• One who transports.
Transporting
a.
• That transports; fig., ravishing.
Transportingly
adv.
• So as to transport.
Transportment
n.
• The act of transporting, or the state of being transported; transportation.
Transposable
a.
• That may transposed; as, a transposable phrase.
Transposal
n.
• The act of transposing, or the state of being transposed; transposition.
Transpose
v. t.
• To change the place or order of; to substitute one for the other of; to exchange, in respect of position; as, to transpose letters, words, or propositions.
• To change; to transform; to invert.
(Alg.) To bring, as any term of an equation, from one side over to the other, without destroying the equation; thus, if a + b = c, and we make a = c - b, then b is said to be transposed.
(Gram.) To change the natural order of, as words.
(Mus.) To change the key of.
Transposer
n.
• One who transposes.
Transposition
n.
• The act of transposing, or the state of being transposed.
(Alg.) The bringing of any term of an equation from one side over to the other without destroying the equation.
(Gram.) A change of the natural order of words in a sentence; as, the Latin and Greek languages admit transposition, without inconvenience, to a much greater extent than the English.
(Mus.) A change of a composition into another key.
Transpositional
a.
• Of or pertaining to transposition; involving transposition.
Transpositive
a.
• Made by transposing; consisting in transposition; transposable.
Transprint
v. t.
• To transfer to the wrong place in printing; to print out of place.
Transprose
v. t.
• To change from prose into verse; to versify; also, to change from verse into prose.
Transregionate
a.
• Foreign.
Transscribbler
n.
• A transcriber; — used in contempt.
Transscribe
v. t.
• To write over again, or in the same words; to copy; as, to transcribe Livy or Tacitus; to transcribe a letter.
Transshape
v. t.
• To change into another shape or form; to transform.
Transship
v. t.
• To transfer from one ship or conveyance to another.
Transshipment
n.
• The act of transshipping, or transferring, as goods, from one ship or conveyance to another.
Transsummer
n.
(Naut.) See Transom, 2.
Transubstantiate
v. t.
• To change into another substance.
(R. C. Theol.) To change, as the sacramental elements, bread and wine, into the flesh and blood of Christ.
Transubstantiation
n.
• A change into another substance.
(R. C. Theol.) The doctrine held by Roman Catholics, that the bread and wine in the Mass is converted into the body and blood of Christ; — distinguished from consubstantiation, and impanation.
Transubstantiator
n.
• One who maintains the doctrine of transubstantiation.
Transudation
n.
• The act or process of transuding.
(Physics) Same as Exosmose.
Transudatory
a.
• Of or pertaining to transudation; passing by transudation.
Transude
v. i.
• To pass, as perspirable matter does, through the pores or interstices of textures; as, liquor may transude through leather or wood.
Transume
v. t.
• To change; to convert.
Transumpt
n.
• A copy or exemplification of a record.
Transumption
n.
• Act of taking from one place to another.
Transumptive
a.
• Taking from one to another; metaphorical.
Transvasate
v. t.
• To pour out of one vessel into another.
Transvasation
n.
• The act or process of pouring out of one vessel into another.
Transvection
n.
• The act of conveying or carrying over.
Transverberate
v. t.
• To beat or strike through.
Transversal
a.
• Running or lying across; transverse; as, a transversal line.
n.
(Geom.) A straight line which traverses or intersects any system of other lines, as a line intersecting the three sides of a triangle or the sides produced.
Transverse
a.
• Lying or being across, or in a crosswise direction; athwart; — often opposed to longitudinal.
n.
• Anything that is transverse or athwart.
(Geom.) The longer, or transverse, axis of an ellipse.
v. t.
• To overturn; to change.
v. t.
• To change from prose into verse, or from verse into prose.
Transversely
adv.
• In a transverse manner.
Transversion
n.
• The act of changing from prose into verse, or from verse into prose.
Transvert
v. t.
• To cause to turn across; to transverse.
Transvertible
a.
• Capable of being transverted.
Transvolation
n.
• The act of flying beyond or across.
Trant
v. i.
• To traffic in an itinerary manner; to peddle.
Tranter
n.
• One who trants; a peddler; a carrier.
Trap
v. t.
• To dress with ornaments; to adorn; — said especially of horses.
n.
(Geol.) An old term rather loosely used to designate various dark-colored, heavy igneous rocks, including especially the feldspathic-augitic rocks, basalt, dolerite, amygdaloid, etc., but including also some kinds of diorite. Called also trap rock.
a.
• Of or pertaining to trap rock; as, a trap dike.
n.
• A machine or contrivance that shuts suddenly, as with a spring, used for taking game or other animals; as, a trap for foxes.
• Fig.: A snare; an ambush; a stratagem; any device by which one may be caught unawares.
• A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball. It consists of a pivoted arm on one end of which is placed the ball to be thrown into the air by striking the other end. Also, a machine for throwing into the air glass balls, clay pigeons, etc., to be shot at.
• The game of trapball.
• A bend, sag, or partitioned chamber, in a drain, soil pipe, sewer, etc., arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents passage of air or gas, but permits the flow of liquids.
• A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for want of an outlet.
• A wagon, or other vehicle.
• A kind of movable stepladder.
v. t.
• To catch in a trap or traps; as, to trap foxes.
• Fig.: To insnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.
• To provide with a trap; to trap a drain; to trap a sewer pipe. See 4th Trap, 5.
v. i.
• To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game; as, to trap for beaver.
Trapan
n.
• A snare; a stratagem; a trepan. See 3d Trepan.
v. t.
• To insnare; to catch by stratagem; to entrap; to trepan.
Trapanner
n.
• One who trapans, or insnares.
Trapball
n.
• An old game of ball played with a trap. See 4th Trap, 4.
Trapdoor
n.
(Arch.) A lifting or sliding door covering an opening in a roof or floor.
(Mining) A door in a level for regulating the ventilating current; — called also weather door.
Trape
v. i.
• To walk or run about in an idle or slatternly manner; to traipse.
Trapes
n.
• A slattern; an idle, sluttish, or untidy woman.
v. i.
• To go about in an idle or slatternly fashion; to trape; to traipse.
Trapezate
a.
• Having the form of a trapezium; trapeziform.
Trapeze
n.
(Geom.) A trapezium. See Trapezium, 1.
• A swinging horizontal bar, suspended at each end by a rope; — used by gymnasts.
Trapeziform
a.
• Having the form of a trapezium; trapezoid.
Trapezium
n.
(Geom.) A plane figure bounded by four right lines, of which no two are parallel.
(Anat.) A bone of the carpus at the base of the first metacarpal, or thumb.
• A region on the ventral side of the brain, either just back of the pons Varolii, or, as in man, covered by the posterior extension of its transverse fibers.
Trapezohedral
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a trapezohedron.
Trapezohedron
n.
(Crystalloq.) A solid bounded by twenty-four equal and similar trapeziums; a tetragonal trisoctahedron. See the Note under Trisoctahedron.
• A tetartohedral solid of the hexagonal system, bounded by six trapezoidal planes. The faces of this form are common on quartz crystals.
Trapezoid
n.
(Geom.) A plane four-sided figure, having two sides parallel to each other.
(Anat.) A bone of the carpus at the base of the second metacarpal, or index finger.
a.
• Having the form of a trapezoid; trapezoidal; as, the trapezoid ligament which connects the coracoid process and the clavicle.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the trapezoid ligament; as, the trapezoid line.
Trapezoidal
a.
• Having the form of a trapezoid; trapezoid.
(Min.) Tranpezohedral.
Traphole
n.
(Mil.) See Trou-de-loup.
Trappean
a.
(Min.) Of or pertaining to trap; being of the nature of trap.
Trapper
n.
• One who traps animals; one who makes a business of trapping animals for their furs.
(Mining) A boy who opens and shuts a trapdoor in a gallery or level.
Trappings
n. pl.
• That which serves to trap or adorn; ornaments; dress; superficial decorations.
• Specifically, ornaments to be put on horses.
Trappist
n.
(R. C. Ch.) A monk belonging to a branch of the Cistercian Order, which was established by Armand de Rance in 1660 at the monastery of La Trappe in Normandy. Extreme austerity characterizes their discipline. They were introduced permanently into the United States in 1848, and have monasteries in Iowa and Kentucky.
Trappous
n.
(Min.) Of or performance to trap; resembling trap, or partaking of its form or qualities; trappy.
Trappures
n. pl.
• Trappings for a horse.
Trappy
a.
(Min.) Same as Trappous.
Traps
n. pl.
• Small or portable articles for dress, furniture, or use; goods; luggage; things.
Trapstick
n.
• A stick used in playing the game of trapball; hence, fig., a slender leg.
Trash
n.
• That which is worthless or useless; rubbish; refuse.
• Especially, loppings and leaves of trees, bruised sugar cane, or the like.
• A worthless person.
• A collar, leash, or halter used to restrain a dog in pursuing game.
v. t.
• To free from trash, or worthless matter; hence, to lop; to crop, as to trash the rattoons of sugar cane.
• To treat as trash, or worthless matter; hence, to spurn, humiliate, or crush.
• To hold back by a trash or leash, as a dog in pursuing game; hence, to retard, encumber, or restrain; to clog; to hinder vexatiously.
v. i.
• To follow with violence and trampling.
Trashily
adv.
• In a trashy manner.
Trashiness
n.
• The quality or state of being trashy.
Trashy
a.
• Like trash; containing much trash; waste; rejected; worthless; useless; as, a trashy novel.
Trass
n.
(Geol.) A white to gray volcanic tufa, formed of decomposed trachytic cinders; — sometimes used as a cement. Hence, a coarse sort of plaster or mortar, durable in water, and used to line cisterns and other reservoirs of water.
Traulism
n.
• A stammering or stuttering.
Traumatic
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to wounds; applied to wounds.
• Adapted to the cure of wounds; vulnerary.
• Produced by wounds; as, traumatic tetanus.
n.
• A traumatic medicine.
Traumatism
n.
(Med.) A wound or injury directly produced by causes external to the body; also, violence producing a wound or injury; as, rupture of the stomach caused by traumatism.
Traunce
n. & v.
• See Trance.
Traunt
v. i.
• Same as Trant.
Traunter
n.
• Same as Tranter.
Travail
n.
• Labor with pain; severe toil or exertion.
• Parturition; labor; as, an easy travail.
v. i.
• To labor with pain; to toil.
• To suffer the pangs of childbirth; to be in labor.
v. t
• To harass; to tire.
Travailous
a.
• Causing travail; laborious.
Trave
n.
(Arch.) A crossbeam; a lay of joists.
• A wooden frame to confine an unruly horse or ox while shoeing.
Travel
v. i.
• To labor; to travail.
• To go or march on foot; to walk; as, to travel over the city, or through the streets.
• To pass by riding, or in any manner, to a distant place, or to many places; to journey; as, a man travels for his health; he is traveling in California.
• To pass; to go; to move.
v. t.
• To journey over; to traverse; as, to travel the continent.
• To force to journey.
n.
• The act of traveling, or journeying from place to place; a journey.
• An account, by a traveler, of occurrences and observations during a journey; as, a book of travels; — often used as the title of a book; as, Travels in Italy.
(Mach.) The length of stroke of a reciprocating piece; as, the travel of a slide valve.
• Labor; parturition; travail.
Traveled
a.
• Having made journeys; having gained knowledge or experience by traveling; hence, knowing; experienced.
Traveler
n.
• One who travels; one who has traveled much.
• A commercial agent who travels for the purpose of receiving orders for merchants, making collections, etc.
(Mach.) A traveling crane. See under Crane.
(Spinning) The metal loop which travels around the ring surrounding the bobbin, in a ring spinner.
(Naut.) An iron encircling a rope, bar, spar, or the like, and sliding thereon.
Travers
adv.
• Across; athwart.
Traversable
a.
• Capable of being traversed, or passed over; as, a traversable region.
• Deniable; specifically (Law), liable to legal objection; as, a traversable presentment.
Traverse
a.
• Lying across; being in a direction across something else; as, paths cut with traverse trenches.
adv.
• Athwart; across; crosswise.
n.
• Anything that traverses, or crosses.
• Something that thwarts, crosses, or obstructs; a cross accident; as, he would have succeeded, had it not been for unlucky traverses not under his control.
• A barrier, sliding door, movable screen, curtain, or the like.
(Arch.) A gallery or loft of communication from side to side of a church or other large building.
(Fort.) A work thrown up to intercept an enfilade, or reverse fire, along exposed passage, or line of work.
(Law) A formal denial of some matter of fact alleged by the opposite party in any stage of the pleadings. The technical words introducing a traverse are absque hoc, without this; that is, without this which follows.
(Naut.) The zigzag course or courses made by a ship in passing from one place to another; a compound course.
(Geom.) A line lying across a figure or other lines; a transversal.
(Surv.) A line surveyed across a plot of ground.
(Gun.) The turning of a gun so as to make it point in any desired direction.
• A turning; a trick; a subterfuge.
v. t.
• To lay in a cross direction; to cross.
• To cross by way of opposition; to thwart with obstacles; to obstruct; to bring to naught.
• To wander over; to cross in traveling; as, to traverse the habitable globe.
• To pass over and view; to survey carefully.
(Gun.) To turn to the one side or the other, in order to point in any direction; as, to traverse a cannon.
(Carp.) To plane in a direction across the grain of the wood; as, to traverse a board.
(Law) To deny formally, as what the opposite party has alleged. When the plaintiff or defendant advances new matter, he avers it to be true, and traverses what the other party has affirmed. To traverse an indictment or an office is to deny it.
v. i.
• To use the posture or motions of opposition or counteraction, as in fencing.
• To turn, as on a pivot; to move round; to swivel; as, the needle of a compass traverses; if it does not traverse well, it is an unsafe guide.
• To tread or move crosswise, as a horse that throws his croup to one side and his head to the other.
Traverser
n.
• One who, or that which, traverses, or moves, as an index on a scale, and the like.
(Law) One who traverses, or denies.
(Railroad) A traverse table. See under Traverse, n.
Traversing
a.
• Adjustable laterally; having a lateral motion, or a swinging motion; adapted for giving lateral motion.
Travertine
n.
(Min.) A white concretionary form of calcium carbonate, usually hard and semicrystalline. It is deposited from the water of springs or streams holding lime in solution. Extensive deposits exist at Tivoli, near Rome.
Travesty
a.
• Disguised by dress so as to be ridiculous; travestied; — applied to a book or shorter composition.
n.
• A burlesque translation or imitation of a work.
v. t.
• To translate, imitate, or represent, so as to render ridiculous or ludicrous.
Trawl
v. i.
• To take fish, or other marine animals, with a trawl.
n.
• A fishing line, often extending a mile or more, having many short lines bearing hooks attached to it. It is used for catching cod, halibut, etc.; a boulter.
• A large bag net attached to a beam with iron frames at its ends, and dragged at the bottom of the sea, — used in fishing, and in gathering forms of marine life from the sea bottom.
Trawlboat
n.
• A boat used in fishing with trawls or trawlnets.
Trawler
n.
• One who, or that which, trawls.
• A fishing vessel which trails a net behind it.
Trawlerman
n.
• A fisherman who used unlawful arts and engines to catch fish.
Trawlnet
n.
• Same as Trawl, n., 2.
Trawlwarp
n.
• A rope passing through a block, used in managing or dragging a trawlnet.
Tray
v. t.
• To betray; to deceive.
n.
• A small trough or wooden vessel, sometimes scooped out of a block of wood, for various domestic uses, as in making bread, chopping meat, etc.
• A flat, broad vessel on which dishes, glasses, etc., are carried; a waiter; a salver.
• A shallow box, generally without a top, often used within a chest, trunk, box, etc., as a removable receptacle for small or light articles.
Trayful
n.
• As much as a tray will hold; enough to fill a tray.
Trays
n. pl.
• See Trais.
Treacher
n.
• A traitor; a cheat.
Treacherous
a.
• Like a traitor; involving treachery; violating allegiance or faith pledged; traitorous to the state or sovereign; perfidious in private life; betraying a trust; faithless.
Treachery
n.
• Violation of allegiance or of faith and confidence; treasonable or perfidious conduct; perfidy; treason.
Treacle
n.
(Old Med.) A remedy against poison. See Theriac, 1.
• A sovereign remedy; a cure.
• Molasses; sometimes, specifically, the molasses which drains from the sugar-refining molds, and which is also called sugarhouse molasses.
• A saccharine fluid, consisting of the inspissated juices or decoctions of certain vegetables, as the sap of the birch, sycamore, and the like.
Treacly
a.
• Like, or composed of, treacle.
Tread
v. i.
• To set the foot; to step.
• To walk or go; especially, to walk with a stately or a cautious step.
• To copulate; said of birds, esp. the males.
v. t.
• To step or walk on.
• To beat or press with the feet; as, to tread a path; to tread land when too light; a well-trodden path.
• To go through or accomplish by walking, dancing, or the like.
• To crush under the foot; to trample in contempt or hatred; to subdue.
• To copulate with; to feather; to cover; — said of the male bird.
n.
• A step or stepping; pressure with the foot; a footstep; as, a nimble tread; a cautious tread.
• Manner or style of stepping; action; gait; as, the horse has a good tread.
• Way; track; path.
• The act of copulation in birds.
(Arch.) The upper horizontal part of a step, on which the foot is placed.
(Fort.) The top of the banquette, on which soldiers stand to fire over the parapet.
(Mach.) The part of a wheel that bears upon the road or rail.
• The part of a rail upon which car wheels bear.
(Biol.) The chalaza of a bird's egg; the treadle.
(Far.) A bruise or abrasion produced on the foot or ankle of a horse that interferes. See Interfere, 3.
Treadboard
n.
• See Tread, n., 5.
Treader
n.
• One who treads.
Treadfowl
n.
• A cock.
Treadle
n.
• The part of a foot lathe, or other machine, which is pressed or moved by the foot.
(Biol.) The chalaza of a bird's egg; the tread.
Treadmill
n.
• A mill worked by persons treading upon steps on the periphery of a wide wheel having a horizontal axis. It is used principally as a means of prison discipline. Also, a mill worked by horses, dogs, etc., treading an endless belt.
Treadwheel
n.
• A wheel turned by persons or animals, by treading, climbing, or pushing with the feet, upon its periphery or face. See Treadmill.
Treague
n.
• A truce.
Treason
n.
• The offense of attempting to overthrow the government of the state to which the offender owes allegiance, or of betraying the state into the hands of a foreign power; disloyalty; treachery.
• Loosely, the betrayal of any trust or confidence; treachery; perfidy.
Treasonable
a.
• Pertaining to treason; consisting of treason; involving the crime of treason, or partaking of its guilt.
Treasonous
a.
• Treasonable.
Treasure
n.
• Wealth accumulated; especially, a stock, or store of money in reserve.
• A great quantity of anything collected for future use; abundance; plenty.
• That which is very much valued.
v. t.
• To collect and deposit, as money or other valuable things, for future use; to lay up; to hoard; usually with up; as, to treasure up gold.
Treasurer
n.
• One who has the care of a treasure or treasure or treasury; an officer who receives the public money arising from taxes and duties, or other sources of revenue, takes charge of the same, and disburses it upon orders made by the proper authority; one who has charge of collected funds; as, the treasurer of a society or corporation.
Treasurership
n.
• The office of treasurer.
Treasuress
n.
• A woman who is a treasurer.
Treasury
n.
• A place or building in which stores of wealth are deposited; especially, a place where public revenues are deposited and kept, and where money is disbursed to defray the expenses of government; hence, also, the place of deposit and disbursement of any collected funds.
• That department of a government which has charge of the finances.
• A repository of abundance; a storehouse.
• Hence, a book or work containing much valuable knowledge, wisdom, wit, or the like; a thesaurus; as, " Maunder's Treasury of Botany."
• A treasure.
Treat
v. t.
• To handle; to manage; to use; to bear one's self toward; as, to treat prisoners cruelly; to treat children kindly.
• To discourse on; to handle in a particular manner, in writing or speaking; as, to treat a subject diffusely.
• To entertain with food or drink, especially the latter, as a compliment, or as an expression of friendship or regard; as, to treat the whole company.
• To negotiate; to settle; to make terms for.
(Med.) To care for medicinally or surgically; to manage in the use of remedies or appliances; as, to treat a disease, a wound, or a patient.
• To subject to some action; to apply something to; as, to treat a substance with sulphuric acid.
• To entreat; to beseech.
v. i.
• To discourse; to handle a subject in writing or speaking; to make discussion; — usually with of; as, Cicero treats of old age and of duties.
• To negotiate; to come to terms of accommodation; — often followed by with; as, envoys were appointed to treat with France.
• To give a gratuitous entertainment, esp. of food or drink, as a compliment.
n.
• A parley; a conference.
• An entertainment given as an expression of regard.
• That which affords entertainment; a gratification; a satisfaction; as, the concert was a rich treat.
Treatable
a.
• Manageable; tractable; hence, moderate; not violent.
Treatably
adv.
• In a treatable manner.
Treater
n.
• One who treats; one who handles, or discourses on, a subject; also, one who entertains.
Treatise
n.
• A written composition on a particular subject, in which its principles are discussed or explained; a tract.
• Story; discourse.
Treatiser
n.
• One who writes a treatise.
Treatment
n.
• The act or manner of treating; management; manipulation; handling; usage; as, unkind treatment; medical treatment.
• Entertainment; treat.
Treature
n.
• Treatment.
Treaty
n.
• The act of treating for the adjustment of differences, as for forming an agreement; negotiation.
• An agreement so made; specifically, an agreement, league, or contract between two or more nations or sovereigns, formally signed by commissioners properly authorized, and solemnly ratified by the several sovereigns, or the supreme power of each state; an agreement between two or more independent states; as, a treaty of peace; a treaty of alliance.
• A proposal tending to an agreement.
• A treatise; a tract.
Treble
a.
• Threefold; triple.
(Mus.) Acute; sharp; as, a treble sound.
• Playing or singing the highest part or most acute sounds; playing or singing the treble; as, a treble violin or voice.
adv.
• Trebly; triply.
n.
(Mus.) The highest of the four principal parts in music; the part usually sung by boys or women; soprano.
v. t.
• To make thrice as much; to make threefold.
• To utter in a treble key; to whine.
v. i.
• To become threefold.
Trebleness
n.
• The quality or state of being treble; as, the trebleness of tones.
Treblet
n.
• Same as Triblet.
Trebly
adv.
• In a treble manner; with a threefold number or quantity; triply.
Trechometer
n.
• An odometer for vehicles.
Treckschuyt
n.
• A covered boat for goods and passengers, used on the Dutch and Flemish canals.
Treddle
n.
• See Treadle.
• A prostitute; a strumpet.
• The dung of sheep or hares.
Tredille
n.
• A game at cards for three.
Tree
n.
(Bot.) Any perennial woody plant of considerable size (usually over twenty feet high) and growing with a single trunk.
• Something constructed in the form of, or considered as resembling, a tree, consisting of a stem, or stock, and branches; as, a genealogical tree.
• A piece of timber, or something commonly made of timber; — used in composition, as in axletree, boottree, chesstree, crosstree, whiffletree, and the like.
• A cross or gallows; as Tyburn tree.
• Wood; timber.
(Chem.) A mass of crystals, aggregated in arborescent forms, obtained by precipitation of a metal from solution. See Lead tree, under Lead.
v. t.
• To drive to a tree; to cause to ascend a tree; as, a dog trees a squirrel.
• To place upon a tree; to fit with a tree; to stretch upon a tree; as, to tree a boot. See Tree, n., 3.
Treebeard
n.
(Bot.) A pendulous branching lichen (Usnea barbata); — so called from its resemblance to hair.
Treeful
n.
• The quantity or number which fills a tree.
Treeless
a
• Destitute of trees.
Treen
a.
• Made of wood; wooden.
• Relating to, or drawn from, trees.
• pl. of Tree.
Treenail
n.
(Shipbuilding) A long wooden pin used in fastening the planks of a vessel to the timbers or to each other.
Trefle
a.
(Her.) Having a three-lobed extremity or extremities, as a cross; also, more rarely, ornamented with trefoils projecting from the edges, as a bearing.
Trefle
n.
(Fort.) A species of time; — so called from its resemblance in form to a trefoil.
Trefoil
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Trifolium, which includes the white clover, red clover, etc.; — less properly, applied also to the nonesuch, or black medic. See Clover, and Medic.
(Arch.) An ornamental foliation consisting of three divisions, or foils.
(Her.) A charge representing the clover leaf.
Trefoiled
a.
(Her.) Same as Trefle.
Treget
n.
• Guile; trickery.
Tregetour
n.
• A juggler who produces illusions by the use of elaborate machinery.
Tregetry
n.
• Trickery; also, a trick.
Trehala
n.
(Chem.) An amorphous variety of manna obtained from the nests and cocoons of a Syrian coleopterous insect (Larinus maculatus, L. nidificans, etc.) which feeds on the foliage of a variety of thistle. It is used as an article of food, and is called also nest sugar.
Trehalose
n.
(Chem.) Mycose; — so called because sometimes obtained from trehala.
Treillage
n.
• Latticework for supporting vines, etc.; an espalier; a trellis.
Trellis
n.
• A structure or frame of crossbarred work, or latticework, used for various purposes, as for screens or for supporting plants.
Trellised
a.
• Having a trellis or trellises.
Tremando
a.
(Mus.) Trembling; — used as a direction to perform a passage with a general shaking of the whole chord.
Trematode
n.
(Zool.) One of the Trematodea. Also used adjectively.
Trematodea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive order of parasitic worms. They are found in the internal cavities of animals belonging to all classes. Many species are found, also, on the gills and skin of fishes. A few species are parasitic on man, and some, of which the fluke is the most important, are injurious parasites of domestic animals. The trematodes usually have a flattened body covered with a chitinous skin, and are furnished with two or more suckers for adhesion. Most of the species are hermaphrodite. Called also Trematoda, and Trematoidea. See Fluke, Tristoma, and Cercaria.
Trematoid
a.
(Zool.) f or pertaining to the Trematodea. See Illustration in Appendix.
Tremble
v. i.
• To shake involuntarily, as with fear, cold, or weakness; to quake; to quiver; to shiver; to shudder; — said of a person or an animal.
• To totter; to shake; — said of a thing.
• To quaver or shake, as sound; to be tremulous; as the voice trembles.
n.
• An involuntary shaking or quivering.
Trembler
n.
• One who trembles.
Trembling
a.
• Shaking; tottering; quivering.
Tremella
n.
(Bot.) A genus of gelatinous fungi found in moist grounds.
Tremendous
a.
• Fitted to excite fear or terror; such as may astonish or terrify by its magnitude, force, or violence; terrible; dreadful; as, a tremendous wind; a tremendous shower; a tremendous shock or fall.
Tremex
n.
(Zool.) A genus of large hymenopterous insects allied to the sawflies. The female lays her eggs in holes which she bores in the trunks of trees with her large and long ovipositor, and the larva bores in the wood. See Illust. of Horntail.
Tremolando
a.
(Mus.) Same as Tremando.
Tremolite
n.
(Min.) A white variety of amphibole, or hornblende, occurring in long, bladelike crystals, and coarsely fibrous masses.
Tremolo
n.
(Mus.) The rapid reiteration of tones without any apparent cessation, so as to produce a tremulous effect.
• A certain contrivance in an organ, which causes the notes to sound with rapid pulses or beats, producing a tremulous effect; — called also tremolant, and tremulant.
Tremor
n.
• A trembling; a shivering or shaking; a quivering or vibratory motion; as, the tremor of a person who is weak, infirm, or old.
Tremulous
a.
• Shaking; shivering; quivering; as, a tremulous limb; a tremulous motion of the hand or the lips; the tremulous leaf of the poplar.
• Affected with fear or timidity; trembling.
Tren
n.
• A fish spear.
Trenail
n.
(Shipbuilding) Same as Treenail.
Trench
v. t.
• To cut; to form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, or the like.
(Fort.) To fortify by cutting a ditch, and raising a rampart or breastwork with the earth thrown out of the ditch; to intrench.
• To cut furrows or ditches in; as, to trench land for the purpose of draining it.
• To dig or cultivate very deeply, usually by digging parallel contiguous trenches in succession, filling each from the next; as, to trench a garden for certain crops.
v. i.
• To encroach; to intrench.
• To have direction; to aim or tend.
n.
• A long, narrow cut in the earth; a ditch; as, a trench for draining land.
• An alley; a narrow path or walk cut through woods, shrubbery, or the like.
(Fort.) An excavation made during a siege, for the purpose of covering the troops as they advance toward the besieged place. The term includes the parallels and the approaches.
Trenchand
a.
• Trenchant.
Trenchant
a.
• Fitted to trench or cut; gutting; sharp.
• Fig.: Keen; biting; severe; as, trenchant wit.
Trenchantly
adv.
• In a trenchant, or sharp, manner; sharply; severely.
Trencher
n.
• One who trenches; esp., one who cuts or digs ditches.
• A large wooden plate or platter, as for table use.
• The table; hence, the pleasures of the table; food.
Trenchmore
n.
• A kind of lively dance of a rude, boisterous character. Also, music in triple time appropriate to the dance.
v. i.
• To dance the trenchmore.
Trend
v. i.
• To have a particular direction; to run; to stretch; to tend; as, the shore of the sea trends to the southwest.
v. t.
• To cause to turn; to bend.
n.
• Inclination in a particular direction; tendency; general direction; as, the trend of a coast.
v. t.
• To cleanse, as wool.
n.
• Clean wool.
Trender
n.
• One whose business is to free wool from its filth.
Trendle
n.
• A wheel, spindle, or the like; a trundle.
Trental
n.
(R. C. Ch.) An office and mass for the dead on the thirtieth day after death or burial.
• Hence, a dirge; an elegy.
Trepan
n.
(Surg.) A crown-saw or cylindrical saw for perforating the skull, turned, when used, like a bit or gimlet. See Trephine.
(Mining) A kind of broad chisel for sinking shafts.
v. t. & i.
(Surg.) To perforate (the skull) with a trepan, so as to remove a portion of the bone, and thus relieve the brain from pressure or irritation; to perform an operation with the trepan.
n.
• A snare; a trapan.
• a deceiver; a cheat.
v. t.
• To insnare; to trap; to trapan.
Trepang
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of large holothurians, some of which are dried and extensively used as food in China; — called also beche de mer, sea cucumber, and sea slug.
Trepanize
v. t.
• To trepan.
Trepanner
n.
• One who trepans.
Trepeget
n.
(Mil.) A trebuchet.
Trephine
n.
(Surg.) An instrument for trepanning, being an improvement on the trepan. It is a circular or cylindrical saw, with a handle like that of a gimlet, and a little sharp perforator called the center pin.
v. t.
• To perforate with a trephine; to trepan.
Trepid
a.
• Trembling; quaking.
Trepidation
n.
• An involuntary trembling, sometimes an effect of paralysis, but usually caused by terror or fear; quaking; quivering.
• Hence, a state of terror or alarm; fear; confusion; fright; as, the men were in great trepidation.
(Anc. Astron.) A libration of the starry sphere in the Ptolemaic system; a motion ascribed to the firmament, to account for certain small changes in the position of the ecliptic and of the stars.
Trepidity
n.
• Trepidation.
Tresayle
n.
• A grandfather's grandfather.
Tresor
n.
• Treasure.
Trespass
v. i.
• To pass beyond a limit or boundary; hence, to depart; to go.
(Law) To commit a trespass; esp., to enter unlawfully upon the land of another.
• To go too far; to put any one to inconvenience by demand or importunity; to intrude; as, to trespass upon the time or patience of another.
• To commit any offense, or to do any act that injures or annoys another; to violate any rule of rectitude, to the injury of another; hence, in a moral sense, to transgress voluntarily any divine law or command; to violate any known rule of duty; to sin; — often followed by against.
n.
• Any injury or offence done to another.
• Any voluntary transgression of the moral law; any violation of a known rule of duty; sin.
(Law) An unlawful act committed with force and violence (vi et armis) on the person, property, or relative rights of another.
• An action for injuries accompanied with force.
Trespasser
n.
• One who commits a trespass
(Law) One who enters upon another's land, or violates his rights.
• A transgressor of the moral law; an offender; a sinner.
Tress
n.
• A braid, knot, or curl, of hair; a ringlet.
• Fig.: A knot or festoon, as of flowers.
Tressed
a.
• Having tresses.
• Formed into ringlets or braided; braided; curled.
Tressel
n.
• A trestle.
Tressful
a.
• Tressy.
Tressure
n.
(Her.) A kind of border similar to the orle, but of only half the breadth of the latter.
Tressured
a.
(Her.) Provided or bound with a tressure; arranged in the form of a tressure.
Tressy
a.
• Abounding in tresses.
Trestle
n.
• A movable frame or support for anything, as scaffolding, consisting of three or four legs secured to a top piece, and forming a sort of stool or horse, used by carpenters, masons, and other workmen; also, a kind of framework of strong posts or piles, and crossbeams, for supporting a bridge, the track of a railway, or the like.
• The frame of a table.
Trestletree
n.
(Naut.) One of two strong bars of timber, fixed horizontally on the opposite sides of the masthead, to support the crosstrees and the frame of the top; — generally used in the plural.
Trestlework
n.
• A viaduct, pier, scaffold, or the like, resting on trestles connected together.
Tret
• 3d pers. sing. pres. of Tread, for treadeth.
n.
(Com.) An allowance to purchasers, for waste or refuse matter, of four pounds on every 104 pounds of suttle weight, or weight after the tare deducted.
Tretable
a.
• Tractable; moderate.
Trething
n.
• A tax; an impost.
Trevat
n.
• A weaver's cutting instrument; for severing the loops of the pile threads of velvet.
Trevet
n.
• A stool or other thing supported by three legs; a trivet.
Trews
n. pl.
• Trowsers; especially, those of the Scotch Highlanders.
Trewth
n.
• Truth.
Trey
n.
• Three, at cards, dice, or dominoes; a card, die, or domino of three spots or pips.
Triable
a.
• Fit or possible to be tried; liable to be subjected to trial or test.
(Law) Liable to undergo a judicial examination; properly coming under the cognizance of a court; as, a cause may be triable before one court which is not triable in another.
Triableness
n.
• Quality or state of being triable.
Triacid
a.
(Chem.) Capable of neutralizing three molecules of a monobasic acid or the equivalent; having three hydrogen atoms which may be acid radicals; — said of certain bases; thus, glycerin is a triacid base.
Triacle
n.
• See Treacle.
Triacontahedral
a.
• Having thirty sides.
Triaconter
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A vessel with thirty banks of oars, or, as some say, thirty ranks of rowers.
Triad
n.
• A union of three; three objects treated as one; a ternary; a trinity; as, a triad of deities.
(Mus.) A chord of three notes.
• The common chord, consisting of a tone with its third and fifth, with or without the octave.
(Chem.) An element or radical whose valence is three.
Triadelphous
a.
(Bot.) Having stamens joined by filaments into three bundles. See Illust. under Adelphous.
Triadic
a.
(Chem.) Having the characteristics of a triad; as, boron is triadic.
Triakisoctahedron
n.
(Crystalloq.) A trigonal trisoctahedron.
Trial
n.
• The act of trying or testing in any manner.
• Any effort or exertion of strength for the purpose of ascertaining what can be done or effected.
• The act of testing by experience; proof; test.
• Examination by a test; experiment, as in chemistry, metallurgy, etc.
• The state of being tried or tempted; exposure to suffering that tests strength, patience, faith, or the like; affliction or temptation that exercises and proves the graces or virtues of men.
• That which tries or afflicts; that which harasses; that which tries the character or principles; that which tempts to evil; as, his child's conduct was a sore trial.
(Law) The formal examination of the matter in issue in a cause before a competent tribunal; the mode of determining a question of fact in a court of law; the examination, in legal form, of the facts in issue in a cause pending before a competent tribunal, for the purpose of determining such issue.
Triality
n.
• Three united; state of being three.
Trialogue
n.
• A discourse or colloquy by three persons.
Triamide
n.
(Chem.) An amide containing three amido groups.
Triamine
n.
(Chem.) An amine containing three amido groups.
Triander
n.
(Bot.) Any one of the Triandria.
Triandria
n. pl.
(Bot.) A Linnaean class of plants having three distinct and equal stamens.
Triangle
n.
(Geom.) A figure bounded by three lines, and containing three angles.
(Mus.) An instrument of percussion, usually made of a rod of steel, bent into the form of a triangle, open at one angle, and sounded by being struck with a small metallic rod.
• A draughtsman's square in the form of a right-angled triangle.
(Mus.) A kind of frame formed of three poles stuck in the ground and united at the top, to which soldiers were bound when undergoing corporal punishment, — now disused.
(Astron.) A small constellation situated between Aries and Andromeda.
• A small constellation near the South Pole, containing three bright stars.
Triangled
a.
• Having three angles; triangular.
Triangular
a.
• Having three angles; having the form of a triangle.
(Bot.) Oblong or elongated, and having three lateral angles; as, a triangular seed, leaf, or stem.
Triangulares
n. pl.
(Zool.) The triangular, or maioid, crabs. See Illust. under Maioid, and Illust. of Spider crab, under Spider.
Triangularity
n.
• The quality or state of being triangular.
Triangularly
adv.
• In a triangular manner; in the form of a triangle.
Triangulate
v. t.
• To divide into triangles; specifically, to survey by means of a series of triangles properly laid down and measured.
• To make triangular, or three-cornered.
Triangulation
n.
(Surv.) The series or network of triangles into which the face of a country, or any portion of it, is divided in a trigonometrical survey; the operation of measuring the elements necessary to determine the triangles into which the country to be surveyed is supposed to be divided, and thus to fix the positions and distances of the several points connected by them.
Triarchy
n.
• Government by three persons; a triumvirate; also, a country under three rulers.
Triarian
a.
• Occupying the third post or rank.
Triarticulate
a.
(Zool.) Having three joints.
Trias
n.
(Geol.) The formation situated between the Permian and Lias, and so named by the Germans, because consisting of three series of strata, which are called in German the Bunter sandstein, Muschelkalk, and Keuper.
Triassic
a.
(Geol.) Of the age of, or pertaining to, the Trias.
n.
• The Triassic formation.
Triatic
a.
(Naut.) A term used in the phrase triatic stay. See under Stay.
Triatomic
a.
(Chem.) Having three atoms; — said of certain elements or radicals.
• Having a valence of three; trivalent; sometimes, in a specific sense, having three hydroxyl groups, whether acid or basic; thus, glycerin, glyceric acid, and tartronic acid are each triatomic.
Tribal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a tribe or tribes; as, a tribal scepter.
Tribalism
n.
• The state of existing in tribes; also, tribal feeling; tribal prejudice or exclusiveness; tribal peculiarities or characteristics.
Tribasic
a.
(Chem.) Capable of neutralizing three molecules of a monacid base, or their equivalent; having three hydrogen atoms capable of replacement by basic elements on radicals; — said of certain acids; thus, citric acid is a tribasic acid.
Tribble
n.
(Paper Manuf.) A frame on which paper is dried.
Tribe
n.
• A family, race, or series of generations, descending from the same progenitor, and kept distinct, as in the case of the twelve tribes of Israel, descended from the twelve sons of Jacob.
(Bot.) A number of species or genera having certain structural characteristics in common; as, a tribe of plants; a tribe of animals.
• A nation of savages or uncivilized people; a body of rude people united under one leader or government; as, the tribes of the Six Nations; the Seneca tribe.
• A division, class, or distinct portion of a people, from whatever cause that distinction may have originated; as, the city of Athens was divided into ten tribes.
(Stock Breeding) A family of animals descended from some particular female progenitor, through the female line; as, the Duchess tribe of shorthorns.
v. t.
• To distribute into tribes or classes.
Tribometer
n.
• An instrument to ascertain the degree of friction in rubbing surfaces.
Tribrach
n.
(Gr. & L. Pros.) A poetic foot of three short syllables, as, m\'cbl\'cc\'dcs.
Tribracteate
a.
(Bot.) Having three bracts.
Tribulation
n.
• That which occasions distress, trouble, or vexation; severe affliction.
Tribunal
n.
• The seat of a judge; the bench on which a judge and his associates sit for administering justice.
• Hence, a court or forum; as, the House of Lords, in England, is the highest tribunal in the kingdom.
Tribunary
a.
• Of or pertaining to tribunes; as, tribunary powers or authority.
Tribunate
n.
• The state or office of a tribune; tribuneship.
Tribune
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) An officer or magistrate chosen by the people, to protect them from the oppression of the patricians, or nobles, and to defend their liberties against any attempts that might be made upon them by the senate and consuls.
• Anciently, a bench or elevated place, from which speeches were delivered; in France, a kind of pulpit in the hall of the legislative assembly, where a member stands while making an address; any place occupied by a public orator.
Tribuneship
n.
• The office or power of a tribune.
Tribunitious
a.
• Tribunician; tribunitial.
Tributariness
n.
• The quality or state of being tributary.
Tributary
a.
• Paying tribute to another, either from compulsion, as an acknowledgment of submission, or to secure protection, or for the purpose of purchasing peace.
• Hence, subject; subordinate; inferior.
• Paid in tribute.
• Yielding supplies of any kind; serving to form or make up, a greater object of the same kind, as a part, branch, etc.; contributing; as, the Ohio has many tributary streams, and is itself tributary to the Mississippi.
n.
• A ruler or state that pays tribute, or a stated sum, to a conquering power, for the purpose of securing peace and protection, or as an acknowledgment of submission, or for the purchase of security.
• A stream or river flowing into a larger river or into a lake; an affluent.
Tribute
n.
• An annual or stated sum of money or other valuable thing, paid by one ruler or nation to another, either as an acknowledgment of submission, or as the price of peace and protection, or by virtue of some treaty; as, the Romans made their conquered countries pay tribute.
• A personal contribution, as of money, praise, service, etc., made in token of services rendered, or as that which is due or deserved; as, a tribute of affection.
(Mining) A certain proportion of the ore raised, or of its value, given to the miner as his recompense.
v. i.
• To pay as tribute.
Tributer
n.
(Mining) One who works for a certain portion of the ore, or its value.
Trica
n.
(Bot.) An apothecium in certain lichens, having a spherical surface marked with spiral or concentric ridges and furrows.
Tricarballylic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a complex tribasic organic acid, C3H5.(CO2H)3 occurring naturally in unripe beet roots, and produced artificially from glycerin as a white crystalline substance.
Tricarbimide
n.
(Chem.) See under Cyanuric.
Trice
v. t.
• To pull; to haul; to drag; to pull away.
(Naut.) To haul and tie up by means of a rope.
n.
• A very short time; an instant; a moment; — now used only in the phrase in a trice.
Tricennarious
a.
• Of or pertaining to thirty years; tricennial.
Tricennial
a.
• Of or pertaining to thirty years; consisting of thirty years; occurring once in every thirty years.
Tricentenary
a.
• Including, or relating to, the interval of three hundred years; tercentenary.
n.
• A period of three centuries, or three hundred years, also, the three-hundredth anniversary of any event; a tercentenary.
Triceps
n.
(Anat.) A muscle having three heads; specif., the great extensor of the forearm, arising by three heads and inserted into the olecranon at the elbow.
Trichiasis
n.
(Med.) A disease of the eye, in which the eyelashes, being turned in upon the eyeball, produce constant irritation by the motion of the lids.
Trichina
n.
(Zool.) A small, slender nematoid worm (Trichina spiralis) which, in the larval state, is parasitic, often in immense numbers, in the voluntary muscles of man, the hog, and many other animals. When insufficiently cooked meat containing the larvae is swallowed by man, they are liberated and rapidly become adult, pair, and the ovoviviparous females produce in a short time large numbers of young which find their way into the muscles, either directly, or indirectly by means of the blood. Their presence in the muscles and the intestines in large numbers produces trichinosis.
Trichiniasis
n.
(Med.) Trichinosis.
Trichinize
v. t.
• To render trichinous; to affect with trichinae; — chiefly used in the past participle; as, trichinized pork.
Trichinoscope
n.
• An apparatus for the detection of trichinae in the flesh of animals, as of swine.
Trichinosis
n.
(Med.) The disease produced by the presence of trichinae in the muscles and intestinal track. It is marked by fever, muscular pains, and symptoms resembling those of typhoid fever, and is frequently fatal.
Trichinous
a.
• Of or pertaining to trichinae or trichinosis; affected with, or containing, trichinae; as, trichinous meat.
Trichite
n.
(Min.) A kind of crystallite resembling a bunch of hairs, common in obsidian. See Illust. of Crystallite.
(Zool.) A delicate, hairlike siliceous spicule, found in certain sponges.
Trichiuriform
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the genus Trichiurus or family Trichiuridae, comprising the scabbard fishes and hairtails.
Trichiuroid
a.
(Zool.) Of, like, or pertaining to, Trichiurus.
Trichiurus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of fishes comprising the hairtails. See Hairtail.
Trichloride
n.
(Chem.) A chloride having three atoms of chlorine in the molecule.
Trichobranchia
n.
(Zool.) The gill of a crustacean in which the branchial filaments are slender and cylindrical, as in the crawfishes.
Trichocyst
n.
(Zool.) A lasso cell.
Trichogyne
n.
(Bot.) The slender, hairlike cell which receives the fertilizing particles, or antherozoids, in red seaweeds.
Trichomanes
n.
(Bot.) Any fern of the genus Trichomanes. The fronds are very delicate and often translucent, and the sporangia are borne on threadlike receptacles rising from the middle of cup-shaped marginal involucres. Several species are common in conservatories; two are native in the United States.
Trichomatose
a.
(Med.) Affected with a disease which causes agglutination and matting together; — said of the hair when affected with plica. See Plica, 1.
Trichome
n.
(Bot.) A hair on the surface of leaf or stem, or any modification of a hair, as a minute scale, or star, or gland. The sporangia of ferns are believed to be of the nature of trichomes.
Trichophore
n.
(Bot.) The special cell in red algae which produces or bears a trichogyne. See Illust. of Trichogyne.
(Zool.) One of the saclike organs from which the setae of annelids arise.
Trichopter
n.
(Zool.) One of the Trichoptera.
Trichoptera
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of Neuroptera usually having the wings covered with minute hairs. It comprises the caddice flies, and is considered by some to be a distinct order.
Trichopteran
(Zool.) One of the Trichoptera.
Trichopterous
a.
(Zool.) Of, pertaining to, or characterizing, the Trichoptera.
Trichord
n.
(Mus.) An instrument, as a lyre or harp, having three strings.
Trichoscolices
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive group of wormlike animals characterized by being more or less covered with cilia.
Trichotomous
a.
• Divided into three parts, or into threes; three-forked; as, a trichotomous stem.
Trichotomy
n.
• Division into three parts.
Trichroic
a.
• Exhibiting trichroism; pleochroic; pleochroism.
Trichroism
n.
(Min.) The quality possessed by some crystals of presenting different colors in three different directions.
Trichromatic
a.
(Zool.) Having or existing in three different phases of color; having three distinct color varieties; — said of certain birds and insects.
Trichromatism
n.
(Zool.) The quality, state, or phenomenon of being trichromatic.
Trichromic
a.
(Opt.) If, pertaining to, or consisting of, three colors or color sensations.
a.
(Chem.) Containing three atoms of chromium.
Tricipital
a.
(Anat.) Having three heads, or three origins; as, a tricipital muscle.
Trick
n.
• An artifice or stratagem; a cunning contrivance; a sly procedure, usually with a dishonest intent; as, a trick in trade.
• A sly, dexterous, or ingenious procedure fitted to puzzle or amuse; as, a bear's tricks; a juggler's tricks.
• Mischievous or annoying behavior; a prank; as, the tricks of boys.
• A particular habit or manner; a peculiarity; a trait; as, a trick of drumming with the fingers; a trick of frowning.
• A knot, braid, or plait of hair.
(Card Playing) The whole number of cards played in one round, and consisting of as many cards as there are players.
(Naut.) A turn; specifically, the spell of a sailor at the helm, — usually two hours.
• A toy; a trifle; a plaything.
v. t.
• To deceive by cunning or artifice; to impose on; to defraud; to cheat; as, to trick another in the sale of a horse.
• To dress; to decorate; to set off; to adorn fantastically; — often followed by up, off, or out.
• To draw in outline, as with a pen; to delineate or distinguish without color, as arms, etc., in heraldry.
Tricker
n.
• One who tricks; a trickster.
n.
• A trigger.
Trickery
n.
• The art of dressing up; artifice; stratagem; fraud; imposture.
Trickiness
n.
• The quality of being tricky.
Tricking
a.
• Given to tricks; tricky.
n.
• Dress; ornament.
Trickish
a.
• Given to tricks; artful in making bargains; given to deception and cheating; knavish.
Trickle
v. i.
• To flow in a small, gentle stream; to run in drops.
Trickment
n.
• Decoration.
Tricksiness
n.
• The quality or state of being tricksy; trickiness.
Trickster
n.
• One who tricks; a deceiver; a tricker; a cheat.
Tricksy
a.
• Exhibiting artfulness; trickish.
Tricktrack
n.
• An old game resembling backgammon.
Tricky
a.
• Given to tricks; practicing deception; trickish; knavish.
Triclinate
a.
(Min.) Triclinic.
Tricliniary
a.
• Of or pertaining to a triclinium, or to the ancient mode of reclining at table.
Triclinic
a.
(Crystallog.) Having, or characterized by, three unequal axes intersecting at oblique angles. See the Note under crystallization.
Triclinium
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A couch for reclining at meals, extending round three sides of a table, and usually in three parts.
• A dining room furnished with such a triple couch.
Tricoccous
a.
(Bot.) Having three cocci, or roundish carpels.
Tricolor
n.
• The national French banner, of three colors, blue, white, and red, adopted at the first revolution.
• Hence, any three-colored flag.
Tricolored
a.
• Having three colors.
Tricornigerous
a.
• Having three horns.
Tricostate
a.
(Bot.) Three-ribbed; having three ribs from the base.
Tricot
n.
• A fabric of woolen, silk, or cotton knitted, or women to resemble knitted work.
Tricrotic
a.
(Physiol.) Of or pertaining to tricrotism; characterized by tricrotism.
Tricrotism
n.
(Physiol.) That condition of the arterial pulse in which there is a triple beat. The pulse curve obtained in the sphygmographic tracing characteristic of tricrotism shows two secondary crests in addition to the primary.
Tricrotous
a.
(Physiol.) Tricrotic.
Tricurvate
a.
(Zool.) Curved in three directions; as, a tricurvate spicule (see Illust. of Spicule).
Tricuspid
a.
• Having three cusps, or points; tricuspidate; as, a tricuspid molar.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the tricuspid valves; as, tricuspid obstruction.
Tricuspidate
a.
• Three-pointed; ending in three points; as, a tricuspidate leaf.
Tricycle
n.
• A three-wheeled velocipede. See Illust. under Velocipede. Cf. Bicycle.
Tridacna
n.
(Zool.) A genus of very large marine bivalve shells found on the coral reefs of the Indian and Pacific Oceans. One species (T. gigas) often weighs four or five hundred pounds, and is sometimes used for baptismal fonts. Called also paw shell, and fountain shell.
Tridactylous
a.
(Biol.) Tridactyl.
Triddler
n.
(Zool.) The jacksnipe.
Tride
a.
• Short and ready; fleet; as, a tride pace; — a term used by sportsmen.
Tridecane
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon, C13H28, of the methane series, which is a probable ingredient both of crude petroleum and of kerosene, and is produced artificially as a light colorless liquid.
Tridecatoic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, that acid of the fatty acids heterologous with tridecane. It is a white crystalline substance.
Tridecatylene
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon, C13H26, of the ethylene series, corresponding to tridecane, and obtained from Burmah petroleum as a light colorless liquid; — called also tridecylene, and tridecene.
Trident
n.
(Class Myth.) A kind of scepter or spear with three prongs, — the common attribute of Neptune.
(Rom. Antiq.) A three-pronged spear or goad, used for urging horses; also, the weapon used by one class of gladiators.
• A three-pronged fish spear.
(Geom.) A curve of third order, having three infinite branches in the direction and a fourth infinite branch in the opposite direction.
a.
• Having three teeth or prongs; tridentate.
Tridented
a.
• Having three prongs; trident; tridentate; as, a tridented mace.
Tridentiferous
a.
• Bearing a trident.
Tridentine
a.
• Of or pertaining to Trent, or the general church council held in that city.
Tridiapason
n.
(Anc. Mus.) A triple octave, or twenty-second.
Tridimensional
a.
(Chem.) Having three dimensions; extended in three different directions.
Triding
n.
• A riding. See Trithing.
Triduan
a.
• Lasting three lays; also, happening every third day.
Tridymite
n.
(Min.) Pure silica, like quartz, but crystallizing in hexagonal tables. It is found in trachyte and similar rocks.
Tried
• imp. & p. p. of Try.
adj.
• Proved; tested; faithful; trustworthy; as, a tried friend.
Triedral
a.
• See Trihedral.
Triennial
a.
• Continuing three years; as, triennial parliaments; a triennial reign.
• Happening, coming about, or appearing once in every three years; as, triennial elections; a triennial catalogue; a triennial visitation.
n.
• Something which takes place or appears once in three years.
Triennially
adv.
• Once in three years.
Triens
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A Roman copper coin, equal to one third of the as. See 3d As, 2.
Trier
n.
• One who tries; one who makes experiments; one who examines anything by a test or standard.
• One who tries judicially.
(Law) A person appointed according to law to try challenges of jurors; a trior.
• That which tries or approves; a test.
Trierarch
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The commander of a trireme.
• At Athens, one who (singly, or jointly with other citizens) had to fit out a trireme for the public service.
Trierarchy
n.
• The office duty of a trierarch.
Trieterical
a.
• Kept or occurring once in three years; triennial.
Trieterics
n. pl.
(Class. Antiq.) Festival games celebrated once in three years.
Triethylamine
n.
(Chem.) A tertiary amine analogous to trimethylamine.
Trifacial
a.
(Anat.) See Trigeminal.
Trifallow
v. t.
• To plow the third time before sowing, as land.
Trifarious
a.
(Bot.) Facing three ways; arranged in three vertical ranks, as the leaves of veratrum.
Trifasciated
a.
• Having, or surrounded by, three fasciae, or bands.
Trifid
a.
• Cleft to the middle, or slightly beyond the middle, into three parts; three-cleft.
Trifistulary
a.
• Having three pipes.
Trifle
n.
• A thing of very little value or importance; a paltry, or trivial, affair.
• A dish composed of sweetmeats, fruits, cake, wine, etc., with syllabub poured over it.
v. i.
• To act or talk without seriousness, gravity, weight, or dignity; to act or talk with levity; to indulge in light or trivial amusements.
v. t.
• To make of no importance; to treat as a trifle.
• To spend in vanity; to fritter away; to waste; as, to trifle away money.
Trifler
n.
• One who trifles.
Trifling
a.
• Being of small value or importance; trivial; paltry; as, a trifling debt; a trifling affair.
Trifluctuation
n.
• A concurrence of three waves.
Trifoliolate
a.
(Bot.) Having three leaflets.
Trifolium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of leguminous herbs with densely spiked flowers and usually trifoliate leaves; trefoil. There are many species, all of which are called clover. See Clover.
Trifoly
n.
(Bot.) Sweet trefoil.
Triforium
n.
(Arch.) The gallery or open space between the vaulting and the roof of the aisles of a church, often forming a rich arcade in the interior of the church, above the nave arches and below the clearstory windows.
Triform
a.
• Having a triple form or character.
Triformity
n.
• The state of being triform, or of having a threefold shape.
Trig
v. t.
• To fill; to stuff; to cram.
a.
• Full; also, trim; neat.
v. t.
• To stop, as a wheel, by placing something under it; to scotch; to skid.
n.
• A stone, block of wood, or anything else, placed under a wheel or barrel to prevent motion; a scotch; a skid.
Trigamist
n.
• One who has been married three times; also, one who has three husbands or three wives at the same time.
Trigamous
a.
(Bot.) Having three sorts of flowers in the same head, — male, female, and hermaphrodite, or perfect, flowers.
Trigamy
n.
• The act of marrying, or the state of being married, three times; also, the offense of having three husbands or three wives at the same time.
Trigastric
a.
(Anat.) Having three bellies; — said of a muscle.
Trigeminal
a.
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the fifth pair of cranial nerves, which divide on each side of the head into three main branches distributed to the orbits, jaws, and parts of the mouth; trifacial.
Trigeminous
a.
• Born three together; being one of three born at the same birth; also, threefold.
Trigenic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid, C4H7N3O2, obtained, by the action of the vapor of cyanic acid on cold aldehyde, as a white crystalline substance having a slightly acid taste and faint smell; — called also ethidene- or ethylidene-biuret.
Trigger
n.
• A catch to hold the wheel of a carriage on a declivity.
(Mech.) A piece, as a lever, which is connected with a catch or detent as a means of releasing it; especially (Firearms), the part of a lock which is moved by the finger to release the cock and discharge the piece.
Trigintal
n.
(R. C. Ch.) A trental.
Triglyceride
n.
(Chem.) A glyceride formed by the replacement of three hydrogen atoms in glycerin by acid radicals.
Triglyph
n.
(Arch.) An ornament in the frieze of the Doric order, repeated at equal intervals. Each triglyph consists of a rectangular tablet, slightly projecting, and divided nearly to the top by two parallel and perpendicular gutters, or channels, called glyphs, into three parts, or spaces, called femora. A half channel, or glyph, is also cut upon each of the perpendicular edges of the tablet. See Illust. of Entablature.
Trigness
n.
• The quality or state of being trig; smartness; neatness.
Trigon
n.
• A figure having three angles; a triangle.
(Astrol.) A division consisting of three signs.
• Trine, an aspect of two planets distant 120 degrees from each other.
(Gr. & Rom. Antiq.) A kind of triangular lyre or harp.
• A kind of game at ball played by three persons standing at the angular points of a triangle.
Trigonal
a.
• Having three angles, or corners; triangular; as, a trigonal stem, one having tree prominent longitudinal angles.
Trigone
n.
(Anat.) A smooth triangular area on the inner surface of the bladder, limited by the apertures of the ureters and urethra.
Trigonia
n.
(Zool.) A genus of pearly bivalve shells, numerous extinct species of which are characteristic of the Mesozoic rocks. A few living species exist on the coast of Australia.
Trigonocerous
a.
(Zool.) Having horns with three angles, like those of some species of goats.
Trigonometry
n.
• That branch of mathematics which treats of the relations of the sides and angles of triangles, which the methods of deducing from certain given parts other required parts, and also of the general relations which exist between the trigonometrical functions of arcs or angles.
• A treatise in this science.
Trigonous
a.
• Same as Trigonal.
Trigram
n.
• Same as Trigraph.
Trigrammatic
a.
• Containing three letters or characters, or three sets of letters or characters.
Trigrammic
a.
• Same as Trigrammatic.
Trigraph
n.
• Three letters united in pronunciation so as to have but one sound, or to form but one syllable, as -ieu in adieu; a triphthong.
Trigyn
n.
(Bot.) Any one of the Trigynia.
Trigynia
n. pl.
(Bot.) A Linnaean order of plants having three pistils or styles.
Trihedral
a.
(Geom.) Having three sides or faces; thus, a trihedral angle is a solid angle bounded by three plane angles.
Trihedron
n.
(Geom.) A figure having three sides.
Trihoral
a.
• Occurring once in every three hours.
Trijugate
a.
(Bot.) In three pairs; as, a trijugate leaf, or a pinnate leaf with three pairs of leaflets.
Trijugous
a.
(Bot.) Same as Trijugate.
Trikosane
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon, C23H48, of the methane series, resembling paraffin; — so called because it has twenty-three atoms of carbon in the molecule.
Trilateral
a.
(Geom.) Having three sides; being three-sided; as, a trilateral triangle.
Trilemma
n.
(Logic) A syllogism with three conditional propositions, the major premises of which are disjunctively affirmed in the minor. See Dilemma.
• A state of things in which it is difficult to determine which one of three courses to pursue.
Trilinear
a.
(Math.) Of, pertaining to, or included by, three lines; as, trilinear coordinates.
Trilingual
a.
• Containing, or consisting of, three languages; expressed in three languages.
Trilinguar
a.
• See Trilingual.
Triliteral
a.
• Consisting of three letters; trigrammic; as, a triliteral root or word.
n.
• A triliteral word.
Triliteralism
n.
• Same as Triliterality.
Trilith
n.
• Same as Trilithon.
Trilithic
a.
• Pertaining to a trilith.
Trilithon
n.
(Archaeol.) A monument consisting of three stones; especially, such a monument forming a kind of doorway, as among the ancient Celts.
Trill
v. i.
• To flow in a small stream, or in drops rapidly succeeding each other; to trickle.
v. t.
• To turn round; to twirl.
v. t.
• To impart the quality of a trill to; to utter as, or with, a trill; as, to trill the r; to trill a note.
v. i.
• To utter trills or a trill; to play or sing in tremulous vibrations of sound; to have a trembling sound; to quaver.
n.
• A sound, of consonantal character, made with a rapid succession of partial or entire intermissions, by the vibration of some one part of the organs in the mouth — tongue, uvula, epiglottis, or lip — against another part; as, the r is a trill in most languages.
• The action of the organs in producing such sounds; as, to give a trill to the tongue. d
(Mus.) A shake or quaver of the voice in singing, or of the sound of an instrument, produced by the rapid alternation of two contiguous tones of the scale; as, to give a trill on the high C. See Shake.
Trillachan
n.
(Zool.) The oyster catcher.
Trilling
n.
• One of tree children born at the same birth.
(Crystallog.) A compound crystal, consisting of three individuals.
Trillion
n.
• According to the French notation, which is used upon the Continent generally and in the United States, the number expressed by a unit with twelve ciphers annexed; a million millions; according to the English notation, the number produced by involving a million to the third power, or the number represented by a unit with eighteen ciphers annexed. See the Note under Numeration.
Trillium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of liliaceous plants; the three-leaved nightshade; — so called because all the parts of the plant are in threes.
Trillo
n.
(Mus.) A trill or shake. See Trill.
Trilobate
a.
• Having three lobes.
Trilobation
n.
• The state of being trilobate.
Trilobed
a.
• Same as Trilobate.
Trilobita
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct order of arthropods comprising the trilobites.
Trilobite
n.
(Paleon.) Any one of numerous species of extinct arthropods belonging to the order Trilobita. Trilobites were very common in the Silurian and Devonian periods, but became extinct at the close of the Paleozoic. So named from the three lobes usually seen on each segment.
Trilobitic
a.
• Of, pertaining to or containing, trilobites; as, trilobitic rocks.
Trilocular
a.
• Having three cells or cavities; as, a trilocular capsule; a trilocular heart.
Trilogy
n.
• A series of three dramas which, although each of them is in one sense complete, have a close mutual relation, and form one historical and poetical picture. Shakespeare's " Henry VI." is an example.
Trim
v. t.
• To make trim; to put in due order for any purpose; to make right, neat, or pleasing; to adjust.
• To dress; to decorate; to adorn; to invest; to embellish; as, to trim a hat.
• To make ready or right by cutting or shortening; to clip or lop; to curtail; as, to trim the hair; to trim a tree.
(Carp.) To dress, as timber; to make smooth.
(Naut.) To adjust, as a ship, by arranging the cargo, or disposing the weight of persons or goods, so equally on each side of the center and at each end, that she shall sit well on the water and sail well; as, to trim a ship, or a boat.
• To arrange in due order for sailing; as, to trim the sails.
• To rebuke; to reprove; also, to beat.
v. i.
• To balance; to fluctuate between parties, so as to appear to favor each.
n.
• Dress; gear; ornaments.
• Order; disposition; condition; as, to be in good trim.
• The state of a ship or her cargo, ballast, masts, etc., by which she is well prepared for sailing.
(Arch) The lighter woodwork in the interior of a building; especially, that used around openings, generally in the form of a molded architrave, to protect the plastering at those points.
a.
• Fitly adjusted; being in good order., or made ready for service or use; firm; compact; snug; neat; fair; as, the ship is trim, or trim built; everything about the man is trim; a person is trim when his body is well shaped and firm; his dress is trim when it fits closely to his body, and appears tight and snug; a man or a soldier is trim when he stands erect.
Trimaculated
a.
• Marked with three spots, or maculae.
Trimellic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a certain tribasic acid (called also trimellitic acid) metameric with trimesitic acid.
Trimembral
a.
• Having, or consisting of, three members.
Trimera
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Coleoptera including those which have but three joints in the tarsi.
Trimeran
n.
(Zool.) One of the Trimera. Also used adjectively.
Trimerous
a.
(Bot.) Having the parts in threes.
Trimesitic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a tribasic acid, C6H3.(CO2)3, of the aromatic series, obtained, by the oxidation of mesitylene, as a white crystalline substance.
Trimester
n.
• A term or period of three months.
Trimestral
a.
• Trimestrial.
Trimestrial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a trimester, or period of three months; occurring once in every three months; quarterly.
Trimeter
a.
(Pros.) Consisting of three poetical measures.
n.
• A poetical division of verse, consisting of three measures.
Trimethyl
(Chem.) A prefix or combining form (also used adjectively) indicating the presence of three methyl groups.
Trimethylamine
n.
(Chem.) A colorless volatile alkaline liquid, N.(CH3)3, obtained from herring brine, beet roots, etc., with a characteristic herringlike odor. It is regarded as a substituted ammonia containing three methyl groups.
Trimethylene
n.
(Chem.) A gaseous hydrocarbon, C3H6, isomeric with propylene and obtained from it indirectly. It is the base of a series of compounds analogous to the aromatic hydrocarbons.
Trimetric
a.
(Crystallog.) Same as Orthorhombic.
Trimetrical
a.
• Same as Trimeter.
Trimly
adv.
• In a trim manner; nicely.
Trimmer
n.
• One who trims, arranges, fits, or ornaments.
• One who does not adopt extreme opinions in politics, or the like; one who fluctuates between parties, so as to appear to favor each; a timeserver.
• An instrument with which trimming is done.
(Arch.) A beam, into which are framed the ends of headers in floor framing, as when a hole is to be left for stairs, or to avoid bringing joists near chimneys, and the like. See Illust. of Header.
Trimming
• a. from Trim, v.
n.
• The act of one who trims.
• That which serves to trim, make right or fitting, adjust, ornament, or the like; especially, the necessary or the ornamental appendages, as of a garment; hence, sometimes, the concomitants of a dish; a relish; — usually in the pluraltrimmings. —>.
• The act of reprimanding or chastisting; as, to give a boy a trimming.
Trimmingly
adv.
• In a trimming manner.
Trimness
n.
• The quality or state of being trim; orderliness; compactness; snugness; neatness.
Trimorph
n.
(Crystallog.) A substance which crystallizes in three distinct forms, or which has three distinct physical states; also, any one of these distinct forms. See Trimorphism, 1.
Trimorphism
n.
(Crystallog.) The property of crystallizing in three forms fundamentally distinct, as is the case with titanium dioxide, which crystallizes in the forms of rutile, octahedrite, and brookite. See Pleomorphism.
(Biol.) The coexistence among individuals of the same species of three distinct forms, not connected, as a rule, by intermediate gradations; the condition among individuals of the same species of having three different shapes or proportions of corresponding parts; — contrasted with polymorphism, and dimorphism.
Trimurti
n.
(Hindoo Myth.) The triad, or trinity, of Hindoo gods, consisting of Brahma, the Creator, Vishnu, the Preserver, and Siva, the Destroyer.
Trimyarian
n.
(Zool.) A lamellibranch which has three muscular scars on each valve.
Trinal
a.
• Threefold.
Trindle
v. t. & n.
• See Trundle.
Trine
a.
• Threefold; triple; as, trine dimensions, or length, breadth, and thickness.
n.
(Astrol.) The aspect of planets distant from each other 120 degrees, or one third of the zodiac; trigon.
• A triad; trinity.
v. t.
• To put in the aspect of a trine.
Trinervate
a.
(Bot.) Having three ribs or nerves extending unbranched from the base to the apex; — said of a leaf.
Tringa
n.
(Zool.) A genus of limicoline birds including many species of sandpipers. See Dunlin, Knot, and Sandpiper.
Tringle
n.
• A curtain rod for a bedstead.
Tringoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to Tringa, or the Sandpiper family.
Trinitarian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Trinity, the doctrine of the Trinity, or believers in that doctrine.
n.
• One who believes in the doctrine of the Trinity.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of a monastic order founded in Rome in 1198 by St. John of Matha, and an old French hermit, Felix of Valois, for the purpose of redeeming Christian captives from the Mohammedans.
Trinitarianism
n.
• The doctrine of the Trinity; the doctrine that there are three distinct persons in the Godhead.
Trinitrocellulose
n.
• Gun cotton; — so called because regarded as containing three nitro groups.
Trinitrophenol
n.
(Chem.) Picric acid.
Trinity
n.
(Christian Theol.) The union of three persons (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost) in one Godhead, so that all the three are one God as to substance, but three persons as to individuality.
• Any union of three in one; three units treated as one; a triad, as the Hindoo trinity, or Trimurti.
• Any symbol of the Trinity employed in Christian art, especially the triangle.
Triniunity
n.
• Triunity; trinity.
Trink
n.
• A kind of fishing net.
Trinket
n.
(Naut.) A three-cornered sail formerly carried on a ship's foremast, probably on a lateen yard.
n.
• A knife; a cutting tool.
• A small ornament, as a jewel, ring, or the like.
• A thing of little value; a trifle; a toy.
v. i.
• To give trinkets; hence, to court favor; to intrigue.
Trinketer
n.
• One who trinkets.
Trinketry
n.
• Ornaments of dress; trinkets, collectively.
Trinkle
v. i.
• To act secretly, or in an underhand way; to tamper.
Trinoctial
a.
• Lasting during three nights; comprising three nights.
Trinodal
a.
(Bot.) Having three knots or nodes; having three points from which a leaf may shoot; as, a trinodal stem.
(Geom.) Having three nodal points.
Trinomial
n.
(Math.) A quantity consisting of three terms, connected by the sign + or -; as, x + y + z, or ax + 2b - c2.
a.
(Math.) Consisting of three terms; of or pertaining to trinomials; as, a trinomial root.
Trinominal
n. & a.
(Math.) Trinomial.
Trinucleus
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of Lower Silurian trilobites in which the glabella and cheeks form three rounded elevations on the head.
Trio
n.
• Three, considered collectively; three in company or acting together; a set of three; three united.
(Mus.) A composition for three parts or three instruments.
• The secondary, or episodical, movement of a minuet or scherzo, as in a sonata or symphony, or of a march, or of various dance forms; — not limited to three parts or instruments.
Trioctile
n.
(Astrol.) An aspect of two planets with regard to the earth when they are three octants, or three eighths of a circle, that is, 135 degrees, distant from each other.
Triole
n.
(Mus.) Same as Triplet.
Triolein
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) See Olein.
Triolet
n.
• A short poem or stanza of eight lines, in which the first line is repeated as the fourth and again as the seventh line, the second being, repeated as the eighth.
Trionychoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of chelonians which comprises Trionyx and allied genera; — called also Trionychoides, and Trionychina.
Trionyx
n.
(Zool.) A genus of fresh-water or river turtles which have the shell imperfectly developed and covered with a soft leathery skin. They are noted for their agility and rapacity. Called also soft tortoise, soft-shell tortoise, and mud turtle.
Trior
n.
(Law) Same as Trier, 2 and 3.
Trioxide
n.
(Chem.) An oxide containing three atoms of oxygen; as, sulphur trioxide, SO3; — formerly called tritoxide.
Trip
n. i.
• To move with light, quick steps; to walk or move lightly; to skip; to move the feet nimbly; — sometimes followed by it. See It, 5.
• To make a brief journey or pleasure excursion; as, to trip to Europe.
• To take a quick step, as when in danger of losing one's balance; hence, to make a false; to catch the foot; to lose footing; to stumble.
• Fig.: To be guilty of a misstep; to commit an offense against morality, propriety, or rule; to err; to mistake; to fail.
v. t.
• To cause to stumble, or take a false step; to cause to lose the footing, by striking the feet from under; to cause to fall; to throw off the balance; to supplant; — often followed by up; as, to trip up a man in wrestling.
• Fig.: To overthrow by depriving of support; to put an obstacle in the way of; to obstruct; to cause to fail.
• To detect in a misstep; to catch; to convict.
(Naut.) To raise (an anchor) from the bottom, by its cable or buoy rope, so that it hangs free.
• To pull (a yard) into a perpendicular position for lowering it.
(Mach.) To release, let fall, or see free, as a weight or compressed spring, as by removing a latch or detent.
n.
• A quick, light step; a lively movement of the feet; a skip.
• A brief or rapid journey; an excursion or jaunt.
• A false step; a stumble; a misstep; a loss of footing or balance. Fig.: An error; a failure; a mistake.
• A small piece; a morsel; a bit.
• A stroke, or catch, by which a wrestler causes his antagonist to lose footing.
(Naut.) A single board, or tack, in plying, or beating, to windward.
• A herd or flock, as of sheep, goats, etc.
• A troop of men; a host.
(Zool.) A flock of widgeons.
Tripalmitate
n.
(Chem.) A palmitate derived from three molecules of palmitic acid.
Tripalmitin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) See Palmitin.
Tripang
n.
(Zool.) See Trepang.
Triparted
a.
(Her.) Parted into three piece; having three parts or pieces; — said of the field or of a bearing; as, a cross triparted.
(Bot.) Divided nearly to the base into three segments or lobes.
Tripartible
a.
• Divisible into three parts.
Tripartient
a.
(Arith.) Dividing into three parts; — said of a number which exactly divides another into three parts.
Tripartite
a.
• Divided into three parts; triparted; as, a tripartite leaf.
• Having three corresponding parts or copies; as, to make indentures tripartite.
• Made between three parties; as, a tripartite treaty.
Tripartitely
adv.
• In a tripartite manner.
Tripartition
n.
• A division by threes, or into three parts; the taking of a third part of any number or quantity.
Tripaschal
a.
• Including three passovers.
Tripe
n.
• The large stomach of ruminating animals, when prepared for food.
• The entrails; hence, humorously or in contempt, the belly; — generally used in the plural.
Tripedal
a.
• Having three feet.
Tripel
n.
(Min.) Same as Tripoli.
Tripeman
n.
• A man who prepares or sells tripe.
Tripennate
a.
(Bot.) Same as Tripinnate.
Tripersonal
a.
• Consisting of three persons.
Tripersonalist
n.
• A Trinitarian.
Tripersonality
n.
• The state of existing as three persons in one Godhead; trinity.
Tripery
n.
• A place where tripe is prepared or sold.
Tripestone
n.
(Min.) A variety of anhydrite composed of contorted plates fancied to resemble pieces of tripe.
Tripetaloid
a.
(Bot.) Having the form or appearance of three petals; appearing as if furnished with three petals.
Tripetalous
a.
(Bot.) Having three petals, or flower leaves; three-petaled.
Triphane
n.
(Min.) Spodumene.
Triphthong
n.
(Orthoepy) A combination of three vowel sounds in a single syllable, forming a simple or compound sound; also, a union of three vowel characters, representing together a single sound; a trigraph; as, eye, -ieu in adieu, -eau in beau, are examples of triphthongs.
Triphthongal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a triphthong; consisting of three vowel sounds pronounced together in a single syllable.
Triphyline
n.
• Triphylite.
Triphylite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a grayish-green or bluish color, consisting of the phosphates of iron, manganese, and lithia.
Triphyllous
a.
(Bot.) Having three leaves; three-leaved.
Tripinnate
a.
(Bot.) Having bipinnate leaflets arranged on each side of a rhachis.
Tripinnatifid
a.
(Bot.) Thrice pinnately cleft; — said of a pinnatifid leaf when its segments are pinnatifid, and the subdivisions of these also are pinnatifid.
Triplasian
a.
• Three-fold; triple; treble.
Triple
a.
• Consisting of three united; multiplied by three; threefold; as, a triple knot; a triple tie.
• Three times repeated; treble. See Treble.
• One of three; third.
v. i.
• To make threefold, or thrice as much or as many; to treble; as, to triple the tax on coffee.
Triplet
n.
• A collection or combination of three of a kind; three united.
(Poetry) Three verses rhyming together.
(Mus.) A group of three notes sung or played in the tree of two.
• Three children or offspring born at one birth.
Triplicate
a.
• Made thrice as much; threefold; tripled.
n.
• A third thing corresponding to two others of the same kind.
Triplication
n.
• The act of tripling, or making threefold, or adding three together.
(Civil Law) Same as Surrejoinder.
Triplicity
n.
• The quality or state of being triple, or threefold; trebleness.
Triplicostate
a.
(Bot.) Three-ribbed.
Triplite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a dark brown color, generally with a fibrous, massive structure. It is a fluophosphate of iron and manganese.
Triploblastic
a.
(Biol.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, that condition of the ovum in which there are three primary germinal layers, or in which the blastoderm splits into three layers.
Triploidite
n.
(Min.) A manganese phosphate near triplite, but containing hydroxyl instead of fluorine.
Triply
adv.
• In a triple manner.
Tripmadam
n.
(Bot.) Same as Prickmadam.
Tripod
n.
• Any utensil or vessel, as a stool, table, altar, caldron, etc., supported on three feet.
• A three-legged frame or stand, usually jointed at top, for supporting a theodolite, compass, telescope, camera, or other instrument.
Tripodian
n.
(Mus.) An ancient stringed instrument; — so called because, in form, it resembled the Delphic tripod.
Tripody
n.
(Pros.) Three metrical feet taken together, or included in one measure.
Tripoli
n.
(Min.) An earthy substance originally brought from Tripoli, used in polishing stones and metals. It consists almost wholly of the siliceous shells of diatoms.
Tripoline
a.
• Of or pertaining to Tripoli or its inhabitants; Tripolitan.
• Of or pertaining to tripoli, the mineral.
Tripolitan
a.
• Of or pertaining to Tripoli or its inhabitants; Tripoline.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Tripoli.
Tripos
n.
• A tripod.
• A university examination of questionists, for honors; also, a tripos paper; one who prepares a tripos paper.
Trippant
a.
(Her.) See Tripping, a., 2.
Tripper
n.
• One who trips or supplants; also, one who walks or trips nimbly; a dancer.
• An excursionist.
Trippet
n.
(Mach.) A cam, wiper, or projecting piece which strikes another piece repeatedly.
Tripping
a.
• Quick; nimble; stepping lightly and quickly.
(Her.) Having the right forefoot lifted, the others remaining on the ground, as if he were trotting; trippant; — said of an animal, as a hart, buck, and the like, used as a bearing.
n.
• Act of one who, or that which, trips.
• A light dance.
(Naut.) The loosing of an anchor from the ground by means of its cable or buoy rope.
Trippingly
adv.
• In a tripping manner; with a light, nimble, quick step; with agility; nimbly.
Tripsis
n.
(Med.) Trituration.
• Shampoo.
Triptote
n.
(Gram.) A noun having three cases only.
Triptych
n.
• Anything in three parts or leaves.
• A writing tablet in three parts, two of which fold over on the middle part.
• A picture or altarpiece in three compartments.
Tripudiary
a.
• Of or pertaining to dancing; performed by dancing.
Tripudiate
v. i.
• To dance.
Tripudiation
n.
• The act of dancing.
Triquadrantal
a.
(Spherical Trig.) Having three quadrants; thus, a triquadrantal triangle is one whose three sides are quadrants, and whose three angles are consequently right angles.
Triquetral
a.
• Triquetrous.
Triquetrous
a.
• Three sided, the sides being plane or concave; having three salient angles or edges; trigonal.
Triquetrum
n.
(Anat.) One of the bones of the carpus; the cuneiform. See Cuneiform (b).
Trirectangular
a.
(Spherical Trig.) Having three right angles. See Triquadrantal.
Trireme
n.
(Class. Antiq.) An ancient galley or vessel with tree banks, or tiers, of oars.
Trirhomboidal
a.
• Having three rhombic faces or sides.
Trisacramentarian
n.
(Eccl.) One who recognizes three sacraments, and no more; — namely, baptism, the Lord's Supper, and penance. See Sacrament.
Trisagion
n.
(Eccl.) An ancient anthem, — usually known by its Latin name tersanctus.See Tersanctus.
Trisect
v. t.
• To cut or divide into three parts.
(Geom.) To cut or divide into three equal parts.
Trisected
a.
(Bot.) Divided into three parts or segments by incisions extending to the midrib or to the base; — said of leaves.
Trisection
n.
• The division of a thing into three parts, Specifically: (Geom.) the division of an angle into three equal parts.
Triseralous
a.
(Bot.) Having three sepals, or calyx leaves.
Trismus
n.
(Med.) The lockjaw.
Trisnitrate
n.
(Chem.) A nitrate formed from three molecules of nitric acid; also, less properly, applied to certain basic nitrates; as, trisnitrate of bismuth.
Trisoctahedron
n.
(Crystallog.) A solid of the isometric system bounded by twenty-four equal faces, three corresponding to each face of an octahedron.
Trispermous
a.
(Bot.) Containing three seeds; three-seeded; as, a trispermous capsule.
Trisplanchnic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the three great splanchnic cavities, namely, that of the head, the chest, and the abdomen; — applied to the sympathetic nervous system.
Trist
v. t. & i.
• To trust.
n.
• Trust.
• A post, or station, in hunting.
• A secret meeting, or the place of such meeting; a tryst. See Tryst.
a.
• Sad; sorrowful; gloomy.
Triste
n.
• A cattle fair.
Tristearate
n.
• Tristearin.
Tristearin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) See Stearin.
Tristfully
adv.
• In a tristful manner; sadly.
Tristichous
a.
(Bot.) Arranged in three vertical rows.
Tristitiate
v. t.
• To make sad.
Tristoma
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of trematode worms belonging to Tristoma and allied genera having a large posterior sucker and two small anterior ones. They usually have broad, thin, and disklike bodies, and are parasite on the gills and skin of fishes.
Tristtul
a.
• Sad; sorrowful; gloomy.
Tristy
a.
• See Trist, a.
Trisulcate
a.
• Having three furrows, forks, or prongs; having three grooves or sulci; three-grooved.
Trisulphide
n.
(Chem.) A sulphide containing three atoms of sulphur.
Trisuls
n.
• Something having three forks or prongs, as a trident.
Trisyllable
n.
• A word consisting of three syllables only; as, a-ven-ger.
Trite
a.
• Worn out; common; used until so common as to have lost novelty and interest; hackneyed; stale; as, a trite remark; a trite subject.
Triternate
a.
(Bot.) Three times ternate; — applied to a leaf whose petiole separates into three branches, each of which divides into three parts which each bear three leafiets.
Tritheism
n.
• The opinion or doctrine that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are three distinct Gods.
Tritheist
n.
• One who believes in tritheism.
Tritheite
n.
• A tritheist.
Trithing
n.
• One of three ancient divisions of a county in England; — now called riding.
Trithionate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of trithionic acid.
Trithionic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to, or designating, a certain thionic acid, H2S3O6 which is obtained as a colorless, odorless liquid.
Tritical
a.
• Trite.
Triticin
n.
(Chem.) A carbohydrate isomeric with dextrin, obtained from quitch grass (Agropyrum, formerly Triticum, repens) as a white amorphous substance.
Triticum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of grasses including the various species of wheat.
Triton
n.
(Gr. Myth.) A fabled sea demigod, the son of Neptune and Amphitrite, and the trumpeter of Neptune. He is represented by poets and painters as having the upper part of his body like that of a man, and the lower part like that of a fish. He often has a trumpet made of a shell.
(Zool.) Any one of many species of marine gastropods belonging to Triton and allied genera, having a stout spiral shell, often handsomely colored and ornamented with prominent varices. Some of the species are among the largest of all gastropods. Called also trumpet shell, and sea trumpet.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of aquatic salamanders. The common European species are Hemisalamandra cristata, Molge palmata, and M. alpestris, a red-bellied species common in Switzerland. The most common species the United States is Diemyctylus viridescens. See Illust. under Salamander.
Tritone
n.
(Mus.) A superfluous or augmented fourth.
Tritorium
n.
• Same as Triturium.
Tritovum
n.
(Zool.) An embryonic insect which has twice cast its skin previous to hatching from the egg.
Tritozooid
n.
(Zool.) A zooid of the third generation in asexual reproduction.
Triturable
a.
• Capable of being triturated.
Triturate
v. t.
• To rub, grind, bruise, or thrash.
• To rub or grind to a very fine or impalpable powder; to pulverize and comminute thoroughly.
Trituration
n.
• The act of triturating, or reducing to a fine or impalpable powder by grinding, rubbing, bruising, etc.
Triture
n.
• A rubbing or grinding; trituration.
Triturium
n.
• A vessel for separating liquids of different densities.
Trityl
n.
(Chem.) Propyl.
Tritylene
n.
(Chem.) Propylene.
Triumph
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A magnificent and imposing ceremonial performed in honor of a general who had gained a decisive victory over a foreign enemy.
• Hence, any triumphal procession; a pompous exhibition; a stately show or pageant.
• A state of joy or exultation for success.
• Success causing exultation; victory; conquest; as, the triumph of knowledge.
• A trump card; also, an old game at cards.
v. i.
• To celebrate victory with pomp; to rejoice over success; to exult in an advantage gained; to exhibit exultation.
• To obtain victory; to be successful; to prevail.
• To be prosperous; to flourish.
• To play a trump card.
v. t.
• To obtain a victory over; to prevail over; to conquer. Also, to cause to triumph.
Triumphal
a.
• Of or pertaining to triumph; used in a triumph; indicating, or in honor of, a triumph or victory; as, a triumphal crown; a triumphal arch.
n.
• A token of victory.
Triumphantly
adv.
• In a triumphant manner.
Triumpher
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) One who was honored with a triumph; a victor.
• One who triumphs or rejoices for victory.
Triumphing
a.
• Having or celebrating a triumph; victorious; triumphant.
Triumplant
a.
• Rejoicing for victory; triumphing; exultant.
• Celebrating victory; expressive of joy for success; as, a triumphant song or ode.
• Graced with conquest; victorious.
• Of or pertaining to triumph; triumphal.
Triumvir
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) One of tree men united in public office or authority.
Triumvirate
n.
• Government by three in coalition or association; the term of such a government.
• A coalition or association of three in office or authority; especially, the union of three men who obtained the government of the Roman empire.
Triumviry
n.
• A triumvirate.
Triune
a.
• Being three in one; — an epithet used to express the unity of a trinity of persons in the Godhead.
Triungulus
n.
(Zool.) The active young larva of any oil beetle. It has feet armed with three claws, and is parasitic on bees. See Illust. of Oil beetle, under Oil.
Triunity
n.
• The quality or state of being triune; trinity.
Trivalence
n.
(Chem.) The quality or state of being trivalent.
Trivalent
a.
(Chem.) Having a valence of three; capable of being combined with, substituted for, or compared with, three atoms of hydrogen; — said of triad atoms or radicals; thus, nitrogen is trivalent in ammonia.
Trivalve
n.
• Anything having three valves, especially a shell.
Trivalvular
a.
• Having three valves; three-valved.
Trivant
n.
• A truant.
Triverbial
a.
(Rom. Antiq.) Pertaining to, or designating, certain days allowed to the pretor for hearing causes, when be might speak the three characteristic words of his office, do, dico, addico. They were called dies fasti.
Trivet
n.
• A tree-legged stool, table, or other support; especially, a stand to hold a kettle or similar vessel near the fire; a tripod.
• A weaver's knife. See Trevat.
Trivial
a.
• Found anywhere; common.
• Ordinary; commonplace; trifling; vulgar.
• Of little worth or importance; inconsiderable; trifling; petty; paltry; as, a trivial subject or affair.
• Of or pertaining to the trivium.(Chem.)
n.
• One of the three liberal arts forming the trivium.
Trivialism
n.
• A trivial matter or method; a triviality.
Triviality
n.
• The quality or state of being trivial; trivialness.
• That which is trivial; a trifle.
Trivially
adv.
• In a trivial manner.
Trivialness
n.
• Quality or state of being trivial.
Trivium
n.
• The three " liberal" arts, grammar, logic, and rhetoric; — being a triple way, as it were, to eloquence.
(Zool.) The three anterior ambulacra of echinoderms, collectively.
Triweekly
a.
• Occurring or appearing three times a week; thriceweekly; as, a triweekly newspaper.
adv.
• Three times a week.
n.
• A triweekly publication.
Troad
n.
• See Trode.
Troat
v. i.
• To cry, as a buck in rutting time.
n.
• The cry of a buck in rutting time.
Trocar
n.
(Surg.) A stylet, usually with a triangular point, used for exploring tissues or for inserting drainage tubes, as in dropsy.
Trochaic
n.
(Pros.) A trochaic verse or measure.
Trochal
a.
(Zool.) Resembling a wheel.
Trochanter
n.
(Anat.) One of two processes near the head of the femur, the outer being called the great trochanter, and the inner the small trochanter.
(Zool.) The third joint of the leg of an insect, or the second when the trochantine is united with the coxa.
Trochanteric
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to one or both of the trochanters.
Trochantine
n.
(Zool.) The second joint of the leg of an insect, — often united with the coxa.
Trochar
n.
(Surg.) See Trocar.
Troche
n.
(Pharm.) A medicinal tablet or lozenge; strictly, one of circular form.
Trochee
n.
(Pros.) A foot of two syllables, the first long and the second short, as in the Latin word ante, or the first accented and the second unaccented, as in the English word motion; a choreus.
Trochil
n.
(Zool.) The crocodile bird.
Trochili
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of birds comprising the humming birds.
Trochilic
a.
• OF or pertaining to rotary motion; having power to draw out or turn round.
Trochilics
n.
• The science of rotary motion, or of wheel work.
Trochilidist
n.
• One who studies, or is versed in, the nature and habits of humming birds, or the Trochilidae.
Trochilos
n.
(Zool.) The crocodile bird, or trochil.
Trochilus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of humming birds. It Formerly included all the known species.
• Any one of several species of wrens and kinglets.
• The crocodile bird.
(Arch.) An annular molding whose section is concave, like the edge of a pulley; — called also scotia.
Troching
n.
(Zool.) One of the small branches of a stag's antler.
Trochiscus
n.
(Pharm.) A kind of tablet or lozenge; a troche.
Trochisk
n.
• See Trochiscus.
Trochite
n.
(Paleon.) A wheel-like joint of the stem of a fossil crinoid.
Trochlea
n.
(Mach.) A pulley.
(Anat.) A pulley, or a structure resembling a pulley; as, the trochlea, or pulleylike end, of the humerus, which articulates with the ulna; or the trochlea, or fibrous ring, in the upper part of the orbit, through which the superior oblique, or trochlear, muscle of the eye passes.
Trochlear
n.
(Anat.) Shaped like, or resembling, a pulley; pertaining to, or connected with, a trochlea; as, a trochlear articular surface; the trochlear muscle of the eye.
Trochleary
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or connected with, a trochlea; trochlear; as, the trochleary, or trochlear, nerve.
Trochoid
n.
(Geom.) The curve described by any point in a wheel rolling on a line; a cycloid; a roulette; in general, the curve described by any point fixedly connected with a moving curve while the moving curve rolls without slipping on a second fixed curve, the curves all being in one plane. Cycloids, epicycloids, hypocycloids, cardioids, etc., are all trochoids.
a.
(Anat.) Admitting of rotation on an axis; — sometimes applied to a pivot joint like that between the atlas and axis in the vertebral column.
(Zool.) Top-shaped; having a flat base and conical spire; — said of certain shells.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the genus Trochus or family Trochidae.
Trochoidal
a.
(Geom.) Of or pertaining to a trochoid; having the properties of a trochoid.
(Anat. & Zool.) See Trochoid, a.
Trochometer
n.
• A contrivance for computing the revolutions of a wheel; an odometer.
Trochosphere
n.
(Zool.) A young larval form of many annelids, mollusks, and bryozoans, in which a circle of cilia is developed around the anterior end.
Trochus
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine univalve shells belonging to Trochus and many allied genera of the family Trochidae. Some of the species are called also topshells.
Troco
n.
• An old English game; — called also lawn billiards.
Trod
• imp. & p. p. of Tread.
Trodden
• p. p. of Tread.
Trode
• imp. of Tread.
n.
• Tread; footing.
Troglodyte
n.
(Ethnol.) One of any savage race that dwells in caves, instead of constructing dwellings; a cave dweller. Most of the primitive races of man were troglodytes.
(Zool.) An anthropoid ape, as the chimpanzee.
(Zool.) The wren.
Troglodytes
n.
(Zool.) A genus of apes including the chimpanzee.
(Zool.) A genus of singing birds including the common wrens.
Trogon
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of beautiful tropical birds belonging to the family Trogonidae. They are noted for the brilliant colors and the resplendent luster of their plumage.
Trogonoid
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the trogons.
Trogue
n.
(Mining) A wooden trough, forming a drain.
Troic
a.
• Pertaining to Troy; Trojan.
Troilite
n.
(Min.) Native iron protosulphide, FeS. It is known only in meteoric irons, and is usually in imbedded nodular masses of a bronze color.
Troilus
n.
(Zool.) A large, handsome American butterfly (Euph&oe;ades, or Papilio, troilus). It is black, with yellow marginal spots on the front wings, and blue spots on the rear wings.
Trojan
a.
• Of or pertaining to ancient Troy or its inhabitants.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Troy.
Troll
n.
(Scand. Myth.) A supernatural being, often represented as of diminutive size, but sometimes as a giant, and fabled to inhabit caves, hills, and like places; a witch.
v. t.
• To move circularly or volubly; to roll; to turn.
• To send about; to circulate, as a vessel in drinking.
• To sing the parts of in succession, as of a round, a catch, and the like; also, to sing loudly or freely.
• To angle for with a trolling line, or with a book drawn along the surface of the water; hence, to allure.
• To fish in; to seek to catch fish from.
v. i.
• To roll; to run about; to move around; as, to troll in a coach and six.
• To move rapidly; to wag.
• To take part in trolling a song.
• To fish with a rod whose line runs on a reel; also, to fish by drawing the hook through the water.
n.
• The act of moving round; routine; repetition.
• A song the parts of which are sung in succession; a catch; a round.
• A trolley.
Troller
n.
• One who trolls.
Trollmydames
n.
• The game of nineholes.
Trollop
n.
• A stroller; a loiterer; esp., an idle, untidy woman; a slattern; a slut; a whore.
Trollopee
n.
• A kind of loose dress for women.
Trombone
n.
(Mus.) A powerful brass instrument of the trumpet kind, thought by some to be the ancient sackbut, consisting of a tube in three parts, bent twice upon itself and ending in a bell. The middle part, bent double, slips into the outer parts, as in a telescope, so that by change of the vibrating length any tone within the compass of the instrument (which may be bass or tenor or alto or even, in rare instances, soprano) is commanded. It is the only member of the family of wind instruments whose scale, both diatonic and chromatic, is complete without the aid of keys or pistons, and which can slide from note to note as smoothly as the human voice or a violin. Softly blown, it has a rich and mellow sound, which becomes harsh and blatant when the tones are forced; used with discretion, its effect is often solemn and majestic.
(Zool.) The common European bittern.
Trommel
n.
(Mining) A revolving buddle or sieve for separating, or sizing, ores.
Tromp
n.
• A blowing apparatus, in which air, drawn into the upper part of a vertical tube through side holes by a stream of water within, is carried down with the water into a box or chamber below which it is led to a furnace.
Trompil
n.
• An aperture in a tromp.
Tron
n.
• See 3d Trone, 2.
Trona
n.
(Chem. & Min.) A native double salt, consisting of a combination of neutral and acid sodium carbonate, Na2CO3.2HNaCO3.2H2O, occurring as a white crystalline fibrous deposit from certain soda brine springs and lakes; — called also urao, and by the ancients nitrum.
Tronage
n.
• A toll or duty paid for weighing wool; also, the act of weighing wool.
Tronator
n.
• An officer in London whose duty was to weigh wool.
Trone
n.
• A throne.
n.
• A small drain.
Troop
n.
• A collection of people; a company; a number; a multitude.
• Soldiers, collectively; an army; — now generally used in the plural.
(Mil.) Specifically, a small body of cavalry, light horse, or dragoons, consisting usually of about sixty men, commanded by a captain; the unit of formation of cavalry, corresponding to the company in infantry. Formerly, also, a company of horse artillery; a battery.
• A company of stageplayers; a troupe.
(Mil.) A particular roll of the drum; a quick march.
v. i.
• To move in numbers; to come or gather in crowds or troops.
• To march on; to go forward in haste.
Troopbird
n.
(Zool.) Any troupial.
Trooper
n.
• A soldier in a body of cavalry; a cavalryman; also, the horse of a cavalryman.
Troopfowl
n.
(Zool.) The American scaup duck.
Troopial
n.
(Zool.) Same as Troupial.
Troopmeal
adv.
• By troops; in crowds.
Troopship
n.
• A vessel built or fitted for the conveyance of troops; a transport.
Troostite
n.
(Min.) Willemite.
Tropaeolin
n.
(Chem.) A name given to any one of a series of orange-red dyestuffs produced artificially from certain complex sulphonic acid derivatives of azo and diazo hydrocarbons of the aromatic series; — so called because of the general resemblance to the shades of nasturtium (Tropaeolum).
Trope
n.
(Rhet.) The use of a word or expression in a different sense from that which properly belongs to it; the use of a word or expression as changed from the original signification to another, for the sake of giving life or emphasis to an idea; a figure of speech.
• The word or expression so used.
Tropeine
n.
(Chem.) Any one of a series of artificial ethereal salts derived from the alkaloidal base tropine.
Trophi
n. pl.
(Zool.) The mouth parts of an insect, collectively, including the labrum, labium, maxillae, mandibles, and lingua, with their appendages.
Trophic
a.
(Physiol.) Of or connected with nutrition; nitritional; nourishing; as, the so-called trophic nerves, which have a direct influence on nutrition.
Trophied
a.
• Adorned with trophies.
Trophonian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Trophonius, his architecture, or his cave and oracle.
Trophosome
n.
(Zool.) The nutritive zooids of a hydroid, collectively, as distinguished from the gonosome, or reproductive zooids.
Trophosperm
n.
(Bot.) The placenta.
Trophy
n.
(Gr. & Rom. Antiq.) A sign or memorial of a victory raised on the field of battle, or, in case of a naval victory, on the nearest land. Sometimes trophies were erected in the chief city of the conquered people.
• The representation of such a memorial, as on a medal; esp. (Arch.), an ornament representing a group of arms and military weapons, offensive and defensive.
• Anything taken from an enemy and preserved as a memorial of victory, as arms, flags, standards, etc.
• Any evidence or memorial of victory or conquest; as, every redeemed soul is a trophy of grace.
Tropic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained from atropine and certain other alkaloids, as a white crystalline substance slightly soluble in water.
n.
(Astron.) One of the two small circles of the celestial sphere, situated on each side of the equator, at a distance of 23° 28&min;, and parallel to it, which the sun just reaches at its greatest declination north or south, and from which it turns again toward the equator, the northern circle being called the Tropic of Cancer, and the southern the Tropic of Capricorn, from the names of the two signs at which they touch the ecliptic.
(Geog.) One of the two parallels of terrestrial latitude corresponding to the celestial tropics, and called by the same names.
• The region lying between these parallels of latitude, or near them on either side.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the tropics; tropical.
Tropical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the tropics; characteristic of, or incident to, the tropics; being within the tropics; as, tropical climate; tropical latitudes; tropical heat; tropical diseases.
• Rhetorically changed from its exact original sense; being of the nature of a trope; figurative; metaphorical.
Tropically
adv.
• In a tropical manner; figuratively; metaphorically.
Tropidine
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid, C8H13N, obtained by the chemical dehydration of tropine, as an oily liquid having a coninelike odor.
Tropilidene
n.
(Chem.) A liquid hydrocarbon obtained by the dry distillation of tropine with quicklime. It is regarded as being homologous with dipropargyl.
Tropine
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline alkaloid, C8H15NO, produced by decomposing atropine.
Tropist
n.
• One who deals in tropes; specifically, one who avoids the literal sense of the language of Scripture by explaining it as mere tropes and figures of speech.
Tropologize
v. t.
• To use in a tropological sense, as a word; to make a trope of.
Tropology
n.
• A rhetorical mode of speech, including tropes, or changes from the original import of the word.
Trossers
n. pl.
• Trousers.
Trot
v. i.
• To proceed by a certain gait peculiar to quadrupeds; to ride or drive at a trot. See Trot, n.
• Fig.: To run; to jog; to hurry.
v. t.
• To cause to move, as a horse or other animal, in the pace called a trot; to cause to run without galloping or cantering.
n.
• The pace of a horse or other quadruped, more rapid than a walk, but of various degrees of swiftness, in which one fore foot and the hind foot of the opposite side are lifted at the same time.
• Fig.: A jogging pace, as of a person hurrying.
• One who trots; a child; a woman.
Troth
n.
• Belief; faith; fidelity.
• Truth; verity; veracity; as, by my troth.
• Betrothal.
Trothless
a.
• Faitless; false; treacherous.
Trothplight
v. t.
• To betroth.
a.
• Betrothed; espoused; affianced.
n.
• The act of betrothing, or plighting faith; betrothing.
Trothplighted
a.
• Having fidelity pledged.
Trotter
n.
• One that trots; especially, a horse trained to be driven in trotting matches.
• The foot of an animal, especially that of a sheep; also, humorously, the human foot.
Trottoir
n.
• Footpath; pavement; sidewalk.
Troubadour
n.
• One of a school of poets who flourished from the eleventh to the thirteenth century, principally in Provence, in the south of France, and also in the north of Italy. They invented, and especially cultivated, a kind of lyrical poetry characterized by intricacy of meter and rhyme, and usually of a romantic, amatory strain.
Troublable
a.
• Causing trouble; troublesome. troublable ire." Chaucer.
Trouble
v. t.
• To put into confused motion; to disturb; to agitate.
• To disturb; to perplex; to afflict; to distress; to grieve; to fret; to annoy; to vex.
• To give occasion for labor to; — used in polite phraseology; as, I will not trouble you to deliver the letter.
a.
• Troubled; dark; gloomy.
n.
• The state of being troubled; disturbance; agitation; uneasiness; vexation; calamity.
• That which gives disturbance, annoyance, or vexation; that which afflicts.
(Mining) A fault or interruption in a stratum.
Troubler
n.
• One who troubles or disturbs; one who afflicts or molests; a disturber; as, a troubler of the peace.
Troublesome
a.
• Giving trouble or anxiety; vexatious; burdensome; wearisome.
Troublous
a.
• Full of trouble; causing trouble.
Trough
n.
• A long, hollow vessel, generally for holding water or other liquid, especially one formed by excavating a log longitudinally on one side; a long tray; also, a wooden channel for conveying water, as to a mill wheel.
• Any channel, receptacle, or depression, of a long and narrow shape; as, trough between two ridges, etc.
Troul
v. t. & i.
• See Troll.
Trounce
v. t.
• To punish or beat severely; to whip smartly; to flog; to castigate.
Troupe
n.
• A company or troop, especially the company pf performers in a play or an opera.
Troupial
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of bright-colored American birds belonging to Icterus and allied genera, especially Icterus icterus, a native of the West Indies and South America. Many of the species are called orioles in America.
Trouse
n.
• Trousers.
Trousering
n.
• Cloth or material for making trousers.
Trousers
n. pl.
• A garment worn by men and boys, extending from the waist to the knee or to the ankle, and covering each leg separately.
Trousseau
n.
• The collective lighter equipments or outfit of a bride, including clothes, jewelry, and the like; especially, that which is provided for her by her family.
Trout
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of fishes belonging to Salmo, Salvelinus, and allied genera of the family Salmonidae. They are highly esteemed as game fishes and for the quality of their flesh. All the species breed in fresh water, but after spawning many of them descend to the sea if they have an opportunity.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of marine fishes more or less resembling a trout in appearance or habits, but not belonging to the same family, especially the California rock trouts, the common squeteague, and the southern, or spotted, squeteague; — called also salt-water trout, sea trout, shad trout, and gray trout. See Squeteague, and Rock trout under Rock.
Troutbird
n.
(Zool.) The American golden plover.
Troutlet
n.
• A little trout; a troutling.
Troutling
n.
• A little trout; a troutlet.
Trover
n.
(Law) The gaining possession of any goods, whether by finding or by other means.
• An action to recover damages against one who found goods, and would not deliver them to the owner on demand; an action which lies in any case to recover the value of goods wrongfully converted by another to his own use. In this case the finding, though alleged, is an immaterial fact; the injury lies in the conversion.
Trow
n.
• A boat with an open well amidships. It is used in spearing fish.
v. i. & t.
• To believe; to trust; to think or suppose.
Trowel
n.
• A mason's tool, used in spreading and dressing mortar, and breaking bricks to shape them.
• A gardener's tool, somewhat like a scoop, used in taking up plants, stirring the earth, etc.
(Founding) A tool used for smoothing a mold.
Troweled
• Formed with a trowel; smoothed with a trowel; as, troweled stucco, that is, stucco laid on and ready for the reception of paint.
Trowelful
n.
• As much as a trowel will hold; enough to fill a trowel.
Trowl
n.
• See Troll.
Trowsed
a.
• Wearing trousers.
Trowsers
n. pl.
• Same as Trousers.
Troy
n.
• Troy weight.
Troyounce
n.
• See Troy ounce, under Troy weight, above, and under Ounce.
Truage
n.
• A pledge of truth or peace made on payment of a tax.
• A tax or impost; tribute.
Truancy
n.
• The act of playing truant, or the state of being truant; as, addicted to truancy.
Truand
n. & a.
• See Truant.
Truant
n.
• One who stays away from business or any duty; especially, one who stays out of school without leave; an idler; a loiterer; a shirk.
a.
• Wandering from business or duty; loitering; idle, and shirking duty; as, a truant boy.
v. i.
• To idle away time; to loiter, or wander; to play the truant.
v. t.
• To idle away; to waste.
Truantly
adv.
• Like a truant; in idleness.
Truantship
n.
• The conduct of a truant; neglect of employment; idleness; truancy.
Trub
n.
• A truffle.
Trubtall
n.
• A short, squat woman.
Trubu
n.
(Zool.) An East India herring (Clupea toli) which is extensively caught for the sake of its roe and for its flesh.
Trubutarily
adv.
• In a tributary manner.
Truce
n.
(Mil.) A suspension of arms by agreement of the commanders of opposing forces; a temporary cessation of hostilities, for negotiation or other purpose; an armistice.
• Hence, intermission of action, pain, or contest; temporary cessation; short quiet.
Trucebreaker
n.
• One who violates a truce, covenant, or engagement.
Truceless
a.
• Without a truce; unforbearing.
Truchman
n.
• An interpreter. See Dragoman.
Trucidation
n.
• The act of killing.
Truck
n.
• A small wheel, as of a vehicle; specifically (Ord.), a small strong wheel, as of wood or iron, for a gun carriage.
• A low, wheeled vehicle or barrow for carrying goods, stone, and other heavy articles.
(Railroad Mach.) A swiveling carriage, consisting of a frame with one or more pairs of wheels and the necessary boxes, springs, etc., to carry and guide one end of a locomotive or a car; — sometimes called bogie in England. Trucks usually have four or six wheels.
(Naut.) A small wooden cap at the summit of a flagstaff or a masthead, having holes in it for reeving halyards through.
• A small piece of wood, usually cylindrical or disk-shaped, used for various purposes.
• A freight car.
• A frame on low wheels or rollers; — used for various purposes, as for a movable support for heavy bodies.
v. t.
• To transport on a truck or trucks.
v. t.
• To exchange; to give in exchange; to barter; as, to truck knives for gold dust.
v. i.
• To exchange commodities; to barter; to trade; to deal.
n.
• Exchange of commodities; barter.
• Commodities appropriate for barter, or for small trade; small commodities; esp., in the United States, garden vegetables raised for the market.
• The practice of paying wages in goods instead of money; — called also truck system.
Truckage
n.
• The practice of bartering goods; exchange; barter; truck.
n.
• Money paid for the conveyance of goods on a truck; freight.
Trucker
n.
• One who trucks; a trafficker.
Trucking
n.
• The business of conveying goods on trucks.
Truckle
n.
• A small wheel or caster.
v. i.
• To yield or bend obsequiously to the will of another; to submit; to creep.
v. t.
• To roll or move upon truckles, or casters; to trundle.
Truckler
n.
• One who truckles, or yields servilely to the will of another.
Truckman
n.
• One who does business in the way of barter or exchange.
• One who drives a truck, or whose business is the conveyance of goods on trucks.
Truculent
a.
• Fierce; savage; ferocious; barbarous; as, the truculent inhabitants of Scythia.
• Cruel; destructive; ruthless.
Truculently
adv.
• In a truculent manner.
Trudge
v. i.
• To walk or march with labor; to jog along; to move wearily.
Trudgeman
n.
• A truchman.
True
a.
• Conformable to fact; in accordance with the actual state of things; correct; not false, erroneous, inaccurate, or the like; as, a true relation or narration; a true history; a declaration is true when it states the facts.
• Right to precision; conformable to a rule or pattern; exact; accurate; as, a true copy; a true likeness of the original.
• Steady in adhering to friends, to promises, to a prince, or the like; unwavering; faithful; loyal; not false, fickle, or perfidious; as, a true friend; a wife true to her husband; an officer true to his charge.
• Actual; not counterfeit, adulterated, or pretended; genuine; pure; real; as, true balsam; true love of country; a true Christian.
adv.
• In accordance with truth; truly.
Truelove
n.
• One really beloved.
(Bot.) A plant. See Paris.
• An unexplained word occurring in Chaucer, meaning, perhaps, an aromatic sweetmeat for sweetening the breath.
Trueness
n.
• The quality of being true; reality; genuineness; faithfulness; sincerity; exactness; truth.
Truffle
n.
• Any one of several kinds of roundish, subterranean fungi, usually of a blackish color. The French truffle (Tuber melanosporum) and the English truffle (T. aestivum) are much esteemed as articles of food.
Truffled
a.
• Provided or cooked with truffles; stuffed with truffles; as, a truffled turkey.
Trug
n.
• A trough, or tray.
• A hod for mortar.
• An old measure of wheat equal to two thirds of a bushel.
• A concubine; a harlot.
Truism
n.
• An undoubted or self-evident truth; a statement which is pliantly true; a proposition needing no proof or argument; — opposed to falsism.
Truismatic
a.
• Of or pertaining to truisms; consisting of truisms.
Trull
n.
• A drab; a strumpet; a harlot; a trollop.
• A girl; a wench; a lass.
Trullization
n.
• The act of laying on coats of plaster with a trowel.
Truly
adv.
• In a true manner; according to truth; in agreement with fact; as, to state things truly; the facts are truly represented.
• Exactly; justly; precisely; accurately; as, to estimate truly the weight of evidence.
• Sincerely; honestly; really; faithfully; as, to be truly attached to a lover; the citizens are truly loyal to their prince or their country.
• Conformably to law; legally; legitimately.
• In fact; in deed; in reality; in truth.
Trump
n.
• A wind instrument of music; a trumpet, or sound of a trumpet; — used chiefly in Scripture and poetry.
v. i.
• To blow a trumpet.
n.
• A winning card; one of a particular suit (usually determined by chance for each deal) any card of which takes any card of the other suits.
• An old game with cards, nearly the same as whist; — called also ruff.
• A good fellow; an excellent person.
v. i.
• To play a trump card when one of another suit has been led.
v. t.
• To play a trump card upon; to take with a trump card; as, she trumped the first trick.
v. t.
• To trick, or impose on; to deceive.
• To impose unfairly; to palm off.
Trumpery
n.
• Deceit; fraud.
• Something serving to deceive by false show or pretense; falsehood; deceit; worthless but showy matter; hence, things worn out and of no value; rubbish.
a.
• Worthless or deceptive in character.
Trumpet
n.
(Mus.) A wind instrument of great antiquity, much used in war and military exercises, and of great value in the orchestra. In consists of a long metallic tube, curved (once or twice) into a convenient shape, and ending in a bell. Its scale in the lower octaves is limited to the first natural harmonics; but there are modern trumpets capable, by means of valves or pistons, of producing every tone within their compass, although at the expense of the true ringing quality of tone.
(Mil.) A trumpeter.
• One who praises, or propagates praise, or is the instrument of propagating it.
(Mach) A funnel, or short, fiaring pipe, used as a guide or conductor, as for yarn in a knitting machine.
v. t.
• To publish by, or as by, sound of trumpet; to noise abroad; to proclaim; as, to trumpet good tidings.
v. i.
• To sound loudly, or with a tone like a trumpet; to utter a trumplike cry.
Trumpeter
n.
• One who sounds a trumpet.
• One who proclaims, publishes, or denounces.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of long-legged South American birds of the genus Psophia, especially P. crepitans, which is abundant, and often domesticated and kept with other poultry by the natives. They are allied to the cranes. So called from their loud cry. Called also agami, and yakamik.
• A variety of the domestic pigeon.
• An American swan (Olor buccinator) which has a very loud note.
(Zool.) A large edible fish (Latris hecateia) of the family Cirrhitidae, native of Tasmania and New Zealand. It sometimes weighs as much as fifty or sixty pounds, and is highly esteemed as a food fish.
Trumpeting
n.
(Mining) A channel cut behind the brick lining of a shaft.
Trumpets
n. pl.
(Bot.) A plant (Sarracenia flava) with long, hollow leaves.
Trumpetweed
n.
(Bot.) An herbaceous composite plant (Eupatorium purpureum), often having hollow stems, and bearing purplish flowers in small corymbed heads.
• The sea trumpet.
Trumpetwood
n.
(Bot.) A tropical American tree (Cecropia peltata) of the Breadfruit family, having hollow stems, which are used for wind instruments; — called also snakewood, and trumpet tree.
Trumpie
n.
(Zool.) The Richardson's skua (Stercorarius parasiticus).
Trumplike
a.
• Resembling a trumpet, esp. in sound; as, a trumplike voice.
Truncal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the trunk, or body.
Truncate
v. t.
• To cut off; to lop; to maim.
a.
• Appearing as if cut off at the tip; as, a truncate leaf or feather.
Truncated
a.
• Cut off; cut short; maimed.
(Min.) Replaced, or cut off, by a plane, especially when equally inclined to the adjoining faces; as, a truncated edge.
(Zool.) Lacking the apex; — said of certain spiral shells in which the apex naturally drops off.
Truncation
n.
• The act of truncating, lopping, or cutting off.
• The state of being truncated.
(Min.) The replacement of an edge or solid angle by a plane, especially when the plane is equally inclined to the adjoining faces.
Trunch
n.
• A stake; a small post.
Truncheon
n.
• A short staff, a club; a cudgel; a shaft of a spear.
• A baton, or military staff of command.
• A stout stem, as of a tree, with the branches lopped off, to produce rapid growth.
v. t.
• To beat with a truncheon.
Truncheoned
a.
• Having a truncheon.
Truncheoneer
n.
• A person armed with a truncheon.
Truncus
n.
(Zool.) The thorax of an insect. See Trunk, n., 5.
Trundle
n.
• A round body; a little wheel.
• A lind of low-wheeled cart; a truck.
• A motion as of something moving upon little wheels or rollers; a rolling motion.
(Mach.) A lantern wheel. See under Lantern.
• One of the bars of a lantern wheel.
v. t.
• To roll (a thing) on little wheels; as, to trundle a bed or a gun carriage.
• To cause to roll or revolve; to roll along; as, to trundle a hoop or a ball.
v. i.
• To go or move on small wheels; as, a bed trundles under another.
• To roll, or go by revolving, as a hoop.
Trundlehead
n.
(Gearing) One of the disks forming the ends of a lantern wheel or pinion.
• The drumhead of a capstan; especially, the drumhead of the lower of two capstans on the sane axis.
Trundletail
n.
• A round or curled-up tail; also, a dog with such a tail.
Trunk
n.
• The stem, or body, of a tree, apart from its limbs and roots; the main stem, without the branches; stock; stalk.
• The body of an animal, apart from the head and limbs.
• The main body of anything; as, the trunk of a vein or of an artery, as distinct from the branches.
(Arch) That part of a pilaster which is between the base and the capital, corresponding to the shaft of a column.
(Zool.) That segment of the body of an insect which is between the head and abdomen, and bears the wings and legs; the thorax; the truncus.
(Zool.) The proboscis of an elephant.
• The proboscis of an insect.
• A long tube through which pellets of clay, pas, etc., are driven by the force of the breath.
• A box or chest usually covered with leather, metal, or cloth, or sometimes made of leather, hide, or metal, for containing clothes or other goods; especially, one used to convey the effects of a traveler.
(Mining) A flume or sluice in which ores are separated from the slimes in which they are contained.
(Steam Engine) A large pipe forming the piston rod of a steam engine, of sufficient diameter to allow one end of the connecting rod to be attached to the crank, and the other end to pass within the pipe directly to the piston, thus making the engine more compact.
• A long, large box, pipe, or conductor, made of plank or metal plates, for various uses, as for conveying air to a mine or to a furnace, water to a mill, grain to an elevator, etc.
v. t.
• To lop off; to curtail; to truncate; to maim.
(Mining) To extract (ores) from the slimes in which they are contained, by means of a trunk. See Trunk, n., 9.
Trunkback
n.
(Zool.) The leatherback.
Trunked
a.
• Having (such) a trunk.
Trunkfish
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of plectognath fishes, belonging to the genus Ostracion, or the family Ostraciontidae, having an angular body covered with a rigid integument consisting of bony scales. Some of the species are called also coffer fish, and boxfish.
Trunkful
n.
• As much as a trunk will hold; enough to fill a trunk.
Trunkwork
n.
• Work or devices suitable to be concealed; a secret stratagem.
Trunnel
n.
• A trundle.
n.
(Shipbuilding) See Treenail.
Trunnion
n.
(Gun.) A cylindrical projection on each side of a piece, whether gun, mortar, or howitzer, serving to support it on the cheeks of the carriage. See Illust. of Cannon.
(Steam Engine) A gudgeon on each side of an oscillating steam cylinder, to support it. It is usually tubular, to convey steam.
Trunnioned
a.
• Provided with trunnions; as, the trunnioned cylinder of an oscillating steam engine.
Trusion
n.
• The act of pushing or thrusting.
Truss
n.
• A bundle; a package; as, a truss of grass.
• A padded jacket or dress worn under armor, to protect the body from the effects of friction; also, a part of a woman's dress; a stomacher.
(Surg.) A bandage or apparatus used in cases of hernia, to keep up the reduced parts and hinder further protrusion, and for other purposes.
(Bot.) A tuft of flowers formed at the top of the main stalk, or stem, of certain plants.
(Naut.) The rope or iron used to keep the center of a yard to the mast.
(Arch. & Engin.) An assemblage of members of wood or metal, supported at two points, and arranged to transmit pressure vertically to those points, with the least possible strain across the length of any member. Architectural trusses when left visible, as in open timber roofs, often contain members not needed for construction, or are built with greater massiveness than is requisite, or are composed in unscientific ways in accordance with the exigencies of style.
v. t.
• To bind or pack close; to make into a truss.
• To take fast hold of; to seize and hold firmly; to pounce upon.
• To strengthen or stiffen, as a beam or girder, by means of a brace or braces.
• To skewer; to make fast, as the wings of a fowl to the body in cooking it.
• To execute by hanging; to hang; — usually with up.
Trussing
n.
(Arch. & Engin.) The timbers, etc., which form a truss, taken collectively.
(Arch. & Engin.) The art of stiffening or bracing a set of timbers, or the like, by putting in struts, ties, etc., till it has something of the character of a truss.
• The act of a hawk, or other bird of prey, in seizing its quarry, and soaring with it into air.
Trust
n.
• Assured resting of the mind on the integrity, veracity, justice, friendship, or other sound principle, of another person; confidence; reliance; reliance.
• Credit given; especially, delivery of property or merchandise in reliance upon future payment; exchange without immediate receipt of an equivalent; as, to sell or buy goods on trust.
• Assured anticipation; dependence upon something future or contingent, as if present or actual; hope; belief.
• That which is committed or intrusted to one; something received in confidence; charge; deposit.
• The condition or obligation of one to whom anything is confided; responsible charge or office.
• That upon which confidence is reposed; ground of reliance; hope.
(Law) An estate devised or granted in confidence that the devisee or grantee shall convey it, or dispose of the profits, at the will, or for the benefit, of another; an estate held for the use of another; a confidence respecting property reposed in one person, who is termed the trustee, for the benefit of another, who is called the cestui que trust.
• An organization formed mainly for the purpose of regulating the supply and price of commodities, etc.; as, a sugar trust.
a.
• Held in trust; as, trust property; trustmoney.
v. t.
• To place confidence in; to rely on, to confide, or repose faith, in; as, we can not trust those who have deceived us.
• To give credence to; to believe; to credit.
• To hope confidently; to believe; — usually with a phrase or infinitive clause as the object.
• to show confidence in a person by intrusting (him) with something.
• To commit, as to one's care; to intrust.
• To give credit to; to sell to upon credit, or in confidence of future payment; as, merchants and manufacturers trust their customers annually with goods.
• To risk; to venture confidently.
v. i.
• To have trust; to be credulous; to be won to confidence; to confide.
• To be confident, as of something future; to hope.
• To sell or deliver anything in reliance upon a promise of payment; to give credit.
Trustee
n.
(Law) A person to whom property is legally committed in trust, to be applied either for the benefit of specified individuals, or for public uses; one who is intrusted with property for the benefit of another; also, a person in whose hands the effects of another are attached in a trustee process.
v. t.
• To commit (property) to the care of a trustee; as, to trustee an estate.
(Law) To attach (a debtor's wages, credits, or property in the hands of a third person) in the interest of the creditor.
Trusteeship
n.
• The office or duty of a trustee.
Truster
n.
• One who trusts, or credits.
(Scots Law) One who makes a trust; — the correlative of trustee.
Trustful
a.
• Full of trust; trusting.
• Worthy of trust; faithful; trusty; trustworthy.
Trustily
adv.
• In a trusty manner.
Trustiness
n.
• The quality or state of being trusty.
Trusting
a.
• Having or exercising trust; confiding; unsuspecting; trustful.
Trustless
a.
• That may not be trusted; not worthy of trust; unfaithful.
Trustworthy
a.
• Worthy of trust or confidence; trusty.
Trusty
a.
• Admitting of being safely trusted; justly deserving confidence; fit to be confided in; trustworthy; reliable.
• Hence, not liable to fail; strong; firm.
• Involving trust; as, a trusty business.
Truth
n.
• The quality or being true; as: — (a) Conformity to fact or reality; exact accordance with that which is, or has been; or shall be.
• Conformity to rule; exactness; close correspondence with an example, mood, object of imitation, or the like.
• Fidelity; constancy; steadfastness; faithfulness.
• The practice of speaking what is true; freedom from falsehood; veracity.
• That which is true or certain concerning any matter or subject, or generally on all subjects; real state of things; fact; verity; reality.
• A true thing; a verified fact; a true statement or proposition; an established principle, fixed law, or the like; as, the great truths of morals.
• Righteousness; true religion.
v. t.
• To assert as true; to declare.
Truthful
a.
• Full of truth; veracious; reliable.
Truthless
a.
• Devoid of truth; dishonest; dishonest; spurious; faithless.
Truthness
n.
• Truth.
Truthy
a.
• Truthful; likely; probable.
Trutination
n.
• The act of weighing.
Truttaceous
a.
(Zool.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a trout; as, fish of the truttaceous kind.
Try
v. t.
• To divide or separate, as one sort from another; to winnow; to sift; to pick out; — frequently followed by out; as, to try out the wild corn from the good.
• To purify or refine, as metals; to melt out, and procure in a pure state, as oil, tallow, lard, etc.
• To prove by experiment; to apply a test to, for the purpose of determining the quality; to examine; to prove; to test; as, to try weights or measures by a standard; to try a man's opinions.
• To subject to severe trial; to put to the test; to cause suffering or trouble to.
• To experiment with; to test by use; as, to try a remedy for disease; to try a horse.
• To strain; to subject to excessive tests; as, the light tries his eyes; repeated disappointments try one's patience.
(Law) To examine or investigate judicially; to examine by witnesses or other judicial evidence and the principles of law; as, to try a cause, or a criminal.
• To settle; to decide; to determine; specifically, to decide by an appeal to arms; as, to try rival claims by a duel; to try conclusions.
• To experience; to have or gain knowledge of by experience.
• To essay; to attempt; to endeavor.
v. i.
• To exert strength; to endeavor; to make an effort or an attempt; as, you must try hard if you wish to learn.
• To do; to fare; as, how do you try!
n.
• A screen, or sieve, for grain.
• Act of trying; attempt; experiment; trial.
a.
• Refined; select; excellent; choice.
Trygon
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of large sting rays belonging to Trygon and allied genera.
Trying
a.
• Adapted to try, or put to severe trial; severe; afflictive; as, a trying occasion or position.
Trypsin
n.
(physiol.) A proteolytic ferment, or enzyme, present in the pancreatic juice. Unlike the pepsin of the gastric juice, it acts in a neutral or alkaline fluid, and not only converts the albuminous matter of the food into soluble peptones, but also, in part, into leucin and tyrosin.
Trypsinogen
n.
(Physiol.) The antecedent of trypsin, a substance which is contained in the cells of the pancreas and gives rise to the trypsin.
Tryptic
a.
(Physiol.) Relating to trypsin or to its action; produced by trypsin; as, trypsin digestion.
Tryptone
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) The peptone formed by pancreatic digestion; — so called because it is formed through the agency of the ferment trypsin.
Trysail
n.
(Naut.) A fore-and-aft sail, bent to a gaff, and hoisted on a lower mast or on a small mast, called the trysail mast, close abaft a lower mast; — used chiefly as a storm sail. Called also spencer.
Tryst
n.
• Trust.
• An appointment to meet; also, an appointed place or time of meeting; as, to keep tryst; to break tryst.
v. t.
• To trust.
• To agree with to meet at a certain place; to make an appointment with.
v. i.
• To mutually agree to meet at a certain place.
Tryster
n.
• One who makes an appointment, or tryst; one who meets with another.
Trysting
n.
• An appointment; a tryst.
Tsar
n.
• The title of the emperor of Russia. See Czar.
Tschakmeck
n.
(Zool.) The chameck.
Tschego
n.
(Zool.) A West African anthropoid ape allied to the gorilla and chimpanzee, and by some considered only a variety of the chimpanzee. It is noted for building large, umbrella-shaped nests in trees. Called also tscheigo, tschiego, nschego, nscheigo.
Tsebe
n.
(Zool.) The springbok.
Tsetse
n.
(Zool.) A venomous two-winged African fly (Glossina morsitans) whose bite is very poisonous, and even fatal, to horses and cattle, but harmless to men. It renders extensive districts in which it abounds uninhabitable during certain seasons of the year.
Tuatera
n.
(Zool.) See Hatteria.
Tub
n.
• An open wooden vessel formed with staves, bottom, and hoops; a kind of short cask, half barrel, or firkin, usually with but one head, — used for various purposes.
• The amount which a tub contains, as a measure of quantity; as, a tub of butter; a tub of camphor, which is about 1 cwt., etc.
• Any structure shaped like a tub: as, a certain old form of pulpit; a short, broad boat, etc., — often used jocosely or opprobriously.
• A sweating in a tub; a tub fast.
• A small cask; as, a tub of gin.
• A box or bucket in which coal or ore is sent up a shaft; — so called by miners.
v. t.
• To plant or set in a tub; as, to tub a plant.
i.
• To make use of a bathing tub; to lie or be in a bath; to bathe.
Tuba
n.
(Mus.) An ancient trumpet.
• A sax-tuba. See Sax-tuba.
Tubal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a tube; specifically, of or pertaining to one of the Fallopian tubes; as, tubal pregnancy.
Tubbing
n.
• The forming of a tub; also, collectively, materials for tubs.
• A lining of timber or metal around the shaft of a mine; especially, a series of cast-iron cylinders bolted together, used to enable those who sink a shaft to penetrate quicksand, water, etc., with safety.
Tubby
a.
• Resembling a tub; specifically sounding dull and without resonance, like a tub; wanting elasticity or freedom of sound; as, a tubby violin.
Tube
n.
• A hollow cylinder, of any material, used for the conveyance of fluids, and for various other purposes; a pipe.
• A telescope.
• A vessel in animal bodies or plants, which conveys a fluid or other substance.
(Bot.) The narrow, hollow part of a gamopetalous corolla.
(Gun.) A priming tube, or friction primer. See under Priming, and Friction.
(Steam Boilers) A small pipe forming part of the boiler, containing water and surrounded by flame or hot gases, or else surrounded by water and forming a flue for the gases to pass through.
(Zool.) A more or less cylindrical, and often spiral, case secreted or constructed by many annelids, crustaceans, insects, and other animals, for protection or concealment. See Illust. of Tubeworm.
• One of the siphons of a bivalve mollusk.
v. t.
• To furnish with a tube; as, to tube a well.
Tubeform
a.
• In the form of a tube; tubular; tubiform.
Tuber
n.
(Bot.) A fleshy, rounded stem or root, usually containing starchy matter, as the potato or arrowroot; a thickened root-stock. See Illust. of Tuberous.
• A genus of fungi. See Truffle.
(Anat.) A tuberosity; a tubercle.
Tubercle
n.
• A small knoblike prominence or excrescence, whether natural or morbid; as, a tubercle on a plant; a tubercle on a bone; the tubercles appearing on the body in leprosy.
(Med.) A small mass or aggregation of morbid matter; especially, the deposit which accompanies scrofula or phthisis. This is composed of a hard, grayish, or yellowish, translucent or opaque matter, which gradually softens, and excites suppuration in its vicinity. It is most frequently found in the lungs, causing consumption.
Tubercled
a.
• Having tubercles; affected with, tubercles; tuberculate; as, a tubercled lung or stalk.
Tubercular
a.
• Having tubercles; affected with tubercles; tubercled; tuberculate.
• Like a tubercle; as, a tubercular excrescence.
(Med.) Characterized by the development of tubercles; as, tubercular diathesis.
Tuberculin
n.
• A fluid containing the products formed by the growth of the tubercle bacillus in a suitable culture medium.
Tuberculization
n.
(Med.) The development of tubercles; the condition of one who is affected with tubercles.
Tuberculosis
n.
(Med.) A constitutional disease characterized by the production of tubercles in the internal organs, and especially in the lungs, where it constitutes the most common variety of pulmonary consumption.
Tuberculum
n.
(Zool.) A tubercle.
Tuberiferous
a.
• Producing or bearing tubers.
Tuberose
n.
(Bot.) A plant (Polianthes tuberosa) with a tuberous root and a liliaceous flower. It is much cultivated for its beautiful and fragrant white blossoms.
a.
• Tuberous.
Tuberosity
n.
• The state of being tuberous.
• An obtuse or knoblike prominence; a protuberance.
Tuberous
a.
• Covered with knobby or wartlike prominences; knobbed.
(Bot.) Consisting of, or bearing, tubers; resembling a tuber.
Tubeworm
n.
(Zool.) Any annelid which constructs a tube; one of the Tubicolae.
Tubfish
n.
(Zool.) The sapphirine gurnard (Trigla hirundo). See Illust. under Gurnard.
Tubful
n.
• As much as a tub will hold; enough to fill a tub.
Tubicinate
v. i.
• To blow a trumpet.
Tubicolae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of annelids including those which construct, and habitually live in, tubes. The head or anterior segments usually bear gills and cirri. Called also Sedentaria, and Capitibranchiata. See Serpula, and Sabella.
Tubicolar
a.
(Zool.) Tubicolous.
Tubicole
n.
(Zool.) One of the Tubicolae.
Tubicolous
a.
(Zool.) Inhabiting a tube; as, tubicolous worms.
Tubicorn
n.
(Zool.) Any ruminant having horns composed of a bony axis covered with a horny sheath; a hollow-horned ruminant.
Tubicornous
a.
• Having hollow horns.
Tubiform
a.
• Having the form of a tube; tubeform.
Tubinares
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of sea birds comprising the petrels, shearwaters, albatrosses, hagdons, and allied birds having tubular horny nostrils.
Tubing
n.
• The act of making tubes.
• A series of tubes; tubes, collectively; a length or piece of a tube; material for tubes; as, leather tubing.
Tubipora
n.
(Zool.) A genus of halcyonoids in which the skeleton, or coral (called organ-pipe coral), consists of a mass of parallel cylindrical tubes united at intervals by transverse plates. These corals are usually red or purple and form large masses. They are natives of the tropical parts of the Indian and Pacific Oceans.
Tubipore
n.
(Zool.) Any species of the genus Tubipora.
Tubiporite
n.
(Paleon.) Any fossil coral of the genus Syringopora consisting of a cluster of upright tubes united together by small transverse tubules.
Tubivalve
n.
(Zool.) A shell or tube formed by an annelid, as a serpula.
Tubman
n.
(Eng. Law) One of the two most experienced barristers in the Court of Exchequer. Cf. Postman, 2.
Tubular
a.
• Having the form of a tube, or pipe; consisting of a pipe; fistular; as, a tubular snout; a tubular calyx. Also, containing, or provided with, tubes.
Tubularia
n.
(Zool.) A genus of hydroids having large, naked, flowerlike hydranths at the summits of long, slender, usually simple, stems. The gonophores are small, and form clusters at the bases of the outer tentacles.
Tubulariae
n. pl.
• See Tubularida.
Tubularian
n.
(Zool.) Any hydroid belonging to the suborder Tubularida.
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the tubularians.
Tubularida
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive division of Hydroidea; the tubularians; — called also Athecata, Gymnoblastea, and Tubulariae.
Tubulate
a.
• Tubular; tubulated; tubulous.
Tubulated
a.
• Made in the form of a small tube; provided with a tube, or elongated opening.
Tubulation
n.
(Chem.) The act of shaping or making a tube, or of providing with a tube; also, a tube or tubulure; as, the tubulation of a retort.
Tubulature
n.
(Chem.) A tubulure.
Tubule
n.
• A small pipe or fistular body; a little tube.
(Anat.) A minute tube lined with glandular epithelium; as, the uriniferous tubules of the kidney.
Tubulibranchian
n.
(Zool.) One of the Tubulibranchiata.
Tubulibranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of gastropod mollusks having a tubular shell. Vermetus is an example.
Tubulicole
n.
(Zool.) Any hydroid which has tubular chitinous stems.
Tubulidentate
a.
(Zool.) Having teeth traversed by canals; — said of certain edentates.
Tubuliform
a.
• Having the form of a small tube.
Tubulipore
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of Bryozoa belonging to Tubulipora and allied genera, having tubular calcareous calicles.
Tubulure
n.
(Chem.) A short tubular opening at the top of a retort, or at the top or side of a bottle; a tubulation.
Tucan
n.
(Zool.) The Mexican pocket gopher (Geomys Mexicanus). It resembles the common pocket gopher of the Western United States, but is larger. Called also tugan, and tuza.
Tucet
n.
• See Tucket, a steak.
Tuch
n.
• A dark-colored kind of marble; touchstone.
Tuck
n.
• A long, narrow sword; a rapier.
n.
• The beat of a drum.
v. t.
• To draw up; to shorten; to fold under; to press into a narrower compass; as, to tuck the bedclothes in; to tuck up one's sleeves.
• To make a tuck or tucks in; as, to tuck a dress.
• To inclose; to put within; to press into a close place; as, to tuck a child into a bed; to tuck a book under one's arm, or into a pocket.
• To full, as cloth.
v. i.
• To contract; to draw together.
n.
• A horizontal sewed fold, such as is made in a garment, to shorten it; a plait.
• A small net used for taking fish from a larger one; — called also tuck-net.
• A pull; a lugging.
(Naut.) The part of a vessel where the ends of the bottom planks meet under the stern.
• Food; pastry; sweetmeats.
Tuckahoe
n.
(Bot.) A curious vegetable production of the Southern Atlantic United States, growing under ground like a truffle and often attaining immense size. The real nature is unknown. Called also Indian bread, and Indian loaf.
Tucker
n.
• One who, or that which, tucks; specifically, an instrument with which tuck are made.
• A narrow piece of linen or the like, folded across the breast, or attached to the gown at the neck, forming a part of a woman's dress in the 17th century and later.
• A fuller.
v. t.
• To tire; to weary; — usually with out.
Tucket
n.
• A slight flourish on a trumpet; a fanfare.
n.
• A steak; a collop.
Tucum
n.
• A fine, strong fiber obtained from the young leaves of a Brazilian palm (Astrocaryum vulgare), used for cordage, bowstrings, etc.; also, the plant yielding this fiber. Called also tecum, and tecum fiber.
Tucuma
n.
(Bot.) A Brazilian palm (Astrocaryum Tucuma) which furnishes an edible fruit.
Tudor
a.
• Of or pertaining to a royal line of England, descended from Owen Tudor of Wales, who married the widowed queen of Henry V. The first reigning Tudor was Henry VII.; the last, Elizabeth.
Tue
n.
(Zool.) The parson bird.
Tuefall
n.
(Arch.) See To-fall.
Tuesday
n.
• The third day of the week, following Monday and preceding Wednesday.
Tuet
n.
(Zool.) The lapwing.
Tufa
(Min.) A soft or porous stone formed by depositions from water, usually calcareous; — called also calcareous tufa.
• A friable volcanic rock or conglomerate, formed of consolidated cinders, or scoria.
Tufaceous
a.
(Min.) Pertaining to tufa; consisting of, or resembling, tufa.
Tuff
n.
(Min.) Same as Tufa.
Tuffoon
n.
• See Typhoon.
Tuft
n.
• A collection of small, flexible, or soft things in a knot or bunch; a waving or bending and spreading cluster; as, a tuft of flowers or feathers.
• A cluster; a clump; as, a tuft of plants.
• A nobleman, or person of quality, especially in the English universities; — so called from the tuft, or gold tassel, on the cap worn by them.
v. t.
• To separate into tufts.
• To adorn with tufts or with a tuft.
v. i.
• To grow in, or form, a tuft or tufts.
Tufted
a.
• Adorned with a tuft; as, the tufted duck.
• Growing in tufts or clusters; tufty.
Tufthunter
n.
• A hanger-on to noblemen, or persons of quality, especially in English universities; a toady. See 1st Tuft, 3.
Tufthunting
n.
• The practice of seeking after, and hanging on, noblemen, or persons of quality, especially in English universities.
Tufty
a.
• Abounding with tufts.
• Growing in tufts or clusters.
Tug
v. t.
• To pull or draw with great effort; to draw along with continued exertion; to haul along; to tow; as, to tug a loaded cart; to tug a ship into port.
• To pull; to pluck.
v. i.
• To pull with great effort; to strain in labor; as, to tug at the oar; to tug against the stream.
• To labor; to strive; to struggle.
n.
• A pull with the utmost effort, as in the athletic contest called tug of war; a supreme effort.
• A sort of vehicle, used for conveying timber and heavy articles.
(Naut.) A small, powerful steamboat used to tow vessels; — called also steam tug, tugboat, and towboat.
• A trace, or drawing strap, of a harness.
(Mining.) An iron hook of a hoisting tub, to which a tackle is affixed.
Tugan
n.
(Zool.) Same as Tucan.
Tugboat
n.
• See Tug, n., 3.
Tugger
n.
• One who tugs.
Tuggingly
adv.
• In a tugging manner; with laborious pulling.
Tuition
n.
• Superintending care over a young person; the particular watch and care of a tutor or guardian over his pupil or ward; guardianship.
• Especially, the act, art, or business of teaching; instruction; as, children are sent to school for tuition; his tuition was thorough.
• The money paid for instruction; the price or payment for instruction.
Tuitionary
a.
• Of or pertaining to tuition.
Tule
n.
(Bot.) A large bulrush (Scirpus lacustris, and S. Tatora) growing abundantly on overflowed land in California and elsewhere.
Tulip
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the liliaceous genus Tulipa. Many varieties are cultivated for their beautiful, often variegated flowers.
Tulipist
n.
• A person who is especially devoted to the cultivation of tulips.
Tulipomania
n.
• A violent passion for the acquisition or cultivation of tulips; — a word said by Beckman to have been coined by Menage.
Tulipomaniac
n.
• One who is affected with tulipomania.
Tulipwood
n.
• The beautiful rose-colored striped wood of a Brazilian tree (Physocalymna floribunda), much used by cabinetmakers for inlaying.
Tull
v. t.
• To allure; to tole.
Tulle
n.
• A kind of silk lace or light netting, used for veils, etc.
Tulle
n.
• In plate armor, a suspended plate in from of the thigh. See Illust. of Tasses.
Tullian
a.
• Belonging to, or in the style of, Tully (Marcus Tullius Cicero).
Tullibee
n.
(Zool.) A whitefish (Coregonus tullibee) found in the Great Lakes of North America; — called also mongrel whitefish.
Tumble
v. i.
• To roll over, or to and fro; to throw one's self about; as, a person on pain tumbles and tosses.
• To roll down; to fall suddenly and violently; to be precipitated; as, to tumble from a scaffold.
• To play tricks by various movements and contortions of the body; to perform the feats of an acrobat.
v. t.
• To turn over; to turn or throw about, as for examination or search; to roll or move in a rough, coarse, or unceremonious manner; to throw down or headlong; to precipitate; — sometimes with over, about, etc.; as, to tumble books or papers.
• To disturb; to rumple; as, to tumble a bed.
n.
• Act of tumbling, or rolling over; a fall.
Tumblebug
n.
• See Tumbledung.
Tumbledung
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of scaraboid beetles belonging to Scarabaeus, Copris, Phanaeus, and allied genera. The female lays her eggs in a globular mass of dung which she rolls by means of her hind legs to a burrow excavated in the earth in which she buries it.
Tumbler
n.
• One who tumbles; one who plays tricks by various motions of the body; an acrobat.
• A movable obstruction in a lock, consisting of a lever, latch, wheel, slide, or the like, which must be adjusted to a particular position by a key or other means before the bolt can be thrown in locking or unlocking.
(Firearms) A piece attached to, or forming part of, the hammer of a gunlock, upon which the mainspring acts and in which are the notches for sear point to enter.
• A drinking glass, without a foot or stem; — so called because originally it had a pointed or convex base, and could not be set down with any liquor in it, thus compelling the drinker to finish his measure.
(Zool.) A variety of the domestic pigeon remarkable for its habit of tumbling, or turning somersaults, during its flight.
(Zool.) A breed of dogs that tumble when pursuing game. They were formerly used in hunting rabbits.
• A kind of cart; a tumbrel.
Tumblerful
n.
• As much as a tumbler will hold; enough to fill a tumbler.
Tumbleweed
n.
(Bot.) Any plant which habitually breaks away from its roots in the autumn, and is driven by the wind, as a light, rolling mass, over the fields and prairies; as witch grass, wild indigo, Amarantus albus, etc.
Tumbling
• a. & vb. n. from Tumble, v.
Tumefaction
n.
• The act or process of tumefying, swelling, or rising into a tumor; a swelling.
Tumefy
v. t.
• To swell; to cause to swell, or puff up.
v. i.
• To rise in a tumor; to swell.
Tumid
a.
• Swelled, enlarged, or distended; as, a tumid leg; tumid flesh.
• Rising above the level; protuberant.
• Swelling in sound or sense; pompous; puffy; inflated; bombastic; falsely sublime; turgid; as, a tumid expression; a tumid style.
Tumidity
n.
• The quality or state of being tumid.
Tummals
n.
(Mining) A great quantity or heap.
Tumor
n.
(Med.) A morbid swelling, prominence, or growth, on any part of the body; especially, a growth produced by deposition of new tissue; a neoplasm.
• Affected pomp; bombast; swelling words or expressions; false magnificence or sublimity.
Tumored
a.
• Distended; swelled.
Tumorous
a.
• Swelling; protuberant.
• Inflated; bombastic.
Tump
n.
• A little hillock; a knoll.
v. t.
• To form a mass of earth or a hillock about; as, to tump teasel.
• To draw or drag, as a deer or other animal after it has been killed.
Tumpline
n.
• A strap placed across a man's forehead to assist him in carrying a pack on his back.
Tumular
a.
• Consisting in a heap; formed or being in a heap or hillock.
Tumulate
v. t.
• To cover, as a corpse, with a mound or tomb; to bury.
v. i.
• To swell.
Tumulose
a.
• Tumulous.
Tumulosity
n.
• The quality or state of being tumulous; hilliness.
Tumulous
a.
• Full of small hills or mounds; hilly; tumulose.
Tumult
n.
• The commotion or agitation of a multitude, usually accompanied with great noise, uproar, and confusion of voices; hurly-burly; noisy confusion.
• Violent commotion or agitation, with confusion of sounds; as, the tumult of the elements.
• Irregular or confused motion; agitation; high excitement; as, the tumult of the spirits or passions.
v. i.
• To make a tumult; to be in great commotion.
Tumulter
n.
• A maker of tumults.
Tumultuarily
adv.
• In a tumultuary manner.
Tumultuariness
n.
• The quality or state of being tumultuary.
Tumultuary
a.
• Attended by, or producing, a tumult; disorderly; promiscuous; confused; tumultuous.
• Restless; agitated; unquiet.
Tumultuate
v. i.
• To make a tumult.
Tumultuation
n.
• Irregular or disorderly movement; commotion; as, the tumultuation of the parts of a fluid.
Tumultuous
a.
• Full of tumult; characterized by tumult; disorderly; turbulent.
• Conducted with disorder; noisy; confused; boisterous; disorderly; as, a tumultuous assembly or meeting.
• Agitated, as with conflicting passions; disturbed.
• Turbulent; violent; as, a tumultuous speech.
Tumulus
n.
• An artificial hillock, especially one raised over a grave, particularly over the graves of persons buried in ancient times; a barrow.
Tun
n.
• A large cask; an oblong vessel bulging in the middle, like a pipe or puncheon, and girt with hoops; a wine cask.
(Brewing) A fermenting vat.
• A certain measure for liquids, as for wine, equal to two pipes, four hogsheads, or 252 gallons. In different countries, the tun differs in quantity.
(Com.) A weight of 2,240 pounds. See Ton.
• An indefinite large quantity.
• A drunkard; — so called humorously, or in contempt.
(Zool.) Any shell belonging to Dolium and allied genera; — called also tun-shell.
v. i.
• To put into tuns, or casks.
Tuna
n.
(Bot.) The Opuntia Tuna. See Prickly pear, under Prickly.
n.
(Zool.) The tunny.
• The bonito, 2.
Tunable
a.
• Capable of being tuned, or made harmonious; hence, harmonious; musical; tuneful.
Tundra
n.
• A rolling, marshy, mossy plain of Northern Siberia.
Tune
n.
• A sound; a note; a tone.
(Mus.) A rhythmical, melodious, symmetrical series of tones for one voice or instrument, or for any number of voices or instruments in unison, or two or more such series forming parts in harmony; a melody; an air; as, a merry tune; a mournful tune; a slow tune; a psalm tune. See Air.
• The state of giving the proper, sound or sounds; just intonation; harmonious accordance; pitch of the voice or an instrument; adjustment of the parts of an instrument so as to harmonize with itself or with others; as, the piano, or the organ, is not in tune.
• Order; harmony; concord; fit disposition, temper, or humor; right mood.
v. t.
• To put into a state adapted to produce the proper sounds; to harmonize, to cause to be in tune; to correct the tone of; as, to tune a piano or a violin.
• To give tone to; to attune; to adapt in style of music; to make harmonious.
• To sing with melody or harmony.
• To put into a proper state or disposition.
v. i.
• To form one sound to another; to form accordant musical sounds.
• To utter inarticulate harmony with the voice; to sing without pronouncing words; to hum.
Tuneful
a.
• Harmonious; melodious; musical; as, tuneful notes.
Tuneless
a.
• Without tune; inharmonious; unmusical.
• Not employed in making music; as, tuneless harps.
• Not expressed in music or poetry; unsung.
Tuner
n.
• One who tunes; especially, one whose occupation is to tune musical instruments.
Tungstate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of tungstic acid; a wolframate.
Tungsten
n.
(Chem.) A rare element of the chromium group found in certain minerals, as wolfram and scheelite, and isolated as a heavy steel-gray metal which is very hard and infusible. It has both acid and basic properties. When alloyed in small quantities with steel, it greatly increases its hardness. Symbol W (Wolframium). Atomic weight, 183.6. Specific gravity, 18.
(Min.) Scheelite, or calcium tungstate.
Tungstenic
a.
• Of or pertaining to tungsten; containing tungsten; as, tungstenic ores.
Tungstic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to tungsten; derived from, or resembling, tungsten; wolframic; as, tungstic oxide.
Tungstite
n.
(Min.) The oxide of tungsten, a yellow mineral occurring in a pulverulent form. It is often associated with wolfram.
Tunguses
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A group of roving Turanian tribes occupying Eastern Siberia and the Amoor valley. They resemble the Mongols.
Tungusic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Tunguses; as, the Tungusic dialects.
Tunhoof
n.
(Bot.) Ground ivy; alehoof.
Tunic
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) An under-garment worn by the ancient Romans of both sexes. It was made with or without sleeves, reached to or below the knees, and was confined at the waist by a girdle.
• Any similar garment worm by ancient or Oriental peoples; also, a common name for various styles of loose-fitting under-garments and over-garments worn in modern times by Europeans and others.
(R. C. Ch.) Same as Tunicle.
(Anat.) A membrane, or layer of tissue, especially when enveloping an organ or part, as the eye.
(Bot.) A natural covering; an integument; as, the tunic of a seed.
(Zool.) See Mantle, n., 3 (a).
Tunicary
n.
(Zool.) One of the Tunicata.
Tunicata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A grand division of the animal kingdom, intermediate, in some respects, between the invertebrates and vertebrates, and by some writers united with the latter. They were formerly classed with acephalous mollusks. The body is usually covered with a firm external tunic, consisting in part of cellulose, and having two openings, one for the entrance and one for the exit of water. The pharynx is usually dilated in the form of a sac, pierced by several series of ciliated slits, and serves as a gill.
Tunicate
n.
(Zool.) One of the Tunicata.
Tunicin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) Animal cellulose; a substance present in the mantle, or tunic, of the Tunicates, which resembles, or is identical with, the cellulose of the vegetable kingdom.
Tunicle
n.
• A slight natural covering; an integument.
(R. C. Ch.) A short, close-fitting vestment worn by bishops under the dalmatic, and by subdeacons.
Tuning
• a. & n. from Tune, v.
Tunk
n.
• A sharp blow; a thump.
Tunker
n.
(Eccl.) Same as Dunker.
Tunnage
n.
• See Tonnage.
Tunnel
n. .
• A vessel with a broad mouth at one end, a pipe or tube at the other, for conveying liquor, fluids, etc., into casks, bottles, or other vessels; a funnel.
• The opening of a chimney for the passage of smoke; a flue; a funnel.
• An artificial passage or archway for conducting canals or railroads under elevated ground, for the formation of roads under rivers or canals, and the construction of sewers, drains, and the like.
(Mining) A level passage driven across the measures, or at right angles to veins which it is desired to reach; — distinguished from the drift, or gangway, which is led along the vein when reached by the tunnel.
v. t.
• To form into a tunnel, or funnel, or to form like a tunnel; as, to tunnel fibrous plants into nests.
Tunny
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of large oceanic fishes belonging to the Mackerel family, especially the common or great tunny (Orcynus or Albacora thynnus) native of the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean. It sometimes weighs a thousand pounds or more, and is extensively caught in the Mediterranean. On the American coast it is called horse mackerel. See Illust. of Horse mackerel, under Horse.
Tup
v. t. & i.
• To butt, as a ram does.
• To cover; — said of a ram.
n.
(Zool.) A ram.
Tupaiid
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of East Indian and Asiatic insectivores of the family Tupaiidae, somewhat resembling squirrels in size and arboreal habits. The nose is long and pointed.
Tupal
n.
(Zool.) Any one of the tupaiids.
Tupelo
n.
(Bot.) A North American tree (Nyssa multiflora) of the Dogwood family, having brilliant, glossy foliage and acid red berries. The wood is crossgrained and very difficult to split. Called also black gum, sour gum, and pepperidge.
Tupman
n.
• A man who breeds, or deals in tups.
Tur
n.
(Zool.) The urus.
Turacin
n.
(Physiol.)(Chem.) A red or crimson pigment obtained from certain feathers of several species of turacou; whence the name. It contains nearly six per cent of copper.
Turacou
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of plantain eaters of the genus Turacus, native of Africa. They are remarkable for the peculiar green and red pigments found in their feathers.
Turacoverdin
n.
(Physiol.)(Chem.) A green pigment found in the feathers of the turacou. See Turacin.
Turanian
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or designating, an extensive family of languages of simple structure and low grade (called also Altaic, Ural-Altaic, and Scythian), spoken in the northern parts of Europe and Asia and Central Asia; of pertaining to, or designating, the people who speak these languages.
n.
• One of the Turanians.
Turanians
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) An extensive division of mankind including the Mongols and allied races of Asia, together with the Malays and Polynesians.
• A group of races or tribes inhabiting Asia and closely related to the Mongols.
Turatt
n.
(Zool.) The hare kangaroo.
Turban
n.
• A headdress worn by men in the Levant and by most Mohammedans of the male sex, consisting of a cap, and a sash, scarf, or shawl, usually of cotton or linen, wound about the cap, and sometimes hanging down the neck.
• A kind of headdress worn by women.
(Zool.) The whole set of whorls of a spiral shell.
Turband
n.
• A turban.
Turbaned
a.
• Wearing a turban.
Turbant
n.
• A turban.
Turbary
n.
(Eng. Law) A right of digging turf on another man's land; also, the ground where turf is dug.
Turbellaria
n.
(Zool.) An extensive group of worms which have the body covered externally with vibrating cilia. It includes the Rhabdoc&oe;la and Dendroc&oe;la. Formerly, the nemerteans were also included in this group.
Turbellarian
n.
(Zool.) One of the Turbellaria. Also used adjectively.
Turbeth
n.
• See Turpeth.
Turbid
a.
• Having the lees or sediment disturbed; roiled; muddy; thick; not clear; — used of liquids of any kind; as, turbid water; turbid wine.
• Disturbed; confused; disordered.
Turbidity
n.
• Turbidness.
Turbidly
adv.
• In a turbid manner; with muddiness or confusion.
• Proudly; haughtily.
Turbidness
n.
• The quality or state of being turbid; muddiness; foulness.
Turbillion
n.
• A whirl; a vortex.
Turbinaceous
a.
• Of or pertaining to peat, or turf; of the nature of peat, or turf; peaty; turfy.
Turbinal
a.
(Anat.) Rolled in a spiral; scroll-like; turbinate; — applied to the thin, plicated, bony or cartilaginous plates which support the olfactory and mucous membranes of the nasal chambers.
n.
(Anat.) A turbinal bone or cartilage.
Turbinate
v. i.
• To revolve or spin like a top; to whirl.
Turbination
n.
• The act of spinning or whirling, as a top.
Turbine
n.
• A water wheel, commonly horizontal, variously constructed, but usually having a series of curved floats or buckets, against which the water acts by its impulse or reaction in flowing either outward from a central chamber, inward from an external casing, or from above downward, etc.; — also called turbine wheel.
Turbinella
n.
(Zool.) A genus of large marine gastropods having a thick heavy shell with conspicuous folds on the columella.
Turbinite
n.
(Paleon.) A petrified shell resembling the genus Turbo.
Turbinoid
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to Turbo or the family Turbinidae.
Turbit
n.
(Zool.) The turbot.
(Zool.) A variety of the domestic pigeon, remarkable for its short beak.
Turbite
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil turbo.
Turbith
n.
• See Turpeth.
Turbo
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous marine gastropods of the genus Turbo or family Turbinidae, usually having a turbinate shell, pearly on the inside, and a calcareous operculum.
Turbot
n.
(Zool.) A large European flounder (Rhombus maximus) highly esteemed as a food fish. It often weighs from thirty to forty pounds. Its color on the upper side is brownish with small roundish tubercles scattered over the surface. The lower, or blind, side is white. Called also bannock fluke.
• Any one of numerous species of flounders more or less related to the true turbots, as the American plaice, or summer flounder (see Flounder), the halibut, and the diamond flounder (Hypsopsetta guttulata) of California.
• The filefish; — so called in Bermuda.
• The trigger fish.
Turbulence
n.
• The quality or state of being turbulent; a disturbed state; tumult; disorder; agitation.
Turbulency
n.
• Turbulence.
Turbulent
a.
• Disturbed; agitated; tumultuous; roused to violent commotion; as, the turbulent ocean.
• Disposed to insubordination and disorder; restless; unquiet; refractory; as, turbulent spirits.
• Producing commotion; disturbing; exciting.
Turbulently
adv.
• In a turbulent manner.
Turcism
n.
• A mode of speech peculiar to the Turks; a Turkish idiom or expression; also, in general, a Turkish mode or custom.
Turcoman
n.
• A member of a tribe of Turanians inhabiting a region east of the Caspian Sea.
• A Turcoman carpet.
Turdiformes
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of singing birds including the thrushes and allied kinds.
Turdus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of singing birds including the true thrushes.
Tureen
n.
• A large, deep vessel for holding soup, or other liquid food, at the table.
Tureenful
n.
• As much as a tureen can hold; enough to fill a tureen.
Turf
n.
• That upper stratum of earth and vegetable mold which is filled with the roots of grass and other small plants, so as to adhere and form a kind of mat; sward; sod.
• Peat, especially when prepared for fuel. See Peat.
• Race course; horse racing; — preceded by the.
v. t.
• To cover with turf or sod; as, to turf a bank, of the border of a terrace.
Turfen
a.
• Made of turf; covered with turf.
Turfiness
n.
• Quality or state of being turfy.
Turfing
n.
• The act or process of providing or covering with turf.
Turfite
n.
• A votary of the turf, or race course; hence, sometimes, a blackleg.
Turfless
a.
• Destitute of turf.
Turfman
n.
• A turfite; a votary of the turf, or race course.
Turfy
a.
• Abounding with turf; made of, or covered with, turf.
• Having the nature or appearance of turf.
• Of or pertaining to the turf, or horse racing.
Turgent
a.
• Rising into a tumor, or a puffy state; swelling; tumid; as, turgent humors.
• Inflated; bombastic; turgid; pompous.
Turgesce
v. i.
• To become turgid; to swell or be inflated.
Turgescent
a.
• Becoming turgid or inflated; swelling; growing big.
Turgid
a.
• Distended beyond the natural state by some internal agent or expansive force; swelled; swollen; bloated; inflated; tumid; — especially applied to an enlarged part of the body; as, a turgid limb; turgid fruit.
• Swelling in style or language; vainly ostentatious; bombastic; pompous; as, a turgid style of speaking.
Turgidity
n.
• The quality or state of being turgid.
Turgidous
a.
• Turgid.
Turio
n.
(Bot.) A shoot or sprout from the ground.
Turiole
n.
• The golden oriole.
Turion
n.
(Bot.) Same as Turio.
Turioniferous
a.
• Producing shoots, as asparagus.
Turk
n.
• A member of any of numerous Tartar tribes of Central Asia, etc.; esp., one of the dominant race in Turkey.
• A native or inhabitant of Turkey.
• A Mohammedan; esp., one living in Turkey.
(Zool.) The plum weevil. See Curculio, and Plum weevil, under Plum.
Turkeis
a.
• Turkish.
Turkey
n.
• An empire in the southeast of Europe and southwest of Asia.
Turkeys
a.
• Turkish.
Turkic
a.
• Turkish.
Turkis
n.
(Min.) Turquois.
Turkish
a.
• Of or pertaining to Turkey or the Turks.
n.
• The language spoken by Turks, esp. that of the people of Turkey.
Turkism
n.
• Same as Turcism.
Turkle
n.
• A turtle.
Turko
n.
• One of a body of native Algerian tirailleurs in the French army, dressed as a Turk.
Turkois
n. & a.
• Turquoise.
Turkoman
n.
• Same as Turcoman.
Turlupin
n.
(Fr. Eccl. Hist.) One of the precursors of the Reformation; — a nickname corresponding to Lollard, etc.
Turm
n.
• A troop; a company.
Turmaline
n.
(Min.) See Tourmaline.
Turmeric
n.
(Bot.) An East Indian plant of the genus Curcuma, of the Ginger family.
• The root or rootstock of the Curcuma longa. It is externally grayish, but internally of a deep, lively yellow or saffron color, and has a slight aromatic smell, and a bitterish, slightly acrid taste. It is used for a dye, a medicine, a condiment, and a chemical test.
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to turmeric; resembling, or obtained from, turmeric; specif., designating an acid obtained by the oxidation of turmerol.
Turmerol
n.
(Chem.) Turmeric oil, a brownish yellow, oily substance extracted from turmeric by ligroin.
Turmoil
n.
• Harassing labor; trouble; molestation by tumult; disturbance; worrying confusion.
v. t.
• To harass with commotion; to disquiet; to worry.
v. i.
• To be disquieted or confused; to be in commotion.
Turn
v. t.
• To cause to move upon a center, or as if upon a center; to give circular motion to; to cause to revolve; to cause to move round, either partially, wholly, or repeatedly; to make to change position so as to present other sides in given directions; to make to face otherwise; as, to turn a wheel or a spindle; to turn the body or the head.
• To cause to present a different side uppermost or outmost; to make the upper side the lower, or the inside to be the outside of; to reverse the position of; as, to turn a box or a board; to turn a coat.
• To give another direction, tendency, or inclination to; to direct otherwise; to deflect; to incline differently; — used both literally and figuratively; as, to turn the eyes to the heavens; to turn a horse from the road, or a ship from her course; to turn the attention to or from something.
• To change from a given use or office; to divert, as to another purpose or end; to transfer; to use or employ; to apply; to devote.
• To change the form, quality, aspect, or effect of; to alter; to metamorphose; to convert; to transform; — often with to or into before the word denoting the effect or product of the change; as, to turn a worm into a winged insect; to turn green to blue; to turn prose into verse; to turn a Whig to a Tory, or a Hindoo to a Christian; to turn good to evil, and the like.
• To form in a lathe; to shape or fashion (anything) by applying a cutting tool to it while revolving; as, to turn the legs of stools or tables; to turn ivory or metal.
• Hence, to give form to; to shape; to mold; to put in proper condition; to adapt.
• To translate; to construe; as, to turn the Iliad.
• To make acid or sour; to ferment; to curdle, etc.: as, to turn cider or wine; electricity turns milk quickly.
• To sicken; to nauseate; as, an emetic turns one's stomach.
v. i.
• To move round; to have a circular motion; to revolve entirely, repeatedly, or partially; to change position, so as to face differently; to whirl or wheel round; as, a wheel turns on its axis; a spindle turns on a pivot; a man turns on his heel.
• Hence, to revolve as if upon a point of support; to hinge; to depend; as, the decision turns on a single fact.
• To result or terminate; to come about; to eventuate; to issue.
• To be deflected; to take a different direction or tendency; to be directed otherwise; to be differently applied; to be transferred; as, to turn from the road.
• To be changed, altered, or transformed; to become transmuted; also, to become by a change or changes; to grow; as, wood turns to stone; water turns to ice; one color turns to another; to turn Mohammedan.
• To undergo the process of turning on a lathe; as, ivory turns well.
• To become acid; to sour; — said of milk, ale, etc.
• To become giddy; — said of the head or brain.
• To be nauseated; — said of the stomach.
• To become inclined in the other direction; — said of scales.
• To change from ebb to flow, or from flow to ebb; — said of the tide.
(Obstetrics) To bring down the feet of a child in the womb, in order to facilitate delivery.
(Print.) To invert a type of the same thickness, as temporary substitute for any sort which is exhausted.
n.
• The act of turning; movement or motion about, or as if about, a center or axis; revolution; as, the turn of a wheel.
• Change of direction, course, or tendency; different order, position, or aspect of affairs; alteration; vicissitude; as, the turn of the tide.
• One of the successive portions of a course, or of a series of occurrences, reckoning from change to change; hence, a winding; a bend; a meander.
• A circuitous walk, or a walk to and fro, ending where it began; a short walk; a stroll.
• Successive course; opportunity enjoyed by alternation with another or with others, or in due order; due chance; alternate or incidental occasion; appropriate time.
• Incidental or opportune deed or office; occasional act of kindness or malice; as, to do one an ill turn.
• Convenience; occasion; purpose; exigence; as, this will not serve his turn.
• Form; cast; shape; manner; fashion; — used in a literal or figurative sense; hence, form of expression; mode of signifying; as, the turn of thought; a man of a sprightly turn in conversation.
• A change of condition; especially, a sudden or recurring symptom of illness, as a nervous shock, or fainting spell; as, a bad turn.
• A fall off the ladder at the gallows; a hanging; — so called from the practice of causing the criminal to stand on a ladder which was turned over, so throwing him off, when the signal was given.
• A round of a rope or cord in order to secure it, as about a pin or a cleat.
(Mining) A pit sunk in some part of a drift.
(Eng. Law) A court of record, held by the sheriff twice a year in every hundred within his county.
(Med.) Monthly courses; menses.
(Mus.) An embellishment or grace (marked thus, ), commonly consisting of the principal note, or that on which the turn is made, with the note above, and the semitone below, the note above being sounded first, the principal note next, and the semitone below last, the three being performed quickly, as a triplet preceding the marked note. The turn may be inverted so as to begin with the lower note, in which case the sign is either placed on end thus , or drawn thus .
Turnbroach
n.
• A turnspit.
Turncoat
n.
• One who forsakes his party or his principles; a renegade; an apostate.
Turnep
n.
(Bot.) See Turnip.
Turner
n.
• One who turns; especially, one whose occupation is to form articles with a lathe.
(Zool.) A variety of pigeon; a tumbler.
n.
• A person who practices athletic or gymnastic exercises.
Turnerite
n.
(Min.) A variety of monazite.
Turnery
n.
• The art of fashioning solid bodies into cylindrical or other forms by means of a lathe.
• Things or forms made by a turner, or in the lathe.
Turney
n. & v.
• Tourney.
Turnhalle
n.
• A building used as a school of gymnastics.
Turnicimorphae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of birds including Turnix and allied genera, resembling quails in appearance but differing from them anatomically.
Turning
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, turns; also, a winding; a bending course; a fiexure; a meander.
• The place of a turn; an angle or corner, as of a road.
• Deviation from the way or proper course.
• Turnery, or the shaping of solid substances into various by means of a lathe and cutting tools.
• The pieces, or chips, detached in the process of turning from the material turned.
(Mil.) A maneuver by which an enemy or a position is turned.
Turningness
n.
• The quality of turning; instability; tergiversation.
Turnip
n.
(Bot.) The edible, fleshy, roundish, or somewhat conical, root of a cruciferous plant (Brassica campestris, var. Napus); also, the plant itself.
Turnix
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of birds belonging to Turnix or Hemipodius and allied genera of the family Turnicidae. These birds resemble quails and partridges in general appearance and in some of their habits, but differ in important anatomical characteristics. The hind toe is usually lacking. They are found in Asia, Africa, Southern Europe, the East Indian Islands, and esp. in Australia and adjacent islands, where they are called quails (see Quail, n., 3.). See Turnicimorphae.
Turnkey
n.
• A person who has charge of the keys of a prison, for opening and fastening the doors; a warder.
(Dentistry) An instrument with a hinged claw, — used for extracting teeth with a twist.
Turnover
n.
• The act or result of turning over; an upset; as, a bad turnover in a carriage.
• A semicircular pie or tart made by turning one half of a circular crust over the other, inclosing the fruit or other materials.
• An apprentice, in any trade, who is handed over from one master to another to complete his time.
a.
• Admitting of being turned over; made to be turned over; as, a turnover collar, etc.
Turnpike
n.
• A frame consisting of two bars crossing each other at right angles and turning on a post or pin, to hinder the passage of beasts, but admitting a person to pass between the arms; a turnstile. See Turnstile, 1.
• A gate or bar set across a road to stop carriages, animals, and sometimes people, till toll is paid for keeping the road in repair; a tollgate.
• A turnpike road.
• A winding stairway.
(Mil.) A beam filled with spikes to obstruct passage; a cheval-de-frise.
v. t.
• To form, as a road, in the manner of a turnpike road; into a rounded form, as the path of a road.
Turnplate
n.
• A turntable.
Turnsole
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Heliotropium; heliotrope; — so named because its flowers are supposed to turn toward the sun.
• The sunflower.
• A kind of spurge (Euphorbia Helioscopia).
• The euphorbiaceous plant Chrozophora tinctoria.
(Chem.) Litmus.
• A purple dye obtained from the plant turnsole. See def. 1 (d).
Turnspit
n.
• One who turns a spit; hence, a person engaged in some menial office.
(Zool.) A small breed of dogs having a long body and short crooked legs. These dogs were formerly much used for turning a spit on which meat was roasting.
Turnstile
n.
• A revolving frame in a footpath, preventing the passage of horses or cattle, but admitting that of persons; a turnpike. See Turnpike, n., 1.
• A similar arrangement for registering the number of persons passing through a gateway, doorway, or the like.
Turnstone
n.
(Zool.) Any species of limicoline birds of the genera Strepsilas and Arenaria, allied to the plovers, especially the common American and European species (Strepsilas interpres). They are so called from their habit of turning up small stones in search of mollusks and other aquatic animals. Called also brant bird, sand runner, sea quail, sea lark, sparkback, and skirlcrake.
Turntable
n.
• A large revolving platform, for turning railroad cars, locomotives, etc., in a different direction; — called also turnplate.
Turnus
n.
(Zool.) A common, large, handsome, American swallowtail butterfly, now regarded as one of the forms of Papilio, or Jasoniades, glaucus. The wings are yellow, margined and barred with black, and with an orange-red spot near the posterior angle of the hind wings. Called also tiger swallowtail. See Illust. under Swallowtail.
Turnverein
n.
• A company or association of gymnasts and athletes.
Turnwrest
n.
• Designating a cumbersome style of plow used in England, esp. in Kent.
• designating a kind of hillside plow.
Turonian
n.
(Geol.) One of the subdivisions into which the Upper Cretaceous formation of Europe is divided.
Turpentine
n.
• A semifluid or fluid oleoresin, primarily the exudation of the terebinth, or turpentine, tree (Pistacia Terebinthus), a native of the Mediterranean region. It is also obtained from many coniferous trees, especially species of pine, larch, and fir.
Turpeth
n.
(Bot.) The root of Ipom&oe;a Turpethum, a plant of Ceylon, Malabar, and Australia, formerly used in medicine as a purgative; — sometimes called vegetable turpeth.
(Chem.) A heavy yellow powder, Hg3O2SO4, which consists of a basic mercuric sulphate; — called also turpeth mineral.
Turpin
n.
(Zool.) A land tortoise.
Turpitude
n.
• Inherent baseness or vileness of principle, words, or actions; shameful wickedness; depravity.
Turquoise
a.
• Having a fine light blue color, like that of choice mineral turquoise.
Turrel
n.
• A certain tool used by coopers.
Turret
n.
(Arch.) A little tower, frequently a merely ornamental structure at one of the angles of a larger structure.
(Anc. Mil.) A movable building, of a square form, consisting of ten or even twenty stories and sometimes one hundred and twenty cubits high, usually moved on wheels, and employed in approaching a fortified place, for carrying soldiers, engines, ladders, casting bridges, and other necessaries.
(Mil.) A revolving tower constructed of thick iron plates, within which cannon are mounted. Turrets are used on vessels of war and on land.
(Railroads) The elevated central portion of the roof of a passenger car. Its sides are pierced for light and ventilation.
Turreted
a.
• Furnished with a turret or turrets; specifically (Zool.), having the whorls somewhat flattened on the upper side and often ornamented by spines or tubercles; — said of certain spiral shells.
• Formed like a tower; as, a turreted lamp.
Turribant
n.
• A turban.
Turrical
a.
• Of or pertaining to a turret, or tower; resembling a tower.
Turrilite
n.
(Paleon.) Any fossil ammonite of the genus Turrilites. The shell forms an open spiral with the later whorls separate.
Turritella
n.
(Zool.) Any spiral marine gastropod belonging to Turritella and allied genera. These mollusks have an elongated, turreted shell, composed of many whorls. They have a rounded aperture, and a horny multispiral operculum.
Turritelloid
a.
(Zool.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the turritellas.
Turtle
n.
(Zool.) The turtledove.
n.
(Zool.) Any one of the numerous species of Testudinata, especially a sea turtle, or chelonian.
(Printing) The curved plate in which the form is held in a type-revolving cylinder press.
Turtledove
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of pigeons belonging to Turtur and allied genera, native of various parts of the Old World; especially, the common European species (Turtur vulgaris), which is noted for its plaintive note, affectionate disposition, and devotion to its mate.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of pigeons more or less resembling the true turtledoves, as the American mourning dove (see under Dove), and the Australian turtledove (Stictopelia cuneata).
Turtlehead
n.
(Bot.) An American perennial herb (Chelone glabra) having white flowers shaped like the head of a turtle. Called also snakehead, shell flower, and balmony.
Turtler
n.
• One who catches turtles or tortoises.
Turtling
n.
• The act, practice, or art of catching turtles.
Turves
• pl. of Turf.
Tuscan
a.
• Of or pertaining to Tuscany in Italy; — specifically designating one of the five orders of architecture recognized and described by the Italian writers of the 16th century, or characteristic of the order. The original of this order was not used by the Greeks, but by the Romans under the Empire. See Order, and Illust. of Capital.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Tuscany.
Tuscaroras
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe of North American Indians formerly living on the Neuse and Tar rivers in North Carolina. They were conquered in 1713, after which the remnant of the tribe joined the Five Nations, thus forming the Six Nations. See Six Nations, under Six.
Tuscor
n.
• A tush of a horse.
Tush
interj.
• An exclamation indicating check, rebuke, or contempt; as, tush, tush! do not speak of it.
n.
• A long, pointed tooth; a tusk; — applied especially to certain teeth of horses.
Tusk
n.
(Zool.) Same as Torsk.
n.
(Zool.) One of the elongated incisor or canine teeth of the wild boar, elephant, etc.; hence, any long, protruding tooth.
(Zool.) A toothshell, or Dentalium; — called also tusk-shell.
(Carp.) A projecting member like a tenon, and serving the same or a similar purpose, but composed of several steps, or offsets. Thus, in the illustration, a is the tusk, and each of the several parts, or offsets, is called a tooth.
v. i.
• To bare or gnash the teeth.
Tusked
a.
• Furnished with tusks.
Tusker
n.
(Zool.) An elephant having large tusks.
Tusky
a.
• Having tusks.
Tussicular
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cough.
Tussle
v. i. & t.
• To struggle, as in sport; to scuffle; to struggle with.
n.
• A struggle; a scuffle.
Tussock
n.
• A tuft, as of grass, twigs, hair, or the like; especially, a dense tuft or bunch of grass or sedge.
(Bot.) Same as Tussock grass, below.
(Zool.) A caterpillar of any one of numerous species of bombycid moths. The body of these caterpillars is covered with hairs which form long tufts or brushes. Some species are very injurious to shade and fruit trees. Called also tussock caterpillar. See Orgyia.
Tussocky
a.
• Having the form of tussocks; full of, or covered with, tussocks, or tufts.
Tussuck
n.
• See Tussock.
Tut
• Be still; hush; — an exclamation used for checking or rebuking.
n.
• An imperial ensign consisting of a golden globe with a cross on it.
• A hassock.
Tutelage
n.
• The act of guarding or protecting; guardianship; protection; as, the king's right of seigniory and tutelage.
• The state of being under a guardian; care or protection enjoyed.
Tutele
n.
• Tutelage.
Tutenag
n.
(Metal.) Crude zinc.
• Packfong.
Tutor
n.
• One who guards, protects, watches over, or has the care of, some person or thing.
• A treasurer; a keeper.
(Civ. Law) One who has the charge of a child or pupil and his estate; a guardian.
• A private or public teacher.
(Eng. Universities) An officer or member of some hall, who instructs students, and is responsible for their discipline.
(Am. Colleges) An instructor of a lower rank than a professor.
v. t.
• To have the guardianship or care of; to teach; to instruct.
• To play the tutor toward; to treat with authority or severity.
Tutorage
n.
• The office or occupation of a tutor; tutorship; guardianship.
Tutoress
n.
• A woman who performs the duties of a tutor; an instructress.
Tutorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a tutor; belonging to, or exercised by, a tutor.
Tutorism
n.
• Tutorship.
Tutorize
v. t.
• To teach; to instruct.
Tutorship
n.
• The office, duty, or care of a tutor; guardianship; tutelage.
Tutory
n.
• Tutorage.
Tutress
n.
• Tutoress.
Tutrix
n.
• A female guardian; a tutoress.
Tutsan
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Hypericum (H. Androsoemum), from which a healing ointment is prepared in Spain; — called also parkleaves.
Tutti
n. pl.
(Mus.) All; — a direction for all the singers or players to perform together.
Tutty
n.
(Chem.) A yellow or brown amorphous substance obtained as a sublimation product in the flues of smelting furnaces of zinc, and consisting of a crude zinc oxide.
Tuyere
n.
• A nozzle, mouthpiece, or fixture through which the blast is delivered to the interior of a blast furnace, or to the fire of a forge.
Tuz
n.
• A lock or tuft of hair.
Tuza
n.
(Zool.) The tucan.
Twaddle
v. i. & t.
• To talk a weak and silly manner, like one whose faculties are decayed; to prate; to prattle.
n.
• Silly talk; gabble; fustian.
Twaddler
n.
• One who prates in a weak and silly manner, like one whose faculties are decayed.
Twaddling
• a. & n. from Twaddle, v.
Twaddy
n.
• Idle trifling; twaddle.
Twagger
n.
• A lamb.
Twain
a. & n.
• Two;- nearly obsolete in common discourse, but used in poetry and burlesque.
Twaite
n.
(Zool.) A European shad; — called also twaite shad. See Shad.
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A piece of cleared ground. See Thwaite.
Twang
n.
• A tang. See Tang a state.
v. i.
• To sound with a quick, harsh noise; to make the sound of a tense string pulled and suddenly let go; as, the bowstring twanged.
v. t.
• To make to sound, as by pulling a tense string and letting it go suddenly.
n.
• A harsh, quick sound, like that made by a stretched string when pulled and suddenly let go; as, the twang of a bowstring.
• An affected modulation of the voice; a kind of nasal sound.
Twangle
v. i. & t.
• To twang.
Twank
v. t.
• To cause to make a sharp twanging sound; to twang, or twangle.
Twankay
n.
• See Note under Tea, n., 1.
Twattle
v. i.
• To prate; to talk much and idly; to gabble; to chatter; to twaddle; as, a twattling gossip.
v. t.
• To make much of, as a domestic animal; to pet.
n.
• Act of prating; idle talk; twaddle.
Twattler
n.
• One who twattles; a twaddler.
Tway
a. & n.
• Two; twain.
Twayblade
n.
(Bot.) Any one of several orchidaceous plants which have only two leaves, as the species of Listera and of Liparis.
Tweag
v. t.
• To tweak.
Tweak
v. t.
• To pinch and pull with a sudden jerk and twist; to twitch; as, to tweak the nose.
n.
• A sharp pinch or jerk; a twist or twitch; as, a tweak of the nose.
• Trouble; distress; tweag.
• A prostitute.
Tweed
n.
• A soft and flexible fabric for men's wear, made wholly of wool except in some inferior kinds, the wool being dyed, usually in two colors, before weaving.
Tweedle
v. t.
• To handle lightly; — said with reference to awkward fiddling; hence, to influence as if by fiddling; to coax; to allure.
• To twist.
Tweel
n. & v.
• See Twill.
Tweer
n.
• Same as Tuyere.
Tweezers
n. pl.
• Small pinchers used to pluck out hairs, and for other purposes.
Twelfth
a.
• Next in order after the eleventh; coming after eleven others; — the ordinal of twelve.
• Consisting, or being one of, twelve equal parts into which anything is divided.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by twelve; one of twelve equal parts of one whole.
• The next in order after the eleventh.
(Mus.) An interval comprising an octave and a fifth.
Twelfthtide
n.
• The twelfth day after Christmas; Epiphany; — called also Twelfth-day.
Twelve
a.
• One more that eleven; two and ten; twice six; a dozen.
n.
• The number next following eleven; the sum of ten and two, or of twice six; twelve units or objects; a dozen.
• A symbol representing twelve units, as 12, or xii.
Twelvemo
a. & n.
• See Duodecimo.
Twelvemonth
n.
• A year which consists of twelve calendar months.
Twelvepence
n.
• A shilling sterling, being about twenty-four cents.
Twelvepenny
• , Sold for a shilling; worth or costing a shilling.
Twelvescore
n. & a.
• Twelve times twenty; two hundred and forty.
Twentieth
a.
• Next in order after the nineteenth; tenth after the tenth; coming after nineteen others; — the ordinal of twenty.
• Consisting, or being, one of twenty equal parts into which anything is divided.
n.
• The next in order after the nineteen; one coming after nineteen others.
• The quotient of a unit divided by twenty; one of twenty equal parts of one whole.
Twenty
a.
• One more that nineteen; twice; as, twenty men.
• An indefinite number more or less that twenty.
n.
• The number next following nineteen; the sum of twelve and eight, or twice ten; twenty units or objects; a score.
• A symbol representing twenty units, as 20, or xx.
Twentyfold
a.
• Twenty times as many.
Twey
a.
• Two.
Tweyfold
a.
• Twofold.
Twibil
n.
• A kind of mattock, or ax; esp., a tool like a pickax, but having, instead of the points, flat terminations, one of which is parallel to the handle, the other perpendicular to it.
• A tool for making mortises.
• A reaping hook.
Twibilled
a.
• Armed or provided with a twibil or twibils.
Twice
adv.
• Two times; once and again.
• Doubly; in twofold quantity or degree; as, twice the sum; he is twice as fortunate as his neighbor.
Twiddle
v. t.
• To touch lightly, or play with; to tweedle; to twirl; as, to twiddle one's thumbs; to twiddle a watch key.
v. i.
• To play with anything; hence, to be busy about trifles.
n.
• A slight twist with the fingers.
• A pimple.
Twifallow
v. t.
• To plow, or fallow, a second time (land that has been once fallowed).
Twifold
a.
• Twofold; double.
Twig
v. t.
• To twitch; to pull; to tweak.
v. t.
• To understand the meaning of; to comprehend; as, do you twig me?
• To observe slyly; also, to perceive; to discover.
n.
• A small shoot or branch of a tree or other plant, of no definite length or size.
v. t.
• To beat with twigs.
Twiggen
a.
• Made of twigs; wicker.
Twigger
n.
• A fornicator.
Twiggy
a.
• Of or pertaining to a twig or twigs; like a twig or twigs; full of twigs; abounding with shoots.
Twight
v. t.
• To twit.
• p. p. of Twitch.
Twighte
• imp. of Twitch.
Twigless
a.
• Having no twigs.
Twigsome
a.
• Full of, or abounding in, twigs; twiggy.
Twilight
n.
• The light perceived before the rising, and after the setting, of the sun, or when the sun is less than 18° below the horizon, occasioned by the illumination of the earth's atmosphere by the direct rays of the sun and their reflection on the earth.
• faint light; a dubious or uncertain medium through which anything is viewed.
a.
• Seen or done by twilight.
• Imperfectly illuminated; shaded; obscure.
Twill
v. i.
• To weave, as cloth, so as to produce the appearance of diagonal lines or ribs on the surface.
n.
• An appearance of diagonal lines or ribs produced in textile fabrics by causing the weft threads to pass over one and under two, or over one and under three or more, warp threads, instead of over one and under the next in regular succession, as in plain weaving.
• A fabric women with a twill.
• A quill, or spool, for yarn.
Twilly
n.
• A machine for cleansing or loosening wool by the action of a revolving cylinder covered with long iron spikes or teeth; a willy or willying machine; — called also twilly devil, and devil. See Devil, n., 6, and Willy.
Twilt
n.
• A quilt.
Twin
a.
• Being one of two born at a birth; as, a twin brother or sister.
• Being one of a pair much resembling one another; standing the relation of a twin to something else; — often followed by to or with.
(Bot.) Double; consisting of two similar and corresponding parts.
(Crystallog.) Composed of parts united according to some definite law of twinning. See Twin, n., 4.
n.
• One of two produced at a birth, especially by an animal that ordinarily brings forth but one at a birth; — used chiefly in the plural, and applied to the young of beasts as well as to human young.
(Astron.) A sign and constellation of the zodiac; Gemini. See Gemini.
• A person or thing that closely resembles another.
(Crystallog.) A compound crystal composed of two or more crystals, or parts of crystals, in reversed position with reference to each other.
v. i.
• To bring forth twins.
• To be born at the same birth.
v. t.
• To cause to be twins, or like twins in any way.
• To separate into two parts; to part; to divide; hence, to remove; also, to strip; to rob.
v. i.
• To depart from a place or thing.
Twinborn
a.
• Born at the same birth.
Twine
n.
• A twist; a convolution.
• A strong thread composed of two or three smaller threads or strands twisted together, and used for various purposes, as for binding small parcels, making nets, and the like; a small cord or string.
• The act of twining or winding round.
v. t.
• To twist together; to form by twisting or winding of threads; to wreathe; as, fine twined linen.
• To wind, as one thread around another, or as any flexible substance around another body.
• To wind about; to embrace; to entwine.
• To change the direction of.
• To mingle; to mix.
v. i.
• To mutually twist together; to become mutually involved.
• To wind; to bend; to make turns; to meander.
• To turn round; to revolve.
• To ascend in spiral lines about a support; to climb spirally; as, many plants twine.
Twiner
n.
(Bot.) Any plant which twines about a support.
Twinge
v. i.
• To pull with a twitch; to pinch; to tweak.
• To affect with a sharp, sudden pain; to torment with pinching or sharp pains.
v. i.
• To have a sudden, sharp, local pain, like a twitch; to suffer a keen, darting, or shooting pain; as, the side twinges.
n.
• A pinch; a tweak; a twitch.
• A sudden sharp pain; a darting local pain of momentary continuance; as, a twinge in the arm or side.
Twining
a.
• Winding around something; twisting; embracing; climbing by winding about a support; as, the hop is a twinning plant.
a.
• The act of one who, or that which, twines; (Bot.) the act of climbing spirally.
Twink
v. i.
• To twinkle.
n.
• A wink; a twinkling.
(Zool.) The chaffinch.
Twinkle
v. i.
• To open and shut the eye rapidly; to blink; to wink.
• To shine with an intermitted or a broken, quavering light; to flash at intervals; to sparkle; to scintillate.
n.
• A closing or opening, or a quick motion, of the eye; a wink or sparkle of the eye.
• A brief flash or gleam, esp. when rapidly repeated.
• The time of a wink; a twinkling.
Twinkler
n.
• One who, or that which, twinkles, or winks; a winker; an eye.
Twinkling
n.
• The act of one who, or of that which, twinkles; a quick movement of the eye; a wink; a twinkle.
• A shining with intermitted light; a scintillation; a sparkling; as, the twinkling of the stars.
• The time of a wink; a moment; an instant.
Twinleaf
n.
(Bot.) See Jeffersonia.
Twinlike
a.
• Closely resembling; being a counterpart.
Twinling
n.
• A young or little twin, especially a twin lamb.
Twinned
a.
(Crystallog.) Composed of parts united according to a law of twinning. See Twin, n., 4.
Twinner
n.
• One who gives birth to twins; a breeder of twins.
Twinning
n.
(Crystallog.) The assemblage of two or more crystals, or parts of crystals, in reversed position with reference to each other in accordance with some definite law; also, rarely, in artificial twinning (accomplished for example by pressure), the process by which this reversal is brought about.
Twinter
n.
• A domestic animal two winters old.
Twire
n.
• A twisted filament; a thread.
v. i.
• To peep; to glance obliquely; to leer.
• To twinkle; to glance; to gleam.
v. i.
• To sing, or twitter.
Twirl
v. t.
• To move or turn round rapidly; to whirl round; to move and turn rapidly with the fingers.
v. i.
• To revolve with velocity; to be whirled round rapidly.
n.
• The act of twirling; a rapid circular motion; a whirl or whirling; quick rotation.
• A twist; a convolution.
Twist
v. t.
• To contort; to writhe; to complicate; to crook spirally; to convolve.
• Hence, to turn from the true form or meaning; to pervert; as, to twist a passage cited from an author.
• To distort, as a solid body, by turning one part relatively to another about an axis passing through both; to subject to torsion; as, to twist a shaft.
• To wreathe; to wind; to encircle; to unite by intertexture of parts.
• To wind into; to insinuate; — used reflexively; as, avarice twists itself into all human concerns.
• To unite by winding one thread, strand, or other flexible substance, round another; to form by convolution, or winding separate things round each other; as, to twist yarn or thread.
• Hence, to form as if by winding one part around another; to wreathe; to make up.
• To form into a thread from many fine filaments; as, to twist wool or cotton.
v. i.
• To be contorted; to writhe; to be distorted by torsion; to be united by winding round each other; to be or become twisted; as, some strands will twist more easily than others.
• To follow a helical or spiral course; to be in the form of a helix.
n.
• The act of twisting; a contortion; a flexure; a convolution; a bending.
• The form given in twisting.
• That which is formed by twisting, convoluting, or uniting parts.
• A cord, thread, or anything flexible, formed by winding strands or separate things round each other.
• A kind of closely twisted, strong sewing silk, used by tailors, saddlers, and the like.
• A kind of cotton yarn, of several varieties.
• A roll of twisted dough, baked.
• A little twisted roll of tobacco.
(Weaving) One of the threads of a warp, — usually more tightly twisted than the filling.
(Firearms) A material for gun barrels, consisting of iron and steel twisted and welded together; as, Damascus twist. (h) (Firearms & Ord.) The spiral course of the rifling of a gun barrel or a cannon.
• A beverage made of brandy and gin.
• A twig.
Twiste
• imp. of Twist.
Twisted
a.
• Contorted; crooked spirally; subjected to torsion; hence, perverted.
Twister
n.
• One who twists; specifically, the person whose occupation is to twist or join the threads of one warp to those of another, in weaving.
• The instrument used in twisting, or making twists.
(Carp.) A girder.
(Man.) The inner part of the thigh, the proper place to rest upon when on horseback.
Twistical
a.
• Crooked; tortuous; hence, perverse; unfair; dishonest.
Twisting
• a. & n. from Twist.
Twit
v. t.
• To vex by bringing to notice, or reminding of, a fault, defect, misfortune, or the like; to revile; to reproach; to upbraid; to taunt; as, he twitted his friend of falsehood.
Twitch
v. t.
• To pull with a sudden jerk; to pluck with a short, quick motion; to snatch; as, to twitch one by the sleeve; to twitch a thing out of another's hand; to twitch off clusters of grapes.
n.
• The act of twitching; a pull with a jerk; a short, sudden, quick pull; as, a twitch by the sleeve.
• A short, spastic contraction of the fibers or muscles; a simple muscular contraction; as, convulsive twitches; a twitch in the side.
(Far.) A stick with a hole in one end through which passes a loop, which can be drawn tightly over the upper lip or an ear of a horse. By twisting the stick the compression is made sufficiently painful to keep the animal quiet during a slight surgical operation.
Twitcher
n.
• One who, or that which, twitches.
Twite
n.
(Zool.) The European tree sparrow.
• The mountain linnet (Linota flavirostris).
Twitlark
n.
(Zool.) The meadow pipit.
Twitter
n.
• One who twits, or reproaches; an upbraider.
v. i.
• To make a succession of small, tremulous, intermitted noises.
• To make the sound of a half-suppressed laugh; to titter; to giggle.
• To have a slight trembling of the nerves; to be excited or agitated.
v. t.
• To utter with a twitter.
n.
• The act of twittering; a small, tremulous, intermitted noise, as that made by a swallow.
• A half-suppressed laugh; a fit of laughter partially restrained; a titter; a giggle.
• A slight trembling or agitation of the nerves.
Twittering
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, twitters.
• A slight nervous excitement or agitation, such as is caused by desire, expectation, or suspense.
Twittingly
adv.
• In a twitting manner; with upbraiding.
Two
a.
• One and one; twice one.
n.
• The sum of one; the number next greater than one, and next less than three; two units or objects.
• A symbol representing two units, as 2, II., or ii.
Twofold
a.
• Double; duplicate; multiplied by two; as, a twofold nature; a twofold sense; a twofold argument.
adv.
• In a double degree; doubly.
Twopence
n.
• A small coin, and money of account, in England, equivalent to two pennies, — minted to a fixed annual amount, for almsgiving by the sovereign on Maundy Thursday.
Twopenny
a.
• Of the value of twopence.
Twyblade
n.
• See Twayblade.
Tychonic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Tycho Brahe, or his system of astronomy.
Tycoon
n.
• The title by which the shogun, or former commander in chief of the Japanese army, was known to foreigners.
Tydy
n.
(Zool.) Same as Tidy.
Tye
n.
• A knot; a tie.
(Naut.) A chain or rope, one end of which passes through the mast, and is made fast to the center of a yard; the other end is attached to a tackle, by means of which the yard is hoisted or lowered.
(Mining) A trough for washing ores.
v. t.
• See Tie, the proper orthography.
Tyer
n.
• One who ties, or unites.
Tyfoon
n.
• See Typhoon.
Tyger
n.
(Zool.) A tiger.
Tying
• p. pr. of Tie.
n.
(Mining) The act or process of washing ores in a buddle.
Tyke
n.
• See 2d Tike.
Tylarus
n.
(Zool.) One of the pads on the under surface of the toes of birds.
Tyler
n.
• See 2d Tiler.
Tylopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of ungulates comprising the camels.
Tylosis
n.
(Bot.) An intrusion of one vegetable cell into the cavity of another, sometimes forming there an irregular mass of cells.
Tymbal
n.
• A kind of kettledrum.
Tymp
n.
(Blast Furnace) A hollow water-cooled iron casting in the upper part of the archway in which the dam stands.
Tympan
n.
• A drum.
(Arch.) A panel; a tympanum.
(Print.) A frame covered with parchment or cloth, on which the blank sheets are put, in order to be laid on the form to be impressed.
Tympanal
n.
• Tympanic.
Tympanic
a.
• Like a tympanum or drum; acting like a drumhead; as, a tympanic membrane.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the tympanum.
n.
(Anat.) The tympanic bone.
Tympanist
n.
• One who beats a drum.
Tympanites
n.
(Med.) A flatulent distention of the belly; tympany.
Tympanitic
a.
(Med.) Of, pertaining to, or affected with, tympanites.
Tympanitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the lining membrane of the middle ear.
Tympanize
v. i.
• To drum.
v. t.
• To stretch, as a skin over the head of a drum; to make into a drum or drumhead, or cause to act or sound like a drum.
Tympano
n.
(Mus.) A kettledrum; — chiefly used in the plural to denote the kettledrums of an orchestra. See Kettledrum.
Tympanohyal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the tympanum and the hyoidean arch.
n.
• The proximal segment in the hyoidean arch, becoming a part of the styloid process of the temporal bone in adult man.
Tympanum
n.
(Anat.) The ear drum, or middle ear. Sometimes applied incorrectly to the tympanic membrane. See Ear.
• A chamber in the anterior part of the syrinx of birds.
(Zool.) One of the naked, inflatable air sacs on the neck of the prairie chicken and other species of grouse.
(Arch.) The recessed face of a pediment within the frame made by the upper and lower cornices, being usually a triangular space or table.
• The space within an arch, and above a lintel or a subordinate arch, spanning the opening below the arch.
(Mech.) A drum-shaped wheel with spirally curved partitions by which water is raised to the axis when the wheel revolves with the lower part of the circumference submerged, — used for raising water, as for irrigation.
Tympany
n.
(Med.) A flatulent distention of the belly; tympanites.
• Hence, inflation; conceit; bombast; turgidness.
Tynd
v. t.
• To shut; to close.
Tyne
v. t.
• To lose.
v. i.
• To become lost; to perish.
n.
(Zool.) A prong or point of an antler.
n.
• Anxiety; tine.
Tyny
a.
• Small; tiny.
Typal
a.
• Relating to a type or types; belonging to types; serving as a type; typical.
Type
n.
• The mark or impression of something; stamp; impressed sign; emblem.
• Form or character impressed; style; semblance.
• A figure or representation of something to come; a token; a sign; a symbol; — correlative to antitype.
• That which possesses or exemplifies characteristic qualities; the representative.
(Biol.) A general form or structure common to a number of individuals; hence, the ideal representation of a species, genus, or other group, combining the essential characteristics; an animal or plant possessing or exemplifying the essential characteristics of a species, genus, or other group. Also, a group or division of animals having a certain typical or characteristic structure of body maintained within the group.
(Fine Arts) The original object, or class of objects, scene, face, or conception, which becomes the subject of a copy; esp., the design on the face of a medal or a coin.
(Chem.) A simple compound, used as a mode or pattern to which other compounds are conveniently regarded as being related, and from which they may be actually or theoretically derived.
(Typog.) A raised letter, figure, accent, or other character, cast in metal or cut in wood, used in printing.
• Such letters or characters, in general, or the whole quantity of them used in printing, spoken of collectively; any number or mass of such letters or characters, however disposed.
v. t.
• To represent by a type, model, or symbol beforehand; to prefigure.
• To furnish an expression or copy of; to represent; to typify.
Typesetter
n.
• One who, or that which, sets type; a compositor; a machine for setting type.
Typesetting
n.
• The act or art of setting type.
Typewrite
v. t. & i.
• To write with a typewriter.
Typewriter
n.
• An instrument for writing by means of type, a typewheel, or the like, in which the operator makes use of a sort of keyboard, in order to obtain printed impressions of the characters upon paper.
• One who uses such an instrument.
Typewriting
n.
• The act or art of using a typewriter; also, a print made with a typewriter.
Typhlitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the caecum.
Typhlosole
n.
(Zool.) A fold of the wall which projects into the cavity of the intestine in bivalve mollusks, certain annelids, starfishes, and some other animals.
Typhoean
a.
• Of or pertaining to Typhoeus (t&isl;*f&omac;"&umac;s), the fabled giant of Greek mythology, having a hundred heads; resembling Typhoeus.
Typhoid
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to typhus; resembling typhus; of a low grade like typhus; as, typhoid symptoms.
Typhomalarial
a.
(Med.) Pertaining to typhoid fever and malaria; as, typhomalarial fever, a form of fever having symptoms both of malarial and typhoid fever.
Typhomania
n.
(Med.) A low delirium common in typhus fever.
Typhon
n.
(Class. Mythol.) According to Hesiod, the son of Typhoeus, and father of the winds, but later identified with him.
• A violent whirlwind; a typhoon.
Typhoon
n.
• A violent whirlwind; specifically, a violent whirlwind occurring in the Chinese seas.
Typhos
n.
(Med.) Typhus.
Typhotoxin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A basic substance, C7H17NO2, formed from the growth of the typhoid bacillus on meat pulp. It induces in small animals lethargic conditions with liquid dejecta.
Typhous
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to typhus; of the nature of typhus.
Typhus
n.
(Med.) A contagious continued fever lasting from two to three weeks, attended with great prostration and cerebral disorder, and marked by a copious eruption of red spots upon the body. Also called jail fever, famine fever, putrid fever, spottled fever, etc. See Jail fever, under Jail.
Typic
a.
• Typical.
Typical
a.
• Of the nature of a type; representing something by a form, model, or resemblance; emblematic; prefigurative.
(Nat. Hist.) Combining or exhibiting the essential characteristics of a group; as, a typical genus.
Typification
n.
• The act of typifying, or representing by a figure.
Typifier
n.
• One who, or that which, typifies.
Typify
v. t.
• To represent by an image, form, model, or resemblance.
Typo
n.
• A compositor.
Typocosmy
n.
• A representation of the world.
Typographer
n.
• A printer.
Typography
n.
• The act or art of expressing by means of types or symbols; emblematical or hieroglyphic representation.
• The art of printing with types; the use of types to produce impressions on paper, vellum, etc.
Typolite
n.
(Min.) A stone or fossil which has on it impressions or figures of plants and animals.
Typology
n.
(Theol.) A discourse or treatise on types.
(Theol.) The doctrine of types.
Typothetae
n. pl.
• Printers; — used in the name of an association of the master printers of the United States and Canada, called The United Typothetae of America.
Tyran
n.
• A tyrant.
Tyranness
n.
• A female tyrant.
Tyrannicidal
a.
• Of or pertaining to tyrannicide, or the murder of a tyrant.
Tyrannicide
n.
• The act of killing a tyrant.
• One who kills a tyrant.
Tyrannish
a.
• Like a tyrant; tyrannical.
Tyrannize
v. i.
• To act the tyrant; to exercise arbitrary power; to rule with unjust and oppressive severity; to exercise power others not permitted by law or required by justice, or with a severity not necessary to the ends of justice and government; as, a prince will often tyrannize over his subjects; masters sometimes tyrannize over their servants or apprentices.
v. t.
• To subject to arbitrary, oppressive, or tyrannical treatment; to oppress.
Tyrannous
a.
• Tyrannical; arbitrary; unjustly severe; despotic.
Tyranny
n.
• The government or authority of a tyrant; a country governed by an absolute ruler; hence, arbitrary or despotic exercise of power; exercise of power over subjects and others with a rigor not authorized by law or justice, or not requisite for the purposes of government.
• Cruel government or discipline; as, the tyranny of a schoolmaster.
• Severity; rigor; inclemency.
Tyrant
n.
• An absolute ruler; a sovereign unrestrained by law or constitution; a usurper of sovereignty.
• Specifically, a monarch, or other ruler or master, who uses power to oppress his subjects; a person who exercises unlawful authority, or lawful authority in an unlawful manner; one who by taxation, injustice, or cruel punishment, or the demand of unreasonable services, imposes burdens and hardships on those under his control, which law and humanity do not authorize, or which the purposes of government do not require; a cruel master; an oppressor.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of American clamatorial birds belonging to the family Tyrannidae; — called also tyrant bird.
v. i.
• To act like a tyrant; to play the tyrant; to tyrannical.
Tyre
• Curdled milk.
n. & v.
• Attire. See 2d and 3d Tire.
v. i.
• To prey. See 4th Tire.
Tyrian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Tyre or its people.
• Being of the color called Tyrian purple.
n.
• A native of Tyre.
Tyrkey
n.
(Zool.) Any large American gallinaceous bird belonging to the genus Meleagris, especially the North American wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo), and the domestic turkey, which was probably derived from the Mexican wild turkey, but had been domesticated by the Indians long before the discovery of America.
Tyro
n.
• A beginner in learning; one who is in the rudiments of any branch of study; a person imperfectly acquainted with a subject; a novice.
Tyrociny
n.
• The state of being a tyro, or beginner; apprenticeship.
Tyrolite
n.
(Min.) A translucent mineral of a green color and pearly or vitreous luster. It is a hydrous arseniate of copper.
Tyronism
n.
• The state of being a tyro, or beginner.
Tyrosin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A white crystalline nitrogenous substance present in small amount in the pancreas and spleen, and formed in large quantity from the decomposition of proteid matter by various means, — as by pancreatic digestion, by putrefaction as of cheese, by the action of boiling acids, etc. Chemically, it consists of oxyphenol and amidopropionic acid, and by decomposition yields oxybenzoic acid, or some other benzol derivative.
Tyrotoxicon
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A ptomaine discovered by Vaughan in putrid cheese and other dairy products, and producing symptoms similar to cholera infantum. Chemically, it appears to be related to, or identical with, diazobenzol.
Tyrotoxine
n.
• Same as Tyrotoxicon.
Tysonite
n.
(Min.) A fluoride of the cerium metals occurring in hexagonal crystals of a pale yellow color. Cf. Fluocerite.
Tystie
n.
(Zool.) The black guillemot.
Tythe
n.
• See Tithe.
Tything
n.
• See Tithing.
Tzar
n.
• The emperor of Russia. See Czar.

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