Dictionary Of The English Language "Soc"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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Soc
n.
(O. Eng. Law) The lord's power or privilege of holding a court in a district, as in manor or lordship; jurisdiction of causes, and the limits of that jurisdiction.
• Liberty or privilege of tenants excused from customary burdens.
• An exclusive privilege formerly claimed by millers of grrinding all the corn used within the manor or township which the mill stands.
Socage
n.
(O.Eng. Law) A tenure of lands and tenements by a certain or determinate service; a tenure distinct from chivalry or knight's service, in which the obligations were uncertain. The service must be certain, in order to be denominated socage, as to hold by fealty and twenty shillings rent.
Socager
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A tennant by socage; a socman.
Sociability
n.
• The quality of being sociable; sociableness.
Sociable
n.
• A gathering of people for social purposes; an informal party or reception; as, a church sociable.
• A carriage having two double seats facing each other, and a box for the driver.
a.
• Capable of being, or fit to be, united in one body or company; associable.
• Inclined to, or adapted for, society; ready to unite with others; fond of companions; social.
• Ready to converse; inclined to talk with others; not taciturn or reserved.
• Affording opportunites for conversation; characterized by much conversation; as, a sociable party.
• No longer hostile; friendly.
Sociableness
n.
• The quality of being sociable.
Sociably
adv.
• In a sociable manner.
Social
a.
• Of or pertaining to society; relating to men living in society, or to the public as an aggregate body; as, social interest or concerns; social pleasure; social benefits; social happiness; social duties.
• Ready or disposed to mix in friendly converse; companionable; sociable; as, a social person.
• Consisting in union or mutual intercourse.
(Bot.) Naturally growing in groups or masses; — said of many individual plants of the same species.
(Zool.) Living in communities consisting of males, females, and neuters, as do ants and most bees.
• Forming compound groups or colonies by budding from basal processes or stolons; as, the social ascidians.
Socialism
n.
• A theory or system of social reform which contemplates a complete reconstruction of society, with a more just and equitable distribution of property and labor. In popular usage, the term is often employed to indicate any lawless, revolutionary social scheme. See Communism, Fourierism, Saint-Simonianism, forms of socialism.
Socialist
n.
• One who advocates or practices the doctrines of socialism.
Sociality
n.
• The quality of being social; socialness.
Socialize
v. t.
• To render social.
• To subject to, or regulate by, socialism.
Socially
adv.
• In a social manner; sociably.
Socialness
n.
• The quality or state of being social.
Sociate
a.
• Associated.
n.
• An associate.
v. i.
• To associate.
Societarian
a.
• Of or pertaining to society; social.
Societary
a.
• Societarian.
Society
n.
• The relationship of men to one another when associated in any way; companionship; fellowship; company.
• Connection; participation; partnership.
• A number of persons associated for any temporary or permanent object; an association for mutual or joint usefulness, pleasure, or profit; a social union; a partnership; as, a missionary society.
• The persons, collectively considered, who live in any region or at any period; any community of individuals who are united together by a common bond of nearness or intercourse; those who recognize each other as associates, friends, and acquaintances.
• Specifically, the more cultivated portion of any community in its social relations and influences; those who mutually give receive formal entertainments.
Socinian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Socinus, or the Socinians.
n.
• One of the followers of Socinus; a believer in Socinianism.
Socinianism
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) The tenets or doctrines of Faustus Socinus, an Italian theologian of the sixteenth century, who denied the Trinity, the deity of Christ, the personality of the Devil, the native and total depravity of man, the vicarious atonement, and the eternity of future punishment. His theory was, that Christ was a man divinely commissioned, who had no existence before he was conceived by the Virgin Mary; that human sin was the imitation of Adam's sin, and that human salvation was the imitation and adoption of Christ's virtue; that the Bible was to be interpreted by human reason; and that its language was metaphorical, and not to be taken literally.
Socinianize
v. t.
• To cause to conform to Socinianism; to regulate by, or imbue with, the principles of Socinianism.
Sociologist
n.
• One who treats of, or devotes himself to, the study of sociology.
Sociology
n.
• That branch of philosophy which treats of the constitution, phenomena, and development of human society; social science.
Sock
n.
• A plowshare.
n.
• The shoe worn by actors of comedy in ancient Greece and Rome, — used as a sumbol of comedy, of the comic drams, as distinguished from tragedy, which is symbolized by the buskin.
• A knit or woven covering for the foot and lower leg; a stocking with a short leg.
• A warm inner sole for a shoe.
Sockdolager
n.
• That which finishes or ends a matter; a settler; a poser, as a heavy blow, a conclusive answer, and the like.
(Angling) A combination of two hooks which close upon each other, by means of a spring, as soon as the fish bites.
Socket
n.
• An opening into which anything is fitted; any hollow thing or place which receives and holds something else; as, the sockets of the teeth.
• Especially, the hollow tube or place in which a candle is fixed in the candlestick.
Socketed
a.
• Having a socket.
Sockless
a.
• Destitute of socks or shoes.
Socky
a.
• Wet; soaky.
Socle
n.
(Arch.) A plain block or plinth forming a low pedestal; any base; especially, the base of a statue, column, or the like. See Plinth.
• A plain face or plinth at the lower part of a wall.
Socman
n.
(O. Eng. Law) One who holds lands or tenements by socage; a socager.
Socmanry
n.
(O.E. Law) Tenure by socage.
Socome
n.
(O.Eng. Law) A custom of tenants to grind corn at the lord's mill.
Socotrine
a.
• Of or pertaining to Socotra, an island in the Indian Ocean, on the east coast of Africa.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Socotra.
Socratically
adv.
• In the Socratic method.
Socratism
n.
• The philosophy or the method of Socrates.
Socratist
n.
• A disciple or follower of Socrates.
Sod
n.
(Zool.) The rock dove.
• imp. of Seethe.
n.
• That stratum of the surface of the soil which is filled with the roots of grass, or any portion of that surface; turf; sward.
v. t.
• To cover with sod; to turf.
Soda
n.
(Chem.) Sodium oxide or hydroxide.
• Popularly, sodium carbonate or bicarbonate.
Sodaic
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, soda.
Sodalite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a white to blue or gray color, occuring commonly in dodecahedrons, also massive. It is a silicate of alumina and soda with some chlorine.
Sodality
n.
• A fellowship or fraternity; a brotherhood.
(R.C.Ch.) Specifically, a lay association for devotion or for charitable purposes.
Sodamide
n.
(Chem.) A greenish or reddish crystalline substance, NaNH2, obtained by passing ammonia over heated sodium.
Sodden
a.
• Boiled; seethed; also, soaked; heavy with moisture; saturated; as, sodden beef; sodden bread; sodden fields.
v. i.
• To be seethed; to become sodden.
v. t.
• To soak; to make heavy with water.
Soddy
a.
• Consisting of sod; covered with sod; turfy.
Soder
n. & v. t.
• See Solder.
Sodic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to sodium; containing sodium.
Sodium
n.
(Chem.) A common metallic element of the alkali group, in nature always occuring combined, as in common salt, in albite, etc. It is isolated as a soft, waxy, white, unstable metal, so readily oxidized that it combines violently with water, and to be preserved must be kept under petroleum or some similar liquid. Sodium is used combined in many salts, in the free state as a reducer, and as a means of obtaining other metals (as magnesium and aluminium) is an important commercial product. Symbol Na (Natrium). Atomic weight 23. Specific gravity 0.97.
Sodomite
n.
• An inhabitant of Sodom.
• One guilty of sodomy.
Sodomitical
a.
• Pertaining to, or of the nature of, sodomy.
Sodomy
n.
• Carnal copulation in a manner against nature; buggery.
Soe
n.
• A large wooden vessel for holding water; a cowl.
Soecificness
n.
• The quality or state of being specific.
Soever
• A word compounded of so and ever, used in composition with who, what, where, when, how, etc., and indicating any out of all possible or supposable persons, things, places, times, ways, etc. It is sometimes used separate from the pronoun or adverb.
Sofa
n.
• A long seat, usually with a cushioned bottom, back, and ends; — much used as a comfortable piece of furniture.
Soffit
n.
(Arch.) The under side of the subordinate parts and members of buildings, such as staircases, entablatures, archways, cornices, or the like. See Illust. of Lintel.
Sofi
n.
• Same as Sufi.
Sofism
n.
• Same as Sufism.
Soft
a.
• Easily yielding to pressure; easily impressed, molded, or cut; not firm in resisting; impressible; yielding; also, malleable; — opposed to hard; as, a soft bed; a soft peach; soft earth; soft wood or metal.
• Not rough, rugged, or harsh to the touch; smooth; delicate; fine; as, soft silk; a soft skin.
• Hence, agreeable to feel, taste, or inhale; not irritating to the tissues; as, a soft liniment; soft wines.
• Not harsh or offensive to the sight; not glaring; pleasing to the eye; not exciting by intensity of color or violent contrast; as, soft hues or tints.
• Not harsh or rough in sound; gentle and pleasing to the ear; flowing; as, soft whispers of music.
• Easily yielding; susceptible to influence; flexible; gentle; kind.
• Expressing gentleness, tenderness, or the like; mild; conciliatory; courteous; kind; as, soft eyes.
• Effeminate; not courageous or manly, weak.
• Gentle in action or motion; easy.
• Weak in character; impressible.
• Somewhat weak in intellect.
• Quiet; undisturbed; paceful; as, soft slumbers.
• Having, or consisting of, a gentle curve or curves; not angular or abrupt; as, soft outlines.
• Not tinged with mineral salts; adapted to decompose soap; as, soft water is the best for washing.
(Phonetics) Applied to a palatal, a sibilant, or a dental consonant (as g in gem, c in cent, etc.) as distinguished from a guttural mute (as g in go, c in cone, etc.); — opposed to hard.
• Belonging to the class of sonant elements as distinguished from the surd, and considered as involving less force in utterance; as, b, d, g, z, v, etc., in contrast with p, t, k, s, f, etc.
n.
• A soft or foolish person; an idiot.
adv.
• Softly; without roughness or harshness; gently; quietly.
interj.
• Be quiet; hold; stop; not so fast.
Softa
n.
• Any one attached to a Mohammedan mosque, esp. a student of the higher branches of theology in a mosque school.
Soften
v. t.
• To make soft or more soft.
• To render less hard; — said of matter
• To mollify; to make less fierce or intractable
• To palliate; to represent as less enormous; as, to soften a fault
• To compose; to mitigate; to assuage
• To make less harsh, less rude, less offensive, or less violent, or to render of an opposite quality
• To make less glaring; to tone down; as, to soften the coloring of a picture
• To make tender; to make effeminate; to enervate; as, troops softened by luxury
• To make less harsh or grating, or of a quality the opposite; as, to soften the voice
v. i.
• To become soft or softened, or less rude, harsh, severe, or obdurate.
Softener
n.
• One who, or that which, softens.
Softening
a. & n.
• from Soften, v.
Softish
a.
• Somewhat soft.
Softling
n.
• A soft, effeminate person; a voluptuary.
Softly
adv.
• In a soft manner.
Softner
n.
• See Softener.
Softness
n.
• The quality or state of being soft; — opposed to hardness, and used in the various specific senses of the adjective.
Sogginess
n.
• The quality or state of being soggy; soddenness; wetness.
Soggy
a.
• Filled with water; soft with moisture; sodden; soaked; wet; as, soggy land or timber.
Soho
interj.
• Ho; — a word used in calling from a distant place; a sportsman's halloo.
Soil
v. t.
• To feed, as cattle or horses, in the barn or an inclosure, with fresh grass or green food cut for them, instead of sending them out to pasture; hence (such food having the effect of purging them), to purge by feeding on green food; as, to soil a horse.
n.
• The upper stratum of the earth; the mold, or that compound substance which furnishes nutriment to plants, or which is particularly adapted to support and nourish them.
• Land; country.
• Dung; faeces; compost; manure; as, night soil.
v. t.
• To enrich with soil or muck; to manure.
n.
• A marshy or miry place to which a hunted boar resorts for refuge; hence, a wet place, stream, or tract of water, sought for by other game, as deer.
v. t.
• To make dirty or unclean on the surface; to foul; to dirty; to defile; as, to soil a garment with dust.
• To stain or mar, as with infamy or disgrace; to tarnish; to sully.
v. i.
• To become soiled; as, light colors soil sooner than dark ones.
n.
• That which soils or pollutes; a soiled place; spot; stain.
Soiliness
n.
• Stain; foulness.
Soilless
a.
• Destitute of soil or mold.
Soilure
n.
• Stain; pollution.
Soily
a.
• Dirty; soiled.
Soiree
n.
• An evening party; — distinguished from levee, and matinee.
Soja
n.
(Bot.) An Asiatic leguminous herb (Glycine Soja) the seeds of which are used in preparing the sauce called soy.
Sojourn
v. i.
• To dwell for a time; to dwell or live in a place as a temporary resident or as a stranger, not considering the place as a permanent habitation; to delay; to tarry.
n.
• A temporary residence, as that of a traveler in a foreign land.
Sojourner
n.
• One who sojourns.
Sojourning
n.
• The act or state of one who sojourns.
Sojournment
n.
• Temporary residence, as that of a stranger or a traveler.
Soke
n.
(Eng. Law) See Soc.
• One of the small territorial divisions into which Lincolnshire, England, is divided.
Sokeman
n.
• See Socman.
Sokemanry
n.
• See Socmanry.
Soken
n.
• A toll. See Soc, n., 2.
• A district held by socage.
Soko
n.
(Zool.) An African anthropoid ape, supposed to be a variety of the chimpanzee.
Sol
n.
• The sun.
(Alchem.) Gold; — so called from its brilliancy, color, and value.
n.
(Mus.) A syllable applied in solmization to the note G, or to the fifth tone of any diatonic scale.
• The tone itself.
n.
• A sou.
• A silver and gold coin of Peru. The silver sol is the unit of value, and is worth about 68 cents.
Sola
a.
• See Solus.
n.
(Bot.) A leguminous plant (Aschynomene aspera) growing in moist places in Southern India and the East Indies. Its pithlike stem is used for making hats, swimming-jackets, etc.
Solace
n.
• Comfort in grief; alleviation of grief or anxiety; also, that which relieves in distress; that which cheers or consoles; relief.
• Rest; relaxation; ease.
v. t.
• To cheer in grief or under calamity; to comfort; to relieve in affliction, solitude, or discomfort; to console; — applied to persons; as, to solace one with the hope of future reward.
• To allay; to assuage; to soothe; as, to solace grief.
v. i.
• To take comfort; to be cheered.
Solacement
n.
• The act of solacing, or the state of being solaced; also, that which solaces.
Solacious
a.
• Affording solace; as, a solacious voice.
Solanaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to plants of the natural order Solanaceae, of which the nightshade (Solanum) is the type. The order includes also the tobacco, ground cherry, tomato, eggplant, red pepper, and many more.
Soland
n.
(Zool.) A solan goose.
Solander
n.
• See Sallenders.
Solania
n.
(Chem.) Solanine.
Solanicine
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid produced by the action of hydrochloric acid on solanidine, as a tasteless yellow crystalline substance.
Solanidine
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid produced by the decomposition of solanine, as a white crystalline substance having a harsh bitter taste.
Solanine
n.
(Chem.) A poisonous alkaloid glucoside extracted from the berries of common nightshade (Solanum nigrum), and of bittersweet, and from potato sprouts, as a white crystalline substance having an acrid, burning taste; — called also solonia, and solanina.
Solano
• A hot, oppressive wind which sometimes blows in the Mediterranean, particularly on the eastern coast of Spain.
Solanoid
a.
(Med.) Resembling a potato; — said of a kind of cancer.
Solanum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants comprehending the potato (S. tuberosum), the eggplant (S. melongena, and several hundred other species; nightshade.
Solar
n.
• A loft or upper chamber; a garret room.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the sun; proceeding from the sun; as, the solar system; solar light; solar rays; solar influence. See Solar system, below.
(Astrol.) Born under the predominant influence of the sun.
• Measured by the progress or revolution of the sun in the ecliptic; as, the solar year.
• Produced by the action of the sun, or peculiarly affected by its influence.
Solarium
n.
• An apartment freely exposed to the sun; anciently, an apartment or inclosure on the roof of a house; in modern times, an apartment in a hospital, used as a resort for convalescents.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of handsome marine spiral shells of the genus Solarium and allied genera. The shell is conical, and usually has a large, deep umbilicus exposing the upper whorls. Called also perspective shell.
Solarization
n.
(Photog.) Injury of a photographic picture caused by exposing it for too long a time to the sun's light in the camera; burning; excessive insolation.
Solarize
v. t.
(Photog.) To injure by too long exposure to the light of the sun in the camera; to burn.
v. i.
(Photog.) To become injured by undue or too long exposure to the sun's rays in the camera.
Solary
a.
• Solar.
Solas
n.
• Solace.
Solatium
n.
• Anything which alleviates or compensates for suffering or loss; a compensation; esp., an additional allowance, as for injured feelings.
Sold
• imp. & p. p. of Sell.
n.
• Solary; military pay.
Soldan
n.
• A sultan.
Soldanel
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Soldanella, low Alpine herbs of the Primrose family.
Soldanrie
n.
• The country ruled by a soldan, or sultan.
Solder
n.
• A metal or metallic alloy used when melted for uniting adjacent metallic edges or surfaces; a metallic coment. Hence, anything which unites or cements.
v. t.
• To unite (metallic surfaces or edges) by the intervention of a more fusible metal or metallic alloy applied when melted; to join by means of metallic cement.
• To mend; to patch up.
Solderer
n.
• One who solders.
Soldering
a. & n.
• from Solder, v. t.
Soldier
n.
• One who is engaged in military service as an officer or a private; one who serves in an army; one of an organized body of combatants.
• Especially, a private in military service, as distinguished from an officer.
• A brave warrior; a man of military experience and skill, or a man of distinguished valor; — used by way of emphasis or distinction.
(Zool.) The red or cuckoo gurnard (Trigla pini.)
(Zool.) One of the asexual polymorphic forms of white ants, or termites, in which the head and jaws are very large and strong. The soldiers serve to defend the nest. See Termite.
v. i.
• To serve as a soldier.
• To make a pretense of doing something, or of performing any task.
Soldieress
n.
• A female soldier.
Soldiering
n.
• The act of serving as a soldier; the state of being a soldier; the occupation of a soldier.
• The act of feigning to work. See the Note under Soldier, v. i., 2.
Soldierlike
a.
• Like a soldier; soldierly.
Soldierly
a.
• Like or becoming a real soldier; brave; martial; heroic; honorable; soldierlike.
Soldiership
n.
• Military qualities or state; martial skill; behavior becoming a soldier.
Soldierwood
n.
(Bot.) A showy leguminous plant (Calliandra purpurea) of the West Indies. The flowers have long tassels of purple stamens.
Soldiery
n.
• A body of soldiers; soldiers, collectivelly; the military.
• Military service.
Soldo
n.
• A small Italian coin worth a sou or a cent; the twentieth part of a lira.
Sole
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of flatfishes of the genus Solea and allied genera of the family Soleidae, especially the common European species (Solea vulgaris), which is a valuable food fish.
• Any one of several American flounders somewhat resembling the true sole in form or quality, as the California sole (Lepidopsetta bilineata), the long-finned sole (Glyptocephalus zachirus), and other species.
n.
• The bottom of the foot; hence, also, rarely, the foot itself.
• The bottom of a shoe or boot, or the piece of leather which constitutes the bottom.
• The bottom or lower part of anything, or that on which anything rests in standing.
(Agric.) The bottom of the body of a plow; — called also slade; also, the bottom of a furrow
(Far.) The horny substance under a horse's foot, which protects the more tender parts
(Fort.) The bottom of an embrasure
(Naut.) A piece of timber attached to the lower part of the rudder, to make it even with the false keel
(Mining) The seat or bottom of a mine; — applied to horizontal veins or lodes.
v. t.
• To furnish with a sole; as, to sole a shoe.
a.
• Being or acting without another; single; individual; only.
(Law) Single; unmarried; as, a feme sole.
Solecism
n.
• An impropriety or incongruity of language in the combination of words or parts of a sentence; esp., deviation from the idiom of a language or from the rules of syntax.
• Any inconsistency, unfitness, absurdity, or impropriety, as in deeds or manners.
Solecistic
a.
• Solecistical.
Solecistical
a.
• Pertaining to, or involving, a solecism; incorrect.
Solecistically
adv.
• In a solecistic manner.
Solecize
v. i.
• To commit a solecism.
Solely
adv.
• Singly; alone; only; without another; as, to rest a cause solely one argument; to rely solelyn one's own strength.
Solemn
a.
• Marked with religious rites and pomps; enjoined by, or connected with, religion; sacred.
• Pertaining to a festival; festive; festal.
• Stately; ceremonious; grand.
• Fitted to awaken or express serious reflections; marked by seriousness; serious; grave; devout; as, a solemn promise; solemn earnestness.
• Real; earnest; downright.
• Affectedly grave or serious; as, to put on a solemn face.
(Law) Made in form; ceremonious; as, solemn war; conforming with all legal requirements; as, probate in solemn form.
Solemness
n.
• Solemnness.
Solemnity
n.
• A rite or ceremony performed with religious reverence; religious or ritual ceremony; as, the solemnity of a funeral, a sacrament.
• ceremony adapted to impress with awe.
• Ceremoniousness; impressiveness; seriousness; grave earnestness; formal dignity; gravity.
• Hence, affected gravity or seriousness.
• Solemn state or feeling; awe or reverence; also, that which produces such a feeling; as, the solemnity of an audience; the solemnity of Westminster Abbey.
(Law) A solemn or formal observance; proceeding according to due form; the formality which is necessary to render a thing done valid.
Solemnizate
v. t.
• To solemnize; as, to solemnizate matrimony.
Solemnization
n.
• The act of solemnizing; celebration; as, the solemnization of a marriage.
Solemnize
v. t.
• To perform with solemn or ritual ceremonies, or according to legal forms.
• To dignify or honor by ceremonies; to celebrate.
• To make grave, serious, and reverential.
n.
• Solemnization.
Solemnizer
n.
• One who solemnizes.
Solemnly
adv.
• In a solemn manner; with gravity; seriously; formally.
Solemnness
n.
• The state or quality of being solemn; solemnity; impressiveness; gravity; as, the solemnness of public worship.
Solempne
a.
• Solemn; grand; stately; splendid; magnificent.
Solen
n.
(Med.) A cradle, as for a broken limb. See Cradle, 6.
(Zool.) Any marine bivalve mollusk belonging to Solen or allied genera of the family Solenidae; a razor shell.
Solenacean
n.
(Zool) Any species of marine bivalve shells belonging to the family Solenidae.
Solenaceous
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the solens or family Solenidae.
Soleness
n.
• The state of being sole, or alone; singleness.
Solenette
n.
(Zool.) A small European sole (Solea minuta).
Solenoconcha
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Scaphopoda.
Solenodon
n.
(Zool.) Either one of two species of singular West Indian insectivores, allied to the tenrec. One species (Solendon paradoxus), native of St. Domingo, is called also agouta; the other (S. Cubanus), found in Cuba, is called almique.
Solenogastra
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of lowly organized Mollusca belonging to the Isopleura. A narrow groove takes the place of the foot of other gastropods.
Solenoglyph
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the Selenoglypha. See Ophidia.
n.
• One of the Selenoglypha.
Solenoglypha
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of serpents including those which have tubular erectile fangs, as the viper and rattlesnake. See Fang.
Solenoid
n.
(Elec.) An electrodynamic spiral having the conjuctive wire turned back along its axis, so as to neutralize that component of the effect of the current which is due to the length of the spiral, and reduce the whole effect to that of a series of equal and parallel circular currents. When traversed by a current the solenoid exhibits polarity and attraction or repulsion, like a magnet.
Solenostomi
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of lophobranch fishes having a tubular snout. The female carries the eggs in a ventral pouch.
Soleplate
n.
(Mach.) A bedplate; as, the soleplate of a steam engine.
• The plate forming the back of a waterwheel bucket.
Solert
a.
• Skillful; clever; crafty.
Solertiousness
n.
• The quality or state of being solert.
Solescist
n.
• One who commits a solecism.
Soleship
n.
• The state of being sole, or alone; soleness.
Solfanaria
n.
• A sulphur mine.
Solfatara
n.
(Geol.) A volcanic area or vent which yields only sulphur vapors, steam, and the like. It represents the stages of the volcanic activity.
Solfeggiare
v. i.
(Mus.) To sol-fa. See Sol-fa, v. i.
Solfeggio
n.
(Mus.) The system of arranging the scale by the names do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, si, by which singing is taught; a singing exercise upon these syllables.
Solferino
n.
• A brilliant deep pink color with a purplish tinge, one of the dyes derived from aniline; — so called from Solferino in Italy, where a battle was fought about the time of its discovery.
Soli
n.
• pl. of Solo.
Solicit
v. t.
• To ask from with earnestness; to make petition to; to apply to for obtaining something; as, to solicit person for alms.
• To endeavor to obtain; to seek; to plead for; as, to solicit an office; to solicit a favor.
• To awake or excite to action; to rouse desire in; to summon; to appeal to; to invite.
• To urge the claims of; to plead; to act as solicitor for or with reference to.
• To disturb; to disquiet; — a Latinism rarely used.
Solicitant
n.
• One who solicits.
Solicitate
a.
• Solicitous.
Solicitor
n.
• One who solicits.
(Law) An attorney or advocate; one who represents another in court; — formerly, in English practice, the professional designation of a person admitted to practice in a court of chancery or equity. See the Note under Attorney.
• The law officer of a city, town, department, or government; as, the city solicitor; the solicitor of the treasury.
Solicitous
a.
• Disposed to solicit; eager to obtain something desirable, or to avoid anything evil; concerned; anxious; careful.
Solicitress
n.
• A woman who solicits.
Solicitude
n.
• The state of being solicitous; uneasiness of mind occasioned by fear of evil or desire good; anxiety.
Solid
a.
• Having the constituent parts so compact, or so firmly adhering, as to resist the impression or penetration of other bodies; having a fixed form; hard; firm; compact; — opposed to fluid and liquid or to plastic, like clay, or to incompact, like sand.
• Not hollow; full of matter; as, a solid globe or cone, as distinguished from a hollow one; not spongy; dense; hence, sometimes, heavy.
(Arith.) Having all the geometrical dimensions; cubic; as, a solid foot contains 1,728 solid inches.
• Firm; compact; strong; stable; unyielding; as, a solid pier; a solid pile; a solid wall.
• Applied to a compound word whose parts are closely united and form an unbroken word; — opposed to hyphened.
• Fig.: Worthy of credit, trust, or esteem; substantial, as opposed to frivolous or fallacious; weighty; firm; strong; valid; just; genuine.
• Sound; not weakly; as, a solid constitution of body.
(Bot.) Of a fleshy, uniform, undivided substance, as a bulb or root; not spongy or hollow within, as a stem.
(Metaph.) Impenetrable; resisting or excluding any other material particle or atom from any given portion of space; — applied to the supposed ultimate particles of matter.
(Print.) Not having the lines separated by leads; not open.
• United; without division; unanimous; as, the delegation is solid for a candidate.
n.
• A substance that is held in a fixed form by cohesion among its particles; a substance not fluid.
(Geom.) A magnitude which has length, breadth, and thickness; a part of space bounded on all sides.
Solidago
n.
(Bot.) A genus of yellow-flowered composite perennial herbs; golden-rod.
Solidare
n.
• A small piece of money.
Solidarity
n.
• An entire union or consolidation of interests and responsibilities; fellowship; community.
Solidary
a.
• Having community of interests and responsibilities.
Solidate
v. t.
• To make solid or firm.
Solidifiable
a.
• Capable of being solidified.
Solidification
n.
• Act of solidifying, or state of being solidified.
Solidify
v. t.
• To make solid or compact.
v. i.
• To become solid; to harden.
Solidism
n.
(Med.) The doctrine that refers all diseases to morbid changes of the solid parts of the body. It rests on the view that the solids alone are endowed with vital properties, and can receive the impression of agents tending to produce disease.
Solidist
n.
(Med.) An advocate of, or believer in, solidism.
Solidity
n.
• The state or quality of being solid; density; consistency, — opposed to fluidity; compactness; fullness of matter, — opposed to openness or hollowness; strength; soundness, — opposed to weakness or instability; the primary quality or affection of matter by which its particles exclude or resist all others; hardness; massiveness.
• Moral firmness; soundness; strength; validity; truth; certainty; — as opposed to weakness or fallaciousness; as, the solidity of arguments or reasoning; the solidity of principles, triuths, or opinions.
(Geom.) The solid contents of a body; volume; amount of inclosed space.
Solidly
adv.
• In a solid manner; densely; compactly; firmly; truly.
Solidness
n.
• State or quality of being solid; firmness; compactness; solidity, as of material bodies.
• Soundness; strength; truth; validity, as of arguments, reasons, principles, and the like.
Solidungula
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of ungulates which includes the horse, ass, and related species, constituting the family Equidae.
Solidungular
a.
(Zool.) Solipedous.
Solidungulate
n.
(Zool.) Same as Soliped.
Solidungulous
a.
(Zool.) Solipedous.
Solifidian
n.
(Eccl.) One who maintains that faith alone, without works, is sufficient for justification; — opposed to nullifidian.
a.
• Holding the tenets of Solifidians; of or pertaining to the solifidians.
Solifidianism
n.
• The state of Solifidians.
Soliform
a.
• Like the sun in form, appearance, or nature; resembling the sun.
Solifugae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of arachnids having large, powerful fangs and a segmented abdomen; — called also Solpugidea, and Solpugides.
Soliitariety
n.
• The state of being solitary; solitariness.
Soliitation
n.
• The act of soliciting; earnest request; persistent asking; importunity.
• Excitement; invitation; as, the solicitation of the senses.
Soliloquize
v. i.
• To utter a soliloquy; to talk to one's self.
Soliloquy
n.
• The act of talking to one's self; a discourse made by one in solitude to one's self; monologue.
• A written composition, reciting what it is supposed a person says to himself.
Soliped
n.
(Zool.) A mammal having a single hoof on each foot, as the horses and asses; a solidungulate
Solipedous
a.
• Having single hoofs.
Solipsism
n.
(Ethics) Egotism.
(Metaph.) Egoism.
Solisequious
a.
• Following the course of the sun; as, solisequious plants.
Solitaire
n.
• A person who lives in solitude; a recluse; a hermit.
• A single diamond in a setting; also, sometimes, a precious stone of any kind set alone.
• A game which one person can play alone; — applied to many games of cards, etc.; also, to a game played on a board with pegs or balls, in which the object is, beginning with all the places filled except one, to remove all but one of the pieces by "jumping," as in draughts.
(Zool.) A large extinct bird (Pezophaps solitaria) which formerly inhabited the islands of Mauritius and Rodrigeuz. It was larger and taller than the wild turkey. Its wings were too small for flight. Called also solitary.
• Any species of American thrushlike birds of the genus Myadestes. They are noted their sweet songs and retiring habits. Called also fly-catching thrush. A West Indian species (Myadestes sibilans) is called the invisible bird.
Solitarian
n.
• A hermit; a solitary.
Solitarily
adv.
• In a solitary manner; in solitude; alone.
Solitariness
n.
• Condition of being solitary.
Solitary
a.
• Living or being by one's self; having no companion present; being without associates; single; alone; lonely.
• Performed, passed, or endured alone; as, a solitary journey; a solitary life.
• ot much visited or frequented remote from society; retired; lonely; as, a solitary residence or place.
• Not inhabited or occupied; without signs of inhabitants or occupation; desolate; deserted; silent; still; hence, gloomy; dismal; as, the solitary desert.
• Single; individual; sole; as, a solitary instance of vengeance; a solitary example.
(Bot.) Not associated with others of the same kind.
n.
• One who lives alone, or in solitude; an anchoret; a hermit; a recluse.
Solitude
n.
• state of being alone, or withdrawn from society; a lonely life; loneliness.
• Remoteness from society; destitution of company; seclusion; — said of places; as, the solitude of a wood.
• solitary or lonely place; a desert or wilderness.
Solivagant
a.
• Wandering alone.
Solivagous
a.
• Solivagant.
Sollar
n.
• See Solar, n.
(Mining) A platform in a shaft, especially one of those between the series of ladders in a shaft.
v. t.
• To cover, or provide with, a sollar.
Sollein
a.
• Sullen; sad.
Solleret
n.
• A flexible steel shoe (or one of the plates forming such a shoe), worn with mediaeval armor.
Solmization
n.
(Mus.) The act of sol-faing.
Solo
n.
(Mus.) A tune, air, strain, or a whole piece, played by a single person on an instrument, or sung by a single voice.
Soloist
n.
(Mus.) One who sings or plays a solo.
Solomon
n.
• One of the kings of Israel, noted for his superior wisdom and magnificent reign; hence, a very wise man.
Solon
n.
• A celebrated Athenian lawmaker, born about 638 b. c.; hence, a legislator; a publicist; — often used ironically.
Solpugid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Solifugae.
n.
• One of the Solifugae.
Solpugidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Solifugae.
Solstice
n.
• A stopping or standing still of the sun.
(Astron.) The point in the ecliptic at which the sun is farthest from the equator, north or south, namely, the first point of the sign Cancer and the first point of the sign Capricorn, the former being the summer solstice, latter the winter solstice, in northern latitudes; — so called because the sun then apparently stands still in its northward or southward motion.
• The time of the sun's passing the solstices, or solstitial points, namely, about June 21 and December 21. See Illust. in Appendix.
Solstitial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a solstice.
• Happening at a solstice; esp. (with reference to the northern hemisphere), happening at the summer solstice, or midsummer.
Solubility
n.
• The quality, condition, or degree of being soluble or solvable; as, the solubility of a salt; the solubility of a problem or intricate difficulty.
(Bot.) The tendency to separate readily into parts by spurious articulations, as the pods of tick trefoil.
Soluble
a.
• Susceptible of being dissolved in a fluid; capable of solution; as, some substances are soluble in alcohol which are not soluble in water.
• Susceptible of being solved; as, a soluble algebraic problem; susceptible of being disentangled, unraveled, or explained; as, the mystery is perhaps soluble.
• Relaxed; open or readily opened.
Solubleness
n.
• Quality or state of being soluble.
Solute
a.
• Loose; free; liberal; as, a solute interpretation.
• Relaxed; hence; merry; cheerful.
• Soluble; as, a solute salt.
(Bot.) Not adhering; loose; — opposed to adnate; as, a solute stipule.
v. t.
• To dissolve; to resolve.
• To absolve; as, to solute sin.
Solution
n.
• The act of separating the parts of any body, or the condition of undergoing a separation of parts; disruption; breach.
• The act of solving, or the state of being solved; the disentanglement of any intricate problem or difficult question; explanation; clearing up; — used especially in mathematics, either of the process of solving an equation or problem, or the result of the process.
• The state of being dissolved or disintegrated; resolution; disintegration.
(Chem.Phys.) The act or process by which a body (whether solid, liquid, or gaseous) is absorbed into a liquid, and, remaining or becoming fluid, is diffused throughout the solvent; also, the product reulting from such absorption.
• release; deliverance; disharge.
(Med.) The termination of a disease; resolution.
• A crisis.
• A liquid medicine or preparation (usually aqueous) in which the solid ingredients are wholly soluble.
Solutive
a.
• Tending to dissolve; loosening; laxative.
Solvability
n.
• The quality or state of being solvable; as, the solvability of a difficulty; the solvability of a problem.
• The condition of being solvent; ability to pay all just debts; solvency; as, the solvability of a merchant.
Solvable
a.
• Susceptible of being solved, resolved, or explained; admitting of solution.
• Capable of being paid and discharged; as, solvable obligations.
• Able to pay one's debts; solvent.
Solvableness
n.
• Quality of being solvable.
Solve
v. t.
• To explain; to resolve; to unfold; to clear up out to a result or conclusion; as, to solve a doubt; to solve difficulties; to solve a problem.
n.
• A solution; an explanation.
Solvency
n.
• The quality or state of being solvent.
Solvend
n.
• A substance to be dissolved.
Solvent
a.
• Having the power of dissolving; dissolving; as, a solvent fluid.
• Able or sufficient to pay all just debts; as, a solvent merchant; the estate is solvent.
n.
(Chem.) A substance (usually liquid) suitable for, or employed in, solution, or in dissolving something; as, water is the appropriate solvent of most salts, alcohol of resins, ether of fats, and mercury or acids of metal, etc.
• That which resolves; as, a solvent of mystery.
Solver
n.
• One who, or that which, solves.
Solvible
a.
• See Solvable.
Soly
adv.
• Solely.
Soma
n.
(Anat.) The whole axial portion of an animal, including the head, neck, trunk, and tail.
Somatic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the body as a whole; corporeal; as, somatic death; somatic changes.
• Of or pertaining to the wall of the body; somatopleuric; parietal; as, the somatic stalk of the yolk sac of an embryo.
Somatical
a.
• Somatic.
Somatics
n.
• The science which treats of the general properties of matter; somatology.
Somatist
n.
• One who admits the existence of material beings only; a materialist.
Somatocyst
n.
(Zool.) A cavity in the primary nectocalyx of certain Siphonophora. See Illust. under Nectocalyx.
Somatology
n.
• The dictrine or the science of the general properties of material substances; somatics.
• A treatise on the human body; anatomy.
Somatome
n.
(Anat. & (Zool.) See Somite.
Somatopleure
n.
(Anat.) The outer, or parietal, one of the two lamellae into which the vertebrate blastoderm divides on either side of the notochord, and from which the walls of the body and the amnion are developed. See Splanchopleure.
Somatopleuric
a.
(Anat.) of or pertaining to the somatopleure.
Somatotropism
n.
(Physiol.) A directive influence exercised by a mass of matter upon growing organs.
Sombrero
n.
• A kind of broad-brimmed hat, worn in Spain and in Spanish America.
Sombrous
a.
• Gloomy; somber.
Some
a.
• Consisting of a greater or less portion or sum; composed of a quantity or number which is not stated; — used to express an indefinite quantity or number; as, some wine; some water; some persons. Used also pronominally; as, I have some.
• A certain; one; — indicating a person, thing, event, etc., as not known individually, or designated more specifically; as, some man, that is, some one man.
• Not much; a little; moderate; as, the censure was to some extent just.
• About; near; more or less; — used commonly with numerals, but formerly also with a singular substantive of time or distance; as, a village of some eighty houses; some two or three persons; some hour hence.
• Considerable in number or quality.
• Certain; those of one part or portion; — in distinct from other or others; as, some men believe one thing, and others another.
• A part; a portion; — used pronominally, and followed sometimes by of; as, some of our provisions.
Somebody
n.
• A person unknown or uncertain; a person indeterminate; some person.
• A person of consideration or importance.
Somedeal
adv.
• In some degree; somewhat.
Somehow
adv.
• In one way or another; in some way not yet known or designated; by some means; as, the thing must be done somehow; he lives somehow.
Something
n.
• Anything unknown, undetermined, or not specifically designated; a certain indefinite thing; an indeterminate or unknown event; an unspecified task, work, or thing.
• A part; a portion, more or less; an indefinite quantity or degree; a little.
• A person or thing importance.
• , adv. In some degree; somewhat; to some exrent; at some distance.
Sometime
adv.
• At a past time indefinitely referred to; once; formerly.
• At a time undefined; once in a while; now and then; sometimes.
• At one time or other hereafter; as, I will do it sometime.
a.
• Having been formerly; former; late; whilom.
Sometimes
adv.
• Formerly; sometime.
• At times; at intervals; now and then;occasionally.
a.
• Former; sometime.
Somewhat
n.
• More or less; a certain quantity or degree; a part, more or less; something.
• A person or thing of importance; a somebody.
adv.
• In some degree or measure; a little.
Somewhen
adv.
• At some indefinite time.
Somewhere
adv.
• In some place unknown or not specified; in one place or another.
Somewhile
adv.
• Once; for a time.
Somewhither
adv.
• To some indeterminate place; to some place or other.
Somite
n.
(Anat.& Zool.) One of the actual or ideal serial segments of which an animal, esp. an articulate or vertebrate, is is composed; somatome; metamere. —
Sommeil
n.
• Slumber; sleep.
Sommerset
n.
• See Somersault.
Sommonour
n.
• A summoner.
Somnambular
a.
• Of or pertaining to somnambulism; somnambulistic.
Somnambulate
v. i. & t.
• To walk when sleep.
Somnambulation
n.
• The act of walking in sleep.
Somnambulator
n.
• A somnambulist.
Somnambule
n.
• A somnambulist.
Somnambulic
a.
• Somnambulistic.
Somnambulism
n.
• A condition of the nervous system in which an individual during sleep performs actions approppriate to the waking state; a state of sleep in which some of the senses and voluntary powers are partially awake; noctambulism.
Somnambulist
n.
• A person who is subject to somnambulism; one who walks in his sleep; a sleepwalker; a noctambulist.
Somnambulistic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a somnambulist or somnambulism; affected by somnambulism; appropriate to the state of a somnambulist.
Somne
v. t.
• To summon.
Somner
n.
• A summoner; esp., one who summons to an ecclesiastical court.
Somnial
a.
• Of or pertaining to sleep or dreams.
Somniative
a.
• Somnial; somniatory.
Somniatory
a.
• Pertaining to sleep or dreams; somnial.
Somniculous
a.
• Inclined to sleep; drowsy; sleepy.
Somniferous
a.
• Causing or inducing sleep; soporific; dormitive; as, a somniferous potion.
Somnific
a.
• Causing sleep; somniferous.
Somnifugous
a.
• Driving away sleep.
Somniloquence
n.
• The act of talking in one's sleep; somniloquism.
Somniloquism
n.
• The act or habit of talking in one's sleep; somniloquy.
Somniloquist
n.
• One who talks in his sleep.
Somniloquous
a.
• Apt to talk in sleep.
Somniloquy
n.
• A talking in sleep; the talking of one in a state of somnipathy.
Somnipathist
n.
• A person in a state of somniapathy.
Somnipathy
n.
• Sleep from sympathy, or produced by mesmerism or the like.
Somnolent
a.
• Sleepy; drowsy; inclined to sleep.
Somnolism
n.
• The somnolent state induced by animal magnetism.
Somnopathy
n.
• Somnipathy.
Somnour
n.
• A summoner; an apparitor; a sompnour.
Sompne
v. t.
• To summon; to cite.
Sompnour
n.
• A summoner.
Son
n.
• A male child; the male issue, or offspring, of a parent, father or mother.
• A male descendant, however distant; hence, in the plural, descendants in general.
• Any young male person spoken of as a child; an adopted male child; a pupil, ward, or any other male dependent.
• A native or inhabitant of some specified place; as, sons of Albion; sons of New England.
• The produce of anything.
• Jesus Christ, the Savior; — called the Son of God, and the Son of man.
Sonance
n.
• A sound; a tune; as, to sound the tucket sonance.
• The quality or state of being sonant.
Sonant
a.
• Of or pertaining to sound; sounding.
(Phonetics) Uttered, as an element of speech, with tone or proper vocal sound, as distinguished from mere breath sound; intonated; voiced; tonic; the opposite of nonvocal, or surd; — sid of the vowels, semivowels, liquids, and nasals, and particularly of the consonants b, d, g hard, v, etc., as compared with their cognates p, t, k, f, etc., which are called nonvocal, surd, or aspirate.
n.
• A sonant letter.
Sonata
n.
(Mus.) An extended composition for one or two instruments, consisting usually of three or four movements; as, Beethoven's sonatas for the piano, for the violin and piano, etc.
Sonatina
n.
(Mus.) A short and simple sonata.
Sondeli
n.
(Zool.) The musk shrew. See under Musk.
Song
n.
• That which is sung or uttered with musical modulations of the voice, whether of a human being or of a bird, insect, etc.
• A lyrical poem adapted to vocal music; a ballad.
• More generally, any poetical strain; a poem.
• Poetical composition; poetry; verse.
• An object of derision; a laughingstock.
• A trifle.
Songcraft
n.
• The art of making songs or verse; metrical composition; versification.
Songful
a.
• Disposed to sing; full of song.
Songish
a.
• Consisting of songs.
Songless
a.
• Destitute of the power of song; without song; as, songless birds; songless woods.
Songster
n.
• One who sings; one skilled in singing; — not often applied to human beings.
(Zool.) A singing bird.
Songstress
n.
• A woman who sings; a female singing bird.
Sonifer
n.
• A kind of ear trumpet for the deaf, or the partially deaf.
Soniferous
a.
• Sounding; producing sound; conveying sound.
Sonification
n.
• The act of producing sound, as the stridulation of insects.
Sonless
a.
• Being without a son.
Sonnet
n.
• A short poem, — usually amatory.
• A poem of fourteen lines, — two stanzas, called the octave, being of four verses each, and two stanzas, called the sestet, of three verses each, the rhymes being adjusted by a particular rule.
v. i.
• To compose sonnets.
Sonneteer
n.
• A composer of sonnets, or small poems; a small poet; — usually in contempt.
v. i.
• To compose sonnets.
Sonneter
n.
• A composer of sonnets.
Sonnetist
n.
• A sonneter, or sonneteer.
Sonnetize
v. i.
• To compose sonnets.
Sonnish
a.
• Like the sun; sunny; golden.
Sonnite
n.
• See Sunnite.
Sonometer
n.
(Physiol.) An instrument for exhibiting the transverse vibrations of cords, and ascertaining the relations between musical notes. It consists of a cord stretched by weight along a box, and divided into different lengths at pleasure by a bridge, the place of which is determined by a scale on the face of the box.
• An instrument for testing the hearing capacity.
Sonorific
a.
• Producing sound; as, the sonorific quality of a body.
Sonority
n.
• The quality or state of being sonorous; sonorousness.
Sonorous
a.
• Giving sound when struck; resonant; as, sonorous metals.
• Loud-sounding; giving a clear or loud sound; as, a sonorous voice.
• Yielding sound; characterized by sound; vocal; sonant; as, the vowels are sonorous.
• Impressive in sound; high-sounding.
(Med.) Sonant; vibrant; hence, of sounds produced in a cavity, deep-toned; as, sonorous rhonchi.
Sonship
n.
• The state of being a son, or of bearing the relation of a son; filiation.
Sonsy
a.
• See Soncy.
Sontag
n.
• A knitted worsted jacket, worn over the waist of a woman's dress.
Sonties
n.
• Probably from "saintes" saints, or from sanctities; — used as an oath.
Soodra
• Same as Sudra.
Soojee
n.
• Same as Suji.
Soon
adv.
• In a short time; shortly after any time specified or supposed; as, soon after sunrise.
• Without the usual delay; before any time supposed; early.
• Promptly; quickly; easily.
• Readily; willingly; — in this sense used with would, or some other word expressing will.
a.
• Speedy; quick.
Soonee
n.
• See Sunnite.
Soonly
adv.
• Soon.
Soord
n.
• Skin of bacon.
Soorma
n.
• A preparation of antimony with which Mohammedan men anoint their eyelids.
Sooshong
n.
• Same as Souchong.
Sooshong
n.
• See Souchong.
Soosoo
n.
(Zool.) A kind of dolphin (Platanista Gangeticus) native of the river Ganges; the Gangetic dolphin. It has a long, slender, somewhat spatulate beak.
Soot
n.
• A black substance formed by combustion, or disengaged from fuel in the process of combustion, which rises in fine particles, and adheres to the sides of the chimney or pipe conveying the smoke; strictly, the fine powder, consisting chiefly of carbon, which colors smoke, and which is the result of imperfect combustion. See Smoke.
v. t.
• To cover or dress with soot; to smut with, or as with, soot; as, to soot land.
Sooterkin
n.
• A kind of false birth, fabled to be produced by Dutch women from sitting over their stoves; also, an abortion, in a figurative sense; an abortive scheme.
Sooth
a.; also adv.
• True; faithful; trustworthy.
• Pleasing; delightful; sweet.
n.
• Truth; reality.
• Augury; prognostication.
• Blandishment; cajolery.
Soothe
v. t.
• To assent to as true.
• To assent to; to comply with; to gratify; to humor by compliance; to please with blandishments or soft words; to flatter.
• To assuage; to mollify; to calm; to comfort; as, to soothe a crying child; to soothe one's sorrows.
Soother
n.
• One who, or that which, soothes.
Soothfast
a.
• Firmly fixed in, or founded upon, the thruth; true; genuine; real; also, truthful; faithful.
soothfastness.
adv.
• Soothly; really; in fact.
Soothing
a. & n.
• from Soothe, v.
Soothingly
adv.
• In a soothing manner.
Soothly
adv.
• In truth; truly; really; verily.
Soothness
n.
• Truth; reality.
Soothsay
v. i.
• To foretell; to predict.
n.
• A true saying; a proverb; a prophecy.
• Omen; portent. Having
Soothsayer
n.
• One who foretells events by the art of soothsaying; a prognosticator.
(Zool.) A mantis.
Soothsaying
n.
• A true saying; truth.
• The act of one who soothsays; the foretelling of events; the art or practice of making predictions.
• A prediction; a prophecy; a prognostication.
Sootiness
n.
• The quality or state of being sooty; fuliginousness.
Sootish
a.
• Sooty.
Sooty
a.
• Of or pertaining to soot; producing soot; soiled by soot.
• Having a dark brown or black color like soot; fuliginous; dusky; dark.
v. t.
• To black or foul with soot.
Sop
v. t.
• To steep or dip in any liquid.
Sope
n.
• See Soap.
Soph
n.
(Eng. Univ.) A contraction of Soph ister.
n.
(Amer. Colleges) A contraction of Sophomore.
Sophi
n.
• See Sufi.
Sophime
n.
• Sophism.
Sophism
n.
• The doctrine or mode of reasoning practiced by a sophist; hence, any fallacy designed to deceive.
Sophist
n.
• One of a class of men who taught eloquence, philosophy, and politics in ancient Greece; especially, one of those who, by their fallacious but plausible reasoning, puzzled inquirers after truth, weakened the faith of the people, and drew upon themselves general hatred and contempt.
• Hence, an impostor in argument; a captious or fallacious reasoner.
Sophister
n.
• A sophist. See Sophist.
(Eng. Univ.) A student who is advanced beyond the first year of his residence.
v. t.
• To maintain by sophistry, or by a fallacious argument.
Sophisticate
v. t.
• To render worthless by admixture; to adulterate; to damage; to pervert; as, to sophisticate wine.
Sophistication
n.
• The act of sophisticating; adulteration; as, the sophistication of drugs.
Sophisticator
n.
• One who sophisticates.
Sophistry
n.
• The art or process of reasoning; logic.
• The practice of a sophist; fallacious reasoning; reasoning sound in appearance only.
Sophomore
n.
• One belonging to the second of the four classes in an American college, or one next above a freshman.
Sophora
n.
(Bot.) A genus of leguminous plants.
• A tree (Sophora Japonica) of Eastern Asia, resembling the common locust; occasionally planted in the United States.
Sophta
n.
• See Softa.
Sopite
v. t.
• To lay asleep; to put to sleep; to quiet.
Sopition
n.
• The act of putting to sleep, or the state of being put to sleep; sleep.
Sopor
n.
(Med.) Profound sleep from which a person can be roused only with difficulty.
Soporate
v. t.
• To lay or put to sleep; to stupefy.
Soporiferous
a.
• Causing sleep; somniferous; soporific.
Soporific
a.
• Causing sleep; tending to cause sleep; soporiferous; as, the soporific virtues of opium.
n.
• A medicine, drug, plant, or other agent that has the quality of inducing sleep; a narcotic.
Sopper
n.
• One who sops.
Soppy
a.
• Soaked or saturated with liquid or moisture; very wet or sloppy.
Sopra
adv.
(Mus.) Above; before; over; upon.
Sopranist
n.
(Mus.) A treble singer.
Soprano
n.
(Mus.) The treble; the highest vocal register; the highest kind of female or boy's voice; the upper part in harmony for mixed voices.
• A singer, commonly a woman, with a treble voice.
Sopsavine
n.
• See Sops of wine, under Sop.
Sora
n.
(Zool.) A North American rail (Porzana Carolina) common in the Eastern United States. Its back is golden brown, varied with black and white, the front of the head and throat black, the breast and sides of the head and neck slate-colored. Called also American rail, Carolina rail, Carolina crake, common rail, sora rail, soree, meadow chicken, and orto.
Sorance
n.
• Soreness.
Sorb
n.
(Bot.) The wild service tree (Pyrus torminalis) of Europe; also, the rowan tree.
• The fruit of these trees.
Sorbate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of sorbic acid.
Sorbefacient
a.
(Med.) Producing absorption.
n.
• A medicine or substance which produces absorption.
Sorbent
n.
• An absorbent.
Sorbet
n.
• A kind of beverage; sherbet.
Sorbic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, the rowan tree, or sorb; specifically, designating an acid, CHCOH, of the acetylene series, found in the unripe berries of this tree, and extracted as a white crystalline substance.
Sorbile
a.
• Fit to be drunk or sipped.
Sorbin
n.
(Chem.) An unfermentable sugar, isomeric with glucose, found in the ripe berries of the rowan tree, or sorb, and extracted as a sweet white crystalline substance; — called also mountain-ash sugar.
Sorbite
n.
(Chem.) A sugarlike substance, isomeric with mannite and dulcite, found with sorbin in the ripe berries of the sorb, and extracted as a sirup or a white crystalline substance.
Sorbition
n.
• The act of drinking or sipping.
Sorbonical
a.
• Belonging to the Sorbonne or to a Sorbonist.
Sorbonist
n.
• A doctor of the Sorbonne, or theological college, in the University of Paris, founded by Robert de Sorbon, a. d. 1252. It was suppressed in the Revolution of 1789.
Sorcerer
n.
• A conjurer; an enchanter; a magician.
Sorceress
n.
• A female sorcerer.
Sorcering
n.
• Act or practice of using sorcery.
Sorcerous
a.
• Of or pertaining to sorcery.
Sorcery
n.
• Divination by the assistance, or supposed assistance, of evil spirits, or the power of commanding evil spirits; magic; necromancy; witchcraft; enchantment.
Sord
n.
• See Sward.
Sordes
n.
• Foul matter; excretion; dregs; filthy, useless, or rejected matter of any kind; specifically (Med.), the foul matter that collects on the teeth and tongue in low fevers and other conditions attended with great vital depression.
Sordet
n.
(Mus.) A sordine.
Sordid
a.
• Filthy; foul; dirty.
• Vile; base; gross; mean; as, vulgar, sordid mortals.
• Meanly avaricious; covetous; niggardly.
Sordidly
n.
• Sordidness.
adv.
• In a sordid manner.
Sordidness
n.
• The quality or state of being sordid.
Sordine
n.
(Mus.) See Damper, and 5th Mute.
Sore
a.
• Reddish brown; sorrel.
n.
(Zool.) A young hawk or falcon in the first year.
(Zool.) A young buck in the fourth year. See the Note under Buck.
a.
• Tender to the touch; susceptible of pain from pressure; inflamed; painful; — said of the body or its parts; as, a sore hand.
• Fig.: Sensitive; tender; easily pained, grieved, or vexed; very susceptible of irritation.
• Severe; afflictive; distressing; as, a sore disease; sore evil or calamity.
• Criminal; wrong; evil.
n.
• A place in an animal body where the skin and flesh are ruptured or bruised, so as to be tender or painful; a painful or diseased place, such as an ulcer or a boil.
• Fig.: Grief; affliction; trouble; difficulty.
adv.
• In a sore manner; with pain; grievously.
• Greatly; violently; deeply.
Soredia
n.
• pl. of Soredium.
Sorediate
a.
(Bot.) Sorediiferous.
Soredium
n.
(Bot.) A patch of granular bodies on the surface of the thallus of lichens.
Soree
n.
(Zool.) Same as Sora
Sorehead
n.
• One who is disgruntled by a failure in politics, or the like.
Sorehon
n.
• Formerly, in Ireland, a kind of servile tenure which subjected the tenant to maintain his chieftain gratuitously whenever he wished to indulge in a revel.
Sorel
n.
(Zool.) A young buck in the third year. See the Note under Buck.
• A yellowish or reddish brown color; sorrel.
Sorely
adv.
• In a sore manner; grievously; painfully; as, to be sorely afflicted.
Sorema
n.
(Bot.) A heap of carpels belonging to one flower.
Soreness
n.
• The quality or state of being sore; tenderness; painfull; as, the soreness of a wound; the soreness of an affliction.
Sorex
n.
(Zool.) A genus of small Insectivora, including the common shrews.
Sorghum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of grasses, properly limited to two species, Sorghum Halepense, the Arabian millet, or Johnson grass (see Johnson grass), and S. vulgare, the Indian millet (see Indian millet, under Indian).
• A variety of Sorghum vulgare, grown for its saccharine juice; the Chinese sugar cane.
Sorgne
n.
(Zool.) The three-beared rocking, or whistlefish.
Sorgo
n.
(Bot.) Indian millet and its varieties. See Sorghum.
Sori
n.
• pl. of Sorus.
Soricine
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Shrew family (Soricidae); like a shrew in form or habits; as, the soricine bat (Glossophaga soricina).
Sorites
n.
(Logic) An abridged form of stating of syllogisms in a series of propositions so arranged that the predicate of each one that precedes forms the subject of each one that follows, and the conclusion unites the subject of the first proposition with the predicate of the last proposition
Soritical
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sorites; resembling a sorites.
Sorn
v. i.
• To obtrude one's self on another for bed and board.
Sorner
n.
• One who obtrudes himself on another for bed and board.
Sororal
a.
• Relating to a sister; sisterly.
Sororicide
n.
• The murder of one's sister; also, one who murders or kills one's own sister.
Sororize
v. i.
• To associate, or hold fellowship, as sisters; to have sisterly feelings; — analogous to fraternize.
Sorosis
n.
• A woman's club; an association of women.
n.
(Bot.) A fleshy fruit formed by the consolidation of many flowers with their receptacles, ovaries, etc., as the breadfruit, mulberry, and pineapple.
Sorrage
n.
• The blades of green or barley.
Sorrance
n.
• Same as Sorance.
Sorrel
a.
• Of a yellowish or redish brown color; as, a sorrel horse.
n.
• A yellowish or redish brown color.
n.
(Bot.) One of various plants having a sour juice; especially, a plant of the genus Rumex, as Rumex Acetosa, Rumex Acetosella, etc.
Sorrily
adv.
• In a sorry manner; poorly.
Sorriness
n.
• The quality or state of being sorry.
Sorrow
n.
• The uneasiness or pain of mind which is produced by the loss of any good, real or supposed, or by diseappointment in the expectation of good; grief at having suffered or occasioned evil; regret; unhappiness; sadness.
v. i.
• To feel pain of mind in consequence of evil experienced, feared, or done; to grieve; to be sad; to be sorry.
Sorrowed
a.
• Accompanied with sorrow; sorrowful.
Sorrowful
a.
• Full of sorrow; exhibiting sorrow; sad; dejected; distressed.
• Producing sorrow; exciting grief; mournful; lamentable; grievous; as, a sorrowful accident.
Sorrowless
a.
• Free from sorrow.
Sorry
a.
• Grieved for the loss of some good; pained for some evil; feeling regret; — now generally used to express light grief or affliction, but formerly often used to express deeper feeling.
• Melancholy; dismal; gloomy; mournful.
• Poor; mean; worthless; as, a sorry excuse.
Sors
n.
• A lot; also, a kind of divination by means of lots.
Sort
n.
• Chance; lot; destiny.
n.
• A kind or species; any number or collection of individual persons or things characterized by the same or like qualities; a class or order; as, a sort of men; a sort of horses; a sort of trees; a sort of poems.
• Manner; form of being or acting.
• Condition above the vulgar; rank.
• A chance group; a company of persons who happen to be together; a troop; also, an assemblage of animals.
• A pair; a set; a suit.
(Print.) Letters, figures, points, marks, spaces, or quadrats, belonging to a case, separately considered.
v. t.
• To separate, and place in distinct classes or divisions, as things having different qualities; as, to sort cloths according to their colors; to sort wool or thread according to its fineness.
• To reduce to order from a confused state.
• To conjoin; to put together in distribution; to class.
• To choose from a number; to select; to cull.
• To conform; to adapt; to accommodate.
v. i.
• To join or associate with others, esp. with others of the same kind or species; to agree.
• To suit; to fit; to be in accord; to harmonize.
Sortable
a.
• Capable of being sorted.
• Suitable; befitting; proper.
Sortably
adv.
• Suitable.
Sortal
a.
• Pertaining to a sort.
Sortance
n.
• Suitableness; agreement.
Sorter
n.
• One who, or that which, sorts.
Sortes
n.
• pl. of Sors.
Sortie
n.
(Mil.) The sudden issuing of a body of troops, usually small, from a besieged place to attack or harass the besiegers; a sally.
Sortilege
n.
• The act or practice of drawing lots; divination by drawing lots.
Sortilegious
a.
• Pertaining to sortilege.
Sortilegy
n.
• Sortilege.
Sortition
n.
• Selection or appointment by lot.
Sortment
n.
• Assortiment.
Sorus
n.
(Bot.) One of the fruit dots, or small clusters of sporangia, on the back of the fronds of ferns.
Sorwe
n. & v.
• Sorrow.
Sorweful
a.
• Sorrowful.
Sory
n.
(Old Min. Chem.) Green vitriol, or some earth imregnated with it.
Soss
v. i.
• To fall at once into a chair or seat; to sit lazily.
v. t.
• To throw in a negligent or careless manner; to toss.
n.
• A lazy fellow.
• A heavy fall.
n.
• Anything dirty or muddy; a dirty puddle.
Sostenuto
a.
(Mus.) Sustained; — applied to a movement or passage the sounds of which are to sustained to the utmost of the nominal value of the time; also, to a passage the tones of which are to be somewhat prolonged or protacted.
Sot
n.
• A stupid person; a blockhead; a dull fellow; a dolt.
• A person stupefied by excessive drinking; an habitual drunkard.
a.
• Sottish; foolish; stupid; dull.
v. t.
• To stupefy; to infatuate; to besot.
v. i.
• To tipple to stupidity.
Sotadean
a.
• Sotadic.
Sotadic
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, the lascivious compositions of the Greek poet Sotades.
n.
• A Sotadic verse or poem.
Sote
a.
• Sweet.
Soteriology
n.
• A discourse on health, or the science of promoting and preserving health.
(Theol.) The doctrine of salvation by Jesus Christ.
Sothe
a.
• Sooth.
Sotilte
n.
• Subtlety.
Sotted
• a. & p. p. of Sot. Befooled; deluded; besotted.
Sottery
n.
• Folly.
Sottish
a.
• Like a sot; doltish; very foolish; drunken.
Sou
n.
• An old French copper coin, equivalent in value to, and now displaced by, the five-centime piece (sou.
Soubah
n.
• See Subah.
Soubahdar
n.
• See Subahdar.
Soubrette
n.
• A female servant or attendant; specifically, as a term of the theater, a lady's maid, in comedies, who acts the part of an intrigante; a meddlesome, mischievous female servant or young woman.
Soubriquet
n.
• See Sobriquet.
Souce
n.
• See 1st Souse.
v. t. & i.
• See Souse.
Souchong
n.
• A kind of black tea of a fine quality.
Soudan
n.
• A sultan.
Souffle
n.
(Cookery) A side dish served hot from the oven at dinner, made of eggs, milk, and flour or other farinaceous substance, beaten till very light, and flavored with fruits, liquors, or essence.
Souffle
n.
(Med.) A murmuring or blowing sound; as, the uterine souffle heard over the pregnant uterus.
Sough
n.
• A sow.
n.
• A small drain; an adit.
n.
• The sound produced by soughing; a hollow murmur or roaring.
• Hence, a vague rumor or flying report.
• A cant or whining mode of speaking, especially in preaching or praying.
v. i.
• To whistle or sigh, as the wind.
Sought
• imp. & p. p. of Seek.
Souir
v. t.
• To throw with a jerk; to throw edge foremost.
Souke
v. t. & i.
• To suck.
Soul
a.
• Sole.
a.
• Sole.
v. i.
• To afford suitable sustenance.
n.
• The spiritual, rational, and immortal part in man; that part of man which enables him to think, and which renders him a subject of moral government; — sometimes, in distinction from the higher nature, or spirit, of man, the so-called animal soul, that is, the seat of life, the sensitive affections and phantasy, exclusive of the voluntary and rational powers; — sometimes, in distinction from the mind, the moral and emotional part of man's nature, the seat of feeling, in distinction from intellect; — sometimes, the intellect only; the understanding; the seat of knowledge, as distinguished from feeling. In a more general sense, "an animating, separable, surviving entity, the vehicle of individual personal existence."
• The seat of real life or vitality; the source of action; the animating or essential part.
• The leader; the inspirer; the moving spirit; the heart; as, the soul of an enterprise; an able gemeral is the soul of his army.
• Energy; courage; spirit; fervor; affection, or any other noble manifestation of the heart or moral nature; inherent power or goodness.
• A human being; a person; — a familiar appellation, usually with a qualifying epithet; as, poor soul.
• A pure or disembodied spirit.
v. t.
• To indue with a soul; to furnish with a soul or mind.
Souled
a.
• Furnished with a soul; possessing soul and feeling; — used chiefly in composition; as, great-souled Hector.
Soulili
n.
(Zool.) A long-tailed, crested Javan monkey (Semnopithecus mitratus). The head, the crest, and the upper surface of the tail, are black.
Soulless
a.
• Being without a soul, or without greatness or nobleness of mind; mean; spiritless.
Soullessly
adv.
• In a soulless manner.
Soun
n. & v.
• Sound.
Sound
n.
• The air bladder of a fish; as, cod sounds are an esteemed article of food.
n.
(Zool.) A cuttlefish.
a.
• Whole; unbroken; unharmed; free from flaw, defect, or decay; perfect of the kind; as, sound timber; sound fruit; a sound tooth; a sound ship.
• Healthy; not diseased; not being in a morbid state; — said of body or mind; as, a sound body; a sound constitution; a sound understanding.
• Firm; strong; safe.
• Free from error; correct; right; honest; true; faithful; orthodox; — said of persons; as, a sound lawyer; a sound thinker.
• Founded in truth or right; supported by justice; not to be overthrown on refuted; not fallacious; as, sound argument or reasoning; a sound objection; sound doctrine; sound principles.
• heavy; laid on with force; as, a sound beating.
• Undisturbed; deep; profound; as, sound sleep.
• Founded in law; legal; valid; not defective; as, a sound title to land.
adv.
• Soundly.
n.
(Geog.) A narrow passage of water, or a strait between the mainland and an island; also, a strait connecting two seas, or connecting a sea or lake with the ocean; as, the Sound between the Baltic and the german Ocean; Long Island Sound.
v. t.
• To measure the depth of; to fathom; especially, to ascertain the depth of by means of a line and plummet.
• Fig.: To ascertain, or try to ascertain, the thoughts, motives, and purposes of (a person); to examine; to try; to test; to probe.
(Med.) To explore, as the bladder or urethra, with a sound; to examine with a sound; also, to examine by auscultation or percussion; as, to sound a patient.
v. i.
• To ascertain the depth of water with a sounding line or other device.
n.
(Med.) Any elongated instrument or probe, usually metallic, by which cavities of the body are sounded or explored, especially the bladder for stone, or the urethra for a stricture.
n.
• The peceived object occasioned by the impulse or vibration of a material substance affecting the ear; a sensation or perception of the mind received through the ear, and produced by the impulse or vibration of the air or other medium with which the ear is in contact; the effect of an impression made on the organs of hearing by an impulse or vibration of the air caused by a collision of bodies, or by other means; noise; report; as, the sound of a drum; the sound of the human voice; a horrid sound; a charming sound; a sharp, high, or shrill sound.
• The occasion of sound; the impulse or vibration which would occasion sound to a percipient if present with unimpaired; hence, the theory of vibrations in elastic media such cause sound; as, a treatise on sound.
• Noise without signification; empty noise; noise and nothing else.
v. i.
• To make a noise; to utter a voice; to make an impulse of the air that shall strike the organs of hearing with a perceptible effect.
• To be conveyed in sound; to be spread or published; to convey intelligence by sound.
• To make or convey a certain impression, or to have a certain import, when heard; hence, to seem; to appear; as, this reproof sounds harsh; the story sounds like an invention.
v. t.
• To causse to make a noise; to play on; as, to sound a trumpet or a horn.
• To cause to exit as a sound; as, to sound a note with the voice, or on an instrument.
• To order, direct, indicate, or proclain by a sound, or sounds; to give a signal for by a certain sound; as, to sound a retreat; to sound a parley.
• To celebrate or honor by sounds; to cause to be reported; to publish or proclaim; as, to sound the praises of fame of a great man or a great exploit.
• To examine the condition of (anything) by causing the same to emit sounds and noting their character; as, to sound a piece of timber; to sound a vase; to sound the lungs of a patient.
• To signify; to import; to denote.
Soundable
a.
• Capable of being sounded.
Soundage
n.
• Dues for soundings.
Sounder
n.
• One who, or that which; sounds; specifically, an instrument used in telegraphy in place of a register, the communications being read by sound.
n.
(Zool.) A herd of wild hogs.
Sounding
a.
• Making or emitting sound; hence, sonorous; as, sounding words.
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, sounds (in any of the senses of the several verbs).
(Naut.) measurement by sounding; also, the depth so ascertained.
• Any place or part of the ocean, or other water, where a sounding line will reach the bottom; — usually in the plural
• The sand, shells, or the like, that are brought up by the sounding lead when it has touched bottom.
Soundless
a.
• Not capable of being sounded or fathomed; unfathomable.
a.
• Having no sound; noiseless; silent.
Soundly
adv.
• In a sound manner.
Soundness
n.
• The quality or state of being sound; as, the soundness of timber, of fruit, of the teeth, etc.; the soundness of reasoning or argument; soundness of faith.
Soune
v. t. & i.
• To sound.
Sounst
a.
• Soused. See Souse.
Soup
n.
• A liquid food of many kinds, usually made by boiling meat and vegetables, or either of them, in water, — commonly seasoned or flavored; strong broth.
v. t.
• To sup or swallow.
v. t.
• To breathe out.
v. t.
• To sweep. See Sweep, and Swoop.
Souple
n.
• That part of a flail which strikes the grain.
Soupy
a.
• Resembling soup; souplike.
Sour
a.
• Having an acid or sharp, biting taste, like vinegar, and the juices of most unripe fruits; acid; tart.
• Changed, as by keeping, so as to be acid, rancid, or musty, turned.
• Disagreeable; unpleasant; hence; cross; crabbed; peevish; morose; as, a man of a sour temper; a sour reply.
• Afflictive; painful.
• Cold and unproductive; as, sour land; a sour marsh.
n.
• A sour or acid substance; whatever produces a painful effect.
v. t.
• To cause to become sour; to cause to turn from sweet to sour; as, exposure to the air sours many substances.
• To make cold and unproductive, as soil.
• To make unhappy, uneasy, or less agreeable.
• To cause or permit to become harsh or unkindly.
• To macerate, and render fit for plaster or mortar; as, to sour lime for business purposes.
v. i.
• To become sour; to turn from sweet to sour; as, milk soon sours in hot weather; a kind temper sometimes sours in adversity.
Source
n.
• The act of rising; a rise; an ascent.
• The rising from the ground, or beginning, of a stream of water or the like; a spring; a fountain.
• That from which anything comes forth, regarded as its cause or origin; the person from whom anything originates; first cause.
Sourcrout
n.
• See Sauerkraut.
Sourde
v. i.
• To have origin or source; to rise; to spring.
Souring
n.
(Bot.) Any sour apple.
Sourish
a.
• Somewhat sour; moderately acid; as, sourish fruit; a sourish taste.
Sourkrout
n.
• Same as Sauerkraut.
Sourly
adv.
• In a sour manner; with sourness.
Sourness
n.
• The quality or state of being sour.
Sours
n.
• Source. See Source.
Soursop
n.
(Bot.) The large succulent and slightly acid fruit of a small tree (Anona muricata) of the West Indies; also, the tree itself. It is closely allied to the custard apple.
Sourt
n.
• A sudden or violent ejection or gushing of a liquid, as of water from a tube, orifice, or other confined place, or of blood from a wound; a jet; a spirt.
• A shoot; a bud.
• Fig.: A sudden outbreak; as, a spurt of jealousy.
Sourwood
n.
(Bot.) The sorrel tree.
Souse
n.
• Pickle made with salt.
• Something kept or steeped in pickle; esp., the pickled ears, feet, etc., of swine.
• The ear; especially, a hog's ear.
• The act of sousing; a plunging into water.
v. t.
• To steep in pickle; to pickle.
• To plunge or immerse in water or any liquid.
• To drench, as by an immersion; to wet throughly.
v. i.
• To swoop or plunge, as a bird upon its prey; to fall suddenly; to rush with speed; to make a sudden attack.
v. t.
• To pounce upon.
n.
• The act of sousing, or swooping.
adv.
• With a sudden swoop; violently.
Souslik
n.
(Zool.) See Suslik.
Sout
n.
• Soot.
Soutache
n.
• A kind of narrow braid, usually of silk; — also known as Russian braid.
Soutage
n.
• That in which anything is packed; bagging, as for hops.
Soutane
n.
(Eccl. Costume) A close garnment with straight sleeves, and skirts reaching to the ankles, and buttoned in front from top to bottom; especially, the black garment of this shape worn by the clergy in France and Italy as their daily dress; a cassock.
Souter
n.
• A shoemaker; a cobbler.
Souterly
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cobbler or cobblers; like a cobbler; hence, vulgar; low.
Souterrain
n.
• A grotto or cavern under ground.
South
n.
• That one of the four cardinal points directly opposite to the north; the region or direction to the right or direction to the right of a person who faces the east.
• A country, region, or place situated farther to the south than another; the southern section of a country.
• Specifically: That part of the United States which is south of Mason and Dixon's line. See under Line.
• The wind from the south.
a.
• Lying toward the south; situated at the south, or in a southern direction from the point of observation or reckoning; proceeding toward the south, or coming from the south; blowing from the south; southern; as, the south pole.
• , adv. 1. Toward the south; southward.
• From the south; as, the wind blows south.
v. i.
• To turn or move toward the south; to veer toward the south.
(Astron.) To come to the meridian; to cross the north and south line; — said chiefly of the moon; as, the moon souths at nine.
Southcottian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Joanna Southcott (1750-1814), an Englishwoman who, professing to have received a miraculous calling, preached and prophesied, and committed many impious absurdities.
Southdown
a.
• Of or pertaining to the South Downs, a range of pasture hills south of the Thames, in England.
n.
• A Southdown sheep.
Southeast
n.
• The point of the compass equally distant from the south and the east; the southeast part or region.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the southeast; proceeding toward, or coming from, the southeast; as, a southeast course; a southeast wind.
Southeaster
n.
• A storm, strong wind, or gale coming from the southeast.
adv.
• Toward the southeast.
Southeastern
a.
• Of or pertaining to the southeast; southeasterly.
Souther
n.
• A strong wind, gale, or storm from the south.
Southerliness
n.
• The quality or state of being southerly; direction toward the south.
Southerly
a.
• Southern.
Southern
a.
• Of or pertaining to the south; situated in, or proceeding from, the south; situated or proceeding toward the south.
n.
• A Southerner.
Southerner
n.
• An inhabitant or native of the south, esp. of the Southern States of North America; opposed to Northerner.
Southernliness
n.
• Southerliness.
Southernly
a.
• Somewhat southern.
adv.
• In a southerly manner or course; southward.
Southernmost
a.
• Farthest south.
Southernwood
n.
(Bot.) A shrubby species of wormwood (Artemisia Abrotanum) having aromatic foliage. It is sometimes used in making beer.
Southing
n.
• Tendency or progress southward; as, the southing of the sun.
• The time at which the moon, or other heavenly body, passes the meridian of a place.
(Astron.) Distance of any heavenly body south of the equator; south declination; south latitude.
(Surv. & Navigation) Distance southward from any point departure or of reckoning, measured on a meridian; — opposed to northing.
Southly
adv.
• Southerly.
Southmost
a.
• Farthest toward the south; southernmost.
Southness
n.
• A tendency in the end of a magnetic needle to point toward the south pole.
Southren
a.
• Southern.
Southron
n.
• An inhabitant of the more southern part of a country; formerly, a name given in Scotland to any Englishman.
Southsay
v. i.
• See Soothsay.
Southsayer
n.
• See Soothsayer.
Southward
a.
• Toward the south.
n.
• The southern regions or countries; the south.
Southwardly
adv.
• In a southern direction.
Southwest
n.
• The point of the compass equally from the south and the west; the southwest part or region.
a.
• Pertaining to, or in the direction of, the southwest; proceeding toward the southwest; coming from the southwest; as, a southwest wind.
Southwester
n.
• A storm, gale, or strong wind from the southwest.
• A hat made of painted canvas, oiled cloth, or the like, with a flap at the back, — worn in stormy weather.
Southwesterly
a.
• To ward or from the southwest; as, a southwesterly course; a southwesterly wind.
Southwestern
a.
• Of or pertaining to the southwest; southwesterly; as, to sail a southwestern course.
Souvenir
n.
• That which serves as a reminder; a remembrancer; a memento; a keepsake.
Sovereign
a.
• Supreme or highest in power; superior to all others; chief; as, our sovereign prince.
• Independent of, and unlimited by, any other; possessing, or entitled to, original authority or jurisdiction; as, a sovereign state; a sovereign discretion.
• Princely; royal.
• Predominant; greatest; utmost; paramount.
• Efficacious in the highest degree; effectual; controlling; as, a sovereign remedy.
n.
• The person, body, or state in which independent and supreme authority is vested; especially, in a monarchy, a king, queen, or emperor.
• A gold coin of Great Britain, on which an effigy of the head of the reigning king or queen is stamped, valued at one pound sterling, or about $4.86.
(Zool.) Any butterfly of the tribe Nymphalidi, or genus Basilarchia, as the ursula and the viceroy.
Sovereignize
v. i.
• To exercise supreme authority.
Sovereignly
adv.
• In a sovereign manner; in the highest degree; supremely.
Sovereignty
n.
• The quality or state of being sovereign, or of being a sovereign; the exercise of, or right to exercise, supreme power; dominion; sway; supremacy; independence; also, that which is sovereign; a sovereign state; as, Italy was formerly divided into many sovereignties.
Sovran
a.
• A variant of Sovereign.
Sow
v. i.
• To sew. See Sew.
n.
(Zool.) The female of swine, or of the hog kind.
(Zool.) A sow bug.
(Metal.) A channel or runner which receives the rows of molds in the pig bed.
• The bar of metal which remains in such a runner.
• A mass of solidified metal in a furnace hearth; a salamander.
(Mil.) A kind of covered shed, formerly used by besiegers in filling up and passing the ditch of a besieged place, sapping and mining the wall, or the like.
v. t.
• To scatter, as seed, upon the earth; to plant by strewing; as, to sow wheat. Also used figuratively: To spread abroad; to propagate.
• To scatter seed upon, in, or over; to supply or stock, as land, with seeds. Also used figuratively: To scatter over; to besprinkle.
v. i.
• To scatter seed for growth and the production of a crop; — literally or figuratively.
Sowans
n. pl.
• See Sowens.
Sowar
n.
• In India, a mounted soldier.
Sowbane
n.
(Bot.) The red goosefoot (Chenopodium rubrum), — said to be fatal to swine.
Sowce
n. & v.
• See Souse.
Sowdan
n.
• Sultan.
Sowdanesse
n.
• A sultaness.
Sowens
n. pl.
• A nutritious article of food, much used in Scotland, made from the husk of the oat by a process not unlike that by which common starch is made; — called flummery in England.
Sower
n.
• One who, or that which, sows.
Sowins
n. pl.
• See Sowens.
Sowl
v. i.
• See Soul, v. i.
Sown
• p. p. of Sow.
Sowne
v. t. & i.
• To sound.
Sowse
n. & v.
• See Souse.
Sowter
n.
• See Souter.
Soy
n.
• A Chinese and Japanese liquid sauce for fish, etc., made by subjecting boiled beans (esp. soja beans), or beans and meal, to long fermentation and then long digestion in salt and water.
(Bot.) The soja, a kind of bean. See Soja.
Soyle
v. t.
• To solve, to clear up; as, to soyl all other texts.
n.
• Prey.
Soyned
a.
• Filled with care; anxious.
Sozzle
v. t.
• To splash or wet carelessly; as, to sozzle the feet in water.
• To heap up in confusion.
n.
• One who spills water or other liquids carelessly; specifically, a sluttish woman.
• A mass, or heap, confusedly mingled.
Spa
n.
• A spring or mineral water; — so called from a place of this name in Belgium.
Spaad
n.
(Min.) A kind of spar; earth flax, or amianthus.
Space
n.
• Extension, considered independently of anything which it may contain; that which makes extended objects conceivable and possible.
• Place, having more or ess extension; room.
• A quantity or portion of extension; distance from one thing to another; an interval between any two or more objects; as, the space between two stars or two hills; the sound was heard for the space of a mile.
• Quantity of time; an interval between two points of time; duration; time.
• A short time; a while.
• Walk; track; path; course.
(print.) A small piece of metal cast lower than a face type, so as not to receive the ink in printing, — used to separate words or letters.
• The distance or interval between words or letters in the lines, or between lines, as in books.
(Mus.) One of the intervals, or open places, between the lines of the staff.
v. i.
• To walk; to rove; to roam.
v. t.
(Print.) To arrange or adjust the spaces in or between; as, to space words, lines, or letters.
Spaceful
a.
• Wide; extensive.
Spacelate
v. i.
(Med.) To die, decay, or become gangrenous, as flesh or bone; to mortify.
Spaceless
a.
• Without space.
Spacial
a.
• See Spatial.
Spacially
adv.
• See Spatially.
Spacious
a.
• Extending far and wide; vast in extent.
• Inclosing an extended space; having large or ample room; not contracted or narrow; capacious; roomy; as, spacious bounds; a spacious church; a spacious hall.
Spadassin
n.
• A bravo; a bully; a duelist.
Spaddle
n.
• A little spade.
Spade
n.
(Zool.) A hart or stag three years old.
• A castrated man or beast.
n.
• An implement for digging or cutting the ground, consisting usually of an oblong and nearly rectangular blade of iron, with a handle like that of a shovel.
• One of that suit of cards each of which bears one or more figures resembling a spade.
• A cutting instrument used in flensing a whale.
v. t.
• To dig with a spade; to pare off the sward of, as land, with a spade.
Spadebone
n.
• Shoulder blade
Spadefish
n.
(Zool.) An American market fish (Chaetodipterus faber) common on the southern coasts; — called also angel fish, moonfish, and porgy.
Spadefoot
n.
(Zool.) Any species of burrowing toads of the genus Scaphiopus, esp. S. Holbrookii, of the Eastern United States; — called also spade toad.
Spadeful
n.
• As much as a spade will hold or lift.
Spader
n.
• One who, or that which, spades; specifically, a digging machine.
Spadiceous
a.
• Of a bright clear brown or chestnut color.
(Bot.) Bearing flowers on a spadix; of the nature of a spadix.
Spadicose
a.
(Bot.) Spadiceous.
Spadille
n.
(Card Playing) The ace of spades in omber and quadrille.
Spadix
n.
(Bot.) A fleshy spike of flowers, usually inclosed in a leaf called a spathe.
(Zool.) A special organ of the nautilus, due to a modification of the posterior tentacles.
Spado
n.
• Same as Spade, 2.
(Law) An impotent person.
Spadroon
n.
• A sword, especially a broadsword, formerly used both to cut and thrust.
Spae
v. i.
• To foretell; to divine.
Spaeman
n.
• A prophet; a diviner.
Spaewife
n.
• A female fortune teller.
Spaghetti
n.
• A variety or macaroni made in tubes of small diameter.
Spagyric
n.
• A spagyrist.
Spagyrist
n.
• A chemist, esp. one devoted to alchemistic pursuits.
• One of a sect which arose in the days of alchemy, who sought to discover remedies for disease by chemical means. The spagyrists historically preceded the iatrochemists.
Spaid
n.
• See 1st Spade.
Spake
• imp. of Speak.
Spakenet
n.
• A net for catching crabs.
Spaky
a.
• Specky.
Spale
n.
• A lath; a shaving or chip, as of wood or stone.
(Shipbuilding) A strengthening cross timber.
Spall
n.
• The shoulder.
n.
• A chip or fragment, especially a chip of stone as struck off the block by the hammer, having at least one feather-edge.
v. t.
(Mining) To break into small pieces, as ore, for the purpose of separating from rock.
(Masonry) To reduce, as irregular blocks of stone, to an approximately level surface by hammering.
v. i.
• To give off spalls, or wedge-shaped chips; — said of stone, as when badly set, with the weight thrown too much on the outer surface.
Spalpeen
n.
• A scamp; an Irish term for a good-for-nothing fellow; — often used in good-humored contempt or ridicule.
Spalt
n.
(Metal.) Spelter.
a.
• Liable to break or split; brittle; as, spalt timber.
• Heedless; clumsy; pert; saucy.
v. t. & i.
• To split off; to cleave off, as chips from a piece of timber, with an ax.
Span
• imp. & p. p. of Spin.
n.
• The space from the thumb to the end of the little finger when extended; nine inches; eighth of a fathom.
• Hence, a small space or a brief portion of time.
• The spread or extent of an arch between its abutments, or of a beam, girder, truss, roof, bridge, or the like, between its supports.
(Naut.) A rope having its ends made fast so that a purchase can be hooked to the bight; also, a rope made fast in the center so that both ends can be used.
• A pair of horses or other animals driven together; usually, such a pair of horses when similar in color, form, and action.
v. t.
• To measure by the span of the hand with the fingers extended, or with the fingers encompassing the object; as, to span a space or distance; to span a cylinder.
• To reach from one side of to the order; to stretch over as an arch.
• To fetter, as a horse; to hobble.
v. i.
• To be matched, as horses.
Spanaemia
n.
(Med.) A condition of impoverishment of the blood; a morbid state in which the red corpuscles, or other important elements of the blood, are deficient.
Spanaemic
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to spanaemia; having impoverished blood.
Spancel
n.
• A rope used for tying or hobbling the legs of a horse or cow.
v. t.
• To tie or hobble with a spancel.
Spandogs
n. pl.
• A pair of grappling dogs for hoisting logs and timber.
Spandrel
n.
(Arch.) The irregular triangular space between the curve of an arch and the inclosing right angle; or the space between the outer moldings of two contiguous arches and a horizontal line above them, or another arch above and inclosing them.
• A narrow mat or passe partout for a picture.
Spane
v. t.
• To wean.
Spang
v. t.
• To spangle.
v. i.
• To spring; to bound; to leap.
n.
• A bound or spring.
n.
• A spangle or shining ornament.
Spangle
n.
• A small plate or boss of shining metal; something brilliant used as an ornament, especially when stitched on the dress.
• Figuratively, any little thing that sparkless.
v. t.
• To set or sprinkle with, or as with, spangles; to adorn with small, distinct, brilliant bodies; as, a spangled breastplate.
v. i.
• To show brilliant spots or points; to glisten; to glitter.
Spangler
n.
• One who, or that which, spangles.
Spangly
a.
• Resembling, or consisting of, spangles; glittering; as, spangly light.
Spaniard
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Spain.
Spaniel
n.
(Zool.) One of a breed of small dogs having long and thick hair and large drooping ears. The legs are usually strongly feathered, and the tail bushy. See Illust. under Clumber, and Cocker.
• A cringing, fawning person.
a.
• Cringing; fawning.
v. i.
• To fawn; to cringe; to be obsequious.
v. t.
• To follow like a spaniel.
Spanish
a.
• Of or pertaining to Spain or the Spaniards.
n.
• The language of Spain.
Spank
v. t.
• To strike, as the breech, with the open hand; to slap.
n.
• A blow with the open hand; a slap.
v. i.
• To move with a quick, lively step between a trot and gallop; to move quickly.
Spanker
n.
• One who spanks, or anything used as an instrument for spanking.
(Naut.) The after sail of a ship or bark, being a fore-and-aft sail attached to a boom and gaff; — sometimes called driver. See Illust. under Sail.
• One who takes long, quick strides in walking; also, a fast horse.
• Something very large, or larger than common; a whopper, as a stout or tall person.
n.
• A small coin.
Spanking
a.
• Moving with a quick, lively pace, or capable of so doing; dashing.
• Large; considerable.
Spanless
a.
• Incapable of being spanned.
Spanner
n.
• One who, or that which, spans.
• The lock of a fusee or carbine; also, the fusee or carbine itself.
• An iron instrument having a jaw to fit a nut or the head of a bolt, and used as a lever to turn it with; a wrench; specifically, a wrench for unscrewing or tightening the couplings of hose.
• A contrivance in some of the ealier steam engines for moving the valves for the alternate admission and shutting off of the steam.
Spannishing
n.
• The full blooming of a flower.
Spanpiece
n.
(Arch.) The collar of a roof; sparpiece.
Spanworm
n.
(Zool.) The larva of any geometrid moth, as the cankeworm; a geometer; a measuring worm.
Spar
n.
(Min.) An old name for a nonmetallic mineral, usually cleavable and somewhat lustrous; as, calc spar, or calcite, fluor spar, etc. It was especially used in the case of the gangue minerals of a metalliferous vein.
n.
(Naut.) A general term any round piece of timber used as a mast, yard, boom, or gaff.
(Arch.) Formerly, a piece of timber, in a general sense; — still applied locally to rafters.
• The bar of a gate or door.
v. t.
• To bolt; to bar.
• To To supply or equip with spars, as a vessel.
v. i.
• To strike with the feet or spurs, as cocks do.
• To use the fists and arms scientifically in attack or defense; to contend or combat with the fists, as for exercise or amusement; to box.
• To contest in words; to wrangle.
n.
• A contest at sparring or boxing.
• A movement of offense or defense in boxing.
Sparable
n.
• A kind of small nail used by shoemakers.
Sparada
n.
(Zool.) A small California surf fish (Micrometrus aggregatus); — called also shiner.
Sparadrap
n.
• A cerecloth.
(Med.) Any adhesive plaster.
Sparble
v. t.
• To scatter; to disperse; to rout.
Spare
v. t.
• To use frugally or stintingly, as that which is scarce or valuable; to retain or keep unused; to save.
• To keep to one's self; to forbear to impart or give.
• To preserve from danger or punishment; to forbear to punish, injure, or harm; to show mercy to.
• To save or gain, as by frugality; to reserve, as from some occupation, use, or duty.
• To deprive one's self of, as by being frugal; to do without; to dispense with; to give up; to part with.
v. i.
• To be frugal; not to be profuse; to live frugally; to be parsimonious.
• To refrain from inflicting harm; to use mercy or forbearance.
• To desist; to stop; to refrain.
a.
• Scanty; not abundant or plentiful; as, a spare diet.
• Sparing; frugal; parsimonious; chary.
• Being over and above what is necessary, or what must be used or reserved; not wanted, or not used; superfluous; as, I have no spare time.
• Held in reserve, to be used in an emergency; as, a spare anchor; a spare bed or room.
• Lean; wanting flesh; meager; thin; gaunt.
• Slow.
n.
• The act of sparing; moderation; restraint.
• Parsimony; frugal use.
• An opening in a petticoat or gown; a placket.
• That which has not been used or expended.
(Tenpins) The right of bowling again at a full set of pins, after having knocked all the pins down in less than three bowls. If all the pins are knocked down in one bowl it is a double spare; in two bowls, a single spare.
Spareful
a.
• Sparing; chary.
Spareless
a.
• Unsparing.
Sparely
adv.
• In a spare manner; sparingly.
Spareness
n.
• The quality or state of being lean or thin; leanness.
Sparer
n.
• One who spares.
Sparerib
n.
• A piece of pork, consisting or ribs with little flesh on them.
Sparge
v. t.
• To sprinkle; to moisten by sprinkling; as, to sparge paper.
Spargefaction
n.
• The act of sprinkling.
Sparger
n.
• A vessel with a perforated cover, for sprinkling with a liquid; a sprinkler.
Sparhawk
n.
(Zool.) The sparrow hawk.
Sparing
a.
• Spare; saving; frugal; merciful.
Spark
n.
• A small particle of fire or ignited substance which is emitted by a body in combustion.
• A small, shining body, or transient light; a sparkle.
• That which, like a spark, may be kindled into a flame, or into action; a feeble germ; an elementary principle.
n.
• A brisk, showy, gay man.
• A lover; a gallant; a beau.
v. i.
• To sparkle.
v. i.
• To play the spark, beau, or lover.
Sparker
n.
• A spark arrester.
Sparkful
a.
• Lively; brisk; gay.
Sparkish
a.
• Like a spark; airy; gay.
• Showy; well-dresed; fine.
Sparkle
n.
• A little spark; a scintillation.
• Brilliancy; luster; as, the sparkle of a diamond.
v. i.
• To emit sparks; to throw off ignited or incandescent particles; to shine as if throwing off sparks; to emit flashes of light; to scintillate; to twinkle; as, the blazing wood sparkles; the stars sparkle.
• To manifest itself by, or as if by, emitting sparks; to glisten; to flash.
• To emit little bubbles, as certain kinds of liquors; to effervesce; as, sparkling wine.
v. t.
• To emit in the form or likeness of sparks.
v. t.
• To disperse.
• To scatter on or over.
Sparkler
n.
• One who scatters; esp., one who scatters money; an improvident person.
n.
• One who, or that which, sparkles.
n.
(Zool.) A tiger beetle.
Sparklet
n.
• A small spark.
Sparkliness
n.
• Vivacity.
Sparkling
a.
• Emitting sparks; glittering; flashing; brilliant; lively; as, sparkling wine; sparkling eyes.
Sparling
n.
(Zool.) The European smelt (Osmerus eperlanus).
• A young salmon.
• A tern.
Sparlyre
n.
• The calf of the leg.
Sparoid
a.
(Zool.) of or pertaining to the Sparidae, a family of spinous-finned fishes which includes the scup, sheepshead, and sea bream.
n.
• One of the Sparidae.
Sparpiece
n.
(Arch.) The collar beam of a roof; the spanpiece.
Sparpoil
v. t.
• To scatter; to spread; to disperse.
Sparrow
n.
(Zool.) One of many species of small singing birds of the family Fringilligae, having conical bills, and feeding chiefly on seeds. Many sparrows are called also finches, and buntings. The common sparrow, or house sparrow, of Europe (Passer domesticus) is noted for its familiarity, its voracity, its attachment to its young, and its fecundity. See House sparrow, under House.
(Zool.) Any one of several small singing birds somewhat resembling the true sparrows in form or habits, as the European hedge sparrow. See under Hedge.
Sparrowgrass
n.
• Asparagus. See the Note under Asparagus.
Sparrowwort
n.
(Bot.) An evergreen shrub of the genus Erica (E. passerina).
Sparry
a.
• Resembling spar, or consisting of spar; abounding with spar; having a confused crystalline structure; spathose.
Sparse
a.
• Thinly scattered; set or planted here and there; not being dense or close together; as, a sparse population.
(Bot.) Placed irregularly and distantly; scattered; — applied to branches, leaves, peduncles, and the like.
v. t.
• To scatter; to disperse.
Sparsedly
adv.
• Sparsely.
Sparsely
adv.
• In a scattered or sparse manner.
Sparseness
n.
• The quality or state of being sparse; as, sparseness of population.
Sparsim
adv.
• Sparsely; scatteredly; here and there.
Spartan
a.
• of or pertaining to Sparta, especially to ancient Sparta; hence, hardy; undaunted; as, Spartan souls; Spartan bravey.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Sparta; figuratively, a person of great courage and fortitude.
Sparteine
n.
(Chem.) A narcotic alkaloid extracted from the tops of the common broom (Cytisus scoparius, formerly Spartium scoparium), as a colorless oily liquid of aniline-like odor and very bitter taste.
Sparth
n.
• An Anglo-Saxon battle-ax, or halberd.
Sparve
n.
(Zool.) The hedge sparrow.
Spary
a.
• Sparing; parsimonious.
Spasm
n.
(Med.) An involuntary and unnatural contraction of one or more muscles or muscular fibers.
• A sudden, violent, and temporary effort or emotion; as, a spasm of repentance.
Spasmatical
a.
• Spasmodic.
Spasmodic
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to spasm; consisting in spasm; occuring in, or characterized by, spasms; as, a spasmodic asthma.
• Soon relaxed or exhausted; convulsive; intermittent; as, spasmodic zeal or industry.
n.
(Med.) A medicine for spasm.
Spasmodical
a.
• Same as Spasmodic, a.
Spastic
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to spasm; spasmodic; especially, pertaining to tonic spasm; tetanic.
Spastically
adv.
• Spasmodically.
Spasticity
n.
• A state of spasm.
• The tendency to, or capability of suffering, spasm.
Spat
• imp. of Spit.
n.
• A young oyster or other bivalve mollusk, both before and after it first becomes adherent, or such young, collectively.
v. i. & t.
• To emit spawn; to emit, as spawn.
n.
• A light blow with something flat.
• Hence, a petty combat, esp. a verbal one; a little quarrel, dispute, or dissension.
v. i.
• To dispute.
v. t.
• To slap, as with the open hand; to clap together; as the hands.
Spatangoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Spatangoidea.
n.
• One of the Spatangoidea.
Spatangoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of irregular sea urchins, usually having a more or less heart-shaped shell with four or five petal-like ambulacra above. The mouth is edentulous and situated anteriorly, on the under side.
Spatangus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of heart-shaped sea urchins belonging to the Spatangoidea.
Spatchcock
n.
• See Spitchcock.
Spate
n.
• A river flood; an overflow or inundation.
Spatha
n
(Bot.) A spathe.
Spathaceous
a.
(Bot.) Having a spathe; resembling a spathe; spathal.
Spathal
a.
(Bot.) Furnished with a spathe; as, spathal flowers.
Spathe
n.
(Bot.) A special involucre formed of one leaf and inclosing a spadix, as in aroid plants and palms. See the Note under Bract, and Illust. of Spadix.
Spathed
a.
(Bot.) Having a spathe or calyx like a sheath.
Spathic
a.
• Like spar; foliated or lamellar; spathose.
Spathiform
a.
• Resembling spar in form.
Spathose
a.
(Min.) See Spathic.
a.
(Bot.) Having a spathe; resembling a spathe; spatheceous; spathal.
Spathous
a.
(Bot.) Spathose.
Spathulate
a.
• See Spatulate.
Spatial
a.
• Of or pertaining to space.
Spatially
adv.
• As regards space.
Spatiate
v. t.
• To rove; to ramble.
Spatter
v. t.
• To sprinkle with a liquid or with any wet substance, as water, mud, or the like; to make wet of foul spots upon by sprinkling; as, to spatter a coat; to spatter the floor; to spatter boots with mud.
• To distribute by sprinkling; to sprinkle around; as, to spatter blood.
• Fig.: To injure by aspersion; to defame; to soil; also, to throw out in a defamatory manner.
v. i.
• To throw something out of the mouth in a scattering manner; to sputter.
Spatterdashed
a.
• Wearing spatterdashes.
Spatterdashes
n. pl.
• Coverings for the legs, to protect them from water and mud; long gaiters.
Spattle
n.
• Spawl; spittle.
n.
• A spatula.
(Pottery) A tool or implement for mottling a molded article with coloring matter
Spatula
n.
• An implement shaped like a knife, flat, thin, and somewhat flexible, used for spreading paints, fine plasters, drugs in compounding prescriptions, etc. Cf. Palette knife, under Palette.
Spatulate
a.
(Nat. Hist.) Shaped like spatula, or like a battledoor, being roundish, with a long, narrow, linear base.
Spauld
n.
• The shoulder.
Spavin
n.
(Far.) A disease of horses characterized by a bony swelling developed on the hock as the result of inflammation of the bones; also, the swelling itself. The resulting lameness is due to the inflammation, and not the bony tumor as popularly supposed.
Spavined
a.
• Affected with spavin.
Spaw
n.
• See Spa.
Spawl
n.
• A splinter or fragment, as of wood or stone. See Spall.
n.
• Scattered or ejected spittle.
v. i. & t.
• To scatter spittle from the mouth; to spit, as saliva.
Spawling
n.
• That which is spawled, or spit out.
Spawn
v. t.
• To produce or deposit (eggs), as fishes or frogs do.
• To bring forth; to generate; — used in contempt.
v. i.
• To deposit eggs, as fish or frogs do.
• To issue, as offspring; — used contemptuously.
n.
• The ova, or eggs, of fishes, oysters, and other aquatic animals.
• Any product or offspring; — used contemptuously.
(Hort.) The buds or branches produced from underground stems.
(Bot.) The white fibrous matter forming the matrix from which fungi.
Spawner
n.
(Zool.) A mature female fish.
• Whatever produces spawn of any kind.
Spay
v. t.
• To remove or extirpate the ovaries of, as a sow or a bitch; to castrate (a female animal).
n.
(Zool.) The male of the red deer in his third year; a spade.
Speak
v. i.
• To utter words or articulate sounds, as human beings; to express thoughts by words; as, the organs may be so obstructed that a man may not be able to speak.
• To express opinions; to say; to talk; to converse.
• To utter a speech, discourse, or harangue; to adress a public assembly formally.
• To discourse; to make mention; to tell.
• To give sound; to sound.
• To convey sentiments, ideas, or intelligence as if by utterance; as, features that speak of self-will.
v. t.
• To utter with the mouth; to pronounce; to utter articulately, as human beings.
• To utter in a word or words; to say; to tell; to declare orally; as, to speak the truth; to speak sense.
• To declare; to proclaim; to publish; to make known; to exhibit; to express in any way.
• To talk or converse in; to utter or pronounce, as in conversation; as, to speak Latin.
• To address; to accost; to speak to.
Speakable
a.
• Capable of being spoken; fit to be spoken.
• Able to speak.
Speaker
n.
• One who speaks.
• One who utters or pronounces a discourse; usually, one who utters a speech in public; as, the man is a good speaker, or a bad speaker
• A book of selections for declamation.
Speakership
n.
• The office of speaker; as, the speakership of the House of Representatives.
Speaking
a.
• Uttering speech; used for conveying speech; as, man is a speaking animal; a speaking tube.
• Seeming to be capable of speech; hence, lifelike; as, a speaking likeness.
Spear
n.
• A long, pointed weapon, used in war and hunting, by thrusting or throwing; a weapon with a long shaft and a sharp head or blade; a lance.
• Fig.: A spearman.
• A sharp-pointed instrument with barbs, used for stabbing fish and other animals.
• A shoot, as of grass; a spire.
• The feather of a horse. See Feather, n., 4.
• The rod to which the bucket, or plunger, of a pump is attached; a pump rod.
v. t.
• To pierce with a spear; to kill with a spear; as, to spear a fish.
v. i.
• To shoot into a long stem, as some plants. See Spire.
Spearer
n.
• One who uses a spear; as, a spearer of fish.
Spearfish
n.
(Zool.) A large and powerful fish (Tetrapturus albidus) related to the swordfish, but having scales and ventral fins. It is found on the American coast and the Mediterranean.
• The carp sucker.
Spearhead
n.
• The pointed head, or end, of a spear.
Spearman
n.
• One who is armed with a spear.
Spearmint
n.
(Bot.) A species of mint (Mentha viridis) growing in moist soil. It vields an aromatic oil. See Mint, and Mentha.
Spearwood
n.
(Bot.) An Australian tree (Acacia Doratoxylon), and its tough wood, used by the natives for spears.
Spearwort
n.
(Bot.) A name given to several species of crowfoot (Ranunculus) which have spear-shaped leaves.
Speary
a.
• Having the form of a spear.
Spece
n.
• Species; kind.
Specht
n.
(Zool.) A woodpecker.
Special
a.
• Of or pertaining to a species; constituting a species or sort.
• Particular; peculiar; different from others; extraordinary; uncommon.
• Appropriate; designed for a particular purpose, occasion, or person; as, a special act of Parliament or of Congress; a special sermon.
• Limited in range; confined to a definite field of action, investigation, or discussion; as, a special dictionary of commercial terms; a special branch of study.
• Chief in excellence.
n.
• A particular.
• One appointed for a special service or occasion.
Specialism
n.
• Devotion to a particular and restricted part or branch of knowledge, art, or science; as, medical specialism.
Specialist
n.
• One who devotes himself to some specialty; as, a medical specialist, one who devotes himself to diseases of particular parts of the body, as the eye, the ear, the nerves, etc.
Speciality
n.
• A particular or peculiar case; a particularity.
(Law) See Specialty, 3.
• The special or peculiar mark or characteristic of a person or thing; that for which a person is specially distinguished; an object of special attention; a special occupation or object of attention; a specialty.
• An attribute or quality peculiar to a species.
Specialization
n.
• The act of specializing, or the state of being spezialized.
(Biol.) The setting spart of a particular organ for the performance of a particular function.
Specialize
v. t.
• To mention specialy; to particularize.
• To apply to some specialty or limited object; to assign to a specific use; as, specialized knowledge.
(Biol.) To supply with an organ or organs having a special function or functions.
Specially
adv.
• In a special manner; partcularly; especially.
• For a particular purpose; as, a meeting of the legislature is specially summoned.
Specialty
n.
• Particularity.
• A particular or peculiar case.
(Law) A contract or obligation under seal; a contract by deed; a writing, under seal, given as security for a debt particularly specified.
• That for which a person is distinguished, in which he is specially versed, or which he makes an object of special attention; a speciality.
Specie
• abl. of L. species sort, kind. Used in the phrase in specie, that is, in sort, in kind, in (its own) form.
n.
• Coin; hard money.
Species
n. sing. & pl.
• Visible or sensible presentation; appearance; a sensible percept received by the imagination; an image.
(Logic) A group of individuals agreeing in common attributes, and designated by a common name; a conception subordinated to another conception, called a genus, or generic conception, from which it differs in containing or comprehending more attributes, and extending to fewer individuals. Thus, man is a species, under animal as a genus; and man, in its turn, may be regarded as a genus with respect to European, American, or the like, as species.
• In science, a more or less permanent group of existing things or beings, associated according to attributes, or properties determined by scientific observation.
• A sort; a kind; a variety; as, a species of low cunning; a species of generosity; a species of cloth.
• Coin, or coined silver, gold, ot other metal, used as a circulating medium; specie.
• A public spectacle or exhibition.
(Pharmacy) A component part of compound medicine; a simple.
(Med.) An officinal mixture or compound powder of any kind; esp., one used for making an aromatic tea or tisane; a tea mixture.
(Civil Law) The form or shape given to materials; fashion or shape; form; figure.
Specifiable
a.
• Admitting specification; capable of being specified.
Specific
a.
• Of or pertaining to a species; characterizing or constituting a species; possessing the peculiar property or properties of a thing which constitute its species, and distinguish it from other things; as, the specific form of an animal or a plant; the specific qualities of a drug; the specific distinction between virtue and vice.
• Specifying; definite, or making definite; limited; precise; discriminating; as, a specific statement.
(Med.) Exerting a peculiar influence over any part of the body; preventing or curing disease by a peculiar adaption, and not on general principles; as, quinine is a specific medicine in cases of malaria.
n.
(Med.) A specific remedy. See Specific, a., 3.
• Anything having peculiar adaption to the purpose to which it is applied.
Specifical
a.
• Specific.
Specifically
adv.
• In a specific manner.
Specificalness
n.
• The quality of being specific.
Specificate
v. t.
• To show, mark, or designate the species, or the distinguishing particulars of; to specify.
Specification
n.
• The act of specifying or determining by a mark or limit; notation of limits.
• The designation of particulars; particular mention; as, the specification of a charge against an officer.
• A written statement containing a minute description or enumeration of particulars, as of charges against a public officer, the terms of a contract, the description of an invention, as in a patent; also, a single article, item, or particular, an allegation of a specific act, as in a charge of official misconduct.
Specify
v. t.
• To mention or name, as a particular thing; to designate in words so as to distinguish from other things; as, to specify the uses of a plant; to specify articles purchased.
Specimen
n.
• A part, or small portion, of anything, or one of a number of things, intended to exhibit the kind and quality of the whole, or of what is not exhibited; a sample; as, a specimen of a man's handwriting; a specimen of painting; aspecimen of one's art.
Speciosity
n.
• The quality or state of being specious; speciousness.
• That which is specious.
Specious
a.
• Presenting a pleasing appearance; pleasing in form or look; showy.
• Apparently right; superficially fair, just, or correct, but not so in reality; appearing well at first view; plausible; as, specious reasoning; a specious argument.
Speck
n.
• The blubber of whales or other marine mammals; also, the fat of the hippopotamus.
n.
• A small discolored place in or on anything, or a small place of a color different from that of the main substance; a spot; a stain; a blemish; as, a speck on paper or loth; specks of decay in fruit.
• A very small thing; a particle; a mite; as, specks of dust; he has not a speck of money.
(Zool.) A small etheostomoid fish (Ulocentra stigmaea) common in the Eastern United States.
v. t.
• To cause the presence of specks upon or in, especially specks regarded as defects or blemishes; to spot; to speckle; as, paper specked by impurities in the water used in its manufacture.
Speckle
n.
• A little or spot in or anything, of a different substance or color from that of the thing itself.
v. t.
• To mark with small spots of a different color from that of the rest of the surface; to variegate with spots of a different color from the ground or surface.
Speckled
a.
• Marked or variegated with small spots of a different color from that of the rest of the surface.
Speckledness
n.
• The quality of being speckled.
Specksioneer
n.
• The chief harpooner, who also directs in cutting up the speck, or blubber; — so called among whalers.
Speckt
n.
• A woodpecker. See Speight.
Specollum
n.
(Med.) See Stylet, 2.
Spectacle
n.
• Something exhibited to view; usually, something presented to view as extraordinary, or as unusual and worthy of special notice; a remarkable or noteworthy sight; a show; a pageant; a gazingstock.
• A spy-glass; a looking-glass.
• An optical instrument consisting of two lenses set in a light frame, and worn to assist sight, to obviate some defect in the organs of vision, or to shield the eyes from bright light.
• Fig.: An aid to the intellectual sight.
Spectacled
a.
• Furnished with spectacles; wearing spectacles.
(Zool.) Having the eyes surrounded by color markings, or patches of naked skin, resembling spectacles.
Spectacular
a.
• Of or pertaining to a shows; of the nature of a show.
• Adapted to excite wonder and admiration by a display of pomp or of scenic effects; as, a spectacular celebration of some event; a spectacular play.
• Pertaining to spectacles, or glasses for the eyes.
Spectant
a.
• Looking forward.
Spectation
n.
• Regard; aspect; appearance.
Spectator
n.
• One who on; one who sees or beholds; a beholder; one who is personally present at, and sees, any exhibition; as, the spectators at a show.
Spectatorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a spectator.
Spectatorship
n.
• The office or quality of a spectator.
• The act of beholding.
Spectioneer
n.
• Same as Specsioneer.
Spectral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a specter; ghosty.
(Opt.) Of or pertaining to the spectrum; made by the spectrum; as, spectral colors; spectral analysis.
Spectrally
adv.
• In the form or manner of a specter.
Spectre
n.
• See Specter.
Spectrological
a.
• Of or pertaining to spectrology; as, spectrological studies or experiments.
Spectrology
n.
(Chem.Phys.) The science of spectrum analysis in any or all of its relations and applications.
Spectrometer
n.
(Physics) A spectroscope fitted for measurements of the luminious spectra observed with it.
Spectrophotometer
n.
(Opt.) An instrument for measuring or comparing the intensites of the colors of the spectrum.
Spectroscope
n.
(Physics) An optical instrument for forming and examining spectra (as that of solar light, or those produced by flames in which different substances are volatilized), so as to determine, from the position of the spectral lines, the composition of the substance.
Spectroscopist
n.
• One who investigates by means of a spectroscope; one skilled in the use of the spectroscope.
Spectroscopy
n.
• The use of the spectroscope; investigations made with the spectroscope.
Spectrum
n.
• An apparition; a specter.
(Opt.) The several colored and other rays of which light is composed, separated by the refraction of a prism or other means, and observed or studied either as spread out on a screen, by direct vision, by photography, or otherwise. See Illust. of Light, and Spectroscope.
• A luminous appearance, or an image seen after the eye has been exposed to an intense light or a strongly illuminated object. When the object is colored, the image appears of the complementary color, as a green image seen after viewing a red wafer lying on white paper. Called also ocular spectrum.
Specular
a.
• Having the qualities of a speculum, or mirror; having a smooth, reflecting surface; as, a specular metal; a specular surface.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to a speculum; conducted with the aid of a speculum; as, a specular examination.
• Assisting sight, as a lens or the like.
• Affording view.
Speculate
v. i.
• To consider by turning a subject in the mind, and viewing it in its different aspects and relations; to meditate; to contemplate; to theorize; as, to speculate on questions in religion; to speculate on political events.
(Philos.) To view subjects from certain premises given or assumed, and infer conclusions respecting them a priori.
(Com.) To purchase with the expectation of a contingent advance in value, and a consequent sale at a profit; — often, in a somewhat depreciative sense, of unsound or hazardous transactions; as, to speculate in coffee, in sugar, or in bank stock.
v. t.
• To consider attentively; as, to speculate the nature of a thing.
Speculation
n.
• The act of speculating.
• Examination by the eye; view
• Mental view of anything in its various aspects and relations; contemplation; intellectual examination
(Philos.) The act or process of reasoning a priori from premises given or assumed
(Com.) The act or practice of buying land, goods, shares, etc., in expectation of selling at a higher price, or of selling with the expectation of repurchasing at a lower price; a trading on anticipated fluctuations in price, as distinguished from trading in which the profit expected is the difference between the retail and wholesale prices, or the difference of price in different markets.
• Any business venture in involving unusual risks, with a chance for large profits
• A conclusion to which the mind comes by speculating; mere theory; view; notion; conjecture.
• Power of sight.
• A game at cards in which the players buy from one another trumps or whole hands, upon a chance of getting the highest trump dealt, which entitles the holder to the pool of stakes.
Speculatist
n.
• One who speculates, or forms theories; a speculator; a theorist.
Speculative
a.
• Given to speculation; contemplative.
• Involving, or formed by, speculation; ideal; theoretical; not established by demonstration.
• Of or pertaining to vision; also, prying; inquisitive; curious.
• Of or pertaining to speculation in land, goods, shares, etc.; as, a speculative dealer or enterprise.
Speculator
n.
• One who speculates. Specifically: (a) An observer; a contemplator; hence, a spy; a watcher.
• One who forms theories; a theorist
(Com.) One who engages in speculation; one who buys and sells goods, land, etc., with the expectation of deriving profit from fluctuations in price.
Speculatorial
a.
• Speculatory; speculative.
Speculatory
a.
• Intended or adapted for viewing or espying; having oversight.
• Exercising speculation; speculative.
Speculist
n.
• One who observes or considers; an observer.
Speculum
n.
• A mirror, or looking-glass; especially, a metal mirror, as in Greek and Roman archaeology.
• A reflector of polished metal, especially one used in reflecting telescopes. See Speculum metal, below.
(Surg.) An instrument for dilating certain passages of the body, and throwing light within them, thus facilitating examination or surgical operations.(Zool.)/fld>
• A bright and lustrous patch of color found on the wings of ducks and some other birds. It is usually situated on the distal portions of the secondary quills, and is much more brilliant in the adult male than in the female.
Sped
• imp. & p. p. of Speed.
Speece
n.
• Species; sort.
Speech
n.
• The faculty of uttering articulate sounds or words; the faculty of expressing thoughts by words or articulate sounds; the power of speaking.
• he act of speaking; that which is spoken; words, as expressing ideas; language; conversation.
• A particular language, as distinct from others; a tongue; a dialect.
• Talk; mention; common saying.
• formal discourse in public; oration; harangue.
• ny declaration of thoughts.
v. i. & t.
• To make a speech; to harangue.
Speechful
a.
• Full of speech or words; voluble; loquacious.
Speechification
n.
• The act of speechifying.
Speechifier
n.
• One who makes a speech or speeches; an orator; a declaimer.
Speechify
v. i.
• To make a speech; to harangue.
Speechifying
n.
• The act of making a speech or speeches.
Speeching
n.
• The act of making a speech.
Speechless
a.
• Destitute or deprived of the faculty of speech.
• Not speaking for a time; dumb; mute; silent.
Speechmaker
n.
• One who makes speeches; one accustomed to speak in a public assembly.
Speed
n.
• Prosperity in an undertaking; favorable issue; success.
• The act or state of moving swiftly; swiftness; velocity; rapidly; rate of motion; dispatch; as, the speed a horse or a vessel.
• One who, or that which, causes or promotes speed or success.
v. i.
• To go; to fare.
• To experience in going; to have any condition, good or ill; to fare.
• To fare well; to have success; to prosper.
• To make haste; to move with celerity.
• To be expedient.
v. t.
• To cause to be successful, or to prosper; hence, to aid; to favor.
• To cause to make haste; to dispatch with celerity; to drive at full speed; hence, to hasten; to hurry.
• To hasten to a conclusion; to expedite.
• To hurry to destruction; to put an end to; to ruin; to undo.
• To wish success or god fortune to, in any undertaking, especially in setting out upon a journey.
Speeder
n.
• One who, or that which, speeds.
(Spinning) A machine for drawing and twisting slivers to form rovings.
Speedful
a.
• Full of speed (in any sense).
Speedfully
adv.
• In a speedful manner.
Speedily
adv.
• In a speedy manner.
Speediness
n.
• The quality or state of being speedy.
Speedless
a.
• Being without speed.
Speedwell
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Veronica, mostly low herbs with pale blue corollas, which quickly fall off.
Speedy
a.
• Not dilatory or slow; quick; swift; nimble; hasty; rapid in motion or performance; as, a speedy flight; on speedy foot.
Speer
n.
• A sphere.
v. t.
• To ask. See Spere.
Speet
v. t.
• To stab.
Speight
n.
(Zool.) A woodpecker; — called also specht, spekt, spight.
Speir
v. i.
• To ask. See Spere.
Speiskobalt
n.
• Smaltite.
Speiss
n.
(Metal.) A regulus consisting essentially of nickel, obtained as a residue in fusing cobalt and nickel ores with silica and sodium carbonate to make smalt.
Spekboom
n.
(Bot.) The purslane tree of South Africa, — said to be the favorite food of elephants.
Speke
v. i. & t.
• To speak.
Spekehouse
n.
• The parlor or reception room of a convent.
Speking
n.
• The act of uttering words.
• Public declamation; oratory.
Spelding
n.
• A haddock or other small fish split open and dried in the sun; — called also speldron.
Spelicans
n. pl.
• See Spilikin.
Spelk
n.
• A small stick or rod used as a spike in thatching; a splinter.
Spell
n.
• A spelk, or splinter.
v. t.
• To supply the place of for a time; to take the turn of, at work; to relieve; as, to spell the helmsman.
n.
• The relief of one person by another in any piece of work or wathing; also, a turn at work which is carried on by one person or gang relieving another; as, a spellat the pumps; a spell at the masthead.
• The time during which one person or gang works until relieved; hence, any relatively short period of time, whether a few hours, days, or weeks.
• One of two or more persons or gangs who work by spells.
• A gratuitous helping forward of another's work; as, a logging spell.
n.
• A story; a tale.
• A stanza, verse, or phrase supposed to be endowed with magical power; an incantation; hence, any charm.
v. t.
• To tell; to relate; to teach.
• To put under the influence of a spell; to affect by a spell; to bewitch; to fascinate; to charm.
• To constitute; to measure.
• To tell or name in their proper order letters of, as a word; to write or print in order the letters of, esp. the proper letters; to form, as words, by correct orthography.
• To discover by characters or marks; to read with difficulty; — usually with out; as, to spell out the sense of an author; to spell out a verse in the Bible.
v. i.
• To form words with letters, esp. with the proper letters, either orally or in writing.
• To study by noting characters; to gain knowledge or learn the meaning of anything, by study.
Spellable
a.
• Capable of being spelt.
Spellbound
a.
• Bound by, or as by, a spell.
Speller
n.
• One who spells.
• A spelling book.
Spellful
a.
• Abounding in spells, or charms.
Spelling
n.
• The act of one who spells; formation of words by letters; orthography.
a.
• Of or pertaining to spelling.
Spellken
n.
• A theater.
Spellwork
n.
• Power or effect of magic; that which is wrought by magic; enchantment.
Spelt
• imp. & p. p. of Spell. Spelled.
n.
(Bot.) A species of grain (Triticum Spelta) much cultivated for food in Germany and Switzerland; — called also German wheat.
n.
(Metal.) Spelter.
v. t. & i.
• To split; to break; to spalt.
Spelter
n.
(Metal.) Zinc; — especially so called in commerce and arts.
Spelunc
n.
• A cavern; a cave.
Spence
n.
• A place where provisions are kept; a buttery; a larder; a pantry.
• The inner apartment of a country house; also, the place where the family sit and eat.
Spencer
n.
• One who has the care of the spence, or buttery.
n.
• A short jacket worn by men and by women.
n.
(Naut.) A fore-and-aft sail, abaft the foremast or the mainmast, hoisted upon a small supplementary mast and set with a gaff and no boom; a trysail carried at the foremast or mainmast; — named after its inventor, Knight Spencer, of England [1802].
Spend
v. t.
• To weigh or lay out; to dispose of; to part with; as, to spend money for clothing.
• To bestow; to employ; — often with on or upon.
• To consume; to waste; to squander; to exhaust; as, to spend an estate in gaming or other vices.
• To pass, as time; to suffer to pass away; as, to spend a day idly; to spend winter abroad.
• To exhaust of force or strength; to waste; to wear away; as, the violence of the waves was spent.
v. i.
• To expend money or any other possession; to consume, use, waste, or part with, anything; as, he who gets easily spends freely.
• To waste or wear away; to be consumed; to lose force or strength; to vanish; as, energy spends in the using of it.
• To be diffused; to spread.
(Mining) To break ground; to continue working.
Spender
n.
• One who spends; esp., one who spends lavishly; a prodigal; a spendthrift.
Spending
n.
• The act of expending; expenditure.
Spendthrift
n.
• One who spends money profusely or improvidently; a prodigal; one who lavishes or wastes his estate. Also used figuratively.
a.
• Prodigal; extravagant; wasteful.
Spendthrifty
a.
• Spendthrift; prodigal.
Spenserian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the English poet Spenser; — specifically applied to the stanza used in his poem "The Faerie Queene."
Spent
a.
• Exhausted; worn out; having lost energy or motive force.
(Zool.) Exhausted of spawn or sperm; — said especially of fishes.
Sperable
a.
• Within the range of hpe; proper to be hoped for.
n.
• See Sperable.
Sperage
n.
• Asperagus.
Sperate
a.
• Hoped for, or to be hoped for.
Spere
v. i.
• To search; to pry; to ask; to inquire.
n.
• A sphere.
Sperge
n.
(Distilling) A charge of wash for the still.
Sperling
n.
(Zool.) A smelt; a sparling.
• A young herring.
Sperm
n.
(Physiol.) The male fecundating fluid; semen. See Semen.
n.
• Spermaceti.
Spermaceti
n.
• A white waxy substance obtained from cavities in the head of the sperm whale, and used making candles, oilments, cosmetics, etc. It consists essentially of ethereal salts of palmitic acid with ethal and other hydrocarbon bases. The substance of spermaceti after the removal of certain impurities is sometimes called cetin.
Spermalist
n.
(Biol.) See Spermist.
Spermaphore
n.
(Bot.) That part of the ovary from which the ovules arise; the placenta.
Spermary
n.
(Anat.) An organ in which spermatozoa are developed; a sperm gland; a testicle.
Spermatheca
n.
(Zool.) A small sac connected with the female reproductive organs of insects and many other invertebrates, serving to receive and retain the spermatozoa.
Spermatic
a.
(Physiol.) Of or pertaining to semen; as, the spermatic fluid, the spermatic vessels, etc.
Spermatical
a.
• Spermatic.
Spermatin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A substance allied to alkali albumin and to mucin, present in semen, to which it is said to impart the mucilaginous character.
Spermatism
n.
(Physiol.) The emission of sperm, or semen.
Spermatium
n.
(Bot.) One of the motionless spermatozoids in the conceptacles of certain fungi.
Spermatize
v. i.
• To yield seed; to emit seed, or sperm.
Spermatoblast
n.
• Same as Spermoblast.
Spermatocyte
n.
(Physiol.) Same as Spermoblast.
Spermatogemma
n.
(Physiol.) Same as Spermosphere.
Spermatogenesis
n.
(Biol.) The development of the spermatozoids.
Spermatogenetic
a.
(Physiol.) Relating to, or connected with, spermatogenesis; as, spermatogenetic function.
Spermatogenous
a.
(Physiol.) Sperm-producing.
Spermatogonium
n.
(Physiol.) A primitive seminal cell, occuring in masses in the seminal tubules. It divides into a mass (spermosphere) of small cells (spermoblast), which in turn give rise to spermatozoids.
Spermatoid
a.
(Physiol.) Spermlike; resembling sperm, or semen.
Spermatoon
n.
(Anat.) A spermoblast.
Spermatophore
n.
(Physiol.) Same as Spermospore.
(Zool.) A capsule or pocket inclosing a number of spermatozoa. They are present in many annelids, brachiopods, mollusks, and crustaceans. In cephalopods the structure of the capsule is very complex.
Spermatophorous
a.
(Physiol.) Producing seed, or sperm; seminiferous; as, the so-called spermatophorous cells.
Spermatospore
n.
• Same as Spermospore.
Spermatozoid
n.
(Biol.) The male germ cell in animals and plants, the essential element in fertilization; a microscopic animalcule-like particle, usually provided with one or more cilia by which it is capable of active motion. In animals, the familiar type is that of a small, more or less ovoid head, with a delicate threadlike cilium, or tail. Called also spermatozoon. In plants the more usual term is antherozoid.
Spermatozooid
n.
(Biol.) A spermatozoid.
Spermatozoon
n.
(Biol.) Same as Spermatozoid.
Spermic
a.
• Of or pertaining to sperm, or semen.
Spermidium
n.
(Bot.) An achenium.
Spermist
n.
(Biol.) A believer in the doctrine, formerly current, of encasement in the male (see Encasement), in which the seminal thread, or spermatozoid, was considered as the real animal germ, the head being the true animal head and the tail the body.
Spermoblast
n.
(Physiol.) One of the cells formed by the diivision of the spermospore, each of which is destined to become a spermatozoid; a spermatocyte; a spermatoblast.
Spermococcus
n.
(Physiol.) The nucleus of the sperm cell.
Spermoderm
n.
(Bot.) The covering of a seed; — sometimes limited to the outer coat or testa.
Spermogonium
n.
(Bot.) A conceptacle of certain lichens, which contains spermatia.
Spermologist
n.
• One who treats of, or collects, seeds.
Spermophile
n.
(Zool.) Any ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus; gopher. See Illust. under Gopher.
Spermophore
n.
(Zool.) A spermatophore.
Spermophyta
n. pl.
• Plants which produce seed; phaenogamia. These plants constitute the highest grand division of the vegetable kingdom.
Spermophyte
n.
(Bot.) Any plant which produces true seeds; — a term recently proposed to replace ph&ae;nogam.
Spermophytic
a.
(Bot.) Capable of producing seeds; ph&ae;nogamic.
Spermoplasma
n.
(Physiol.) The protoplasm of the sperm cell.
Spermosphere
n.
(Physiol.) A mass or ball of cells formed by the repeated division of a male germinal cell (spermospore), each constituent cell (spermoblast) of which is converted into a spermatozoid; a spermatogemma.
Spermospore
n.
(Physiol.) The male germinal or seminal cell, from the breaking up of which the spermoblasts are formed and ultimately the spermatozoids; a spermatospore.
Spermule
n.
(Physiol.) A sperm cell.
Sperrylite
n.
(Min.) An arsenide of platinum occuring in grains and minute isometric crystals of tin-white color. It is found near Sudbury, Ontario Canada, and is the only known compound of platinum occuring in nature.
Sperse
v. t.
• To disperse.
Spessartite
n.
(Min.) A manganesian variety of garnet.
Spet
v. t.
• To spit; to throw out.
n.
• Spittle.
Spetches
n. pl.
• Parings and refuse of hides, skins, etc., from which glue is made.
Spew
v. t.
• To eject from the stomach; to vomit.
• To cast forth with abhorrence or disgust; to eject.
v. i.
• To vomit.
• To eject seed, as wet land swollen with frost.
n.
• That which is vomited; vomit.
Spewer
n.
• One who spews.
Spewiness
n.
• The state of being spewy.
Spewy
a.
• Wet; soggy; inclined to spew.
Sphacel
n.
(Med.) Gangrene.
Sphacelate
v. t.
(Med.) To affect with gangrene.
Sphacelation
n.
(Med.) The process of becoming or making gangrenous; mortification.
Sphacelus
n.
(Med.) Gangrenous part; gangrene; slough.
Sphaerenchyma
n.
(Bot.) Vegetable tissue composed of thin-walled rounded cells, — a modification of parenchyma.
Sphaeridium
n.
(Zool.) A peculiar sense organ found upon the exterior of most kinds of sea urchins, and consisting of an oval or sherical head surmounting a short pedicel. It is generally supposed to be an olfactory organ.
Sphaerospore
n.
(Bot.) One of the nonsexual spores found in red algae; a tetraspore.
Sphaerulite
n.
(Min.) Same as Spherulite.
Sphagnicolous
a.
(Bot.) Growing in moss of the genus Sphagnum.
Sphagnous
a.
(Bot.) Pertaining to moss of the genus Sphagnum, or bog moss; abounding in peat or bog moss.
Sphagnum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of mosses having white leaves slightly tinged with red or green and found growing in marshy places; bog moss; peat moss.
Sphalerite
n.
(Min.) Zinc sulphide; — called also blende, black-jack, false galena, etc. See Blende (a).
Sphene
n.
(Min.) A mineral found usually in thin, wedge-shaped crystals of a yellow or green to black color. It is a silicate of titanium and calcium; titanite.
Sphenethmoid
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to both the sphenoidal and the ethmoidal regions of the skull, or the sphenethmoid bone; sphenethmoidal.
n.
(Anat.) The sphenethmoid bone.
Sphenethmoidal
a.
(Anat.) Relating to the sphenoethmoid bone; sphenoethmoid.
Spheniscan
n.
(Zool.) Any species of penguin.
Sphenodon
n.
(Zool.) Same as Hatteria.
Sphenoethmoidal
a.
(Anat.) Sphenethmoid.
Sphenogram
n.
• A cuneiform, or arrow-headed, character.
Sphenographer
n.
• One skilled in sphenography; a sphenographist.
Sphenographic
a.
• Of or pertaining to sphenography.
Sphenographist
n.
• A sphenographer.
Sphenography
n.
• The art of writing in cuneiform characters, or of deciphering inscriptions made in such characters.
Sphenoid
a.
• Wedge-shaped; as, a sphenoid crystal.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sphenoid bone.
n.
(Crystallog.) A wedge-shaped crystal bounded by four equal isosceles triangles. It is the hemihedral form of a square pyramid.
(Anat.) The sphenoid bone.
Sphenoidal
a.
• Sphenoid.
(Crystalloq.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a sphenoid.
Sphenotic
a.
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the sphenotic bone.
n.
(Anat.) The sphenotic bone.
Spheral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sphere or the spheres.
• Rounded like a sphere; sphere-shaped; hence, symmetrical; complete; perfect.
Sphere
n.
(Geom.) A body or space contained under a single surface, which in every part is equally distant from a point within called its center.
• Hence, any globe or globular body, especially a celestial one, as the sun, a planet, or the earth.
(Astron.) The apparent surface of the heavens, which is assumed to be spherical and everywhere equally distant, in which the heavenly bodies appear to have their places, and on which the various astronomical circles, as of right ascension and declination, the equator, ecliptic, etc., are conceived to be drawn; an ideal geometrical sphere, with the astronomical and geographical circles in their proper positions on it.
• In ancient astronomy, one of the concentric and eccentric revolving spherical transparent shells in which the stars, sun, planets, and moon were supposed to be set, and by which they were carried, in such a manner as to produce their apparent motions.
(Logic) The extension of a general conception, or the totality of the individuals or species to which it may be applied.
• Circuit or range of action, knowledge, or influence; compass; province; employment; place of existence.
• Rank; order of society; social positions.
• An orbit, as of a star; a socket.
v. t.
• To place in a sphere, or among the spheres; to insphere.
• To form into roundness; to make spherical, or spheral; to perfect.
Sphericity
n.
• The quality or state of being spherial; roundness; as, the sphericity of the planets, or of a drop of water.
Sphericle
n.
• A small sphere.
Spherics
n.
(Math.) The doctrine of the sphere; the science of the properties and relations of the circles, figures, and other magnitudes of a sphere, produced by planes intersecting it; spherical geometry and trigonometry.
Spherobacteria
n. pl.
(Biol.) See the Note under Microbacteria.
Spheroconic
n.
(Geom.) A nonplane curve formed by the intersection of the surface of an oblique cone with the surface of a sphere whose center is at the vertex of the cone.
Spherograph
n.
• An instrument for facilitating the practical use of spherics in navigation and astronomy, being constructed of two cardboards containing various circles, and turning upon each other in such a manner that any possible spherical triangle may be readily found, and the measures of the parts read off by inspection.
Spheroid
n.
• A body or figure approaching to a sphere, but not perfectly spherical; esp., a solid generated by the revolution of an ellipse about one of its axes.
Spheroidal
a.
• Having the form of a spheroid.
Spheromere
n.
(Zool.) Any one of the several symmetrical segments arranged around the central axis and composing the body of a radiate anmal.
Spherometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the curvature of spherical surface, as of lenses for telescope, etc.
Spherosiderite
n.
(Min.) Siderite occuring in spheroidal masses.
Spherosome
n.
(Zool.) The body wall of any radiate animal.
Spherulate
a.
• Covered or set with spherules; having one or more rows of spherules, or minute tubercles.
Spherule
n.
• A little sphere or spherical body; as, quicksilver, when poured upon a plane, divides itself into a great number of minute spherules.
Spherulite
n.
(Min.) A minute spherical crystalline body having a radiated structure, observed in some vitreous volcanic rocks, as obsidian and pearlstone.
Spherulitic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a spherulite; characterized by the presence of spherulites.
Sphery
a.
• Round; spherical; starlike.
• Of or pertaining to the spheres.
Sphex
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of sand wasps of the genus Sphex and allied genera. These wasps have the abdomen attached to the thorax by a slender pedicel. See Illust. of Sand wasp, under Sand.
Sphigmometer
n.
• See Sphygmometer.
Sphincter
n.
(Anat.) A muscle which surrounds, and by its contraction tends to close, a natural opening; as, the sphincter of the bladder.
a.
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, a sphincter; as, a sphincter muscle.
Sphingid
n.
(Zool.) A sphinx.
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sphinx, or the family Sphingidae.
Sphinx
n.
• In Egyptian art, an image of granite or porphyry, having a human head, or the head of a ram or of a hawk, upon the wingless body of a lion.
• On Greek art and mythology, a she-monster, usually represented as having the winged body of a lion, and the face and breast of a young woman
• Hence: A person of enigmatical character and purposes, especially in politics and diplomacy.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of large moths of the family Sphingidae; — called also hawk moth.
(Zool.) The Guinea, or sphinx, baboon (Cynocephalus sphinx).
Sphragide
n.
(Min.) Lemnian earth.
Sphragistics
n.
• The science of seals, their history, age, distinctions, etc., esp. as verifying the age and genuiness of documents.
Sphrigosis
n.
(Bot.) A condition of vegetation in which there is too abundant growth of the stem and leaves, accompanied by deficiency of flowers and fruit.
Sphygmic
a.
(Physiol.) Of or pertaining to the pulse.
Sphygmogram
n.
(Physiol.) A tracing, called a pulse tracing, consisting of a series of curves corresponding with the beats of the heart, obtained by the application of the sphygmograph.
Sphygmograph
n.
(Physiol.) An instrument which, when applied over an artery, indicates graphically the movements or character of the pulse. See Sphygmogram.
Sphygmographic
a.
(Phusiol.) Relating to, or produced by, a sphygmograph; as, a sphygmographic tracing.
Sphygmometer
n.
(Physiol.) An instrument for measuring the strength of the pulse beat; a sphygmograph.
Sphygmophone
n.
(Physiol.) An electrical instrument for determining by the ear the rhythm of the pulse of a person at a distance.
Sphygmoscope
n.
(Physiol.) Same as Sphygmograph.
Sphyraenoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Sphyraenidae, a family of marine fishes including the barracudas.
Spial
n.
• A spy; a scout.
Spica
n.
(Med.) A kind of bandage passing, by successive turns and crosses, from an extremity to the trunk; — so called from its resemblance to a spike of a barley.
(Astron.) A star of the first magnitude situated in the constellation Virgo.
Spiccato
a.
(Mus.) Detached; separated; — a term indicating that every note is to be performed in a distinct and pointed manner.
Spice
n.
• Species; kind.
• A vegetable production of many kinds, fragrant or aromatic and pungent to the taste, as pepper, cinnamon, nutmeg, mace, allspice, ginger, cloves, etc., which are used in cookery and to flavor sauces, pickles, etc.
• Figuratively, that which enriches or alters the quality of a thing in a small degree, as spice alters the taste of food; that which gives zest or pungency; a slight flavoring; a relish; hence, a small quantity or admixture; a sprinkling; as, a spice of mischief.
v. t.
• To season with spice, or as with spice; to mix aromatic or pungent substances with; to flavor; to season; as, to spice wine; to spice one's words with wit.
• To fill or impregnate with the odor of spices.
• To render nice or dainty; hence, to render scrupulous.
Spicebush
n.
(Bot.) Spicewood.
Spicenut
• A small crisp cake, highly spiced.
Spicer
n.
• One who seasons with spice.
• One who deals in spice.
Spicery
n.
• Spices, in general.
• A repository of spices.
Spicewood
n.
(Bot.) An American shrub (Lindera Benzoin), the bark of which has a spicy taste and odor; — called also Benjamin, wild allspice, and fever bush.
Spiciferous
a.
• Bearing ears, or spikes; spicate.
Spiciform
a.
(Bot.) Spike-shaped.
Spicily
adv.
• In a spicy manner.
Spiciness
n.
• The quality or state of being spicy.
Spick
n.
• A spike or nail.
Spicknel
n.
(Bot.) An umbelliferous herb (Meum Athamanticum) having finely divided leaves, common in Europe; — called also baldmoney, mew, and bearwort.
Spicose
a.
(Bot.) Having spikes, or ears, like corn spikes.
Spicosity
n.
• The state of having, or being full of, ears like corn.
Spicous
a.
(Bot.) See Spicose.
Spicula
n.
(Bot.) A little spike; a spikelet.
• A pointed fleshy appendage.
Spicular
a.
• Resembling a dart; having sharp points.
Spiculate
a.
• Covered with, or having, spicules.
(Bot.) Covered with minute spiculae, or pointed fleshy appendages; divided into small spikelets.
v. t.
• To sharpen to a point.
Spicule
n.
• A minute, slender granule, or point.
(Bot.) Same as Spicula.
(Zool.) Any small calcareous or siliceous body found in the tissues of various invertebrate animals, especially in sponges and in most Alcyonaria.
Spiculiform
a.
(Zool.) Having the shape of a spicule.
Spiculigenous
a.
(Zool.) Producing or containing spicules.
Spiculispongiae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of sponges including those which have independent siliceous spicules.
Spiculum
n.
(Zool.) Same as Spicule.
Spicy
a.
• Flavored with, or containing, spice or spices; fragrant; aromatic; as, spicy breezes.
• Producing, or abounding with, spices.
• Fig.: Piquant; racy; as, a spicy debate.
Spider
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of arachnids comprising the order Araneina. Spiders have the mandibles converted into poison fangs, or falcers. The abdomen is large and not segmented, with two or three pairs of spinnerets near the end, by means of which they spin threads of silk to form cocoons, or nests, to protect their eggs and young. Many species spin also complex webs to entrap the insects upon which they prey. The eyes are usually eight in number (rarely six), and are situated on the back of the cephalothorax. See Illust. under Araneina.
(Zool.) Any one of various other arachnids resembling the true spiders, especially certain mites, as the red spider (see under Red).
• An iron pan with a long handle, used as a kitchen utensil in frying food. Originally, it had long legs, and was used over coals on the hearth.
• A trevet to support pans or pots over a fire.
(Mach.) A skeleton, or frame, having radiating arms or members, often connected by crosspieces; as, a casting forming the hub and spokes to which the rim of a fly wheel or large gear is bolted; the body of a piston head; a frame for strengthening a core or mold for a casting, etc.
Spidered
a.
• Infested by spiders; cobwebbed.
Spiderlike
a.
• Like a spider.
Spiderwort
n.
(Bot.) An American endogenous plant (Tradescantia Virginica), with long linear leaves and ephemeral blue flowers. The name is sometimes extended to other species of the same genus.
Spied
• imp. & p. p. of Spy.
Spiegelelsen
n.
• See Spiegel iron.
Spight
n. & v.
• Spite.
n.
• A woodpecker. See Speight.
Spignel
n.
(Bot.) Same as Spickenel.
Spignet
n.
(Bot.) An aromatic plant of America. See Spikenard.
Spigot
n.
• A pin or peg used to stop the vent in a cask; also, the plug of a faucet or cock.
Spigurnel
n.
(Eng. Law) Formerly the title of the sealer of writs in chancery.
Spike
n.
• A sort of very large nail; also, a piece of pointed iron set with points upward or outward.
• Anything resembling such a nail in shape.
• An ear of corn or grain.
(Bot.) A kind of flower cluster in which sessile flowers are arranged on an unbranched elongated axis.
v. t.
• To fasten with spikes, or long, large nails; as, to spike down planks.
• To set or furnish with spikes.
• To fix on a spike.
• To stop the vent of (a gun or cannon) by driving a spike nail, or the like into it.
n.
(Bot.) Spike lavender. See Lavender.
Spikebill
n.
(Zool.) The hooded merganser.
• The marbled godwit (Limosa fedoa).
Spiked
a.
• Furnished or set with spikes, as corn; fastened with spikes; stopped with spikes.
Spikefish
n.
(Zool.) See Sailfish (a)
Spikelet
n.
(Bot.) A small or secondary spike; especially, one of the ultimate parts of the in florescence of grasses. See Illust. of Quaking grass.
Spikenard
n.
(Bot.) An aromatic plant. In the United States it is the Aralia racemosa, often called spignet, and used as a medicine. The spikenard of the ancients is the Nardostachys Jatamansi, a native of the Himalayan region. From its blackish roots a perfume for the hair is still prepared in India.
• A fragrant essential oil, as that from the Nardostachys Jatamansi.
Spiketail
n.
(Zool.) The pintail duck.
Spiky
a.
• Like a spike; spikelike.
• Having a sharp point, or sharp points; furnished or armed with spikes.
Spile
n.
• A small plug or wooden pin, used to stop a vent, as in a cask.
• A small tube or spout inserted in a tree for conducting sap, as from a sugar maple.
• A large stake driven into the ground as a support for some superstructure; a pile.
v. t.
• To supply with a spile or a spigot; to make a small vent in, as a cask.
Spilikin
n.
• One of a number of small pieces or pegs of wood, ivory, bone, or other material, for playing a game, or for counting the score in a game, as in cribbage. In the plural (spilikins), a game played with such pieces; pushpin.
Spill
n.
• A bit of wood split off; a splinter.
• A slender piece of anything.
• A peg or pin for plugging a hole, as in a cask; a spile
• A metallic rod or pin
• A small roll of paper, or slip of wood, used as a lamplighter, etc.
(Mining) One of the thick laths or poles driven horizontally ahead of the main timbering in advancing a level in loose ground
• A little sum of money.
v. t.
• To cover or decorate with slender pieces of wood, metal, ivory, etc.; to inlay.
v. t.
• To destroy; to kill; to put an end to.
• To mar; to injure; to deface; hence, to destroy by misuse; to waste.
• To suffer to fall or run out of a vessel; to lose, or suffer to be scattered; — applied to fluids and to substances whose particles are small and loose; as, to spill water from a pail; to spill quicksilver from a vessel; to spill powder from a paper; to spill sand or flour.
• To cause to flow out and be lost or wasted; to shed, or suffer to be shed, as in battle or in manslaughter; as, a man spills another's blood, or his own blood.
(Naut.) To relieve a sail from the pressure of the wind, so that it can be more easily reefed or furled, or to lessen the strain.
v. i.
• To be destroyed, ruined, or wasted; to come to ruin; to perish; to waste.
• To be shed; to run over; to fall out, and be lost or wasted.
Spiller
n.
• One who, or that which, spills.
• A kind of fishing line with many hooks; a boulter.
Spillikin
n.
• See Spilikin.
Spillway
n.
• A sluiceway or passage for superfluous water in a reservoir, to prevent too great pressure on the dam.
Spilt
n.
• A crack, or longitudinl fissure.
• A breach or separation, as in a political party; a division.
• A piece that is split off, or made thin, by splitting; a splinter; a fragment.
• Specif (Leather Manuf.), one of the sections of a skin made by dividing it into two or more thicknesses.
(Faro) A division of a stake happening when two cards of the kind on which the stake is laid are dealt in the same turn.
Spilt
• imp. & p. p. of Spill. Spilled.
Spilter
n.
• Any one of the small branches on a stag's head.
Spilth
n.
• Anything spilt, or freely poured out; slop; effusion.
Spin
v. t.
• To draw out, and twist into threads, either by the hand or machinery; as, to spin wool, cotton, or flax; to spin goat's hair; to produce by drawing out and twisting a fibrous material.
• To draw out tediously; to form by a slow process, or by degrees; to extend to a great length; — with out; as, to spin out large volumes on a subject.
• To protract; to spend by delays; as, to spin out the day in idleness.
• To cause to turn round rapidly; to whirl; to twirl; as, to spin a top.
• To form (a web, a cocoon, silk, or the like) from threads produced by the extrusion of a viscid, transparent liquid, which hardens on coming into contact with the air; — said of the spider, the silkworm, etc.
(Mech.) To shape, as malleable sheet metal, into a hollow form, by bending or buckling it by pressing against it with a smooth hand tool or roller while the metal revolves, as in a lathe.
v. i.
• To practice spinning; to work at drawing and twisting threads; to make yarn or thread from fiber; as, the woman knows how to spin; a machine or jenny spins with great exactness.
• To move round rapidly; to whirl; to revolve, as a top or a spindle, about its axis.
• To stream or issue in a thread or a small current or jet; as, blood spinsfrom a vein.
• To move swifty; as, to spin along the road in a carriage, on a bicycle, etc.
n.
• The act of spinning; as, the spin of a top; a spin a bicycle.
(Kinematics) Velocity of rotation about some specified axis.
Spinaeous
a.
(Bot.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the plant spinach, or the family of plants to which it belongs.
Spinal
a.
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or in the region of, the backbone, or vertebral column; rachidian; vertebral.
• Of or pertaining to a spine or spines.
Spinate
a.
• Bearing a spine; spiniform.
Spindle
n.
• The long, round, slender rod or pin in spinning wheels by which the thread is twisted, and on which, when twisted, it is wound; also, the pin on which the bobbin is held in a spinning machine, or in the shuttle of a loom.
• A slender rod or pin on which anything turns; an axis; as, the spindle of a vane.
(Mach.) The shaft, mandrel, or arbor, in a machine tool, as a lathe or drilling machine, etc., which causes the work to revolve, or carries a tool or center, etc.
(Mach.) The vertical rod on which the runner of a grinding mill turns
(Founding) A shaft or pipe on which a core of sand is formed
• The fusee of a watch.
• A long and slender stalk resembling a spindle.
• A yarn measure containing, in cotton yarn, 15,120 yards; in linen yarn, 14,400 yards.
(Geom.) A solid generated by the revolution of a curved line about its base or double ordinate or chord.
(Zool.) Any marine univalve shell of the genus Rostellaria; — called also spindle stromb.
• Any marine gastropod of the genus Fusus.
v. i.
• To shoot or grow into a long, slender stalk or body; to become disproportionately tall and slender.
Spindlelegs
n.
• A spindlehanks.
Spindleshanks
n.
• A person with slender shanks, or legs; — used humorously or in contempt.
Spindletail
n.
(Zool.) The pintail duck.
Spindleworm
n.
(Zool.) The larva of a noctuid mmoth (Achatodes zeae) which feeds inside the stalks of corn (maize), sometimes causing much damage. It is smooth, with a black head and tail and a row of black dots across each segment.
Spindling
a.
• Long and slender, or disproportionately tall and slender; as, a spindling tree; a spindling boy.
Spine
n.
(Bot.) A sharp appendage to any of a plant; a thorn.
(Zool.) A rigid and sharp projection upon any part of an animal.
• One of the rigid and undivided fin rays of a fish.
(Anat.) The backbone, or spinal column, of an animal; — so called from the projecting processes upon the vertebrae.
• Anything resembling the spine or backbone; a ridge.
Spineback
n.
(Zool.) A fish having spines in, or in front of, the dorsal fins.
Spinebill
n.
(Zool.) Any species of Australian birds of the genus Acanthorhynchus. They are related to the honey eaters.
Spined
a.
• Furnished with spines; spiny.
Spinel
n.
• Bleached yarn in making the linen tape called inkle; unwrought inkle.
Spineless
a.
• Having no spine.
Spinescent
a.
(Bot.) Becoming hard and thorny; tapering gradually to a rigid, leafless point; armed with spines.
Spinet
n.
(Mus.) A keyed instrument of music resembling a harpsichord, but smaller, with one string of brass or steel wire to each note, sounded by means of leather or quill plectrums or jacks. It was formerly much used.
n.
• A spinny.
Spinetail
n.
(Zool.) Any one or several species of swifts of the genus Acanthylis, or Chaetura, and allied genera, in which the shafts of the tail feathers terminate in rigid spines.
• Any one of several species of South American and Central American clamatorial birds belonging to Synallaxis and allied genera of the family Dendrocolaptidae. They are allied to the ovenbirds.
• The ruddy duck.
Spineted
a.
• Slit; cleft.
Spiniferous
a.
• Producing spines; bearing thorns or spines; thorny; spiny.
Spiniform
a.
• Shaped like a spine.
Spinigerous
a.
• Bearing a spine or spines; thorn-bearing.
Spininess
n.
• Quality of being spiny.
Spink
n.
(Zool.) The chaffinch.
Spinnaker
n.
(Naut.) A large triangular sail set upon a boom, — used when running before the wind.
Spinner
n.
• One who, or that which, spins one skilled in spinning; a spinning machine.
• A spider.
(Zool.) A goatsucker; — so called from the peculiar noise it makes when darting through the air.
(Zool.) A spinneret.
Spinneret
n.
(Zool.) One of the special jointed organs situated on the under side, and near the end, of the abdomen of spiders, by means of which they spin their webs. Most spiders have three pairs of spinnerets, but some have only two pairs. The ordinary silk line of the spider is composed of numerous smaller lines jointed after issuing from the spinnerets.
Spinnerule
n.
(Zool.) One of the numerous small spinning tubes on the spinnerets of spiders.
Spinney
n.
• Same as Spinny.
Spinning
a. & n.
• from Spin.
Spinny
n.
• A small thicket or grove with undergrowth; a clump of trees.
a.
• Thin and long; slim; slender.
Spinose
a.
• Full of spines; armed with thorns; thorny.
Spinosity
n.
• The quality or state of being spiny or thorny; spininess.
Spinous
a.
• Spinose; thorny.
• Having the form of a spine or thorn; spinelike.
Spinozism
n.
• The form of Pantheism taught by Benedict Spinoza, that there is but one substance, or infinite essence, in the universe, of which the so-called material and spiritual beings and phenomena are only modes, and that one this one substance is God.
Spinozist
n.
• A believer in Spinozism.
Spinster
n.
• A woman who spins, or whose occupation is to spin.
• A man who spins.
(Law) An unmarried or single woman; — used in legal proceedings as a title, or addition to the surname.
• A woman of evil life and character; — so called from being forced to spin in a house of correction.
Spinstress
n.
• A woman who spins.
Spinstry
n.
• The business of one who spins; spinning.
Spinule
n.
• A minute spine.
Spinulescent
a.
(Bot.) Having small spines; somewhat thorny.
Spiny
a.
• Full of spines; thorny; as, a spiny tree.
• Like a spine in shape; slender.
• Fig.: Abounding with difficulties or annoyances.
n.
• See Spinny.
Spiodea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive division of marine Annelida, including those that are without oral tentacles or cirri, and have the gills, when present, mostly arranged along the sides of the body. They generally live in burrows or tubes.
Spirable
a.
• Capable of being breathed; respirable.
Spiracle
n.
(Anat.) The nostril, or one of the nostrils, of whales, porpoises, and allied animals.
(Zool.) One of the external openings communicating with the air tubes or tracheae of insects, myriapods, and arachnids. They are variable in number, and are usually situated on the sides of the thorax and abdomen, a pair to a segment. These openings are usually elliptical, and capable of being closed. See Illust. under Coleoptera.
• A tubular orifice communicating with the gill cavity of certain ganoid and all elasmobranch fishes. It is the modified first gill cleft.
• Any small aperture or vent for air or other fluid.
Spiracular
a.
• Of or pertaining to a spiracle.
Spiraea
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs or perennial herbs including the meadowsweet and the hardhack.
Spiraeic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, the meadowsweet (Spiraea); formerly, designating an acid which is now called salicylic acid.
Spiral
a.
• Winding or circling round a center or pole and gradually receding from it; as, the spiral curve of a watch spring.
• Winding round a cylinder or imaginary axis, and at the same time rising or advancing forward; winding like the thread of a screw; helical.
(Geom.) Of or pertaining to a spiral; like a spiral.
n.
(Geom.) A plane curve, not reentrant, described by a point, called the generatrix, moving along a straight line according to a mathematical law, while the line is revolving about a fixed point called the pole. Cf. Helix.
• Anything which has a spiral form, as a spiral shell.
Spirality
n.
• The quality or states of being spiral.
Spirally
adv.
• In a spiral form, manner, or direction.
Spiralozooid
n.
(Zool.) One of the special defensive zooids of certain hydroids. They have the form of long, slender tentacles, and bear lasso cells.
Spirant
n.
(Phon.) A term used differently by different authorities; — by some as equivalent to fricative, — that is, as including all the continuous consonants, except the nasals m, n, ng; with the further exception, by others, of the liquids r, l, and the semivowels w, y; by others limited to f, v, th surd and sonant, and the sound of German ch, — thus excluding the sibilants, as well as the nasals, liquids, and semivowels. See Guide to Pronunciation, §§ 197-208.
Spiranthy
n.
(Bot.) The occasional twisted growth of the parts of a flower.
Spiration
n.
• The act of breathing.
Spire
v. i.
• To breathe.
n.
• A slender stalk or blade in vegetation; as, a spire grass or of wheat.
• A tapering body that shoots up or out to a point in a conical or pyramidal form. Specifically (Arch.), the roof of a tower when of a pyramidal form and high in proportion to its width; also, the pyramidal or aspiring termination of a tower which can not be said to have a roof, such as that of Strasburg cathedral; the tapering part of a steeple, or the steeple itself.
(Mining) A tube or fuse for communicating fire to the chargen in blasting.
• The top, or uppermost point, of anything; the summit.
v. i.
• To shoot forth, or up in, or as if in, a spire.
n.
• A spiral; a curl; a whorl; a twist.
(Geom.) The part of a spiral generated in one revolution of the straight line about the pole. See Spiral, n.
Spired
a.
• Having a spire; being in the form of a spire; as, a spired steeple.
Spiricle
n.
(Bot.) One of certain minute coiled threads in the coating of some seeds. When moistened these threads protrude in great numbers.
Spirifer
n.
(Paleon.) Any one of numerous species of fossil brachipods of the genus Spirifer, or Delthyris, and allied genera, in which the long calcareous supports of the arms form a large spiral, or helix, on each side.
Spirillum
n.
(Biol.) A genus of common motile microorganisms (Spirobacteria) having the form of spiral-shaped filaments. One species is said to be the cause of relapsing fever.
Spiring
a.
• Shooting up in a spire or spires.
Spirit
n.
• Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself.
• A rough breathing; an aspirate, as the letter h; also, a mark to denote aspiration; a breathing.
• Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter.
• The intelligent, immaterial and immortal part of man; the soul, in distinction from the body in which it resides; the agent or subject of vital and spiritual functions, whether spiritual or material.
• Specifically, a disembodied soul; the human soul after it has left the body.
• Any supernatural being, good or bad; an apparition; a specter; a ghost; also, sometimes, a sprite,; a fairy; an elf.
• Energy, vivacity, ardor, enthusiasm, courage, etc.
• One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper; as, a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit.
• Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; — often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits.
• Intent; real meaning; — opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like.
• Tenuous, volatile, airy, or vapory substance, possessed of active qualities.
• Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): — often in the plural.
• Rum, whisky, brandy, gin, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol, in distinction from wine and malt liquors.
(Med.) A solution in alcohol of a volatile principle. Cf. Tincture.
(Alchemy) Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment).
(Dyeing) Stannic chloride. See under Stannic.
v. t.
• To animate with vigor; to excite; to encourage; to inspirit; as, civil dissensions often spirit the ambition of private men; — sometimes followed by up.
• To convey rapidly and secretly, or mysteriously, as if by the agency of a spirit; to kidnap; — often with away, or off
Spiritally
adv.
• By means of the breath.
Spirited
a.
• Animated or possessed by a spirit.
• Animated; full of life or vigor; lively; full of spirit or fire; as, a spirited oration; a spirited answer.
Spiritful
a.
• Full of spirit; spirited.
Spiritielle
a.
• Of the nature, or having the appearance, of a spirit; pure; refined; ethereal.
Spiritism
n.
• Spiritualsm.
Spiritist
n.
• A spiritualist.
Spiritless
a.
• Destitute of spirit; wanting animation; wanting cheerfulness; dejected; depressed.
• Destitute of vigor; wanting life, courage, or fire.
• Having no breath; extinct; dead.
Spiritoso
a. & adv.
(Mus.) Spirited; spiritedly; — a direction to perform a passage in an animated, lively manner.
Spiritous
a.
• Like spirit; refined; defecated; pure.
• Ardent; active.
Spiritousness
n.
• Quality of being spiritous.
Spiritual
a.
• Consisting of spirit; not material; incorporeal; as, a spiritual substance or being.
• Of or pertaining to the intellectual and higher endowments of the mind; mental; intellectual.
• Of or pertaining to the moral feelings or states of the soul, as distinguished from the external actions; reaching and affecting the spirits.
• Of or pertaining to the soul or its affections as influenced by the Spirit; controlled and inspired by the divine Spirit; proceeding from the Holy Spirit; pure; holy; divine; heavenly-minded; — opposed to carnal.
• Not lay or temporal; relating to sacred things; ecclesiastical; as, the spiritual functions of the clergy; lords spiritual and temporal; a spiritual corporation.
n.
• A spiritual function, office, or affair. See Spirituality, 2.
Spiritualism
n.
• The quality or state of being spiritual.
(Physiol.) The doctrine, in opposition to the materialists, that all which exists is spirit, or soul — that what is called the external world is either a succession of notions impressed on the mind by the Deity, as maintained by Berkeley, or else the mere educt of the mind itself, as taught by Fichte.
• A belief that departed spirits hold intercourse with mortals by means of physical phenomena, as by rappng, or during abnormal mental states, as in trances, or the like, commonly manifested through a person of special susceptibility, called a medium; spiritism; the doctrines and practices of spiritualists.
Spiritualist
n.
• One who professes a regard for spiritual things only; one whose employment is of a spiritual character; an ecclesiastic.
• One who maintains the doctrine of spiritualism.
• One who believes in direct intercourse with departed spirits, through the agency of persons commonly called mediums, by means of physical phenomena; one who attempts to maintain such intercourse; a spiritist.
a.
• Spiritualistic.
Spiritualistic
a.
• Relating to, or connected with, spiritualism.
Spirituality
n.
• The quality or state of being spiritual; incorporeality; heavenly-mindedness.
(Eccl.) That which belongs to the church, or to a person as an ecclesiastic, or to religion, as distinct from temporalities.
• An ecclesiastical body; the whole body of the clergy, as distinct from, or opposed to, the temporality.
Spiritualization
n.
• The act of spiritualizing, or the state of being spiritualized.
Spiritualize
v. t.
• To refine intellectiually or morally; to purify from the corrupting influence of the world; to give a spiritual character or tendency to; as, to spiritualize soul.
• To give a spiritual meaning to; to take in a spiritual sense; — opposed to literalize.
(Old Chem.) To extract spirit from; also, to convert into, or impregnate with, spirit.
Spiritualizer
n.
• One who spiritualizes.
Spiritually
adv.
• In a spiritual manner; with purity of spirit; like a spirit.
Spiritualness
n.
• The quality or state of being spiritual or spiritual-minded; spirituality.
Spiritualty
n.
(Eccl.) An ecclesiastical body; a spirituality.
Spirituosity
n.
• The quality or state of being spirituous; spirituousness.
Spirituous
a.
• Having the quality of spirit; tenuous in substance, and having active powers or properties; ethereal; immaterial; spiritual; pure.
• Containing, or of the nature of, alcoholic (esp. distilled) spirit; consisting of refined spirit; alcoholic; ardent; as, spirituous liquors.
• Lively; gay; vivid; airy.
Spirituousness
n.
• The quality or state of being spirituous.
Spirketing
n.
(Naut.) The planking from the waterways up to the port sills.
Spirling
n.
• Sparling.
Spirobacteria
n. pl.
(Biol.) See the Note under Microbacteria.
Spirograph
n.
(Physiol.) An instrument for recording the respiratory movements, as the sphygmograph does those of the pulse.
Spirometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring the vital capacity of the lungs, or the volume of air which can be expelled from the chest after the deepest possible inspiration. Cf. Pneumatometer.
Spirometry
n.
• The act or process of measuring the chest capacity by means of a spirometer.
Spiroscope
n.
(Physiol.) A wet meter used to determine the breathing capacity of the lungs.
Spirt
v. & n.
• Same as Spurt.
Spirtle
v. t.
• To spirt in a scattering manner.
Spirula
n.
(Zool.) A genus of cephalopods having a multilocular, internal, siphunculated shell in the form of a flat spiral, the coils of which are not in contact.
Spirulate
n.
(Zool.) Having the color spots, or structural parts, arranged spirally.
Spiry
a.
• Of a spiral form; wreathed; curled; serpentine.
a.
• Of or pertaining to a spire; like a spire, tall, slender, and tapering; abounding in spires; as, spiry turrets.
Spiss
a.
• Thick; crowded; compact; dense
Spissated
a.
• Rendered dense or compact, as by evaporation; inspissated; thickened.
Spissitude
n.
• The quality or state of being spissated; as, the spissitude of coagulated blood, or of any coagulum.
Spit
n.
• A long, slender, pointed rod, usually of iron, for holding meat while roasting.
• A small point of land running into the sea, or a long, narrow shoal extending from the shore into the sea; as, a spit of sand.
• The depth to which a spade goes in digging; a spade; a spadeful.
v. t.
• To thrust a spit through; to fix upon a spit; hence, to thrust through or impale; as, to spit a loin of veal.
• To spade; to dig.
v. i.
• To attend to a spit; to use a spit.
v. t.
• To eject from the mouth; to throw out, as saliva or other matter, from the mouth.
• To eject; to throw out; to belch.
n.
• The secretion formed by the glands of the mouth; spitle; saliva; sputum.
v. i.
• To throw out saliva from the mouth.
• To rain or snow slightly, or with sprinkles.
Spital
n.
• A hospital.
Spitalhouse
n.
• A hospital.
Spitball
n.
• Paper chewed, and rolled into a ball, to be thrown as a missile.
Spitbox
n.
• A vessel to receive spittle.
Spitchcock
v. t.
(Cookery) To split (as an eel) lengthwise, and broil it, or fry it in hot fat.
n.
(Cookery) An eel split and broiled.
Spitchcocked
a.
(Cookery) Broiled or fried after being split lengthwise; — said of eels.
Spite
n.
• Ill-will or hatred toward another, accompanied with the disposition to irritate, annoy, or thwart; petty malice; grudge; rancor; despite.
• Vexation; chargrin; mortification.
v. t.
• To be angry at; to hate.
• To treat maliciously; to try to injure or thwart.
• To fill with spite; to offend; to vex.
Spiteful
a.
• Filled with, or showing, spite; having a desire to vex, annoy, or injure; malignant; malicious; as, a spiteful person or act.
Spitfire
n.
• A violent, irascible, or passionate person.
Spitful
n.
• A spadeful.
Spitous
a.
• Having spite; spiteful.
Spitously
adv.
• Spitefully.
Spitscocked
a.
• Spitchcocked.
Spitted
a.
• Put upon a spit; pierced as if by a spit.
• Shot out long; — said of antlers.
• p. p. of Spit, v. i., to eject, to spit.
Spitter
n.
• One who ejects saliva from the mouth.
n.
• One who puts meat on a spit.
(Zool.) A young deer whose antlers begin to shoot or become sharp; a brocket, or pricket.
Spittle
n.
• See Spital.
v. t.
• To dig or stir with a small spade.
n.
• A small sort of spade.
n.
• The thick, moist matter which is secreted by the salivary glands; saliva; spit.
Spittly
a.
• Like spittle; slimy.
Spittoon
n.
• A spitbox; a cuspidor.
Spitzenburgh
n.
• A kind of red and yellow apple, of medium size and spicy flavor. It originated at Newtown, on Long Island.
Splanchnapophysis
n.
(Anat.) Any element of the skeleton in relation with the alimentary canal, as the jaws and hyoidean apparatus.
Splanchnic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the viscera; visceral.
Splanchnography
n.
• Splanchnology.
Splanchnology
n.
• That part of anatomy which treats of the viscera; also, a treatise on the viscera.
Splanchnopleure
n.
(Anat.) The inner, or visceral, one of the two lamellae into which the vertebrate blastoderm divides on either side of the notochord, and from which the walls of the enteric canal and the umbilical vesicle are developed. See Somatopleure.
Splanchnotomy
n.
• The dissection, or anatomy, of the viscera.
Splandrel
n.
• See Spandrel.
Splash
v. t.
• To strike and dash about, as water, mud, etc.; to plash.
• To spatter water, mud, etc., upon; to wet.
v. i.
• To strike and dash about water, mud, etc.; to dash in such a way as to spatter.
n.
• Water, or water and dirt, thrown upon anything, or thrown from a puddle or the like; also, a spot or daub, as of matter which wets or disfigures.
• A noise made by striking upon or in a liquid.
Splashboard
n.
• A guard in the front part of vehicle, to prevent splashing by a mud or water from the horse's heels; — in the United States commonly called dashboard.
Splasher
n.
• One who, or that which, splashes.
• One of the guarde over the wheels, as of a carriage, locomotive, etc.
• A guard to keep off splashes from anything.
Splashy
a.
• Full of dirty water; wet and muddy, so as be easily splashed about; slushy.
Splatter
v. i. & t.
• To spatter; to splash.
Splatterdash
n .
• Uproar.
Splay
v. t.
• To display; to spread.
• To dislocate, as a shoulder bone.
• To spay; to castrate.
• To turn on one side; to render oblique; to slope or slant, as the side of a door, window, etc.
a.
• Displayed; spread out; turned outward; hence, flat; ungainly; as, splay shoulders.
a.
(Arch.) A slope or bevel, especially of the sides of a door or window, by which the opening is made larged at one face of the wall than at the other, or larger at each of the faces than it is between them.
Splayfoot
n.
• A foot that is abnormally flattened and spread out; flat foot.
Splaymouth
n.
• A wide mouth; a mouth stretched in derision.
Splaymouthed
a.
• Having a splaymouth.
Spleen
n.
(Anat.) A peculiar glandlike but ductless organ found near the stomach or intestine of most vertebrates and connected with the vascular system; the milt. Its exact function in not known.
• Anger; latent spite; ill humor; malice; as, to vent one's spleen.
• A fit of anger; choler.
• A sudden motion or action; a fit; a freak; a whim.
• Melancholy; hypochondriacal affections.
• A fit of immoderate laughter or merriment.
v. t.
• To dislke.
Spleened
a.
• Deprived of the spleen.
• Angered; annoyed.
Spleenful
a.
• Displaying, or affected with, spleen; angry; fretful; melancholy.
Spleenish
a.
• Spleeny; affected with spleen; fretful.
Spleenless
a.
• Having no spleen; hence, kind; gentle; mild.
Spleenwort
n.
(Bot.) Any fern of the genus Asplenium, some species of which were anciently used as remedies for disorders of the spleen.
Spleeny
a.
• Irritable; peevish; fretful.
• Affected with nervous complaints; melancholy.
Spleget
n.
(Med.) A cloth dipped in a liquid for washing a sore.
Splenalgia
n.
(Med.) Pain over the region of the spleen.
Splenculus
n.
(Anat.) A lienculus.
Splendent
a.
• Shining; glossy; beaming with light; lustrous; as, splendent planets; splendent metals. See the Note under 3d Luster, 4.
• Very conspicuous; illustrious.
Splendid
a.
• Possessing or displaying splendor; shining; very bright; as, a splendid sun.
• Showy; magnificent; sumptuous; pompous; as, a splendid palace; a splendid procession or pageant.
• Illustrious; heroic; brilliant; celebrated; famous; as, a splendid victory or reputation.
Splendidious
a.
• Splendid.
Splendidly
adv.
• In a splendid manner; magnificently.
Splendidness
n.
• The quality of being splendid.
Splendidous
a.
• Splendid.
Splendiferous
a.
• Splendor-bearing; splendid.
Splendor
n.
• Great brightness; brilliant luster; brilliancy; as, the splendor ot the sun.
• Magnifience; pomp; parade; as, the splendor of equipage, ceremonies, processions, and the like.
• Brilliancy; glory; as, the splendor of a victory.
Splenetic
a.
• Affected with spleen; malicious; spiteful; peevish; fretful.
n.
• A person affected with spleen.
Splenetical
a.
• Splenetic.
Splenetically
adv.
• In a splenetical manner.
Splenial
a.
(Anat.) Designating the splenial bone.
• Of or pertaining to the splenial bone or splenius muscle.
n.
(Anat.) The splenial bone.
Splenic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the spleen; lienal; as, the splenic vein.
Splenical
a.
• Splenic.
Splenish
a.
• Spleenish.
Splenitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the spleen.
Splenitive
a.
• Splenetic.
Splenium
n.
(Anat.) The thickened posterior border of the corpus callosum; — so called in allusion to its shape.
Splenius
n.
(Anat.) A flat muscle of the back of the neck.
Splenization
n.
(Med.) A morbid state of the lung produced by inflammation, in which its tissue resembles that of the spleen.
Splenocele
n.
(Med.) Hernia formed by the spleen.
Splenography
n.
• A description of the spleen.
Splenoid
a.
(Anat.) Resembling the spleen; spleenlike.
Splenology
n.
• The branch of science which treats of the spleen.
Splenotomy
n.
(Anat.) Dissection or anatomy of the spleen.
(Med.) An incision into the spleen; removal of the spleen by incision.
Splent
n.
• See Splent.
• See Splent coal, below.
Spleuchan
n.
• A pouch, as for tobacco.
Splice
v. t.
• To unite, as two ropes, or parts of a rope, by a particular manner of interweaving the strands, — the union being between two ends, or between an end and the body of a rope.
• To unite, as spars, timbers, rails, etc., by lapping the two ends together, or by applying a piece which laps upon the two ends, and then binding, or in any way making fast.
• To unite in marrige.
n.
• A junction or joining made by splicing.
Spline
n.
• A rectangular piece fitting grooves like key seats in a hub and a shaft, so that while the one may slide endwise on the other, both must revolve together; a feather; also, sometimes, a groove to receive such a rectangular piece.
• A long, flexble piece of wood sometimes used as a ruler.
Splining
a.
• Of or pertaining to a spline.
Splint
n.
• A piece split off; a splinter.
(Surg.) A thin piece of wood, or other substance, used to keep in place, or protect, an injured part, especially a broken bone when set.
(Anat.) A splint bone.
(Far.) A disease affecting the splint bones, as a callosity or hard excrescence.
(Anc. Armor.) One of the small plates of metal used in making splint armor. See Splint armor, below.
• Splint, or splent, coal. See Splent coal, under Splent.
v. t.
• To split into splints, or thin, slender pieces; to splinter; to shiver
• To fasten or confine with splints, as a broken limb. See Splint, n., 2.
Splinter
v. t.
• To split or rend into long, thin pieces; to shiver; as, the lightning splinters a tree.
• To fasten or confine with splinters, or splints, as a broken limb.
v. i.
• To become split into long pieces.
n.
• A thin piece split or rent off lengthwise, as from wood, bone, or other solid substance; a thin piece; a sliver; as, splinters of a ship's mast rent off by a shot.
Splinterproof
a.
(Mil.) Proof against the splinters, or fragments, of bursting shells.
Splintery
a.
• Consisting of splinters; resembling splinters; as, the splintery fracture of a mineral.
Split
a.
• Divided; cleft.
(Bot.) Divided deeply; cleft.
Split
v. t.
• To divide lengthwise; to separate from end to end, esp. by force; to divide in the direction of the grain layers; to rive; to cleave; as, to split a piece of timber or a board; to split a gem; to split a sheepskin.
• To burst; to rupture; to rend; to tear asunder.
• To divide or break up into parts or divisions, as by discord; to separate into parts or parties, as a political party; to disunite.
(Chem.) To divide or separate into components; — often used with up; as, to split up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid.
v. i.
• To part asunder; to be rent; to burst; as, vessels split by the freezing of water in them.
• To be broken; to be dashed to pieces.
• To separate into parties or factions.
• To burst with laughter.
• To divulge a secret; to betray confidence; to peach.
Splitfeet
n. pl.
(Zool.) The Fissipedia.
Splitter
n.
• One who, or that which, splits.
Splotch
n.
• A spot; a stain; a daub.
Splotchy
a.
• Covered or marked with splotches.
Splurge
n.
• A blustering demonstration, or great effort; a great display.
v. i.
• To make a great display in any way, especially in oratory.
Splutter
v. i.
• To speak hastily and confusedly; to sputter.
n.
• A confused noise, as of hasty speaking.
Splutterer
n.
• One who splutters.
Spnsorial
a.
• Pertaining to a sponsor.
Spo
n.
• Anything steeped, or dipped and softened, in any liquid; especially, something dipped in broth or liquid food, and intended to be eaten.
• Anything given to pacify; — so called from the sop given to Cerberus, as related in mythology.
• A thing of little or no value.
Spodomancy
n.
• Divination by means of ashes.
Spodomantic
a.
• Relating to spodomancy, or divination by means of ashes.
Spodumene
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a white to yellowish, purplish, or emerald-green color, occuring in prismatic crystals, often of great size. It is a silicate of aluminia and lithia. See Hiddenite.
Spoffish
a.
• Earnest and active in matters of no moment; bustling.
Spoil
v. t.
• To plunder; to strip by violence; to pillage; to rob; — with of before the name of the thing taken; as, to spoil one of his goods or possession.
• To seize by violence;; to take by force; to plunder.
• To cause to decay and perish; to corrput; to vitiate; to mar.
• To render useless by injury; to injure fatally; to ruin; to destroy; as, to spoil paper; to have the crops spoiled by insects; to spoil the eyes by reading.
v. i.
• To practice plunder or robbery.
• To lose the valuable qualities; to be corrupted; to decay; as, fruit will soon spoil in warm weather.
n.
• That which is taken from another by violence; especially, the plunder taken from an enemy; pillage; booty.
• Public offices and their emoluments regarded as the peculiar property of a successful party or faction, to be bestowed for its own advantage; — commonly in the plural; as to the victor belong the spoils.
• That which is gained by strength or effort.
• The act or practice of plundering; robbery; aste.
• Corruption; cause of corruption.
• The slough, or cast skin, of a serpent or other animal.
Spoilable
a.
• Capable of being spoiled.
Spoiler
n.
• One who spoils; a plunderer; a pillager; a robber; a despoiler.
• One who corrupts, mars, or renders useless.
Spoilfive
n.
• A certain game at cards in which, if no player wins three of the five tricks possible on any deal, the game is said to be spoiled.
Spoilful
a.
• Wasteful; rapacious.
Spoilsman
n.
• One who serves a cause or a party for a share of the spoils; in United States politics, one who makes or recognizes a demand for public office on the ground of partisan service; also, one who sanctions such a policy in appointments to the public service.
Spoilsmonger
n.
• One who promises or distributes public offices and their emoluments as the price of services to a party or its leaders.
Spoke
• imp. of Speak.
n.
• The radius or ray of a wheel; one of the small bars which are inserted in the hub, or nave, and which serve to support the rim or felly.
(Naut.) A projecting handle of a steering wheel.
• A rung, or round, of a ladder.
• A contrivance for fastening the wheel of a vehicle, to prevent it from turning in going down a hill.
v. t.
• To furnish with spokes, as a wheel.
Spoken
a.
• Uttered in speech; delivered by word of mouth; oral; as, a spoken narrative; the spoken word.
• Characterized by a certain manner or style in speaking; — often in composition; as, a pleasant-spoken man.
Spokeshave
n.
• A kind of drawing knife or planing tool for dressing the spokes of wheels, the shells of blocks, and other curved work.
Spokesman
n.
• One who speaks for another.
Spoliate
v. t. & i.
• To plunder; to pillage; to despoil; to rob.
Spoliation
n.
• The act of plundering; robbery; deprivation; despoliation.
• Robbery or plunder in war; especially, the authorized act or practice of plundering neutrals at sea.
(Eccl. Law) The act of an incumbent in taking the fruits of his benefice without right, but under a pretended title.
• A process for possession of a church in a spiritual court
(Law) Injury done to a document.
Spoliative
a.
• Serving to take away, diminish, or rob; esp. (Med.), serving to diminish sensibily the amount of blood in the body; as, spoliative bloodletting.
Spoliator
n.
• One who spoliates; a spoiler.
Spoliatory
a.
• Tending to spoil; destructive; spoliative.
Spondee
n.
(pros.) A poetic foot of two long syllables, as in the Latin word l\'c7g\'c7s.
Spondulics
n.
• Money.
Spong
n.
• An irregular, narrow, projecting part of a field.
Sponge
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of Spongiae, or Porifera. See Illust. and Note under Spongiae.
• The elastic fibrous skeleton of many species of horny Spongiae (keratosa), used for many purposes, especially the varieties of the genus Spongia. The most valuable sponges are found in the Mediterranean and the Red Sea, and on the coasts of Florida and the West Indies.
• Fig.: One who lives upon others; a pertinaceous and indolent dependent; a parasite; a sponger.
• Any spongelike substance.
• Dough before it is kneaded and formed into loaves, and after it is converted into a light, spongy mass by the agency of the yeast or leaven
• Iron from the puddling furnace, in a pasty condition
• Iron ore, in masses, reduced but not melted or worked.
(Gun.) A mop for cleaning the bore of a cannon after a discharge. It consists of a cylinder of wood, covered with sheepskin with the wool on, or cloth with a heavy looped nap, and having a handle, or staff.
(Far.) The extremity, or point, of a horseshoe, answering to the heel.
v. t.
• To cleanse or wipe with a sponge; as, to sponge a slate or a cannon; to wet with a sponge; as, to sponge cloth.
• To wipe out with a sponge, as letters or writing; to efface; to destroy all trace of.
• Fig.: To deprive of something by imposition.
• Fig.: To get by imposition or mean arts without cost; as, to sponge a breakfast.
v. i.
• To suck in, or imbile, as a sponge.
• Fig.: To gain by mean arts, by intrusion, or hanging on; as, an idler sponges on his neighbor.
• To be converted, as dough, into a light, spongy mass by the agency of yeast, or leaven.
Spongelet
n.
• See Spongiole.
Spongeous
a.
• Resembling sponge; having the nature or qualities of sponge.
Sponger
n.
• One who sponges, or uses a sponge.
• One employed in gathering sponges.
• Fig.: A parasitical dependent; a hanger-on.
Spongiae
n. pl.
(Zool.) The grand division of the animal kingdom which includes the sponges; — called also Spongida, Spongiaria, Spongiozoa, and Porifera.
Spongida
n. pl.
• Spongiae.
Spongiform
a.
• Resembling a sponge; soft and porous; porous.
Spongilla
n.
(Zool.) A genus of siliceous spongea found in fresh water.
Spongin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) The chemical basis of sponge tissue, a nitrogenous, hornlike substance which on decomposition with sulphuric acid yields leucin and glycocoll.
Sponginess
n.
• The quality or state of being spongy.
Sponging
• a. & n. from Sponge, v.
Spongiole
n.
(Bot.) A supposed spongelike expansion of the tip of a rootlet for absorbing water; — called also spongelet.
Spongiolite
n.
(Paleon.) One of the microsporic siliceous spicules which occur abundantly in the texture of sponges, and are sometimes found fossil, as in flints.
Spongiopilin
n.
(Med.) A kind of cloth interwoven with small pieces of sponge and rendered waterproof on one side by a covering of rubber. When moistend with hot water it is used as a poultice.
Spongiozoa
n. pl.
(Zool.) See Sponglae.
Spongoblast
n.
(Zool.) One of the cells which, in sponges, secrete the spongin, or the material of the horny fibers.
Spongoid
a.
• Resembling sponge; like sponge.
Spongy
a.
• Soft, and full of cavities; of an open, loose, pliable texture; as, a spongy excrescence; spongy earth; spongy cake; spongy bones.
• Wet; drenched; soaked and soft, like sponge; rainy.
• Having the quality of imbibing fluids, like a sponge.
Sponk
n.
• See Spunk.
Sponsal
a.
• Relating to marriage, or to a spouse; spousal.
Sponsible
a.
• responsible; worthy of credit.
Sponsion
n.
• The act of becoming surety for another.
(Internat. Law) An act or engagement on behalf of a state, by an agent not specially authorized for the purpose, or by one who exceeds the limits of authority.
Sponsional
a.
• Of or pertaining to a pledge or agreement; responsible.
Sponson
n.
(Shipbuilding) One of the triangular platforms in front of, and abaft, the paddle boxes of a steamboat.
• One of the slanting supports under the guards of a steamboat.
• One of the armored projections fitted with gun ports, used on modern war vessels.
Sponsor
n.
• One who binds himself to answer for another, and is responsible for his default; a surety.
• One who at the baptism of an infant professore the christian faith in its name, and guarantees its religious education; a godfather or godmother.
Sponsorship
n.
• State of being a sponsor.
Spontaneity
n.
• The quality or state of being spontaneous, or acting from native feeling, proneness, or temperament, without constraint or external force.
(Biol.) The tendency to undergo change, characteristic of both animal and vegetable organisms, and not restrained or cheked by the environment.
• The tendency to activity of muscular tissue, including the voluntary muscles, when in a state of healthful vigor and refreshment.
Spontaneous
a.
• Proceding from natural feeling, temperament, or disposition, or from a native internal proneness, readiness, or tendency, without constraint; as, a spontaneous gift or proportion.
• Proceeding from, or acting by, internal impulse, energy, or natural law, without external force; as, spontaneous motion; spontaneous growth.
• Produced without being planted, or without human labor; as, a spontaneous growth of wood.
Spontoon
n.
(Mil.) A kind of half-pike, or halberd, formerly borne by inferior officers of the British infantry, and used in giving signals to the soldiers.
Spook
n.
• A spirit; a ghost; an apparition; a hobgoblin.
(Zool.) The chimaera.
Spool
n.
• A piece of cane or red with a knot at each end, or a hollow cylinder of wood with a ridge at each end, used to wind thread or yarn upon.
v. t.
• To wind on a spool or spools.
Spooler
n.
• One who, or that which, spools.
Spoom
v. i.
(Naut.) To be driven steadily and swiftly, as before a strong wind; to be driven before the wind without any sail, or with only a part of the sails spread; to scud under bare poles.
Spoon
v. i.
(Naut.) See Spoom.
n.
• An implement consisting of a small bowl (usually a shallow oval) with a handle, used especially in preparing or eating food.
• Anything which resembles a spoon in shape; esp. (Fishing), a spoon bait.
• Fig.: A simpleton; a spooney.
v. t.
• To take up in, a spoon.
v. i.
• To act with demonstrative or foolish fondness, as one in love.
Spoonbill
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of wading birds of the genera Ajaja and Platalea, and allied genera, in which the long bill is broadly expanded and flattened at the tip.
• The shoveler. See Shoveler, 2.
• The ruddy duck. See under Ruddy.
• The paddlefish
Spoondrift
n.
• Spray blown from the tops waves during a gale at sea; also, snow driven in the wind at sea; — written also spindrift.
Spooney
a.
• Weak-minded; demonstratively fond; as, spooney lovers.
n.
• A weak-minded or silly person; one who is foolishly fond.
Spoonful
n.
• The quantity which a spoon contains, or is able to contain; as, a teaspoonful; a tablespoonful.
• Hence, a small quantity.
Spoonily
adv.
• In a spoony manner.
Spoonwood
n.
(Bot.) The mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia).
Spoonworm
n.
(Zool.) A gephyrean worm of the genus Thalassema, having a spoonlike probiscis.
Spoonwort
n.
(Bot.) Scurvy grass.
Spoony
a. & n.
• Same as Spooney.
Spoor
n.
• The track or trail of any wild animal; as, the spoor of an elephant; — used originally by travelers in South Africa.
v. i.
• To follow a spoor or trail.
Sporades
n. pl.
(Astron.) Stars not included in any constellation; — called also informed, or unformed, stars.
Sporadial
a.
• Sporadic.
Sporadic
a.
• Occuring singly, or apart from other things of the same kind, or in scattered instances; separate; single; as, a sporadic fireball; a sporadic case of disease; a sporadic example of a flower.
Sporadical
a.
• Sporadic.
Sporadically
adv.
• In a sporadic manner.
Sporangiophore
n.
(Bot.) The axis or receptacle in certain ferns (as Trichomanes), which bears the sporangia.
Sporangium
n.
(Bot.) A spore case in the cryptogamous plants, as in ferns, etc.
Spore
n.
(Bot.) One of the minute grains in flowerless plants, which are analogous to seeds, as serving to reproduce the species.
• An embryo sac or embryonal vesicle in the ovules of flowering plants
(Biol.) A minute grain or germ; a small, round or ovoid body, formed in certain organisms, and by germination giving rise to a new organism; as, the reproductive spores of bacteria, etc.
• One of the parts formed by fission in certain Protozoa. See Spore formation, belw.
Sporid
n.
(Bot.) A sporidium.
Sporidiferous
a.
(Bot.) Bearing sporidia.
Sporidium
n.
(Bot.) A secondary spore, or a filament produced from a spore, in certain kinds of minute fungi.
• A spore.
Sporiferous
a.
(Biol.) Bearing or producing spores.
Sporification
n.
(Biol.) Spore formation. See Spore formation (b), under Spore.
Sporocarp
n.
(Bot.) A closed body or conceptacle containing one or more masses of spores or sporangia.
• A sporangium.
Sporocyst
n.
(Zool.) An asexual zooid, usually forming one of a series of larval forms in the agamic reproduction of various trematodes and other parasitic worms. The sporocyst generally develops from an egg, but in its turn produces other larvae by internal budding, or by the subdivision of a part or all of its contents into a number of minute germs. See Redia.
(Zool.) Any protozoan when it becomes encysted produces germs by sporulation.
Sporogenesis
n.
(Biol.) reproduction by spores.
Sporogony
n.
(Zool.) The growth or development of an animal or a zooid from a nonsexual germ.
Sporophore
n.
(Bot.) A placenta.
• That alternately produced form of certain cryptogamous plants, as ferns, mosses, and the like, which is nonsexual, but produces spores in countless numbers. In ferns it is the leafy plant, in mosses the capsule. Cf. Oophore.
Sporophoric
a.
(Bot.) Having the nature of a sporophore.
Sporosac
n.
(Zool.) A hydrozoan reproductive zooid or gonophore which does not become medusoid in form or structure. See Illust. under Athecata.
• An early or simple larval stage of trematode worms and some other invertebrates, which is capable or reproducing other germs by asexual generation; a nurse; a redia.
Sporozoa
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive division of parasitic Protozoa, which increase by sporulation. It includes the Gregarinida.
Sporozoid
n.
(Bot.) Same as Zoospore.
Sporran
n.
• A large purse or pouch made of skin with the hair or fur on, worn in front of the kilt by Highlanders when in full dress.
Sport
n.
• That which diverts, and makes mirth; pastime; amusement.
• Mock; mockery; contemptuous mirth; derision.
• Play; idle jingle.
• Diversion of the field, as fowling, hunting, fishing, racing, games, and the like, esp. when money is staked.
(Bot. & Zool.) A plant or an animal, or part of a plant or animal, which has some peculiarity not usually seen in the species; an abnormal variety or growth. See Sporting plant, under Sporting.
• A sportsman; a gambler.
v. i.
• To play; to frolic; to wanton.
• To practice the diversions of the field or the turf; to be given to betting, as upon races.
• To trifle.
(Bot. & Zool.) To assume suddenly a new and different character from the rest of the plant or from the type of the species; — said of a bud, shoot, plant, or animal. See Sport, n., 6.
v. t.
• To divert; to amuse; to make merry; — used with the reciprocal pronoun.
• To represent by any knd of play.
• To exhibit, or bring out, in public; to use or wear; as, to sport a new equipage.
• To give utterance to in a sportive manner; to throw out in an easy and copious manner; — with off; as, to sport off epigrams.
Sportability
n.
• Sportiveness.
Sportal
a.
• Of or pertaining to sports; used in sports.
Sporter
n.
• One who sports; a sportsman.
Sportful
a.
• Full of sport; merry; frolicsome; full of jesting; indulging in mirth or play; playful; wanton; as, a sportful companion.
• Done in jest, or for mere play; sportive.
Sporting
a.
• Of pertaining to, or engaging in, sport or sporrts; exhibiting the character or conduct of one who, or that which, sports.
Sportingly
adv.
• In sport; sportively.
Sportive
a.
• Tending to, engaged in, or provocate of, sport; gay; froliscome; playful; merry.
Sportless
a.
• Without sport or mirth; joyless.
Sportling
n.
• A little person or creature engaged in sports or in play.
Sportsman
n.
• One who pursues the sports of the field; one who hunts, fishes, etc.
Sportsmanship
n.
• The practice of sportsmen; skill in field sports.
Sportula
n.
• A gift; a present; a prize; hence, an alms; a largess.
Sportulary
a.
• Subsisting on alms or charitable contributions.
Sportule
n.
• A charitable gift or contribution; a gift; an alms; a dole; a largess; a sportula.
Sporulation
n.
(Biol.) The act or process of forming spores; spore formation. See Illust. of Bacillus, b.
Sporule
n.
(Biol.) A small spore; a spore.
Sporuliferous
a.
(Biol.) Producing sporules.
Spot
n.
• A mark on a substance or body made by foreign matter; a blot; a place discolored.
• A stain on character or reputation; something that soils purity; disgrace; reproach; fault; blemish.
• A small part of a different color from the main part, or from the ground upon which it is; as, the spots of a leopard; the spots on a playing card.
• A small extent of space; a place; any particular place.
(Zool.) A variety of the common domestic pigeon, so called from a spot on its head just above its beak.
(Zool.) A sciaenoid food fish (Liostomus xanthurus) of the Atlantic coast of the United States. It has a black spot behind the shoulders and fifteen oblique dark bars on the sides. Called also goody, Lafayette, masooka, and old wife.
• The southern redfish, or red horse, which has a spot on each side at the base of the tail. See Redfish.
• Commodities, as merchandise and cotton, sold for immediate delivery.
v. t.
• To make visible marks upon with some foreign matter; to discolor in or with spots; to stain; to cover with spots or figures; as, to spot a garnment; to spot paper.
• To mark or note so as to insure recognition; to recognize; to detect; as, to spot a criminal.
• To stain; to blemish; to taint; to disgrace; to tarnish, as reputation; to asperse.
v. i.
• To become stained with spots.
Spotless
a.
• Without a spot; especially, free from reproach or impurity; pure; untained; innocent; as, a spotless mind; spotless behavior.
Spotted
a.
• Marked with spots; as, a spotted garment or character.
Spottedness
n.
• State or quality of being spotted.
Spotter
n.
• One who spots.
Spottiness
n.
• The state or quality of being spotty.
Spotty
a.
• Full of spots; marked with spots.
Spousage
n.
• Espousal.
Spousal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a spouse or marriage; nuptial; matrimonial; conjugal; bridal; as, spousal rites; spousal ornaments.
n.
• Marriage; nuptials; espousal; — generally used in the plural; as, the spousals of Hippolita.
Spouse
n.
• A man or woman engaged or joined in wedlock; a married person, husband or wife.
• A married man, in distinct from a spousess or married woman; a bridegroom or husband.
v. t.
• To wed; to espouse.
Spouseless
a.
• Destitute of a spouse; unmarried.
Spousess
n.
• A wife or bride.
Spout
v. t.
• To throw out forcibly and abudantly, as liquids through an office or a pipe; to eject in a jet; as, an elephant spouts water from his trunk.
• To utter magniloquently; to recite in an oratorical or pompous manner.
• To pawn; to pledge; as, spout a watch.
v. i.
• To issue with with violence, or in a jet, as a liquid through a narrow orifice, or from a spout; as, water spouts from a hole; blood spouts from an artery.
• To eject water or liquid in a jet.
• To utter a speech, especially in a pompous manner.
n.
• That through which anything spouts; a discharging lip, pipe, or orifice; a tube, pipe, or conductor of any kind through which a liquid is poured, or by which it is conveyed in a stream from one place to another; as, the spout of a teapot; a spout for conducting water from the roof of a building.
• A trough for conducting grain, flour, etc., into a receptacle.
• A discharge or jet of water or other liquid, esp. when rising in a column; also, a waterspout.
Spouter
n.
• One who, or that which, spouts.
Spoutfish
n.
(Zool.) A marine animal that spouts water; — applied especially to certain bivalve mollusks, like the long clams (Mya), which spout, or squirt out, water when retiring into their holes.
Spoutless
a.
• Having no spout.
Spoutshell
n.
(Zool.) Any marine gastropod shell of the genus Apporhais having an elongated siphon. See Illust. under Rostrifera.
Sprack
a.
• Quick; lively' alert.
Sprad
• p. p. of Spread.
Spradde
• imp. of Spread.
Sprag
n.
(Zool.) A young salmon.
n.
• A billet of wood; a piece of timber used as a prop.
v. t.
• To check the motion of, as a carriage on a steep grade, by putting a sprag between the spokes of the wheel.
• To prop or sustain with a sprag.
a.
• See Sprack, a.
Sprain
v. t.
• To weaken, as a joint, ligament, or muscle, by sudden and excessive exertion, as by wrenching; to overstrain, or stretch injuriously, but without luxation; as, to sprain one's ankle.
n.
• The act or result of spraining; lameness caused by spraining; as, a bad sprain of the wrist.
Spraints
n. pl.
• The dung of an otter.
Sprang
• imp. of Spring.
Sprat
n.
(Zool.) A small European herring (Clupea sprattus) closely allied to the common herring and the pilchard; — called also garvie. The name is also applied to small herring of different kinds.
• A California surf-fish (Rhacochilus toxotes); — called also alfione, and perch.
Sprawl
v. i.
• To spread and stretch the body or limbs carelessly in a horizontal position; to lie with the limbs stretched out ungracefully.
• To spread irregularly, as vines, plants, or tress; to spread ungracefully, as chirography.
• To move, when lying down, with awkward extension and motions of the limbs; to scramble in creeping.
Spray
n.
• A small shoot or branch; a twig.
• A collective body of small branches; as, the tree has a beautiful spray.
(Founding) A side channel or branch of the runner of a flask, made to distribute the metal in all parts of the mold.
• A group of castings made in the same mold and connected by sprues formed in the runner and its branches.
n.
• Water flying in small drops or particles, as by the force of wind, or the dashing of waves, or from a waterfall, and the like.
(Med.) A jet of fine medicated vapor, used either as an application to a diseased part or to charge the air of a room with a disinfectant or a deodorizer.
• An instrument for applying such a spray; an atomizer.
v. t.
• To let fall in the form of spray.
• To throw spray upon; to treat with a liquid in the form of spray; as, to spray a wound, or a surgical instrument, with carbolic acid.
Sprayboard
n.
(Naut.) See Dashboard, n., 2 (b).
Spread
v. t.
• To extend in length and breadth, or in breadth only; to stretch or expand to a broad or broader surface or extent; to open; to unfurl; as, to spread a carpet; to spread a tent or a sail.
• To extend so as to cover something; to extend to a great or grater extent in every direction; to cause to fill or cover a wide or wider space.
• To divulge; to publish, as news or fame; to cause to be more extensively known; to disseminate; to make known fully; as, to spread a report; — often acompanied by abroad.
• To propagate; to cause to affect great numbers; as, to spread a disease.
• To diffuse, as emanations or effluvia; to emit; as, odoriferous plants spread their fragrance.
• To strew; to scatter over a surface; as, to spread manure; to spread lime on the ground.
• To prepare; to set and furnish with provisions; as, to spread a table.
v. i.
• To extend in length and breadth in all directions, or in breadth only; to be extended or stretched; to expand.
• To be extended by drawing or beating; as, some metals spread with difficulty.
• To be made known more extensively, as news.
• To be propagated from one to another; as, the disease spread into all parts of the city.
n.
• Extent; compass.
• Expansion of parts.
• A cloth used as a cover for a table or a bed.
• A table, as spread or furnished with a meal; hence, an entertainment of food; a feast.
• A privilege which one person buys of another, of demanding certain shares of stock at a certain price, or of delivering the same shares of stock at another price, within a time agreed upon.
(Geom.) An unlimited expanse of discontinuous points.
• imp. & p. p. of Spread, v.
Spreader
n.
• One who, or that which, spreads, expands, or propogates.
• A machine for combining and drawing fibers of flax to form a sliver preparatory to spinning.
Spreadingly
• , adv. Increasingly.
Sprechery
n.
• Movables of an inferior description; especially, such as have been collected by depredation.
Spree
n.
• A merry frolic; especially, a drinking frolic; a carousal.
Sprenge
v. t.
• To sprinkle; to scatter.
Sprent
• p. p. of Sprenge. Sprinkled.
Sprew
n.
(Med.) Thrush.
Spreynd
• p. p. of Sprenge. Sprinkled.
Sprig
n.
• A small shoot or twig of a tree or other plant; a spray; as, a sprig of laurel or of parsley.
• A youth; a lad; — used humorously or in slight disparagement.
• A brad, or nail without a head.
(Naut.) A small eyebolt ragged or barbed at the point.
v. t.
• To mark or adorn with the representation of small branches; to work with sprigs; as, to sprig muslin.
Sprigged
a.
• Having sprigs.
Spriggy
a.
• Full of sprigs or small branches.
Spright
n.
• Spirit; mind; soul; state of mind; mood.
• A supernatural being; a spirit; a shade; an apparition; a ghost.
• A kind of short arrow.
v. t.
• To haunt, as a spright.
Sprightful
a.
• Full of spirit or of life; earnest; vivacious; lively; brisk; nimble; gay.
Sprightless
a.
• Destitute of life; dull; sluggish.
Sprightliness
n.
• The quality or state of being sprightly; liveliness; life; briskness; vigor; activity; gayety; vivacity.
Sprightly
a.
• Sprightlike, or spiritlike; lively; brisk; animated; vigorous; airy; gay; as, a sprightly youth; a sprightly air; a sprightly dance.
Sprigtail
n.
(Zool.) The pintail duck; — called also sprig, and spreet-tail.
• The sharp-tailed grouse.
Spring
v. i.
• To leap; to bound; to jump.
• To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot.
• To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert.
• To fly back; as, a bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power.
• To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped; as, a piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning.
• To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; -often followed by up, forth, or out.
• To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle.
• To grow; to prosper.
v. t.
• To cause to spring up; to start or rouse, as game; to cause to rise from the earth, or from a covert; as, to spring a pheasant.
• To produce or disclose suddenly or unexpectedly.
• To cause to explode; as, to spring a mine.
• To crack or split; to bend or strain so as to weaken; as, to spring a mast or a yard.
• To cause to close suddenly, as the parts of a trap operated by a spring; as, to spring a trap.
• To bend by force, as something stiff or strong; to force or put by bending, as a beam into its sockets, and allowing it to straighten when in place; — often with in, out, etc.; as, to spring in a slat or a bar.
• To pass over by leaping; as, to spring a fence.
n.
• A leap; a bound; a jump.
• A flying back; the resilience of a body recovering its former state by elasticity; as, the spring of a bow.
• Elastic power or force.
• An elastic body of any kind, as steel, India rubber, tough wood, or compressed air, used for various mechanical purposes, as receiving and imparting power, diminishing concussion, regulating motion, measuring weight or other force.
• Any source of supply; especially, the source from which a stream proceeds; as issue of water from the earth; a natural fountain.
• Any active power; that by which action, or motion, is produced or propagated; cause; origin; motive.
• That which springs, or is originated, from a source; as: (a) A race; lineage.
• A youth; a springal
• A shoot; a plant; a young tree; also, a grove of trees; woodland
• That which causes one to spring; specifically, a lively tune.
• The season of the year when plants begin to vegetate and grow; the vernal season, usually comprehending the months of March, April, and May, in the middle latitudes north of the equator.
• The time of growth and progress; early portion; first stage.
(Naut.) A crack or fissure in a mast or yard, running obliquely or transversely.
• A line led from a vessel's quarter to her cable so that by tightening or slacking it she can be made to lie in any desired position; a line led diagonally from the bow or stern of a vessel to some point upon the wharf to which she is moored.
Springal(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• An ancient military engine for casting stones and arrows by means of a spring.
Springboard(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• An elastic board, secured at the ends, or at one end, often by elastic supports, used in performing feats of agility or in exercising.
Springe(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A noose fastened to an elastic body, and drawn close with a sudden spring, whereby it catches a bird or other animal; a gin; a snare. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To catch in a springe; to insnare. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To sprinkle; to scatter.
Springer
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• One who, or that which, springs; specifically, one who rouses game.
• A young plant.(Arch.)
The impost, or point at which an arch rests upon its support, and from which it seems to spring.
• The bottom stone of an arch, which lies on the impost. The skew back is one form of springer.
• The rib of a groined vault, as being the solid abutment for each section of vaulting.
(Zool.) The grampus.
(Zool.) A variety of the field spaniel. See Spaniel.
(Zool.) A species of antelope; the sprinkbok.
Springhalt
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.(Far.)
A kind of lameness in horse. See Stringhalt.
Springhead(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A fountain or source.
Springiness(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• The state or quality of being springly.
Springing
Springle(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A springe.
Springlet(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A little spring.
Springtail
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.(Zool.)
Any one of numerous species of small apterous insects belonging to the order Thysanura. They have two elastic caudal stylets which can be bent under the abdomen and then suddenly extended like a spring, thus enabling them to leap to a considerable distance. See Collembola, and Podura.
Springtide(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• The time of spring; springtime.
Springtime(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• The season of spring; springtide.
Springy(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Resembling, having the qualities of, or pertaining to, a spring; elastic; as, springy steel; a springy step.
• Abounding with springs or fountains; wet; spongy; as, springy land.
Sprinkle(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To scatter in small drops or particles, as water, seed, etc.
• To scatter on; to disperse something over in small drops or particles; to besprinkle; as, to sprinkle the earth with water; to sprinkle a floor with sand.
• To baptize by the application of a few drops, or a small quantity, of water; hence, to cleanse; to purify. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. i.
• To scatter a liquid, or any fine substance, so that it may fall in particles.
• To rain moderately, or with scattered drops falling now and then; as, it sprinkles.
• To fly or be scattered in small drops or particles. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A small quantity scattered, or sparsely distributed; a sprinkling.
• A utensil for sprinkling; a sprinkler.
Sprinkler(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• One who sprinkles.
• An instrument or vessel used in sprinkling; specifically, a watering pot.
Sprinkling(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, sprinkles.
• A small quantity falling in distinct drops or particles; as, a sprinkling of rain or snow.
• Hence, a moderate number or quantity distributed like drops.
Sprint(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. i.
• To run very rapidly; to run at full speed.
Sprinter(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• One who sprints; one who runs in sprint races; as, a champion sprinter.
Sprit(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To throw out with force from a narrow orifice; to eject; to spurt out. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. i.
• To sprout; to bud; to germinate, as barley steeped for malt. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A shoot; a sprout.
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.(Naut.)
A small boom, pole, or spar, which crosses the sail of a boat diagonally from the mast to the upper aftmost corner, which it is used to extend and elevate.
Sprite
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A spirit; a soul; a shade; also, an apparition. See Spright.
• An elf; a fairy; a goblin.(Zool.)
The green woodpecker, or yaffle.
Spritsail
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.(Naut.)
A sail extended by a sprit.
• A sail formerly hung under the bowsprit, from the spritsail yard.
Sprod
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.(Zool.)
A salmon in its second year.
Sprong(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
• imp. of Spring. Sprung.
Sprout(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. i.
• To shoot, as the seed of a plant; to germinate; to push out new shoots; hence, to grow like shoots of plants.
• To shoot into ramifications. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To cause to sprout; as, the rain will sprout the seed.
• To deprive of sprouts; as, to sprout potatoes.
Spruce (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Neat, without elegance or dignity; — formerly applied to things with a serious meaning; now chiefly applied to persons.
• Sprightly; dashing. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To dress with affected neatness; to trim; to make spruce. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. i.
• To dress one's self with affected neatness; as, to spruce up.
Sprue
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.(Founding)
Strictly, the hole through which melted metal is poured into the gate, and thence into the mold.
• The waste piece of metal cast in this hole; hence, dross.
(Med.) Same as Sprew.
Sprug(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To make smart.
Sprung(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
• imp. & p. p. of Spring.
(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.(Naut.)
Said of a spar that has been cracked or strained.
Sprunt (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• Anything short and stiff.
• A leap; a spring.
• A steep ascent in a road. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Active; lively; vigorous.
Spruntly(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
adv.
• In a sprunt manner; smartly; vigorously; youthfully.
Spry(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Having great power of leaping or running; nimble; active.
Spud(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• A sharp, narrow spade, usually with a long handle, used by farmers for digging up large-rooted weeds; a similarly shaped implement used for various purposes.
• A dagger.
• Anything short and thick; specifically, a piece of dough boiled in fat.
Spue(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. t. & i.
• See Spew.
Spuilzie(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• See Spulzie.
Spuke(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• See Spook.
Spuller(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• One employed to inspect yarn, to see that it is well spun, and fit for the loom.
Spulzie(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• Plunder, or booty.
Spume(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• Frothy matter raised on liquids by boiling, effervescence, or agitation; froth; foam; scum. (Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
v. i.
• To froth; to foam.
Spumeous(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Spumous.
Spumescence(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• The state of being foamy; frothiness.
Spumescent(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Resembling froth or foam; foaming.
Spumid(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Spumous; frothy.
Spumiferous(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
a.
• Producing foam.
Spuminess(Bookbinding)
n.(Bot.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Zool.)(Bot.)(Locomotive Engines)(Arch.)
n.
• The quality or condition of being spumy; spumescence.
Spun
• imp. & p. p. of Spin.
Spunge
n.
• A sponge.
Spunk
n.
• Wood that readily takes fire; touchwood; also, a kind of tinder made from a species of fungus; punk; amadou.
• An inflammable temper; spirit; mettle; pluck; as, a man of spunk.
Spunky
a.
• Full of spunk; quick; spirited.
Spur
n.
(Zool.) A sparrow.
• A tern.
n.
• An implement secured to the heel, or above the heel, of a horseman, to urge the horse by its pressure. Modern spurs have a small wheel, or rowel, with short points. Spurs were the badge of knighthood.
• That which goads to action; an incitement.
• Something that projects; a snag.
• One of the large or principal roots of a tree.
(Zool.) Any stiff, sharp spine, as on the wings and legs of certain burds, on the legs of insects, etc.; especially, the spine on a cock's leg.
• A mountain that shoots from any other mountain, or range of mountains, and extends to some distance in a lateral direction, or at right angles.
• A spiked iron worn by seamen upon the bottom of the boot, to enable them to stand upon the carcass of a whale, to strip off the blubber.
(Carp.) A brace strengthening a post and some connected part, as a rafter or crossbeam; a strut.
(Arch.) The short wooden buttress of a post.
• A projection from the round base of a column, occupying the angle of a square plinth upon which the base rests, or bringing the bottom bed of the base to a nearly square form. It is generally carved in leafage.
(Bot.) Any projecting appendage of a flower looking like a spur.
• Ergotized rye or other grain
(Fort.) A wall that crosses a part of a rampart and joins to an inner wall.
(Shipbuilding) A piece of timber fixed on the bilge ways before launching, having the upper ends bolted to the vessel's side.
• A curved piece of timber serving as a half to support the deck where a whole beam can not be placed.
v. t.
• To prick with spurs; to incite to a more hasty pace; to urge or goad; as, to spur a horse.
• To urge or encourage to action, or to a more vigorous pursuit of an object; to incite; to stimulate; to instigate; to impel; to drive.
• To put spurs on; as, a spurred boot.
v. i.
• To spur on one' horse; to travel with great expedition; to hasten; hence, to press forward in any pursuit.
Spurgall
n.
• A place galled or excoriated by much using of the spur.
v. t.
• To gall or wound with a spur.
Spurge
v. t.
• To emit foam; to froth; — said of the emission of yeast from beer in course of fermentation.
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Euphobia. See Euphorbia.
Spurgewort
n.
(Bot.) Any euphorbiaceous plant.
Spurging
n.
• A purging.
Spurious
a.
• Not proceeding from the true source, or from the source pretended; not genuine; false; adulterate.
• Not legitimate; bastard; as, spurious issue.
Spurless
a.
• Having no spurs.
Spurling
n.
(Zool.) A tern.
Spurn
v. t.
• To drive back or away, as with the foot; to kick.
• To reject with disdain; to scorn to receive or accept; to treat with contempt.
v. i.
• To kick or toss up the heels.
• To manifest disdain in rejecting anything; to make contemptuous opposition or resistance.
n.
• A kick; a blow with the foot.
• Disdainful rejection; contemptuous tratment.
(Mining) A body of coal left to sustain an overhanding mass.
Spurner
n.
• One who spurns.
Spurred
a.
• Wearing spurs; furnished with a spur or spurs; having shoots like spurs.
• Affected with spur, or ergot; as, spurred rye.
Spurrer
n.
• One who spurs.
Spurrey
n.
(Bot.) See Spurry.
Spurrier
n.
• One whose occupation is to make spurs.
Spurry
n.
(Bot.) An annual herb (Spergula arvensis) with whorled filiform leaves, sometimes grown in Europe for fodder.
Spurt
n.
• A sudden and energetic effort, as in an emergency; an increased exertion for a brief space.
v. i.
• To make a sudden and violent exertion, as in an emergency.
Spurt
v. i.
• To gush or issue suddenly or violently out in a stream, as liquor from a cask; to rush from a confined place in a small stream or jet; to spirt.
v. t.
• To throw out, as a liquid, in a stream or jet; to drive or force out with violence, as a liquid from a pipe or small orifice; as, to spurt water from the mouth.
Spurtle
v. t.
• To spurt or shoot in a scattering manner.
Spurway
n.
• A bridle path.
Sput
n.
(Steam Boiler) An annular reenforce, to strengthen a place where a hole is made.
Sputation
n.
• The act of spitting; expectoration.
Sputative
a.
• Inclined to spit; spitting much.
Spute
v. t.
• To dispute; to discuss.
Sputter
v. i.
• To spit, or to emit saliva from the mouth in small, scattered portions, as in rapid speaking.
• To utter words hastily and indistinctly; to speak so rapidly as to emit saliva.
• To throw out anything, as little jets of steam, with a noise like that made by one sputtering.
v. t.
• To spit out hastily by quick, successive efforts, with a spluttering sound; to utter hastily and confusedly, without control over the organs of speech.
n.
• Moist matter thrown out in small detached particles; also, confused and hasty speech.
Sputterer
n.
• One who sputters.
Sputum
n.
• That which is expectorated; a salival discharge; spittle; saliva.
Spy
v. t.
• To gain sight of; to discover at a distance, or in a state of concealment; to espy; to see.
• To discover by close search or examination.
• To explore; to view; inspect; and examine secretly, as a country; — usually with out.
v. i.
• To search narrowly; to scrutinize.
n.
• One who keeps a constant watch of the conduct of others.
(Mil.) A person sent secretly into an enemy's camp, territory, or fortifications, to inspect his works, ascertain his strength, movements, or designs, and to communicate such intelligence to the proper officer.
Spyboat
n.
• A boat sent to make discoveries and bring intelligence.
Spyglass
n.
• A small telescope for viewing distant terrestrial objects.
Spyism
• , n. Act or business of spying.
Squab
a.
• Fat; thick; plump; bulky.
• Unfledged; unfeathered; as, a squab pigeon.
n.
(Zool.) A neatling of a pigeon or other similar bird, esp. when very fat and not fully fledged.
• A person of a short, fat figure.
• A thickly stuffed cushion; especially, one used for the seat of a sofa, couch, or chair; also, a sofa.
adv.
• With a heavy fall; plump.
v. i.
• To fall plump; to strike at one dash, or with a heavy stroke.
Squabash
v. t.
• To crush; to quash; to squash.
Squabbish
a.
• Thick; fat; heavy.
Squabble
v. i.
• To contend for superiority in an unseemly maner; to scuffle; to struggle; to wrangle; to quarrel.
• To debate peevishly; to dispute.
v. t.
(Print.) To disarrange, so that the letters or lines stand awry or are mixed and need careful readjustment; — said of type that has been set up.
n.
• A scuffle; a wrangle; a brawl.
Squabbler
n.
• One who squabbles; a contentious person; a brawler.
Squabby
a.
• Short and thick; suqabbish.
Squacco
n.
(Zool.) A heron (Ardea comata) found in Asia, Northern Africa, and Southern Europe.
Squad
n.
(Mil.) A small party of men assembled for drill, inspection, or other purposes.
• Hence, any small party.
n.
• Sloppy mud.
Squadron
n.
• Primarily, a square; hence, a square body of troops; a body of troops drawn up in a square.
(Mil.) A body of cavarly comparising two companies or troops, and averging from one hundred and twenty to two hundred men.
(Naut.) A detachment of vessels employed on any particular service or station, under the command of the senior officer; as, the North Atlantic Squadron.
Squadroned
a.
• Formed into squadrons, or squares.
Squail
v. i.
• To throw sticls at cocks; to throw anything about awkwardly or irregularly.
Squaimous
a.
• Squeamish.
Squali
n. pl.
(Zool.) The suborder of elasmobranch fishes which comprises the sharks.
Squalid
a.
• Dirty through neglect; foul; filthy; extremely dirty.
Squalidity
n.
• The quality or state of being squalid; foulness; filthiness.
Squalidly
adv.
• In a squalid manner.
Squalidness
n.
• Quality or state of being squalid.
Squall
n.
• A sudden violent gust of wind often attended with rain or snow.
v. i.
• To cry out; to scream or cry violently, as a woman frightened, or a child in anger or distress; as, the infant squalled.
n.
• A loud scream; a harsh cry.
Squaller
n.
• One who squalls; a screamer.
Squally
a.
• Abounding with squalls; disturbed often with sudden and violent gusts of wind; gusty; as, squally weather.
(Agric.) Interrupted by unproductive spots; — said of a flied of turnips or grain.
(Weaving) Not equally good throughout; not uniform; uneven; faulty; — said of cloth.
Squalodon
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of fossil whales belonging to the Phocodontia; — so called because their are serrated, like a shark's.
Squalodont
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to Squalodon.
Squaloid
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to a shark or sharks.
Squalor
n.
• Squalidness; foulness; filthness; squalidity.
Squama
n.
(Med.) A scale cast off from the skin; a thin dry shred consisting of epithelium.
Squamaceous
a.
• Squamose.
Squamata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of edentates having the body covered with large, imbricated horny scales. It includes the pangolins.
Squamduck
(Zool.) The American eider duck.
Squame
n.
• A scale.
(Zool.) The scale, or exopodite, of an antenna of a crustacean.
Squamella
n.
(Bot.) A diminutive scale or bractlet, such as those found on the receptacle in many composite plants; a palea.
Squamellate
a.
• Furnished or covered with little scales; squamulose.
Squamiform
a.
• Having the shape of a scale.
Squamigerous
a.
(Zool.) Bearing scales.
Squamipen
n.
(Zool.) Any one of a group of fishes having the dorsal and anal fins partially covered with scales.
Squamoid
a.
• Resembling a scale; also, covered with scales; scaly.
Squamosal
a.
(Anat.) Scalelike; squamous; as, the squamosal bone
• Of or pertaining to the squamosal bone.
n.
• The squamous part of the temporal bone, or a bone correspondending to it, under Temporal.
Squamozygomatic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to both the squamosal and zygomatic bones; — applied to a bone, or a center of ossification, in some fetal skulls.
n.
• A squamozygomatic bone.
Squamula
n.
(Bot.) One of the little hypogynous scales found in the flowers of grasses; a lodicule.
Squamulate
a.
• Same as Squamulose.
Squamule
n.
(Bot.) Same as Squamula.
Squamulose
a.
• Having little scales; squamellate; squamulate.
Squander
v. t.
• To scatter; to disperse.
• To spend lavishly or profusely; to spend prodigally or wastefully; to use without economy or judgment; to dissipate; as, to squander an estate.
v. i.
• To spend lavishly; to be wasteful.
• To wander at random; to scatter.
n.
• The act of squandering; waste.
Squanderer
n.
• One who squanders.
Squanderingly
adv.
• In a squandering manner.
Square
n.
(Geom.) The corner, or angle, of a figure.
• A parallelogram having four equal sides and four right angles.
• Hence, anything which is square, or nearly so
• A square piece or fragment.
• A pane of glass
(Print.) A certain number of lines, forming a portion of a column, nearly square; — used chiefly in reckoning the prices of advertisements in newspapers
(Carp.) One hundred superficial feet
• An area of four sides, generally with houses on each side; sometimes, a solid block of houses; also, an open place or area for public use, as at the meeting or intersection of two or more streets.
(Mech. & Joinery) An instrument having at least one right angle and two or more straight edges, used to lay out or test square work. It is of several forms, as the T square, the carpenter's square, the try-square., etc.
• Hence, a pattern or rule.
(Arith. & Alg.) The product of a number or quantity multiplied by itself; thus, 64 is the square of 8, for 8 × 8 = 64; the square of a + b is a2 + 2ab + b2.
• Exact proportion; justness of workmanship and conduct; regularity; rule.
(Mil.) A body of troops formed in a square, esp. one formed to resist a charge of cavalry; a squadron.
• Fig.: The relation of harmony, or exact agreement; equality; level.
(Astrol.) The position of planets distant ninety degrees from each other; a quadrate.
• The act of squaring, or quarreling; a quarrel.
• The front of a woman's dress over the bosom, usually worked or embroidered.
a.
(Geom.) Having four equal sides and four right angles; as, a square figure.
• Forming a right angle; as, a square corner.
• Having a shape broad for the height, with rectilineal and angular rather than curving outlines; as, a man of a square frame.
• Exactly suitable or correspondent; true; just.
• Rendering equal justice; exact; fair; honest, as square dealing.
• Even; leaving no balance; as, to make or leave the accounts square.
• Leaving nothing; hearty; vigorous.
(Naut.) At right angles with the mast or the keel, and parallel to the horizon; — said of the yards of a square-rigged vessel when they are so braced.
v. t.
• To form with four sides and four right angles.
• To form with right angles and straight lines, or flat surfaces; as, to square mason's work.
• To compare with, or reduce to, any given measure or standard.
• To adjust; to regulate; to mold; to shape; to fit; as, to square our actions by the opinions of others.
• To make even, so as leave no remainder of difference; to balance; as, to square accounts.
(Math.) To multiply by itself; as, to square a number or a quantity.
(Astrol.) To hold a quartile position respecting.
(Naut.) To place at right angles with the keel; as, to square the yards.
v. i.
• To accord or agree exactly; to be consistent with; to conform or agree; to suit; to fit.
• To go to opposite sides; to take an attitude of offense or defense, or of defiance; to quarrel.
• To take a boxing attitude; — often with up, sometimes with off.
Squarely
adv.
• In a square form or manner.
Squareness
n.
• The quality of being square; as, an instrument to try the squareness of work.
Squarer
n.
• One who, or that which, squares.
• One who squares, or quarrels; a hot-headed, contentious fellow.
Squarish
a.
• Nearly square.
Squarrose
a.
• Ragged or full of lose scales or projecting parts; rough; jagged
(Bot. & Zool.) Consisting of scales widely divaricating; having scales, small leaves, or other bodies, spreading widely from the axis on which they are crowded; — said of a calyx or stem
(Bot.) Divided into shreds or jags, raised above the plane of the leaf, and not parallel to it; said of a leaf
(Zool.) Having scales spreading every way, or standing upright, or at right angles to the surface; — said of a shell.
Squarrous
a.
• Squarrose.
Squarrulose
a.
(Bot.) Somewhat squarrose; slightly squarrose.
Squash
n.
(Zool.) An American animal allied to the weasel.
n.
(Bot.) A plant and its fruit of the genus Cucurbita, or gourd kind.
v. t.
• To beat or press into pulp or a flat mass; to crush.
n.
• Something soft and easily crushed; especially, an unripe pod of pease.
• Hence, something unripe or soft; — used in contempt.
• A sudden fall of a heavy, soft body; also, a shock of soft bodies.
Squasher
n.
• One who, or that which, squashes.
Squashiness
n.
• The quality or state of being squashy, or soft.
Squashy
a.
• Easily squashed; soft.
Squat
n.
(Zool.) The angel fish (Squatina angelus
v. i.
• To sit down upon the hams or heels; as, the savages squatted near the fire.
• To sit close to the ground; to cower; to stoop, or lie close, to escape observation, as a partridge or rabbit.
• To settle on another's land without title; also, to settle on common or public lands.
v. t.
• To bruise or make flat by a fall.
a.
• Sitting on the hams or heels; sitting close to the ground; cowering; crouching.
• Short and thick, like the figure of an animal squatting.
n.
• The posture of one that sits on his heels or hams, or close to the ground.
• A sudden or crushing fall.
(Mining) A small vein of ore.
• A mineral consisting of tin ore and spar.
Squaterole
n.
(Zool.) The black-bellied plover.
Squatter
n.
• One who squats; specifically, one who settles unlawfully upon land without a title. In the United States and Australia the term is sometimes applied also to a person who settles lawfully upon government land under permission and restrictions, before acquiring title.
(Zool.) See Squat snipe, under Squat.
Squatty
a.
• Squat; dumpy.
Squaw
n.
• A female; a woman; — in the language of Indian tribes of the Algonquin family, correlative of sannup.
Squawberry
n.
(Bot.) A local name for the partridge berry; also, for the deerberry.
Squawk
v. i.
• To utter a shrill, abrupt scream; to squeak harshly.
n.
• Act of squawking; a harsh squeak.
(Zool.) The American night heron. See under Night.
Squawl
v. i.
• See Squall.
Squawroot
n.
(Bot.) A scaly parasitic plant (Conopholis Americana) found in oak woods in the United States; — called also cancer root.
Squawweed
n.
(Bot.) The golden ragwort. See under Ragwort.
Squeak
v. i.
• To utter a sharp, shrill cry, usually of short duration; to cry with an acute tone, as an animal; or, to make a sharp, disagreeable noise, as a pipe or quill, a wagon wheel, a door; to creak.
• To break silence or secrecy for fear of pain or punishment; to speak; to confess.
n.
• A sharp, shrill, disagreeable sound suddenly utered, either of the human voice or of any animal or instrument, such as is made by carriage wheels when dry, by the soles of leather shoes, or by a pipe or reed.
Squeaker
n.
• One who, or that which, squeaks.
(Zool.) The Australian gray crow shrile (Strepera anaphonesis); — so called from its note.
Squeakingly
adv.
• In a squeaking manner.
Squeal
v. i.
• To cry with a sharp, shrill, prolonged sound, as certain animals do, indicating want, displeasure, or pain.
• To turn informer; to betray a secret.
n.
• A shrill, somewhat prolonged cry.
Squealer
n.
• One who, or that which, squeals.
(Zool.) The European swift.
• The harlequin duck.
• The American golden plover.
Squeamish
a.
• Having a stomach that is easily or nauseated; hence, nice to excess in taste; fastidious; easily disgusted; apt to be offended at trifling improprieties.
Squeamous
a.
• Squeamish.
Squeasiness
n.
• Queasiness.
Squeegee
n.
• Same as Squilgee.
Squeeze
v. t.
• To press between two bodies; to press together closely; to compress; often, to compress so as to expel juice, moisture, etc.; as, to squeeze an orange with the fingers; to squeeze the hand in friendship.
• Fig.: To oppress with hardships, burdens, or taxes; to harass; to crush.
• To force, or cause to pass, by compression; often with out, through, etc.; as, to squeeze water through felt.
v. i.
• To press; to urge one's way, or to pass, by pressing; to crowd; — often with through, into, etc.; as, to squeeze hard to get through a crowd.
n.
• The act of one who squeezes; compression between bodies; pressure.
• A facsimile impression taken in some soft substance, as pulp, from an inscription on stone.
Squeezer
n.
• One who, or that which, squeezes; as, a lemon squeezer.
(Forging) A machine like a large pair of pliers, for shingling, or squeezing, the balls of metal when puddled; — used only in the plural.
• A machine of several forms for the same purpose; — used in the singular.
Squeezing
n.
• The act of pressing; compression; oppression.
• That which is forced out by pressure; dregs.
• Same as Squeeze, n., 2.
Squelch
v. t.
• To quell; to crush; to silence or put down.
n.
• A heavy fall, as of something flat; hence, also, a crushing reply.
Squesy
a.
• Queasy; nice; squeamish; fastidious; scrupulous.
Squeteague
n.
(Zool.) An American sciaenoid fish (Cynoscion regalis), abundant on the Atlantic coast of the United States, and much valued as a food fish. It is of a bright silvery color, with iridescent reflections. Called also weakfish, squitee, chickwit, and sea trout. The spotted squeteague (C. nebulosus) of the Southern United States is a similar fish, but the back and upper fins are spotted with black. It is called also spotted weakfish, and, locally, sea trout, and sea salmon.
Squib
n.
• A little pipe, or hollow cylinder of paper, filled with powder or combustible matter, to be thrown into the air while burning, so as to burst there with a crack.
(Mining) A kind of slow match or safety fuse.
• A sarcastic speech or publication; a petty lampoon; a brief, witty essay.
• A writer of lampoons.
• A paltry fellow.
v. i.
• To throw squibs; to utter sarcatic or severe reflections; to contend in petty dispute; as, to squib a little debate.
Squid
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of ten-armed cephalopods having a long, tapered body, and a caudal fin on each side; especially, any species of Loligo, Ommastrephes, and related genera. See Calamary, Decacerata, Dibranchiata.
• A fishhook with a piece of bright lead, bone, or other substance, fastened on its shank to imitate a squid.
Squier
n.
• A square. See 1st Squire.
Squiggle
v. i.
• To shake and wash a fluid about in the mouth with the lips closed.
v. i.
• To move about like an eel; to squirm.
Squilgee
n.
• Formerly, a small swab for drying a vessel's deck; now, a kind of scraper having a blade or edge of rubber or of leather, — used for removing superfluous, water or other liquids, as from a vessel's deck after washing, from window panes, photographer's plates, etc.
Squill
n.
(Bot.) A European bulbous liliaceous plant (Urginea, formerly Scilla, maritima), of acrid, expectorant, diuretic, and emetic properties used in medicine. Called also sea onion.
• Any bulbous plant of the genus Scilla; as, the bluebell squill (S. mutans).
(Zool.) A squilla.
• A mantis.
Squilla
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous stomapod crustaceans of the genus Squilla and allied genera. They make burrows in mud or beneath stones on the seashore. Called also mantis shrimp. See Illust. under Stomapoda.
Squillitic
a.
• Of or pertaining to squills.
Squinch
n.
(Arch.) A small arch thrown across the corner of a square room to support a superimposed mass, as where an octagonal spire or drum rests upon a square tower; — called also sconce, and sconcheon.
Squinsy
n.
(Med.) See Quinsy.
Squint
a.
• Looking obliquely. Specifically (Med.), not having the optic axes coincident; — said of the eyes. See Squint, n., 2.
• Fig.: Looking askance.
v. i.
• To see or look obliquely, asquint, or awry, or with a furtive glance.
(Med.) To have the axes of the eyes not coincident; — to be cross-eyed.
• To deviate from a true line; to run obliquely.
v. t.
• To turn to an oblique position; to direct obliquely; as, to squint an eye.
• To cause to look with noncoincident optic axes.
n.
• The act or habit of squinting.
(Med.) A want of coincidence of the axes of the eyes; strabismus.
(Arch.) Same as Hagioscope.
Squinter
n.
• One who squints.
Squintifego
a.
• Squinting.
Squinting
• a. & n. from Squint, v.
Squiny
v. i.
• To squint.
Squinzey
n.
(Med.) See Quinsy.
Squiralty
n.
• Same as Squirarchy.
Squirarch
n.
• One who belongs to the squirarchy.
Squirarchy
n.
• The gentlemen, or gentry, of a country, collectively.
Squire
n.
• A square; a measure; a rule.
n.
• A shield-bearer or armor-bearer who attended a knight.
• A title of dignity next in degree below knight, and above gentleman. See Esquire.
• A male attendant on a great personage; also (), a devoted attendant or follower of a lady; a beau.
• A title of office and courtesy. See under Esquire.
v. t.
• To attend as a squire.
• To attend as a beau, or gallant, for aid and protection; as, to squire a lady.
Squireen
n.
• One who is half squire and half farmer; — used humorously.
Squirehood
n.
• The rank or state of a squire; squireship.
Squireling
n.
• A petty squire.
Squirely
a. & adv.
• Becoming a squire; like a squire.
Squireship
n.
• Squirehood.
Squirm
v. i.
• To twist about briskly with contorions like an eel or a worm; to wriggle; to writhe.
Squirr
v. t.
• See Squir.
Squirrel
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small rodents belonging to the genus Sciurus and several allied genera of the famly Sciuridae. Squirrels generally have a bushy tail, large erect ears, and strong hind legs. They are commonly arboreal in their habits, but many species live in burrows.
• One of the small rollers of a carding machine which work with the large cylinder.
Squirt
v. t.
• To drive or eject in a stream out of a narrow pipe or orifice; as, to squirt water.
v. i.
• To be thrown out, or ejected, in a rapid stream, from a narrow orifice; — said of liquids.
• Hence, to throw out or utter words rapidly; to prate.
n.
• An instrument out of which a liquid is ejected in a small stream with force.
• A small, quick stream; a jet.
Squirter
n.
• One who, or that which, squirts.
Squiry
n.
• The body of squires, collectively considered; squirarchy.
Squitee
n.
(Zool.) The squeteague; — called also squit.
Srawls
n. pl.
• Small branches of a tree; twigs; sprays.
Stab
v. t.
• To pierce with a pointed weapon; to wound or kill by the thrust of a pointed instrument; as, to stab a man with a dagger; also, to thrust; as, to stab a dagger into a person.
• Fig.: To injure secretly or by malicious falsehood or slander; as, to stab a person's reputation.
v. i.
• To give a wound with a pointed weapon; to pierce; to thrust with a pointed weapon.
• To wound or pain, as if with a pointed weapon.
n.
• The thrust of a pointed weapon.
• A wound with a sharp-pointed weapon; as, to fall by the stab an assassin.
• Fig.: An injury inflicted covertly or suddenly; as, a stab given to character.
Stabber
n.
• One who, or that which, stabs; a privy murderer.
(Naut.) A small marline spike; a pricker.
Stabbingly
adv.
• By stabbing; with intent to injure covertly.
Stabiliment
n.
• The act of making firm; firm support; establishment.
Stabilitate
v. t.
• To make stable; to establish.
Stability
n.
• The state or quality of being stable, or firm; steadiness; firmness; strength to stand without being moved or overthrown; as, the stability of a structure; the stability of a throne or a constitution.
• Steadiness or firmness of character, firmness of resolution or purpose; the quality opposite to fickleness, irresolution, or inconstancy; constancy; steadfastness; as, a man of little stability, or of unusual stability.
• Fixedness; — as opposed to fluidity.
Stable
a.
• Firmly established; not easily moved, shaken, or overthrown; fixed; as, a stable government.
• Steady in purpose; constant; firm in resolution; not easily diverted from a purpose; not fickle or wavering; as, a man of stable character.
• Durable; not subject to overthrow or change; firm; as, a stable foundation; a stable position.
v. t.
• To fix; to establish.
n.
• A house, shed, or building, for beasts to lodge and feed in; esp., a building or apartment with stalls, for horses; as, a horse stable; a cow stable.
v. t.
• To put or keep in a stable.
v. i.
• To dwell or lodge in a stable; to dwell in an inclosed place; to kennel.
Stableness
n.
• The quality or state of being stable, or firmly established; stability.
Stabler
n.
• A stable keeper.
Stabling
n.
• The act or practice of keeping horses and cattle in a stable.
• A building, shed, or room for horses and cattle.
Stablish
v. t.
• To settle permanently in a state; to make firm; to establish; to fix.
Stablishment
n.
• Establishment.
Stably
adv.
• In a stable manner; firmly; fixedly; steadily; as, a government stably settled.
Stabulation
n.
• The act of stabling or housing beasts.
• A place for lodging beasts; a stable.
Staccato
a.
(Mus.) Disconnected; separated; distinct; — a direction to perform the notes of a passage in a short, distinct, and pointed manner. It is opposed to legato, and often indicated by heavy accents written over or under the notes, or by dots when the performance is to be less distinct and emphatic.
• Expressed in a brief, pointed manner.
Stack
a.
• A large pile of hay, grain, straw, or the like, usually of a nearly conical form, but sometimes rectangular or oblong, contracted at the top to a point or ridge, and sometimes covered with thatch.
• A pile of poles or wood, indefinite in quantity.
• A pile of wood containing 108 cubic feet.
(Arch.) A number of flues embodied in one structure, rising above the roof. Hence:
• Any single insulated and prominent structure, or upright pipe, which affords a conduit for smoke; as, the brick smokestack of a factory; the smokestack of a steam vessel.
(Computer programming) A section of memory in a computer used for temporary storage of data, in which the last datum stored is the first retrieved
• A data structure within random-access memory used to simulate a hardware stack, as, a push-down stack
v. t.
• To lay in a conical or other pile; to make into a large pile; as, to stack hay, cornstalks, or grain; to stack or place wood.
Stackage
n.
• Hay, gray, or the like, in stacks; things stacked.
• A tax on things stacked.
Stacket
n.
(Mil.) A stockade.
Stacking
a. & n.
• from Stack.
Stackstand
n.
• A staging for supporting a stack of hay or grain; a rickstand.
Stackyard
n.
• A yard or inclosure for stacks of hay or grain.
Stacte
n.
• One of the sweet spices used by the ancient Jews in the preparation of incense. It was perhaps an oil or other form of myrrh or cinnamon, or a kind of storax.
Staddle
n.
• Anything which serves for support; a staff; a prop; a crutch; a cane.
• The frame of a stack of hay or grain.
• A row of dried or drying hay, etc.
• A small tree of any kind, especially a forest tree.
v. t.
• To leave the staddles, or saplings, of, as a wood when it is cut.
• To form into staddles, as hay.
Stade
n.
• A stadium.
n.
• A landing place or wharf.
Stadimeter
n.
• A horizontal graduated bar mounted on a staff, used as a stadium, or telemeter, for measuring distances.
Stadium
n.
• A Greek measure of length, being the chief one used for itinerary distances, also adopted by the Romans for nautical and astronomical measurements. It was equal to 600 Greek or 625 Roman feet, or 125 Roman paces, or to 606 feet 9 inches English. This was also called the Olympic stadium, as being the exact length of the foot-race course at Olympia.
• Hence, a race course; especially, the Olympic course for foot races.
• A kind of telemeter for measuring the distance of an object of known dimensions, by observing the angle it subtends; especially (Surveying), a graduated rod used to measure the distance of the place where it stands from an instrument having a telescope, by observing the number of the graduations of the rod that are seen between certain parallel wires (stadia wires) in the field of view of the telescope; — also called stadia, and stadia rod.
Stadtholder
n.
• Formerly, the chief magistrate of the United Provinces of Holland; also, the governor or lieutenant governor of a province.
Stafette
n.
• An estafet.
Staff
n.
• A long piece of wood; a stick; the long handle of an instrument or weapon; a pole or srick, used for many purposes; as, a surveyor's staff; the staff of a spear or pike.
• A stick carried in the hand for support or defense by a person walking; hence, a support; that which props or upholds.
• A pole, stick, or wand borne as an ensign of authority; a badge of office; as, a constable's staff.
• A pole upon which a flag is supported and displayed.
• The round of a ladder.
• A series of verses so disposed that, when it is concluded, the same order begins again; a stanza; a stave.
(Mus.) The five lines and the spaces on which music is written; — formerly called stave.
(Mech.) An arbor, as of a wheel or a pinion of a watch.
(Surg.) The grooved director for the gorget, or knife, used in cutting for stone in the bladder.
(Mil.) An establishment of officers in various departments attached to an army, to a section of an army, or to the commander of an army. The general's staff consists of those officers about his person who are employed in carrying his commands into execution. See \'90tat Major.
• Hence: A body of assistants serving to carry into effect the plans of a superintendant or manager; as, the staff of a newspaper.
Staffier
n.
• An attendant bearing a staff.
Staffish
a.
• Stiff; harsh.
Staffman
n.
• A workman employed in silk throwing.
Stag
n.
(Zool.) The adult male of the red deer (Cervus elaphus), a large European species closely related to the American elk, or wapiti.
• The male of certain other species of large deer.
• A colt, or filly; also, a romping girl.
• A castrated bull; — called also bull stag, and bull seg. See the Note under Ox.
(Stock Exchange) An outside irregular dealer in stocks, who is not a member of the exchange.
• One who applies for the allotment of shares in new projects, with a view to sell immediately at a premium, and not to hold the stock.
(Zool.) The European wren.
v. i.
(Com.) To act as a "stag", or irregular dealer in stocks.
v. t.
• To watch; to dog, or keep track of.
Stage
n.
• A floor or story of a house.
• An elevated platform on which an orator may speak, a play be performed, an exhibition be presented, or the like.
• A floor elevated for the convenience of mechanical work, or the like; a scaffold; a staging.
• A platform, often floating, serving as a kind of wharf.
• The floor for scenic performances; hence, the theater; the playhouse; hence, also, the profession of representing dramatic compositions; the drama, as acted or exhibited.
• A place where anything is publicly exhibited; the scene of any noted action or carrer; the spot where any remarkable affair occurs.
• The platform of a microscope, upon which an object is placed to be viewed. See Illust. of Microscope.
• A place of rest on a regularly traveled road; a stage house; a station; a place appointed for a relay of horses.
• A degree of advancement in a journey; one of several portions into which a road or course is marked off; the distance between two places of rest on a road; as, a stage of ten miles.
• A degree of advancement in any pursuit, or of progress toward an end or result.
• A large vehicle running from station to station for the accomodation of the public; a stagecoach; an omnibus.
(Biol.) One of several marked phases or periods in the development and growth of many animals and plants; as, the larval stage; pupa stage; zoea stage.
v. t.
• To exhibit upon a stage, or as upon a stage; to display publicly.
Stagecoach
n.
• A coach that runs regularly from one stage, station, or place to another, for the conveyance of passengers.
Stagecoachman
n.
• One who drives a stagecoach.
Stagehouse
n.
• A house where a stage regularly stops for passengers or a relay of horses.
Stagely
a.
• Pertaining to a stage; becoming the theater; theatrical.
Stageplay
n.
• A dramatic or theatrical entertainment.
Stageplayer
n.
• An actor on the stage; one whose occupation is to represent characters on the stage; as, Garrick was a celebrated stageplayer.
Stager
n.
• A player.
• One who has long acted on the stage of life; a practitioner; a person of experience, or of skill derived from long experience.
• A horse used in drawing a stage.
Stagery
n.
• Exhibition on the stage.
Staggard
n.
(Zool.) The male red deer when four years old.
Stagger
v. i.
• To move to one side and the other, as if about to fall, in standing or walking; not to stand or walk with steadiness; to sway; to reel or totter.
• To cease to stand firm; to begin to give way; to fail.
• To begin to doubt and waver in purposes; to become less confident or determined; to hesitate.
v. t.
• To cause to reel or totter.
• To cause to doubt and waver; to make to hesitate; to make less steady or confident; to shock.
• To arrange (a series of parts) on each side of a median line alternately, as the spokes of a wheel or the rivets of a boiler seam.
n.
• An unsteady movement of the body in walking or standing, as if one were about to fall; a reeling motion; vertigo; — often in the plural; as, the stagger of a drunken man.
(Far.) A disease of horses and other animals, attended by reeling, unsteady gait or sudden falling; as, parasitic staggers; appopletic or sleepy staggers.
• Bewilderment; perplexity.
Staggerbush
n.
(Bot.) An American shrub (Andromeda Mariana) having clusters of nodding white flowers. It grows in low, sandy places, and is said to poison lambs and calves.
Staggeringly
adv.
• In a staggering manner.
Staggerwort
n.
(Bot.) A kind of ragwort (Senecio Jacobaea).
Staghound
n.
(Zool.) A large and powerful hound formerly used in hunting the stag, the wolf, and other large animals. The breed is nearly extinct.
Staging
n.
• A structure of posts and boards for supporting workmen, etc., as in building.
• The business of running stagecoaches; also, the act of journeying in stagecoaches.
Stagirite
n.
• A native of, or resident in, Stagira, in ancient Macedonia; especially, Aristotle.
Stagnancy
n.
• State of being stagnant.
Stagnant
a.
• That stagnates; not flowing; not running in a current or steam; motionless; hence, impure or foul from want of motion; as, a stagnant lake or pond; stagnant blood in the veins.
• Not active or brisk; dull; as, business in stagnant.
Stagnantly
adv.
• In a stagnant manner.
Stagnate
v. i.
• To cease to flow; to be motionless; as, blood stagnates in the veins of an animal; hence, to become impure or foul by want of motion; as, air stagnates in a close room.
• To cease to be brisk or active; to become dull or inactive; as, commerce stagnates; business stagnates.
a.
• Stagnant.
Stagnation
n.
• The condition of being stagnant; cessation of flowing or circulation, as of a fluid; the state of being motionless; as, the stagnation of the blood; the stagnation of water or air; the stagnation of vapors.
• The cessation of action, or of brisk action; the state of being dull; as, the stagnation of business.
Stagworm
n.
(Zool.) The larve of any species of botfly which is parasitic upon the stag, as , which burrows beneath the skin, and Cephalomyia auribarbis, which lives in the nostrils.
Stahlian
a.
• Pertaining to, or taught by, Stahl, a German physician and chemist of the 17th century; as, the Stahlian theory of phlogiston.
n.
• A believer in, or advocate of, Stahlism.
Staid
a.
• Sober; grave; steady; sedate; composed; regular; not wild, volatile, or fanciful.
Staidly
adv.
• In a staid manner, sedately.
Staidness
n.
• The quality or state of being staid; seriousness; steadiness; sedateness; regularity; — the opposite of wildness, or levity.
Stail
n.
• A handle, as of a mop; a stale.
Stail
• imp. & p. p. of Stay.
Stain
v. t.
• To discolor by the application of foreign matter; to make foul; to spot; as, to stain the hand with dye; armor stained with blood.
• To color, as wood, glass, paper, cloth, or the like, by processess affecting, chemically or otherwise, the material itself; to tinge with a color or colors combining with, or penetrating, the substance; to dye; as, to stain wood with acids, colored washes, paint rubbed in, etc.; to stain glass.
• To spot with guilt or infamy; to bring reproach on; to blot; to soil; to tarnish.
• To cause to seem inferior or soiled by comparison.
v. i.
• To give or receive a stain; to grow dim.
n.
• A discoloration by foreign matter; a spot; as, a stain on a garment or cloth.
• A natural spot of a color different from the gound.
• Taint of guilt; tarnish; disgrace; reproach.
• Cause of reproach; shame.
• A tincture; a tinge.
Stainer
n.
• One who stains or tarnishes.
• A workman who stains; as, a stainer of wood.
Stainless
a.
• Free from stain; immaculate.
Stainlessly
adv.
• In a stainless manner.
Stair
n.
• One step of a series for ascending or descending to a different level; — commonly applied to those within a building.
• A series of steps, as for passing from one story of a house to another; — commonly used in the plural; but originally used in the singular only.
Staircase
n.
• A flight of stairs with their supporting framework, casing, balusters, etc.
Stairhead
n.
• The head or top of a staircase.
Stairway
n.
• A flight of stairs or steps; a staircase.
Staith
n.
• A landing place; an elevated staging upon a wharf for discharging coal, etc., as from railway cars, into vessels.
Staithman
n.
• A man employed in weighing and shipping at a staith.
Stake
n.
• A piece of wood, usually long and slender, pointed at one end so as to be easily driven into the ground as a support or stay; as, a stake to support vines, fences, hedges, etc.
• A stick inserted upright in a lop, eye, or mortise, at the side or end of a cart, a flat car, or the like, to prevent goods from falling off.
• The piece of timber to which a martyr was affixed to be burned; hence, martyrdom by fire.
• A small anvil usually furnished with a tang to enter a hole in a bench top, — used by tinsmiths, blacksmiths, etc., for light work, punching upon, etc.
• That which is laid down as a wager; that which is staked or hazarded; a pledge.
v. t.
• To fasten, support, or defend with stakes; as, to stake vines or plants.
• To mark the limits of by stakes; — with out; as, to stake out land; to stake out a new road.
• To put at hazard upon the issue of competition, or upon a future contingency; to wager; to pledge.
• To pierce or wound with a stake.
Stakehead
n.
(Rope making) A horizontal bar on a stake, used for supporting the yarns which are kept apart by pins in the bar.
Stakeholder
n.
• The holder of a stake; one with whom the bets are deposited when a wager is laid.
Staktometer
n.
• A drop measurer; a glass tube tapering to a small orifice at the point, and having a bulb in the middle, used for finding the number of drops in equal quantities of different liquids. See Pipette.
Stal
imp.
• Stole.
Stalactite
n.
(Geol.) A pendent cone or cylinder of calcium carbonate resembling an icicle in form and mode of attachment. Stalactites are found depending from the roof or sides of caverns, and are produced by deposition from waters which have percolated through, and partially dissolved, the overlying limestone rocks.
• In an extended sense, any mineral or rock of similar form and origin; as, a stalactite of lava.
Stalactites
n.
• A stalactite.
Stalactitiform
a.
• Having the form of a stalactite; stalactiform.
Stalactoform
a.
• Like a stalactite; resembling a stalactite.
Stalagmite
n.
(Geol.) A deposit more or less resembling an inverted stalactite, formed by calcareous water dropping on the floors of caverns; hence, a similar deposit of other material.
Stalder
n.
• A wooden frame to set casks on.
Stale
n.
• The stock or handle of anything; as, the stale of a rake.
a.
• Vapid or tasteless from age; having lost its life, spirit, and flavor, from being long kept; as, stale beer.
• Not new; not freshly made; as, stele bread.
• Having lost the life or graces of youth; worn out; decayed.
• Worn out by use or familiarity; having lost its novelty and power of pleasing; trite; common.
v. t.
• To make vapid or tasteless; to destroy the life, beauty, or use of; to wear out.
v. i.
• To make water; to discharge urine; — said especially of horses and cattle.
n.
• That which is stale or worn out by long keeping, or by use.
• A prostitute.
• Urine, esp. that of beasts.
n.
• Something set, or offered to view, as an allurement to draw others to any place or purpose; a decoy; a stool pigeon.
• A stalking-horse.
(Chess) A stalemate.
• A laughingstock; a dupe.
Stalely
adv.
• In a state stale manner.
• Of old; long since.
Stalemate
n.
(Chess) The position of the king when he can not move without being placed on check and there is no other piece which can be moved.
v. t.
(Chess) To subject to a stalemate; hence, to bring to a stand.
Staleness
n.
• The quality or state of being stale.
Stalk
n.
(Bot.) The stem or main axis of a plant; as, a stalk of wheat, rye, or oats; the stalks of maize or hemp.
• The petiole, pedicel, or peduncle, of a plant.
• That which resembes the stalk of a plant, as the stem of a quill.
(Arch.) An ornament in the Corinthian capital resembling the stalk of a plant, from which the volutes and helices spring.
• One of the two upright pieces of a ladder.
(Zool.) A stem or peduncle, as of certain barnacles and crinoids.
• The narrow basal portion of the abdomen of a hymenopterous insect.
• The peduncle of the eyes of decapod crustaceans.
(Founding) An iron bar with projections inserted in a core to strengthen it; a core arbor.
v. i.
• To walk slowly and cautiously; to walk in a stealthy, noiseless manner; — sometimes used with a reflexive pronoun.
• To walk behind something as a screen, for the purpose of approaching game; to proceed under clover.
• To walk with high and proud steps; usually implying the affectation of dignity, and indicating dislike. The word is used, however, especially by the poets, to express dignity of step.
v. t.
• To approach under cover of a screen, or by stealth, for the purpose of killing, as game.
n.
• A high, proud, stately step or walk.
Stalked
a.
• Having a stalk or stem; borne upon a stem.
Stalker
n.
• One who stalks.
• A kind of fishing net.
Stalkless
a.
• Having no stalk.
Stalky
a.
• Hard as a stalk; resembling a stalk.
Stall
n.
• A stand; a station; a fixed spot; hence, the stand or place where a horse or an ox kept and fed; the division of a stable, or the compartment, for one horse, ox, or other animal.
• A stable; a place for cattle.
• A small apartment or shed in which merchandise is exposed for sale; as, a butcher's stall; a bookstall.
• A bench or table on which small articles of merchandise are exposed for sale.
• A seat in the choir of a church, for one of the officiating clergy. It is inclosed, either wholly or partially, at the back and sides. The stalls are frequently very rich, with canopies and elaborate carving.
• In the theater, a seat with arms or otherwise partly inclosed, as distinguished from the benches, sofas, etc.
(Mining) The space left by excavation between pillars. See Post and stall, under Post.
v. t.
• To put into a stall or stable; to keep in a stall or stalls; as, to stall an ox.
• To forestall; to anticipitate. Having
• To keep close; to keep secret.
v. i.
• To live in, or as in, a stall; to dwell.
• To kennel, as dogs.
• To be set, as in mire or snow; to stick fast.
• To be tired of eating, as cattle.
Stallage
n.
(Eng. Law) The right of erecting a stalls in fairs; rent paid for a stall.
• Dung of cattle or horses, mixed with straw.
Stallation
n.
• Installation.
Stalled
a.
• Put or kept in a stall; hence, fatted.
Staller
n.
• A standard bearer. obtaining
Stalling
n.
• Stabling.
Stallion
n.
• A male horse not castrated; a male horse kept for breeding.
Stallman
n.
• One who keeps a stall for the sale of merchandise, especially books.
Stallon
n.
• A slip from a plant; a scion; a cutting.
Stalwartly
adv.
• In a stalwart manner.
Stalwartness
n.
• The quality of being stalwart.
Stamen
n.
• A thread; especially, a warp thread.
(Bot.) The male organ of flowers for secreting and furnishing the pollen or fecundating dust. It consists of the anther and filament.
Stamened
a.
• Furnished with stamens.
Stamin
n.
• A kind of woolen cloth.
Stamina
n. pl.
• See Stamen.
n. pl.
• The fixed, firm part of a body, which supports it or gives it strength and solidity; as, the bones are the stamina of animal bodies; the ligneous parts of trees are the stamina which constitute their strength.
• Whatever constitutes the principal strength or support of anything; power of endurance; backbone; vigor; as, the stamina of a constitution or of life; the stamina of a State.
Staminal
a.
• Of or pertaining to stamens or stamina; consisting in stamens.
Staminate
a.
(Bot.) Furnished with stamens; producing stamens.
• Having stamens, but lacking pistils.
v. t.
• To indue with stamina.
Staminiferous
a.
• Bearing or having stamens.
Staminode
n.
(Bot.) A staminodium.
Staminodium
n.
(Bot.) An abortive stamen, or any organ modified from an abortive stamen.
Stammel
n.
• A large, clumsy horse.
n.
• A kind of woolen cloth formerly in use. It seems to have been often of a red color.
• A red dye, used in England in the 15th and 16th centuries.
a.
• Of the color of stammel; having a red color, thought inferior to scarlet.
Stammer
v. i.
• To make involuntary stops in uttering syllables or words; to hesitate or falter in speaking; to speak with stops and diffivulty; to stutter.
v. t.
• To utter or pronounce with hesitation or imperfectly; — sometimes with out.
n.
• Defective utterance, or involuntary interruption of utterance; a stutter.
Stammerer
n.
• One who stammers.
Stammering
a.
• Apt to stammer; hesitating in speech; stuttering.
n.
(Physiol.) A disturbance in the formation of sounds. It is due essentially to long-continued spasmodic contraction of the diaphragm, by which expiration is preented, and hence it may be considered as a spasmodic inspiration.
Stamp
v. t.
• To strike beat, or press forcibly with the bottom of the foot, or by thrusting the foot downward.
• To bring down (the foot) forcibly on the ground or floor; as, he stamped his foot with rage.
• To crush; to pulverize; specifically (Metal.), to crush by the blow of a heavy stamp, as ore in a mill.
• To impress with some mark or figure; as, to stamp a plate with arms or initials.
• Fig.: To impress; to imprint; to fix deeply; as, to stamp virtuous principles on the heart.
• To cut out, bend, or indent, as paper, sheet metal, etc., into various forms, by a blow or suddenly applied pressure with a stamp or die, etc.; to mint; to coin.
• To put a stamp on, as for postage; as, to stamp a letter; to stamp a legal document.
v. i.
• To strike; to beat; to crush.
• To strike the foot forcibly downward.
n.
• The act of stamping, as with the foot.
• The which stamps; any instrument for making impressions on other bodies, as a die.
• The mark made by stamping; a mark imprinted; an impression.
• that which is marked; a thing stamped.
• A picture cut in wood or metal, or made by impression; a cut; a plate.
• An offical mark set upon things chargeable with a duty or tax to government, as evidence that the duty or tax is paid; as, the stamp on a bill of exchange.
• Hence, a stamped or printed device, issued by the government at a fixed price, and required by law to be affixed to, or stamped on, certain papers, as evidence that the government dues are paid; as, a postage stamp; a receipt stamp, etc.
• An instrument for cutting out, or shaping, materials, as paper, leather, etc., by a downward pressure.
• A character or reputation, good or bad, fixed on anything as if by an imprinted mark; current value; authority; as, these persons have the stamp of dishonesty; the Scriptures bear the stamp of a divine origin.
• Make; cast; form; character; as, a man of the same stamp, or of a different stamp.
• A kind of heavy hammer, or pestle, raised by water or steam power, for beating ores to powder; anything like a pestle, used for pounding or bathing.
• A half-penny.
• Money, esp. paper money.
Stampede
n.
• A wild, headlong scamper, or running away, of a number of animals; usually caused by fright; hence, any sudden flight or dispersion, as of a crowd or an army in consequence of a panic.
v. i.
• To run away in a panic; — said droves of cattle, horses, etc., also of armies.
v. t.
• To disperse by causing sudden fright, as a herd or drove of animals.
Stamper
n.
• One who stamps.
• An instrument for pounding or stamping.
Stamping
a. & n.
• from Stamp, v.
Stance
n.
• A stanza.
• A station; a position; a site.
Stanch
v. t.
• To stop the flowing of, as blood; to check; also, to stop the flowing of blood from; as, to stanch a wound.
• To extinguish; to quench, as fire or thirst.
v. i.
• To cease, as the flowing of blood.
n.
• That which stanches or checks.
• A flood gate by which water is accumulated, for floating a boat over a shallow part of a stream by its release.
a.
• Strong and tight; sound; firm; as, a stanch ship.
• Firm in principle; constant and zealous; loyal; hearty; steady; steadfast; as, a stanch churchman; a stanch friend or adherent.
• Close; secret; private.
v. t.
• To prop; to make stanch, or strong.
Stanchel
n.
• A stanchion.
Stancher
n.
• One who, or that which, stanches, or stops, the flowing, as of blood.
Stanchion
n.
(Arch.) A prop or support; a piece of timber in the form of a stake or post, used for a support or stay.
(Naut.) Any upright post or beam used as a support, as for the deck, the quarter rails, awnings, etc.
• A vertical bar for confining cattle in a stall.
Stanchless
a.
• Incapable of being stanched, or stopped.
• Unquenchable; insatiable.
Stanchly
adv.
• In a stanch manner.
Stanchness
n.
• The quality or state of being stanch.
Stand
v. i.
• To be at rest in an erect position; to be fixed in an upright or firm position
• To be supported on the feet, in an erect or nearly erect position; — opposed to lie, sit, kneel, etc.
• To continue upright in a certain locality, as a tree fixed by the roots, or a building resting on its foundation.
• To occupy or hold a place; to have a situation; to be situated or located; as, Paris stands on the Seine.
• To cease from progress; not to proceed; to stop; to pause; to halt; to remain stationary.
• To remain without ruin or injury; to hold good against tendencies to impair or injure; to be permanent; to endure; to last; hence, to find endurance, strength, or resources.
• To maintain one's ground; to be acquitted; not to fail or yield; to be safe.
• To maintain an invincible or permanent attitude; to be fixed, steady, or firm; to take a position in resistance or opposition.
• To adhere to fixed principles; to maintain moral rectitude; to keep from falling into error or vice.
• To have or maintain a position, order, or rank; to be in a particular relation; as, Christian charity, or love, stands first in the rank of gifts.
• To be in some particular state; to have essence or being; to be; to consist.
• To be consistent; to agree; to accord.
(Naut.) To hold a course at sea; as, to stand from the shore; to stand for the harbor.
• To offer one's self, or to be offered, as a candidate.
• To stagnate; not to flow; to be motionless.
• To measure when erect on the feet.
(Law) To be or remain as it is; to continue in force; to have efficacy or validity; to abide.
• To appear in court.
v. t.
• To endure; to sustain; to bear; as, I can not stand the cold or the heat.
• To resist, without yielding or receding; to withstand.
• To abide by; to submit to; to suffer.
• To set upright; to cause to stand; as, to stand a book on the shelf; to stand a man on his feet.
• To be at the expense of; to pay for; as, to stand a treat.
n.
• The act of standing.
• A halt or stop for the purpose of defense, resistance, or opposition; as, to come to, or to make, a stand.
• A place or post where one stands; a place where one may stand while observing or waiting for something.
• A station in a city or town where carriages or wagons stand for hire; as, a cab stand.
• A raised platform or station where a race or other outdoor spectacle may be viewed; as, the judge's or the grand stand at a race course.
• A small table; also, something on or in which anything may be laid, hung, or placed upright; as, a hat stand; an umbrella stand; a music stand.
• A place where a witness stands to testify in court.
• The situation of a shop, store, hotel, etc.; as, a good, bad, or convenient stand for business.
• Rank; post; station; standing.
• A state of perplexity or embarrassment; as, to be at a stand what to do.
• A young tree, usually reserved when other trees are cut; also, a tree growing or standing upon its own root, in distinction from one produced from a scion set in a stock, either of the same or another kind of tree.
(Com.) A weight of from two hundred and fifty to three hundred pounds, — used in weighing pitch.
Standage
n.
(Mining) A reservior in which water accumulates at the bottom of a mine.
Standard
n.
• A flag; colors; a banner; especially, a national or other ensign.
• That which is established by authority as a rule for the measure of quantity, extent, value, or quality; esp., the original specimen weight or measure sanctioned by government, as the standard pound, gallon, or yard.
• That which is established as a rule or model by authority, custom, or general consent; criterion; test.
(Coinage) The proportion of weights of fine metal and alloy established by authority.
(Hort.) A tree of natural size supported by its own stem, and not dwarfed by grafting on the stock of a smaller species nor trained upon a wall or trellis.
(Bot.) The upper petal or banner of a papilionaceous corolla.
(Mech. & Carp.) An upright support, as one of the poles of a scaffold; any upright in framing.
(Shipbuilding) An inverted knee timber placed upon the deck instead of beneath it, with its vertical branch turned upward from that which lies horizontally.
• The sheth of a plow.
• A large drinking cup.
a.
• Being, affording, or according with, a standard for comparison and judgment; as, standard time; standard weights and measures; a standard authority as to nautical terms; standard gold or silver.
• Hence: Having a recognized and permanent value; as, standard works in history; standard authors.
(Hort.) Not supported by, or fastened to, a wall; as, standard fruit trees.
• Not of the dwarf kind; as, a standard pear tree.
Standardize
v. t.
(Chem.) To reduce to a normal standard; to calculate or adjust the strength of, by means of, and for uses in, analysis.
Standel
n.
• A young tree, especially one reserved when others are cut.
Stander
n.
• One who stands.
• Same as Standel.
Standergrass
n.
(Bot.) A plant (Orchis mascula); — called also standerwort, and long purple. See Long purple, under Long.
Standgale
n.
• See Stannel.
Standing
a.
• Remaining erect; not cut down; as, standing corn.
• Not flowing; stagnant; as, standing water.
• Not transitory; not liable to fade or vanish; lasting; as, a standing color.
• Established by law, custom, or the like; settled; continually existing; permanent; not temporary; as, a standing army; legislative bodies have standing rules of proceeding and standing committees.
• Not movable; fixed; as, a standing bed (distinguished from a trundle-bed).
n.
• The act of stopping, or coming to a stand; the state of being erect upon the feet; stand.
• Maintenance of position; duration; duration or existence in the same place or condition; continuance; as, a custom of long standing; an officer of long standing.
• Place to stand in; station; stand.
• Condition in society; relative position; reputation; rank; as, a man of good standing, or of high standing.
Standish
n.
• A stand, or case, for pen and ink.
Standpipe
n.
(Engin.) A vertical pipe, open at the top, between a hydrant and a reservoir, to equalize the flow of water; also, a large vertical pipe, near a pumping engine, into which water is forced up, so as to give it sufficient head to rise to the required level at a distance.
(Steam Boiler) A supply pipe of sufficient elevation to enable the water to flow into the boiler, notwithstanding the pressure of the steam.
Standpoint
n.
• A fixed point or station; a basis or fundamental principle; a position from which objects or principles are viewed, and according to which they are compared and judged.
Standstill
n.
• A standing without moving forward or backward; a stop; a state or rest.
Stane
n.
• A stone.
Stang
• imp. of Sting.
n.
• A long bar; a pole; a shaft; a stake.
• In land measure, a pole, rod, or perch.
v. i.
• To shoot with pain.
Stanhope
n.
• A light two-wheeled, or sometimes four-wheeled, carriage, without a top; — so called from Lord Stanhope, for whom it was contrived.
Staniel
n.
(Zool.) See Stannel.
Stanielry
n.
• Hawking with staniels, — a base kind of falconry.
Stank
a.
• Weak; worn out.
v. i.
• To sigh.
imp.
• Stunk.
n.
• Water retained by an embankment; a pool water.
• A dam or mound to stop water.
Stannary
a.
• Of or pertaining to tin mines, or tin works.
n.
• A tin mine; tin works.
Stannate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of stannic acid.
Stannel
n.
(Zool.) The kestrel; — called also standgale, standgall, stanchel, stand hawk, stannel hawk, steingale, stonegall.
Stannic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to tin; derived from or containing tin; specifically, designating those compounds in which the element has a higher valence as contrasted with stannous compounds.
Stanniferous
a.
• Containing or affording tin.
Stannofluoride
n.
(Chem.) Any one of a series of double fluorides of tin (stannum) and some other element.
Stannotype
n.
(Photog.) A photograph taken upon a tin plate; a tintype.
Stannous
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or containing, tin; specifically, designating those compounds in which the element has a lower valence as contrasted with stannic compounds.
Stannum
n.
(Chem.) The technical name of tin. See Tin.
Stanza
n.
• A number of lines or verses forming a division of a song or poem, and agreeing in meter, rhyme, number of lines, etc., with other divisions; a part of a poem, ordinarily containing every variation of measure in that poem; a combination or arrangement of lines usually recurring; whether like or unlike, in measure.
(Arch.) An apartment or division in a building; a room or chamber.
Stanzaic
a.
• Pertaining to, or consisting of, stanzas; as, a couplet in stanzaic form.
Stapedial
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to stapes.
Stapelia
n.
(Bot.) An extensive and curious genus of African plants of the natural order Asclepiadaceae (Milkweed family). They are succulent plants without leaves, frequently covered with dark tubercles giving them a very grotesque appearance. The odor of the blossoms is like that of carrion.
Stapes
n.
(Anat.) The innermost of the ossicles of the ear; the stirrup, or stirrup bone; — so called from its form. See Illust. of Ear.
Staphyline
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the uvula or the palate.
Staphylinid
n.
(Zool.) Any rove beetle.
Staphyloma
n.
(Med.) A protrusion of any part of the globe of the eye; as, a staphyloma of the cornea.
Staphylomatous
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to staphyloma; affected with staphyloma.
Staphyloplasty
n.
(Surg.) The operation for restoring or replacing the soft palate when it has been lost.
Staphylotomy
n.
(Surg.) The operation of removing a staphyloma by cutting.
Staple
n.
• A settled mart; an emporium; a city or town to which merchants brought commodities for sale or exportation in bulk; a place for wholesale traffic.
• Hence: Place of supply; source; fountain head.
• The principal commodity of traffic in a market; a principal commodity or production of a country or district; as, wheat, maize, and cotton are great staples of the United States.
• The principal constituent in anything; chief item.
• Unmanufactured material; raw material.
• The fiber of wool, cotton, flax, or the like; as, a coarse staple; a fine staple; a long or short staple.
• A loop of iron, or a bar or wire, bent and formed with two points to be driven into wood, to hold a hook, pin, or the like.
(Mining) A shaft, smaller and shorter than the principal one, joining different levels.
• A small pit.
• A district granted to an abbey.
a.
• Pertaining to, or being market of staple for, commodities; as, a staple town.
• Established in commerce; occupying the markets; settled; as, a staple trade.
• Fit to be sold; marketable.
• Regularly produced or manufactured in large quantities; belonging to wholesale traffic; principal; chief.
v. t.
• To sort according to its staple; as, to staple cotton.
Stapler
n.
• A dealer in staple goods.
• One employed to assort wool according to its staple.
Star
n.
• One of the innumerable luminous bodies seen in the heavens; any heavenly body other than the sun, moon, comets, and nebulae.
• The polestar; the north star.
(Astrol.) A planet supposed to influence one's destiny; (usually pl.) a configuration of the planets, supposed to influence fortune.
• That which resembles the figure of a star, as an ornament worn on the breast to indicate rank or honor.
• Specifically, a radiated mark in writing or printing; an asterisk [thus, *]; — used as a reference to a note, or to fill a blank where something is omitted, etc.
(Pyrotechny) A composition of combustible matter used in the heading of rockets, in mines, etc., which, exploding of a air, presents a starlike appearance.
• A person of brilliant and attractive qualities, especially on public occasions, as a distinguished orator, a leading theatrical performer, etc.
v. t.
• To set or adorn with stars, or bright, radiating bodies; to bespangle; as, a robe starred with gems.
v. i.
• To be bright, or attract attention, as a star; to shine like a star; to be brilliant or prominent; to play a part as a theatrical star.
Starblowlines
n. pl.
(Naut.) The men in the starboard watch.
Starboard
n.
(Naut.) That side of a vessel which is one of the right hand of a person who stands on board facing the bow; — opposed to larboard, or port.
a.
(Naut.) Pertaining to the right-hand side of a ship; being or lying on the right side; as, the starboard quarter; starboard tack.
v. t.
(Naut.) To put to the right, or starboard, side of a vessel; as, to starboard the helm.
Starch
a.
• Stiff; precise; rigid.
n.
(Chem.) A widely diffused vegetable substance found especially in seeds, bulbs, and tubers, and extracted (as from potatoes, corn, rice, etc.) as a white, glistening, granular or powdery substance, without taste or smell, and giving a very peculiar creaking sound when rubbed between the fingers. It is used as a food, in the production of commercial grape sugar, for stiffening linen in laundries, in making paste, etc.
• Fig.: A stiff, formal manner; formality.
v. t.
• To stiffen with starch.
Starched
a.
• Stiffened with starch.
• Stiff; precise; formal.
Starchedness
n.
• The quality or state of being starched; stiffness in manners; formality.
Starcher
n.
• One who starches.
Starchly
adv.
• In a starched or starch manner.
Starchness
n.
• Of or pertaining to starched or starch; stiffness of manner; preciseness.
Starchwort
n.
(Bot.) The cuckoopint, the tubers of which yield a fine quality of starch.
Starchy
a.
• Consisting of starch; resembling starch; stiff; precise.
Starcraft
n.
• Astrology.
Stare
n.
(Zool.) The starling.
v. i.
• To look with fixed eyes wide open, as through fear, wonder, surprise, impudence, etc.; to fasten an earnest and prolonged gaze on some object.
• To be very conspicuous on account of size, prominence, color, or brilliancy; as, staring windows or colors.
• To stand out; to project; to bristle.
v. t.
• To look earnestly at; to gaze at.
n.
• The act of staring; a fixed look with eyes wide open.
Starer
n.
• One who stares, or gazes.
Starf
imp.
• Starved.
Starfinch
n.
(Zool.) The European redstart.
Starfish
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of echinoderms belonging to the class Asterioidea, in which the body is star-shaped and usually has five rays, though the number of rays varies from five to forty or more. The rays are often long, but are sometimes so short as to appear only as angles to the disklike body. Called also sea star, five-finger, and stellerid.
(Zool.) The dollar fish, or butterfish.
Stargaser
n.
• One who gazes at the stars; an astrologer; sometimes, in derision or contempt, an astronomer.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of spiny-rayed marine fishes belonging to Uranoscopus, Astroscopus, and allied genera, of the family Uranoscopidae. The common species of the Eastern United States are Astroscopus anoplus, and A. guttatus. So called from the position of the eyes, which look directly upward.
Stargasing
n.
• The act or practice of observing the stars with attention; contemplation of the stars as connected with astrology or astronomy.
• Hence, absent-mindedness; abstraction.
Staringly
adv.
• With a staring look.
Stark
a.
• Stiff; rigid.
• Complete; absolute; full; perfect; entire.
• Strong; vigorous; powerful.
• Severe; violent; fierce.
• Mere; sheer; gross; entire; downright.
adv.
• Wholly; entirely; absolutely; quite; as, stark mind.
v. t.
• To stiffen.
Starkly
adv.
• In a stark manner; stiffly; strongly.
Starkness
n.
• The quality or state of being stark.
Starless
a.
• Being without stars; having no stars visible; as, a starless night.
Starlight
n.
• The light given by the stars.
a.
• Lighted by the stars, or by the stars only; as, a starlight night.
Starlike
a.
• Resembling a star; stellated; radiated like a star; as, starlike flowers.
• Shining; bright; illustrious.
Starling
n.
(Zool.) Any passerine bird belonging to Sturnus and allied genera. The European starling (Sturnus vulgaris) is dark brown or greenish black, with a metallic gloss, and spotted with yellowish white. It is a sociable bird, and builds about houses, old towers, etc. Called also stare, and starred. The pied starling of India is Sternopastor contra.
(Zool.) A California fish; the rock trout.
• A structure of piles driven round the piers of a bridge for protection and support; — called also sterling.
Starlit
a.
• Lighted by the stars; starlight.
Starmonger
n.
• A fortune teller; an astrologer; — used in contempt.
Starn
n.
(Zool.) The European starling.
Starnose
n.
(Zool.) A curious American mole (Condylura cristata) having the nose expanded at the end into a stellate disk; — called also star-nosed mole.
Starost
n.
• A nobleman who possessed a starosty.
Starosty
n.
• A castle and domain conferred on a nobleman for life.
Starproof
a.
• Impervious to the light of the stars; as, a starproof elm.
Starred
a.
• Adorned or studded with stars; bespangled.
• Influenced in fortune by the stars.
Starriness
n.
• The quality or state of being starry; as, the starriness of the heavens.
Starry
a.
• Abounding with stars; adorned with stars.
• Consisting of, or proceeding from, the stars; stellar; stellary; as, starry light; starry flame.
• Shining like stars; sparkling; as, starry eyes.
• Arranged in rays like those of a star; stellate.
Starshine
n.
• The light of the stars.
Starshoot
n.
• See Nostoc.
Starstone
n.
(Min.) Asteriated sapphire.
Start
v. i.
• To leap; to jump.
• To move suddenly, as with a spring or leap, from surprise, pain, or other sudden feeling or emotion, or by a voluntary act.
• To set out; to commence a course, as a race or journey; to begin; as, to start business.
• To become somewhat displaced or loosened; as, a rivet or a seam may start under strain or pressure.
v. t.
• To cause to move suddenly; to disturb suddenly; to startle; to alarm; to rouse; to cause to flee or fly; as, the hounds started a fox.
• To bring onto being or into view; to originate; to invent.
• To cause to move or act; to set going, running, or flowing; as, to start a railway train; to start a mill; to start a stream of water; to start a rumor; to start a business.
• To move suddenly from its place or position; to displace or loosen; to dislocate; as, to start a bone; the storm started the bolts in the vessel.
(Naut.) To pour out; to empty; to tap and begin drawing from; as, to start a water cask.
n.
• The act of starting; a sudden spring, leap, or motion, caused by surprise, fear, pain, or the like; any sudden motion, or beginning of motion.
• A convulsive motion, twitch, or spasm; a spasmodic effort.
• A sudden, unexpected movement; a sudden and capricious impulse; a sally; as, starts of fancy.
• The beginning, as of a journey or a course of action; first motion from a place; act of setting out; the outset; — opposed to finish.
n.
• A tail, or anything projecting like a tail.
• The handle, or tail, of a plow; also, any long handle.
• The curved or inclined front and bottom of a water-wheel bucket.
(Mining) The arm, or level, of a gin, drawn around by a horse.
Starter
n.
• One who, or that which, starts; as, a starter on a journey; the starter of a race.
• A dog that rouses game.
Startful
a.
• Apt to start; skittish.
Startfulness
n.
• Aptness to start.
Starthroat
n.
(Zool.) Any humming bird of the genus Heliomaster. The feathers of the throat have a brilliant metallic luster.
Starting
a. & n.
• from Start, v.
Startingly
adv.
• By sudden fits or starts; spasmodically.
Startish
a.
• Apt to start; skittish; shy; — said especially of a horse.
Startle
v. t.
• To move suddenly, or be excited, on feeling alarm; to start.
v. t.
• To excite by sudden alarm, surprise, or apprehension; to frighten suddenly and not seriously; to alarm; to surprise.
• To deter; to cause to deviate.
n.
• A sudden motion or shock caused by an unexpected alarm, surprise, or apprehension of danger.
Startlingly
adv.
• In a startling manner.
Startlish
a.
• Easily startled; apt to start; startish; skittish; — said especially of a hourse.
Starvation
n.
• The act of starving, or the state of being starved.
Starve
v. i.
• To die; to perish.
• To perish with hunger; to suffer extreme hunger or want; to be very indigent.
• To perish or die with cold.
v. t.
• To destroy with cold.
• To kill with hunger; as, maliciously to starve a man is, in law, murder.
• To distress or subdue by famine; as, to starvea garrison into a surrender.
• To destroy by want of any kind; as, to starve plans by depriving them of proper light and air.
• To deprive of force or vigor; to disable.
Starvedly
adv.
• In the condition of one starved or starving; parsimoniously.
Starveling
n.
• One who, or that which, pines from lack or food, or nutriment.
a.
• Hungry; lean; pining with want.
Starwort
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Aster. See Aster.
• A small plant of the genus Stellaria, having star-shaped flowers; star flower; chickweed.
Stasimon
n.
• In the Greek tragedy, a song of the chorus, continued without the interruption of dialogue or anapaestics.
Stasis
n.
(Physiol.) A slackening or arrest of the blood current in the vessels, due not to a lessening of the heart's beat, but presumably to some abnormal resistance of the capillary walls. It is one of the phenomena observed in the capillaries in inflammation.
Statable
a.
• That can be stated; as, a statablegrievance; the question at issue is statable.
Statal
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or existing with reference to, a State of the American Union, as distinguished from the general government.
Statant
a.
(Her.) In a standing position; as, a lion statant.
Statarian
a.
• Fixed; settled; steady; statary.
Statarianly
adv.
• Fixedly; steadly.
Statary
a.
• Fixed; settled.
State
n.
• The circumstances or condition of a being or thing at any given time.
• Rank; condition; quality; as, the state of honor.
• Condition of prosperity or grandeur; wealthy or prosperous circumstances; social importance.
• Appearance of grandeur or dignity; pomp.
• A chair with a canopy above it, often standing on a dais; a seat of dignity; also, the canopy itself.
• Estate, possession.
• A person of high rank.
• Any body of men united by profession, or constituting a community of a particular character; as, the civil and ecclesiastical states, or the lords spiritual and temporal and the commons, in Great Britain. Cf. Estate, n., 6.
• The principal persons in a government.
• The bodies that constitute the legislature of a country; as, the States-general of Holland.
• A form of government which is not monarchial, as a republic.
• A political body, or body politic; the whole body of people who are united one government, whatever may be the form of the government; a nation.
• In the United States, one of the commonwealth, or bodies politic, the people of which make up the body of the nation, and which, under the national constitution, stands in certain specified relations with the national government, and are invested, as commonwealth, with full power in their several spheres over all matters not expressly inhibited.
• Highest and stationary condition, as that of maturity between growth and decline, or as that of crisis between the increase and the abating of a disease; height; acme.
a.
• Stately.
• Belonging to the state, or body politic; public.
v. t.
• To set; to settle; to establish.
• To express the particulars of; to set down in detail or in gross; to represent fully in words; to narrate; to recite; as, to state the facts of a case, one's opinion, etc.
n.
• A statement; also, a document containing a statement.
Statecraft
n.
• The art of conducting state affairs; state management; statesmanship.
Stated
a.
• Settled; established; fixed.
• Recurring at regular time; not occasional; as, stated preaching; stated business hours.
Statedly
adv.
• At stated times; regularly.
Stateful
a.
• Full of state; stately.
Statehood
n.
• The condition of being a State; as, a territory seeking Statehood.
Statehouse
n.
• The building in which a State legislature holds its sessions; a State capitol.
Stateless
a.
• Without state or pomp.
Statelily
adv.
• In a stately manner.
Stateliness
n.
• The quality or state of being stately.
Stately
a.
• Evincing state or dignity; lofty; majestic; grand; as, statelymanners; a stately gait.
adv.
• Majestically; loftily.
Statement
n.
• The act of stating, reciting, or presenting, orally or in paper; as, to interrupt a speaker in the statement of his case.
• That which is stated; a formal embodiment in language of facts or opinions; a narrative; a recital.
Statemonger
n.
• One versed in politics, or one who dabbles in state affairs.
Stateprison
• See under State, n.
Stater
n.
• One who states.
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The principal gold coin of ancient Grece. It varied much in value, the stater best known at Athens being worth about \'9c1 2s., or about $5.35. The Attic silver tetradrachm was in later times called stater.
Stateroom
n.
• A magnificent room in a place or great house.
• A small apartment for lodging or sleeping in the cabin, or on the deck, of a vessel; also, a somewhat similar apartment in a railway sleeping car.
Statesman
n.
• A man versed in public affairs and in the principles and art of government; especially, one eminent for political abilities.
• One occupied with the affairs of government, and influental in shaping its policy.
• A small landholder.
Statesmanlike
a.
• Having the manner or wisdom of statesmen; becoming a statesman.
Statesmanly
a.
• Becoming a statesman.
Statesmanship
n.
• The qualifications, duties, or employments of a statesman.
Stateswoman
n.
• A woman concerned in public affairs.
Stathmograph
n.
• A contrivance for recording the speed of a railway train.
Statically
adv.
• In a statical manner.
Statics
n.
• That branch of mechanics which treats of the equilibrium of forces, or relates to bodies as held at rest by the forces acting on them; — distinguished from dynamics.
Stating
n.
• The act of one who states anything; statement; as, the statingof one's opinions.
Station
n.
• The act of standing; also, attitude or pose in standing; posture.
• A state of standing or rest; equilibrium.
• The spot or place where anything stands, especially where a person or thing habitually stands, or is appointed to remain for a time; as, the station of a sentinel.
• A regular stopping place in a stage road or route; a place where railroad trains regularly come to a stand, for the convenience of passengers, taking in fuel, moving freight, etc.
• The headquarters of the police force of any precinct.
• The place at which an instrument is planted, or observations are made, as in surveying.
(Biol.) The particular place, or kind of situation, in which a species naturally occurs; a habitat.
(Naut.) A place to which ships may resort, and where they may anchor safely.
• A place or region to which a government ship or fleet is assigned for duty.
(Mil.) A place calculated for the rendezvous of troops, or for the distribution of them; also, a spot well adapted for offensive measures. Wilhelm (Mil. Dict.).
(Mining) An enlargement in a shaft or galley, used as a landing, or passing place, or for the accomodation of a pump, tank, etc.
• Post assigned; office; the part or department of public duty which a person is appointed to perform; sphere of duty or occupation; employment.
• Situation; position; location.
• State; rank; condition of life; social status.
(Eccl.) The fast of the fourth and sixth days of the week, Wednesday and Friday, in memory of the council which condemned Christ, and of his passion.
(R. C. Ch.) A church in which the procession of the clergy halts on stated days to say stated prayers.
• One of the places at which ecclesiastical processions pause for the performance of an act of devotion; formerly, the tomb of a martyr, or some similarly consecrated spot; now, especially, one of those representations of the successive stages of our Lord's passion which are often placed round the naves of large churches and by the side of the way leading to sacred edifices or shrines, and which are visited in rotation, stated services being performed at each; — called also Station of the cross.
v. t.
• To place; to set; to appoint or assign to the occupation of a post, place, or office; as, to station troops on the right of an army; to station a sentinel on a rampart; to station ships on the coasts of Africa.
Stational
a.
• Of or pertaining to a station.
Stationariness
n.
• The quality or state of being stationary; fixity.
Stationary
a.
• Not moving; not appearing to move; stable; fixed.
• Not improving or getting worse; not growing wiser, greater, better, more excellent, or the contrary.
• Appearing to be at rest, because moving in the line of vision; not progressive or retrograde, as a planet.
n.
• One who, or that which, is stationary, as a planet when apparently it has neither progressive nor retrograde motion.
Stationer
n.
• A bookseller or publisher; — formerly so called from his occupying a stand, or station, in the market place or elsewhere.
• One who sells paper, pens, quills, inkstands, pencils, blank books, and other articles used in writing.
Stationery
n.
• The articles usually sold by stationers, as paper, pens, ink, quills, blank books, etc.
a.
• Belonging to, or sold by, a stationer.
Statism
n.
• The art of governing a state; statecraft; policy.
Statist
n.
• A statesman; a politician; one skilled in government.
• A statistician.
Statistically
adv.
• In the way of statistics.
Statistician
n.
• One versed in statistics; one who collects and classifies facts for statistics.
Statistics
n.
• The science which has to do with the collection and classification of certain facts respecting the condition of the people in a state.
• Classified facts respecting the condition of the people in a state, their health, their longevity, domestic economy, arts, property, and political strength, their resources, the state of the country, etc., or respecting any particular class or interest; especially, those facts which can be stated in numbers, or in tables of numbers, or in any tabular and classified arrangement.
• The branch of mathematics which studies methods for the calculation of probabilities.
Statistology
n.
• See Statistics, 2.
Stative
a.
(Mil.) Of or pertaining to a fixed camp, or military posts or quarters.
Statoblast
n.
(Zool.) One of a peculiar kind of internal buds, or germs, produced in the interior of certain Bryozoa and sponges, especially in the fresh-water species; — also called winter buds.
Statocracy
n.
• Government by the state, or by political power, in distinction from government by ecclesiastical power.
Statua
n.
• A statue.
Statuary
n.
• One who practices the art of making statues.
• The art of carving statues or images as representatives of real persons or things; a branch of sculpture.
• A collection of statues; statues, collectively.
Statue
n.
• The likeness of a living being sculptured or modeled in some solid substance, as marble, bronze, or wax; an image; as, a statue of Hercules, or of a lion.
• A portrait.
v. t.
• To place, as a statue; to form a statue of; to make into a statue.
Statued
a.
• Adorned with statues.
Statueless
a.
• Without a statue.
Statuelike
a.
• Like a statue; motionless.
Statuesque
a.
• Partaking of, or exemplifying, the characteristics of a statue; having the symmetry, or other excellence, of a statue artistically made; as, statuesquelimbs; a statuesque attitude.
Statuesquely
adv.
• In a statuesque manner; in a way suggestive of a statue; like a statue.
Statuette
n.
• A small statue; — usually applied to a figure much less than life size, especially when of marble or bronze, or of plaster or clay as a preparation for the marble or bronze, as distinguished from a figure in terra cotta or the like. Cf. Figurine.
Statuminate
v. t.
• To prop or support.
Stature
n.
• The natural height of an animal body; — generally used of the human body.
Statured
a.
• Arrived at full stature.
Status
n.
• State; condition; position of affairs.
Statutable
a.
• Made or introduced by statute; proceeding from an act of the legistature; as, a statutable provision or remedy.
• Made or being in conformity to statute; standard; as, statutable measures.
Statutably
adv.
• Conformably to statute.
Statute
n.
• An act of the legislature of a state or country, declaring, commanding, or prohibiting something; a positive law; the written will of the legislature expressed with all the requisite forms of legislation; — used in distinction fraom common law. See Common law, under Common, a.
• An act of a corporation or of its founder, intended as a permanent rule or law; as, the statutes of a university.
• An assemblage of farming servants (held possibly by statute) for the purpose of being hired; — called also statute fair.
Statutory
a.
• Enacted by statute; depending on statute for its authority; as, a statutory provision.
Staurolite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a brown to black color occurring in prismatic crystals, often twinned so as to form groups resembling a cross. It is a silicate of aluminia and iron, and is generally found imbedded in mica schist. Called also granatite, and grenatite.
Staurolitic
a.
(Min.) Of or pertaining to staurolite; resembling or containing staurolite.
Stauroscope
n.
(Crystallog.) An optical instrument used in determining the position of the planes of light-vibration in sections of crystals.
Staurotide
n.
(Min.) Staurolite.
Stave
n.
• One of a number of narrow strips of wood, or narrow iron plates, placed edge to edge to form the sides, covering, or lining of a vessel or structure; esp., one of the strips which form the sides of a cask, a pail, etc.
• One of the cylindrical bars of a lantern wheel; one of the bars or rounds of a rack, a ladder, etc.
• A metrical portion; a stanza; a staff.
(Mus.) The five horizontal and parallel lines on and between which musical notes are written or pointed; the staff.
v. t.
• To break in a stave or the staves of; to break a hole in; to burst; — often with in; as, to stave a cask; to stave in a boat.
• To push, as with a staff; — with off.
• To delay by force or craft; to drive away; — usually with off; as, to stave off the execution of a project.
• To suffer, or cause, to be lost by breaking the cask.
• To furnish with staves or rundles.
• To render impervious or solid by driving with a calking iron; as, to stave lead, or the joints of pipes into which lead has been run.
v. i.
• To burst in pieces by striking against something; to dash into fragments.
Staves
n.
• pl. of Staff.
• pl. of Stave.
Stavesacre
n.
(Bot.) A kind of larkspur (Delphinium Staphysagria), and its seeds, which are violently purgative and emetic. They are used as a parasiticide, and in the East for poisoning fish.
Stavewood
n.
(Bot.) A tall tree (Simaruba amara) growing in tropical America. It is one of the trees which yields quassia.
Staving
n.
• A cassing or lining of staves; especially, one encircling a water wheel.
Staw
v. i.
• To be fixed or set; to stay.
Stay
n.
(Naut.) A large, strong rope, employed to support a mast, by being extended from the head of one mast down to some other, or to some part of the vessel. Those which lead forward are called fore-and-aft stays; those which lead to the vessel's side are called backstays. See Illust. of Ship.
v. t.
• To stop from motion or falling; to prop; to fix firmly; to hold up; to support.
• To support from sinking; to sustain with strength; to satisfy in part or for the time.
• To bear up under; to endure; to support; to resist successfully.
• To hold from proceeding; to withhold; to restrain; to stop; to hold.
• To hinde; to delay; to detain; to keep back.
• To remain for the purpose of; to wait for.
• To cause to cease; to put an end to.
(Engin.) To fasten or secure with stays; as, to stay a flat sheet in a steam boiler.
(Naut.) To tack, as a vessel, so that the other side of the vessel shall be presented to the wind.
v. i.
• To remain; to continue in a place; to abide fixed for a space of time; to stop; to stand still.
• To continue in a state.
• To wait; to attend; to forbear to act.
• To dwell; to tarry; to linger.
• To rest; to depend; to rely; to stand; to insist.
• To come to an end; to cease; as, that day the storm stayed.
• To hold out in a race or other contest; as, a horse stays well.
(Naut.) To change tack; as a ship.
n.
• That which serves as a prop; a support.
• A corset stiffened with whalebone or other material, worn by women, and rarely by men.
• Continuance in a place; abode for a space of time; sojourn; as, you make a short stay in this city.
• Cessation of motion or progression; stand; stop.
• Hindrance; let; check.
• Restraint of passion; moderation; caution; steadiness; sobriety.
(Engin.) Strictly, a part in tension to hold the parts together, or stiffen them.
Stayed
a.
• Staid; fixed; settled; sober; — now written staid. See Staid.
Stayedly
adv.
• Staidly. See Staidly.
Stayedness
n.
• Staidness.
• Solidity; weight.
Stayer
n.
• One who upholds or supports that which props; one who, or that which, stays, stops, or restrains; also, colloquially, a horse, man, etc., that has endurance, an a race.
Staylace
n.
• A lace for fastening stays.
Stayless
a.
• Without stop or delay.
Staymaker
n.
• One whose occupation is to make stays.
Staynil
n.
(Zool.) The European starling.
Staysail
n.
(Naut.) Any sail extended on a stay.
Stayship
n.
(Zool.) A remora, — fabled to stop ships by attaching itself to them.
Stead
n.
• Place, or spot, in general.
• Place or room which another had, has, or might have.
• A frame on which a bed is laid; a bedstead.
• A farmhouse and offices.
v. t.
• To help; to support; to benefit; to assist.
• To fill place of.
Steadfast
a.
• Firmly fixed or established; fast fixed; firm.
• Not fickle or wavering; constant; firm; resolute; unswerving; steady.
Steadfastly
adv.
• In a steadfast manner; firmly.
Steadfastness
n.
• The quality or state of being steadfast; firmness; fixedness; constancy.
Steadily
adv.
• In a steady manner.
Steadiness
n.
• The quality or state of being steady.
Steading
n.
• The brans, stables, cattle-yards, etc., of a farm; — called also onstead, farmstead, farm offices, or farmery.
Steady
a.
• Firm in standing or position; not tottering or shaking; fixed; firm.
• Constant in feeling, purpose, or pursuit; not fickle, changeable, or wavering; not easily moved or persuaded to alter a purpose; resolute; as, a man steady in his principles, in his purpose, or in the pursuit of an object.
• Regular; constant; undeviating; uniform; as, the steady course of the sun; a steady breeze of wind.
v. t.
• To make steady; to hold or keep from shaking, reeling, or falling; to make or keep firm; to support; to make constant, regular, or resolute.
v. i.
• To become steady; to regain a steady position or state; to move steadily.
Steak
n.
• A slice of beef, broiled, or cut for broiling; — also extended to the meat of other large animals; as, venison steak; bear steak; pork steak; turtle steak.
Steal
n.
• A handle; a stale, or stele.
v. t.
• To take and carry away, feloniously; to take without right or leave, and with intent to keep wrongfully; as, to steal the personal goods of another.
• To withdraw or convey clandestinely (reflexive); hence, to creep furtively, or to insinuate.
• To gain by insinuating arts or covert means.
• To get into one's power gradually and by imperceptible degrees; to take possession of by a gradual and imperceptible appropriation; — with away.
• To accomplish in a concealed or unobserved manner; to try to carry out secretly; as, to steal a look.
v. i.
• To practice, or be guilty of, theft; to commit larceny or theft.
• To withdraw, or pass privily; to slip in, along, or away, unperceived; to go or come furtively.
Stealer
n.
• One who steals; a thief.
(Shipbuilding) The endmost plank of a strake which stops short of the stem or stern.
Stealing
n.
• The act of taking feloniously the personal property of another without his consent and knowledge; theft; larceny.
• That which is stolen; stolen property; — chiefly used in the plural.
Stealingly
adv.
• By stealing, or as by stealing, furtively, or by an invisible motion.
Stealth
n.
• The act of stealing; theft.
• The thing stolen; stolen property.
• The bringing to pass anything in a secret or concealed manner; a secret procedure; a clandestine practice or action; — in either a good or a bad sense.
Stealthful
a.
• Given to stealth; stealthy.
Stealthily
adv.
• In a stealthy manner.
Stealthiness
n.
• The state, quality, or character of being stealthy; stealth.
Stealthlike
a.
• Stealthy; sly.
Stealthy
a.
• Done by stealth; accomplished clandestinely; unperceived; secret; furtive; sly.
Steam
n.
• The elastic, aeriform fluid into which water is converted when heated to the boiling points; water in the state of vapor.
• The mist formed by condensed vapor; visible vapor; — so called in popular usage.
• Any exhalation.
v. i.
• To emit steam or vapor.
• To rise in vapor; to issue, or pass off, as vapor.
• To move or travel by the agency of steam.
• To generate steam; as, the boiler steams well.
v. t.
• To exhale.
• To expose to the action of steam; to apply steam to for softening, dressing, or preparing; as, to steam wood; to steamcloth; to steam food, etc.
Steamboat
n.
• A boat or vessel propelled by steam power; — generally used of river or coasting craft, as distinguished from ocean steamers.
Steamboating
n.
• The occupation or business of running a steamboat, or of transporting merchandise, passengers, etc., by steamboats.
(Bookbinding) The shearing of a pile of books which are as yet uncovered, or out of boards.
Steamer
n.
• A vessel propelled by steam; a steamship or steamboat.
• A steam fire engine. See under Steam.
• A road locomotive for use on common roads, as in agricultural operations.
• A vessel in which articles are subjected to the action of steam, as in washing, in cookery, and in various processes of manufacture.
(Zool.) The steamer duck.
Steaminess
n.
• The quality or condition of being steamy; vaporousness; mistness.
Steamship
n.
• A ship or seagoing vessel propelled by the power of steam; a steamer.
Steamy
a.
• Consisting of, or resembling, steam; full of steam; vaporous; misty.
Stean
n. & v.
• See Steen.
Steaningp
n.
• See Steening.
Steapsin
n.
(Physiol Chem.) An unorganized ferment or enzyme present in pancreatic juice. It decomposes neutral fats into glycerin and fatty acids.
Stearate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of stearic acid; as, ordinary soap consists largely of sodium or potassium stearates.
Stearic
a.
(Physiol. Chem.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, stearin or tallow; resembling tallow.
Stearin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) One of the constituents of animal fats and also of some vegetable fats, as the butter of cacao. It is especially characterized by its solidity, so that when present in considerable quantity it materially increases the hardness, or raises the melting point, of the fat, as in mutton tallow. Chemically, it is a compound of glyceryl with three molecules of stearic acid, and hence is technically called tristearin, or glyceryl tristearate.
Stearolic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid of the acetylene series, isologous with stearis acid, and obtained, as a white crystalline substance, from oleic acid.
Stearone
n.
(Chem.) The ketone of stearic acid, obtained as a white crystalline substance, (C17H35)2.CO, by the distillation of calcium stearate.
Stearoptene
n.
(Chem.) The more solid ingredient of certain volatile oils; — contrasted with elaeoptene.
Stearrhea
n.
(Med.) seborrhea.
Stearyl
n.
(Chem.) The hypothetical radical characteristic of stearic acid.
Steatite
n.
(Min.) A massive variety of talc, of a grayish green or brown color. It forms extensive beds, and is quarried for fireplaces and for coarse utensils. Called also potstone, lard stone, and soapstone.
Steatitic
n.
(Min.) Pertaining to, or of the nature of, steatite; containing or resembling steatite.
Steatoma
n.
(Med.) A cyst containing matter like suet.
Steatomatous
a.
(Med.) Of the nature of steatoma.
Steatopyga
n.
• A remarkable accretion of fat upon the buttocks of Africans of certain tribes, especially of Hottentot women.
Steatopygous
a.
• Having fat buttocks.
Stee
n.
• A ladder.
Steed
n.
• A horse, especially a spirited horse for state of war; — used chiefly in poetry or stately prose.
Steedless
a.
• Having no steed; without a horse.
Steel
n.
(Metal) A variety of iron intermediate in composition and properties between wrought iron and cast iron (containing between one half of one per cent and one and a half per cent of carbon), and consisting of an alloy of iron with an iron carbide. Steel, unlike wrought iron, can be tempered, and retains magnetism. Its malleability decreases, and fusibility increases, with an increase in carbon.
• An instrument or implement made of steel
• A weapon, as a sword, dagger, etc.
• An instrument of steel (usually a round rod) for sharpening knives.
• A piece of steel for striking sparks from flint.
• Fig.: Anything of extreme hardness; that which is characterized by sternness or rigor.
(Med.) A chalybeate medicine.
v. t.
• To overlay, point, or edge with steel; as, to steel a razor; to steel an ax.
• To make hard or strong; hence, to make insensible or obdurate.
• Fig.: To cause to resemble steel, as in smoothness, polish, or other qualities.
(Elec.) To cover, as an electrotype plate, with a thin layer of iron by electrolysis. The iron thus deposited is very hard, like steel.
Steeler
n.
• One who points, edges, or covers with steel.
n.
(Shipbuilding) Same as Stealer.
Steelhead
n.
(Zool.) A North Pacific salmon (Salmo Gairdneri) found from Northern California to Siberia; — called also hardhead, and preesil.
(Zool.) The ruddy duck.
Steeliness
n.
• The quality of being steely.
Steeling
n.
• The process of pointing, edging, or overlaying with steel; specifically, acierage. See Steel, v.
Steely
a.
• Made of steel; consisting of steel.
• Resembling steel; hard; firm; having the color of steel.
Steelyard
n.
• A form of balance in which the body to be weighed is suspended from the shorter arm of a lever, which turns on a fulcrum, and a counterpoise is caused to slide upon the longer arm to produce equilibrium, its place upon this arm (which is notched or graduated) indicating the weight; a Roman balance; — very commonly used also in the plural form, steelyards.
Steem
n. & v.
• See Esteem.
n. & v.
• See 1st and 2nd Stem.
Steen
n.
• A vessel of clay or stone.
• A wall of brick, stone, or cement, used as a lining, as of a well, cistern, etc.; a steening.
v. t.
• To line, as a well, with brick, stone, or other hard material.
Steenbok
n.
(Zool.) Same as Steinbock.
Steening
n.
• A lining made of brick, stone, or other hard material, as for a well.
Steep
a.
• Bright; glittering; fiery.
v. t.
• To soak in a liquid; to macerate; to extract the essence of by soaking; as, to soften seed by steeping it in water. Often used figuratively.
v. i.
• To undergo the process of soaking in a liquid; as, the tea is steeping.
n.
• Something steeped, or used in steeping; a fertilizing liquid to hasten the germination of seeds.
• A rennet bag.
a.
• Making a large angle with the plane of the horizon; ascending or descending rapidly with respect to a horizontal line or a level; precipitous; as, a steep hill or mountain; a steep roof; a steep ascent; a steep declivity; a steep barometric gradient.
• Difficult of access; not easy reached; lofty; elevated; high.
• Excessive; as, a steep price.
n.
• A precipitous place, hill, mountain, rock, or ascent; any elevated object sloping with a large angle to the plane of the horizon; a precipice.
Steepen
v. i.
• To become steep or steeper.
Steeper
n.
• A vessel, vat, or cistern, in which things are steeped.
Steepiness
n.
• Steepness.
Steepish
a.
• Somewhat steep.
Steeple
n.
(Arch.) A spire; also, the tower and spire taken together; the whole of a structure if the roof is of spire form. See Spire.
Steeplechasing
n.
• The act of riding steeple chases.
Steepled
a.
• Furnished with, or having the form of, a steeple; adorned with steeples.
Steeply
adv.
• In a steep manner; with steepness; with precipitous declivity.
Steepness
n.
• Quality or state of being steep; precipitous declivity; as, the steepnessof a hill or a roof.
• Height; loftiness.
Steepy
a.
• Steep; precipitous.
Steer
n.
• A young male of the ox kind; especially, a common ox; a castrated taurine male from two to four years old. See the Note under Ox.
v. t.
• To castrate; — said of male calves.
v. t.
• To direct the course of; to guide; to govern; — applied especially to a vessel in the water.
v. i.
• To direct a vessel in its course; to direct one's course.
• To be directed and governed; to take a direction, or course; to obey the helm; as, the boat steers easily.
• To conduct one's self; to take or pursue a course of action.
n.
• A rudder or helm.
n.
• A helmsman, a pilot.
Steerable
a.
• Capable of being steered; dirigible.
Steerage
n.
• The act or practice of steering, or directing; as, the steerage of a ship.
(Naut.) The effect of the helm on a ship; the manner in which an individual ship is affected by the helm.
• The hinder part of a vessel; the stern.
• Properly, the space in the after part of a vessel, under the cabin, but used generally to indicate any part of a vessel having the poorest accommodations and occupied by passengers paying the lowest rate of fare.
• Direction; regulation; management; guidance.
• That by which a course is directed.
Steerageway
n.
(Naut.) A rate of motion through the water sufficient to render a vessel governable by the helm.
Steerer
n.
• One who steers; as, a boat steerer.
Steering
a. & n.
• from Steer, v.
Steerless
a.
• Having no rudder.
Steerling
n.
• A young small steer.
Steersman
n.
• One who steers; the helmsman of a vessel.
Steersmate
n.
• One who steers; steersman.
Steeve
v. i.
(Shipbuilding) To project upward, or make an angle with the horizon or with the line of a vessel's keel; — said of the bowsprit, etc.
v. t.
(Shipbuilding) To elevate or fix at an angle with the horizon; — said of the bowsprit, etc.
• To stow, as bales in a vessel's hold, by means of a steeve. See Steeve, n. (b).
n.
(Naut.) The angle which a bowsprit makes with the horizon, or with the line of the vessel's keel; — called also steeving.
• A spar, with a block at one end, used in stowing cotton bales, and similar kinds of cargo which need to be packed tightly.
Steeving
n.
• The act or practice of one who steeves.
(Naut.) See Steeve, n. (a).
Steg
n.
(Zool.) A gander.
Steganographist
n.
• One skilled in steganography; a cryptographer.
Steganography
n.
• The art of writing in cipher, or in characters which are not intelligible except to persons who have the key; cryptography.
Steganophthalmata
n. pl.
(Zool.) The Discophora, or Phanerocarpae. Called also Steganophthalmia.
Steganopod
n.
(Zool.) One of the Steganopodes.
Steganopodes
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of swimming birds in which all four toes are united by a broad web. It includes the pelicans, cormorants, gannets, and others.
Steganopodous
a.
(Zool.) Having all four toes webbed together.
Stegnosis
n.
(Med.) Constipation; also, constriction of the vessels or ducts.
Stegnotic
a.
(Med.) Tending to render costive, or to diminish excretions or discharges generally.
n.
• A stegnotic medicine; an astringent.
Stegocephala
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct order of amphibians found fossil in the Mesozoic rocks; called also Stegocephali, and Labyrinthodonta.
Stegosauria
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct order of herbivorous dinosaurs, including the genera Stegosaurus, Omosaurus, and their allies.
Stegosaurus
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of large Jurassic dinosaurs remarkable for a powerful dermal armature of plates and spines.
Steik
v. t.
• See Steek.
Stein
n. & v.
• See Steen.
Steinbock
n.
(Zool.) The European ibex.
• A small South African antelope (Nanotragus tragulus) which frequents dry, rocky districts; — called also steenbok.
Steingale
n.
• The stannel.
Steining
n.
• See Steening.
Steinkirk
n.
• Same as Steenkirk.
Steinkle
n.
• The wheater.
Stela
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A small column or pillar, used as a monument, milestone, etc.
Stele
n.
• Same as Stela.
n.
• A stale, or handle; a stalk.
Stelene
a.
• Resembling, or used as, a stela; columnar.
Stell
v. t.
• To place or fix firmly or permanently.
n.
• A prop; a support, as for the feet in standing or cilmbing.
• A partial inclosure made by a wall or trees, to serve as a shelter for sheep or cattle.
Stellation
n.
• Radiation of light.
Stelled
a.
• Firmly placed or fixed.
Steller
n.
(Zool) The rytina; — called also stellerine.
Stellerid
n.
(Zool.) A starfish.
Stellerida
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive group of echinoderms, comprising the starfishes and ophiurans.
Stelliferous
a.
• Having, or abounding with, stars.
Stelliform
a.
• Like a star; star-shaped; radiated.
Stellify
v. t.
• To turn into a star; to cause to appear like a star; to place among the stars, or in heaven.
Stellion
n.
(Zool.) A lizard (Stellio vulgaris), common about the Eastern Mediterranean among ruins. In color it is olive-green, shaded with black, with small stellate spots. Called also hardim, and star lizard.
Stellionate
n.
(Scots & Roman Law) Any fraud not distinguished by a more special name; — chiefly applied to sales of the same property to two different persons, or selling that for one's own which belongs to another, etc.
Stellular
a.
• Having the shape or appearance of little stars; radiated.
• Marked with starlike spots of color.
Stellulate
a.
(Bot.) Minutely stellate.
Stelmatopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Gymnolaemata.
Stelography
n.
• The art of writing or inscribing characters on pillars.
Stem
n.
• The principal body of a tree, shrub, or plant, of any kind; the main stock; the part which supports the branches or the head or top.
• A little branch which connects a fruit, flower, or leaf with a main branch; a peduncle, pedicel, or petiole; as, the stem of an apple or a cherry.
• The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors.
• A branch of a family.
(Naut.) A curved piece of timber to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. Hence, the forward part of a vessel; the bow.
• Fig.: An advanced or leading position; the lookout.
• Anything resembling a stem or stalk; as, the stem of a tobacco pipe; the stem of a watch case, or that part to which the ring, by which it is suspended, is attached.
(Bot.) That part of a plant which bears leaves, or rudiments of leaves, whether rising above ground or wholly subterranean.
(Zool.) The entire central axis of a feather.
• The basal portion of the body of one of the Pennatulacea, or of a gorgonian.
(Mus.) The short perpendicular line added to the body of a note; the tail of a crotchet, quaver, semiquaver, etc.
(Gram.) The part of an inflected word which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) throughout a given inflection; theme; base.
v. t.
• To remove the stem or stems from; as, to stem cherries; to remove the stem and its appendages (ribs and veins) from; as, to stem tobacco leaves.
• To ram, as clay, into a blasting hole.
v. t.
• To oppose or cut with, or as with, the stem of a vessel; to resist, or make progress against; to stop or check the flow of, as a current.
v. i.
• To move forward against an obstacle, as a vessel against a current.
Stemless
a.
• Having no stem; (Bot.) acaulescent.
Stemlet
n.
• A small or young stem.
Stemma
n.
(Zool.) One of the ocelli of an insect. See Ocellus.
• One of the facets of a compound eye of any arthropod.
Stemmer
n.
• One who, or that which, stems (in any of the senses of the verbs).
Stemmery
n.
• A large building in which tobacco is stemmed.
Stemmy
a.
• Abounding in stems, or mixed with stems; — said of tea, dried currants, etc.
Stemple
n.
(Mining) A crossbar of wood in a shaft, serving as a step.
Stemson
n.
(Shipbuilding) A piece of curved timber bolted to the stem, keelson, and apron in a ship's frame near the bow.
Stench
v. t.
• To stanch.
n.
• A smell; an odor.
• An ill smell; an offensive odor; a stink.
v. t.
• To cause to emit a disagreeable odor; to cause to stink.
Stenchy
a.
• Having a stench.
Stencil
n.
• A thin plate of metal, leather, or other material, used in painting, marking, etc. The pattern is cut out of the plate, which is then laid flat on the surface to be marked, and the color brushed over it. Called also stencil plate.
v. t.
• To mark, paint, or color in figures with stencils; to form or print by means of a stencil.
Stenciler
n.
• One who paints or colors in figures by means of stencil.
Stenoderm
n.
(Zool.) Any species of bat belonging to the genus Stenoderma, native of the West Indies and South America. These bats have a short or rudimentary tail and a peculiarly shaped nose membrane.
Stenodermine
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the genus Stenoderma, which includes several West Indian and South American nose-leaf bats.
Stenograph
v. t.
• To write or report in stenographic characters.
n.
• A production of stenography; anything written in shorthand.
Stenographer
n.
• One who is skilled in stenography; a writer of shorthand.
Stenographist
n.
• A stenographer.
Stenography
n.
• The art of writing in shorthand, by using abbreviations or characters for whole words; shorthand.
Stenophyllous
a.
(Bot.) Having narrow leaves.
Stenosis
n.
(Med.) A narrowing of the opening or hollow of any passage, tube, or orifice; as, stenosis of the pylorus. It differs from stricture in being applied especially to diffused rather than localized contractions, and in always indicating an origin organic and not spasmodic.
Stenostome
a.
(Zool.) Having a small or narrow mouth; — said of certain small ground snakes (Opoterodonta), which are unable to dilate their jaws.
Stent
v. t.
• To keep within limits; to restain; to cause to stop, or cease; to stint.
v. i.
• To stint; to stop; to cease.
n.
• An allotted portion; a stint.
Stenting
n.
• An opening in a wall in a coal mine.
Stentor
n.
• A herald, in the Iliad, who had a very loud voice; hence, any person having a powerful voice.
(Zool.) Any species of ciliated Infusoria belonging to the genus Stentor and allied genera, common in fresh water. The stentors have a bell-shaped, or cornucopia-like, body with a circle of cilia around the spiral terminal disk. See Illust. under Heterotricha.
(Zool.) A howling monkey, or howler.
Stentorian
a.
• Of or pertaining to a stentor; extremely loud; powerful; as, a stentorian voice; stentorian lungs.
Stentorin
n.
(Chem.) A blue coloring matter found in some stentors. See Stentor, 2.
Stentorious
a.
• Stentorian.
Stentoronic
a.
• Stentorian.
Stentorophonic
a.
• Speaking or sounding very loud; stentorian.
Step
v. i.
• To move the foot in walking; to advance or recede by raising and moving one of the feet to another resting place, or by moving both feet in succession.
• To walk; to go on foot; esp., to walk a little distance; as, to step to one of the neighbors.
• To walk slowly, gravely, or resolutely.
• Fig.: To move mentally; to go in imagination.
v. t.
• To set, as the foot.
(Naut.) To fix the foot of (a mast) in its step; to erect.
n.
• An advance or movement made by one removal of the foot; a pace.
• A rest, or one of a set of rests, for the foot in ascending or descending, as a stair, or a round of a ladder.
• The space passed over by one movement of the foot in walking or running; as, one step is generally about three feet, but may be more or less. Used also figuratively of any kind of progress; as, he improved step by step, or by steps.
• A small space or distance; as, it is but a step.
• A print of the foot; a footstep; a footprint; track.
• Gait; manner of walking; as, the approach of a man is often known by his step.
• Proceeding; measure; action; an act.
• Walk; passage.
• A portable framework of stairs, much used indoors in reaching to a high position.
(Naut.) In general, a framing in wood or iron which is intended to receive an upright shaft; specif., a block of wood, or a solid platform upon the keelson, supporting the heel of the mast.
(Mach.) One of a series of offsets, or parts, resembling the steps of stairs, as one of the series of parts of a cone pulley on which the belt runs.
• A bearing in which the lower extremity of a spindle or a vertical shaft revolves.
(Mus.) The intervak between two contiguous degrees of the csale.
(Kinematics) A change of position effected by a motion of translation.
Stepbrother
n.
• A brother by the marriage of one's father with the mother of another, or of one's mother with the father of another.
Stepchild
n.
• A bereaved child; one who has lost father or mother.
• A son or daughter of one's wife or husband by a former marriage.
Stepdame
n.
• A stepmother.
Stepdaughter
n.
• A daughter of one's wife or husband by a former marriage.
Stepfather
n.
• The husband of one's mother by a subsequent marriage.
Stephanion
n.
(Anat.) The point on the side of the skull where the temporal line, or upper edge of the temporal fossa, crosses the coronal suture.
Stephanite
n.
(Min.) A sulphide of antimony and silver of an iron-black color and metallic luster; called also black silver, and brittle silver ore.
Stephanotis
n.
(Bot.) A genus of climbing asclepiadaceous shrubs, of Madagascar, Malaya, etc. They have fleshy or coriaceous opposite leaves, and large white waxy flowers in cymes.
• A perfume said to be prepared from the flowers of Stephanotis floribunda.
Stepladder
n.
• A portable set of steps.
Stepmother
n.
• The wife of one's father by a subsequent marriage.
Stepparent
n.
• Stepfather or stepmother.
Steppe
n.
• One of the vast plains in Southeastern Europe and in Asia, generally elevated, and free from wood, analogous to many of the prairies in Western North America. See Savanna.
Stepped
a.
• Provided with a step or steps; having a series of offsets or parts resembling the steps of stairs; as, a stepped key.
Stepper
n.
• One who, or that which, steps; as, a quick stepper.
Stepsister
n.
• A daughter of one's stepfather or stepmother by a former marriage.
Stepson
n.
• A son of one's husband or wife by a former marriage.
Stepstone
n.
• A stone laid before a door as a stair to rise on in entering the house.
Stercobilin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A coloring matter found in the faeces, a product of the alteration of the bile pigments in the intestinal canal, — identical with hydrobilirubin.
Stercolin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) Same as Serolin (b).
Stercoraceous
a.
• Of or pertaining to dung; partaking of the nature of, or containing, dung.
Stercoranism
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) The doctrine or belief of the Stercoranists.
Stercoranist
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A nickname formerly given to those who held, or were alleged to hold, that the consecrated elements in the eucharist undergo the process of digestion in the body of the recipient.
Stercorarian
n.
• A Stercoranist.
Stercorary
n.
• A place, properly secured from the weather, for containing dung.
Stercorate
n.
• Excrement; dung.
Stercoration
n.
• Manuring with dung.
Stercorianism
n.
(Eccl.) The doctrine or belief of the Stercoranists.
Stercorin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) Same as Serolin (b).
Stercory
n.
• Excrement; dung.
Sterculiaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order (Sterculiaceae) of polypetalous exogenous plants, mostly tropical. The cacao (Theobroma Cacao) is the most useful plant of the order.
Stere
n.
• A unit of cubic measure in the metric system, being a cubic meter, or kiloliter, and equal to 35.3 cubic feet, or nearly 1
v. t. & i.
• To stir.
n.
• A rudder. See 5th Steer.
n.
• Helmsman. See 6th Steer.
Sterelmintha
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Platyelminthes.
Stereobate
n.
(Arch.) The lower part or basement of a building or pedestal; — used loosely for several different forms of basement.
Stereochrome
n.
• Stereochromic picture.
Stereochromic
a.
• Pertaining to the art of stereochromy; produced by stereochromy.
Stereochromy
n.
• A style of painting on plastered walls or stone, in which the colors are rendered permanent by sprinklings of water, in which is mixed a proportion of soluble glass (a silicate of soda).
Stereoelectric
a.
(Physics) Of or pertaining to the generation of electricity by means of solid bodies alone; as, a stereoelectric current is one obtained by means of solids, without any liquid.
Stereogram
n.
• A diagram or picture which represents objects in such a way as to give the impression of relief or solidity; also, a stereograph.
Stereograph
n.
• Any picture, or pair of pictures, prepared for exhibition in the stereoscope. Stereographs are now commonly made by means of photography.
Stereographically
adv.
• In a stereographical manner; by delineation on a plane.
Stereography
n.
• The art of delineating the forms of solid bodies on a plane; a branch of solid geometry which shows the construction of all solids which are regularly defined.
Stereometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the solid contents of a body, or the capacity of a vessel; a volumenometer.
• An instrument for determining the specific gravity of liquid bodies, porous bodies, and powders, as well as solids.
Stereometry
n.
• The art of measuring and computing the cubical contents of bodies and figures; — distinguished from planimetry.
Stereomonoscope
n.
• An instrument with two lenses, by which an image of a single picture projected upon a screen of ground glass is made to present an appearance of relief, and may be viewed by several persons at once.
Stereoplasm
n.
(Biol.) The solid or insoluble portion of the cell protoplasm. See Hygroplasm.
Stereopticon
n.
• An instrument, consisting essentially of a magic lantern in which photographic pictures are used, by which the image of a landscape, or any object, may be thrown upon a screen in such a manner as to seem to stand out in relief, so as to form a striking and accurate representation of the object itself; also, a pair of magic lanterns for producing the effect of dissolving views.
Stereoscope
n.
• An optical instrument for giving to pictures the appearance of solid forms, as seen in nature. It combines in one, through a bending of the rays of light, two pictures, taken for the purpose from points of view a little way apart. It is furnished with two eyeglasses, and by refraction or reflection the pictures are superimposed, so as to appear as one to the observer.
Stereoscopist
n.
• One skilled in the use or construction of stereoscopes.
Stereoscopy
n.
• The art or science of using the stereoscope, or of constructing the instrument or the views used with it.
Stereostatic
a.
(Civil. Engin.) Geostatic.
Stereotomy
n.
• The science or art of cutting solids into certain figures or sections, as arches, and the like; especially, the art of stonecutting.
Stereotype
n.
• A plate forming an exact faximile of a page of type or of an engraving, used in printing books, etc.; specifically, a plate with type-metal face, used for printing.
• The art or process of making such plates, or of executing work by means of them.
v. t.
• To prepare for printing in stereotype; to make the stereotype plates of; as, to stereotype the Bible.
• Fig.: To make firm or permanent; to fix.
Stereotyped
a.
• Formed into, or printed from, stereotype plates.
• Fig.: Formed in a fixed, unchangeable manner; as, stereotyped opinions.
Stereotyper
n.
• One who stereotypes; one who makes stereotype plates, or works in a stereotype foundry.
Stereotypery
n.
• The art, process, or employment of making stereotype plates.
• A place where stereotype plates are made; a stereotype foundry.
Stereotypic
a.
• Of or pertaining to stereotype, or stereotype plates.
Stereotypist
n.
• A stereotyper.
Stereotypographer
n.
• A stereotype printer.
Stereotypography
n.
• The act or art of printing from stereotype plates.
Stereotypy
n.
• The art or process of making stereotype plates.
Sterhydraulic
a.
• Pertaining to, or designating, a kind of hydraulic press; resembling such a press in action or principle.
Sterile
a.
• Producing little or no crop; barren; unfruitful; unproductive; not fertile; as, sterile land; a sterile desert; a sterile year.
(Biol.) Incapable of reproduction; unfitted for reproduction of offspring; not able to germinate or bear fruit; unfruitful; as, a sterile flower, which bears only stamens.
• Free from reproductive spores or germs; as, a sterile fluid.
• Fig.: Barren of ideas; destitute of sentiment; as, a sterile production or author.
Sterility
n.
• The quality or condition of being sterile.
(Biol.) Quality of being sterile; infecundity; also, the state of being free from germs or spores.
Sterilization
n.
(Biol.) The act or process of sterilizing, or rendering sterile; also, the state of being sterile.
Sterilize
v. t.
• To make sterile or unproductive; to impoverish, as land; to exhaust of fertility.
(Biol.) To deprive of the power of reproducing; to render incapable of germination or fecundation; to make sterile.
• To destroy all spores or germs in (an organic fluid or mixture), as by heat, so as to prevent the development of bacterial or other organisms.
Sterlet
n.
(Zool.) A small sturgeon (Acipenser ruthenus) found in the Caspian Sea and its rivers, and highly esteemed for its flavor. The finest caviare is made from its roe.
Sterling
n.
(Engin.) Same as Starling, 3.
n.
• Any English coin of standard value; coined money.
• A certain standard of quality or value for money.
a.
• Belonging to, or relating to, the standard British money of account, or the British coinage; as, a pound sterling; a shilling sterling; a penny sterling; — now chiefly applied to the lawful money of England; but sterling cost, sterling value, are used.
• Genuine; pure; of excellent quality; conforming to the highest standard; of full value; as, a work of sterling merit; a man of sterling good sense.
Stern
n.
(Zool.) The black tern.
a.
• Having a certain hardness or severity of nature, manner, or aspect; hard; severe; rigid; rigorous; austere; fixed; unchanging; unrelenting; hence, serious; resolute; harsh; as, a sternresolve; a stern necessity; a stern heart; a stern gaze; a stern decree.
n.
• The helm or tiller of a vessel or boat; also, the rudder.
(Naut.) The after or rear end of a ship or other vessel, or of a boat; the part opposite to the stem, or prow.
• Fig.: The post of management or direction.
• The hinder part of anything.
• The tail of an animal; — now used only of the tail of a dog.
a.
• Being in the stern, or being astern; as, the stern davits.
Sternage
n.
• Stern.
Sternal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sternum; in the region of the sternum.
Sternbergite
n.
(Min.) A sulphide of silver and iron, occurring in soft flexible laminae varying in color from brown to black.
Sternebra
n.
(Anat.) One of the segments of the sternum.
Sterned
a.
• Having a stern of a particular shape; — used in composition; as, square-sterned.
Sterner
n.
• A director.
Sternforemost
adv.
• With the stern, instead of the bow, in advance; hence, figuratively, in an awkward, blundering manner.
Sternite
n.
(Zool.) The sternum of an arthropod somite.
Sternly
adv.
• In a stern manner.
Sternmost
a.
• Farthest in the rear; farthest astern; as, the sternmost ship in a convoy.
Sternness
n.
• The quality or state of being stern.
Sternocoracoid
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sternum and the coracoid.
Sternocostal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sternum and the ribs; as, the sternocostal cartilages.
Sternohyoid
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sternum and the hyoid bone or cartilage.
Sternomastoid
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sternum and the mastoid process.
Sternothyroid
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sternum and the thyroid cartilage.
Sternpost
n.
(Naut.) A straight piece of timber, or an iron bar or beam, erected on the extremity of the keel to support the rudder, and receive the ends of the planks or plates of the vessel.
Sternsman
n.
• A steersman.
Sternson
n.
(Naut.) The end of a ship's keelson, to which the sternpost is bolted; — called also stern knee.
Sternum
n.
(Anat.) A plate of cartilage, or a series of bony or cartilaginous plates or segments, in the median line of the pectoral skeleton of most vertebrates above fishes; the breastbone.
(Zool.) The ventral part of any one of the somites of an arthropod.
Sternutation
n.
• The act of sneezing.
Sternutative
a.
• Having the quality of provoking to sneeze.
Sternutatory
a.
• Sternutative.
n.
• A sternutatory substance or medicine.
Sternway
n.
(Naut.) The movement of a ship backward, or with her stern foremost.
Sterquilinous
a.
• Pertaining to a dunghill; hence, mean; dirty; paltry.
Sterre
n.
• A star.
Sterrink
n.
(Zool.) The crab-eating seal (Lobodon carcinophaga) of the Antarctic Ocean.
Sterrometal
n.
• Any alloy of copper, zinc, tin, and iron, of which cannon are sometimes made.
Stert
p. p.
• Started.
Sterte
• p. p. of Start.
Stertorious
a.
• Stertorous.
Stertorous
a.
• Characterized by a deep snoring, which accompaines inspiration in some diseases, especially apoplexy; hence, hoarsely breathing; snoring.
Sterve
v. t. & i.
• To die, or cause to die; to perish. See Starve.
Stet
(Print.) Let it stand; — a word used by proof readers to signify that something once erased, or marked for omission, is to remain.
v. t.
(Print.) To cause or direct to remain after having been marked for omission; to mark with the word stet, or with a series of dots below or beside the matter; as, the proof reader stetted a deled footnote.
Stethal
n.
(Chem.) One of the higher alcohols of the methane series, homologous with ethal, and found in small quantities as an ethereal salt of stearic acid in spermaceti.
Stethograph
n.
(Physiol.) See Pneumatograph.
Stethometer
n.
(Physiol.) An apparatus for measuring the external movements of a given point of the chest wall, during respiration; — also called thoracometer.
Stethoscope
n.
(Med.) An instrument used in auscultation for examining the organs of the chest, as the heart and lungs, by conveying to the ear of the examiner the sounds produced in the thorax.
v. t.
• To auscultate, or examine, with a stethoscope.
Stethoscopist
n.
• One skilled in the use of the stethoscope.
Stethoscopy
n.
• The art or process of examination by the stethoscope.
Steve
v. t.
• To pack or stow, as cargo in a ship's hold. See Steeve.
Stevedore
n.
• One whose occupation is to load and unload vessels in port; one who stows a cargo in a hold.
Steven
n.
• Voice; speech; language.
• An outcry; a loud call; a clamor.
Stew
n.
• A small pond or pool where fish are kept for the table; a vivarium.
• An artificial bed of oysters.
v. t.
• To boil slowly, or with the simmering or moderate heat; to seethe; to cook in a little liquid, over a gentle fire, without boiling; as, to stew meat; to stew oysters; to stew apples.
v. i.
• To be seethed or cooked in a slow, gentle manner, or in heat and moisture.
n.
• A place of stewing or seething; a place where hot bathes are furnished; a hothouse.
• A brothel; — usually in the plural.
• A prostitute.
• A dish prepared by stewing; as, a stewof pigeons.
• A state of agitating excitement; a state of worry; confusion; as, to be in a stew.
Steward
n.
• A man employed in a large family, or on a large estate, to manage the domestic concerns, supervise other servants, collect the rents or income, keep accounts, and the like.
• A person employed in a hotel, or a club, or on board a ship, to provide for the table, superintend the culinary affairs, etc. In naval vessels, the captain's steward, wardroom steward, steerage steward, warrant officers steward, etc., are petty officers who provide for the messes under their charge.
• A fiscal agent of certain bodies; as, a steward in a Methodist church.
• In some colleges, an officer who provides food for the students and superintends the kitchen; also, an officer who attends to the accounts of the students.
• In Scotland, a magistrate appointed by the crown to exercise jurisdiction over royal lands.
v. t.
• To manage as a steward.
Stewardess
n.
• A female steward; specifically, a woman employed in passenger vessels to attend to the wants of female passengers.
Stewardly
adv.
• In a manner, or with the care, of a steward.
Stewardship
n.
• The office of a steward.
Stewartry
n.
• An overseer or superintendent.
• The office of a steward; stewardship.
• In Scotland, the jurisdiction of a steward; also, the lands under such jurisdiction.
Stewish
a.
• Suiting a stew, or brothel.
Stewpan
n.
• A pan used for stewing.
Stewpot
n.
• A pot used for stewing.
Stey
n.
• See Stee.
Sthenic
a.
(Med.) Strong; active; — said especially of morbid states attended with excessive action of the heart and blood vessels, and characterized by strength and activity of the muscular and nervous system; as, a sthenic fever.
Stiacciato
n.
(Sculp.) The lowest relief, — often used in Italian sculpture of the 15th and 16th centuries.
Stian
n.
• A sty on the eye. See Styan.
Stibborn
a.
• Stubborn.
Stibial
a.
• Like, or having the qualities of, antimony; antimonial.
Stibialism
n.
(Med.) Antimonial intoxication or poisoning.
Stibiated
a.
(Med. Chem.) Combined or impregnated with antimony (stibium).
Stibic
a.
(Chem.) Antimonic; — used with reference to certain compounds of antimony.
Stibiconite
n.
(Min.) A native oxide of antimony occurring in masses of a yellow color.
Stibine
n.
(Chem.) Antimony hydride, or hydrogen antimonide, a colorless gas produced by the action of nascent hydrogen on antimony. It has a characteristic odor and burns with a characteristic greenish flame. Formerly called also antimoniureted hydrogen.
Stibious
a.
(Chem.) Antimonious.
Stibium
n.
(Chem.) The technical name of antimony.
(Min.) Stibnite.
Stibnite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a lead-gray color and brilliant metallic luster, occurring in prismatic crystals; sulphide of antimony; — called also antimony glance, and gray antimony.
Stibonium
n.
(Chem.) The hypothetical radical SbH4, analogous to ammonium; — called also antimonium.
Sticcado
n.
(Mus.) An instrument consisting of small bars of wood, flat at the bottom and rounded at the top, and resting on the edges of a kind of open box. They are unequal in size, gradually increasing from the smallest to the largest, and are tuned to the diatonic scale. The tones are produced by striking the pieces of wood with hard balls attached to flexible sticks.
Stich
n.
• A verse, of whatever measure or number of feet.
• A line in the Scriptures; specifically (Hebrew Scriptures), one of the rhythmic lines in the poetical books and passages of the Old Treatment, as written in the oldest Hebrew manuscripts and in the Revised Version of the English Bible.
• A row, line, or rank of trees.
Stichic
a.
• Of or pertaining to stichs, or lines; consisting of stichs, or lines.
Stichidium
n.
(Bot.) A special podlike or fusiform branch containing tetraspores. It is found in certain red algae.
Stichomancy
n.
• Divination by lines, or passages of books, taken at hazard.
Stichometrical
a.
• Of or pertaining to stichometry; characterized by stichs, or lines.
Stichometry
n.
• Measurement of books by the number of lines which they contain.
• Division of the text of a book into lines; especially, the division of the text of books into lines accommodated to the sense, — a method of writing manuscripts used before punctuation was adopted.
Stichwort
n.
(Bot.) A kind of chickweed (Stellaria Holostea).
Stick
n.
• A small shoot, or branch, separated, as by a cutting, from a tree or shrub; also, any stem or branch of a tree, of any size, cut for fuel or timber.
• Any long and comparatively slender piece of wood, whether in natural form or shaped with tools; a rod; a wand; a staff; as, the stick of a rocket; a walking stick.
• Anything shaped like a stick; as, a stick of wax.
• A derogatory expression for a person; one who is inert or stupid; as, an odd stick; a poor stick.
(Print.) A composing stick. See under Composing. It is usually a frame of metal, but for posters, handbills, etc., one made of wood is used.
• A thrust with a pointed instrument; a stab.
v. t.
• To penetrate with a pointed instrument; to pierce; to stab; hence, to kill by piercing; as, to stick a beast.
• To cause to penetrate; to push, thrust, or drive, so as to pierce; as, to stick a needle into one's finger.
• To fasten, attach, or cause to remain, by thrusting in; hence, also, to adorn or deck with things fastened on as by piercing; as, to stick a pin on the sleeve.
• To set; to fix in; as, to stick card teeth.
• To set with something pointed; as, to stick cards.
• To fix on a pointed instrument; to impale; as, to stick an apple on a fork.
• To attach by causing to adhere to the surface; as, to stick on a plaster; to stick a stamp on an envelope; also, to attach in any manner.
(Print.) To compose; to set, or arrange, in a composing stick; as, to stick type.
(Joinery) To run or plane (moldings) in a machine, in contradistinction to working them by hand. Such moldings are said to be stuck.
• To cause to stick; to bring to a stand; to pose; to puzzle; as, to stick one with a hard problem.
• To impose upon; to compel to pay; sometimes, to cheat.
v. i.
• To adhere; as, glue sticks to the fingers; paste sticks to the wall.
• To remain where placed; to be fixed; to hold fast to any position so as to be moved with difficulty; to cling; to abide; to cleave; to be united closely.
• To be prevented from going farther; to stop by reason of some obstacle; to be stayed.
• To be embarrassed or puzzled; to hesitate; to be deterred, as by scruples; to scruple; — often with at.
• To cause difficulties, scruples, or hesitation.
Sticked
imp.
• Stuck.
Sticker
n.
• One who, or that which, sticks; as, a bill sticker.
• That which causes one to stick; that which puzzles or poses.
(Mus.) In the organ, a small wooden rod which connects (in part) a key and a pallet, so as to communicate motion by pushing.
• Same as Paster, 2.
Stickful
n.
(Print.) As much set type as fills a composing stick.
Stickiness
n.
• The quality of being sticky; as, the stickiness of glue or paste.
Sticking
• a. & n. from Stick, v.
Stickit
a.
• Stuck; spoiled in making.
Stickle
v. i.
• To separate combatants by intervening.
• To contend, contest, or altercate, esp. in a pertinacious manner on insufficient grounds.
• To play fast and loose; to pass from one side to the other; to trim.
v. t.
• To separate, as combatants; hence, to quiet, to appease, as disputants.
• To intervene in; to stop, or put an end to, by intervening; hence, to arbitrate.
n.
• A shallow rapid in a river; also, the current below a waterfall.
Stickler
n.
• One who stickles.
• One who arbitrates a duel; a sidesman to a fencer; a second; an umpire.
• One who pertinaciously contends for some trifling things, as a point of etiquette; an unreasonable, obstinate contender; as, a stickler for ceremony.
Sticktail
n.
• The ruddy duck.
Sticky
a.
• Having the quality of sticking to a surface; adhesive; gluey; viscous; viscid; glutinous; tenacious.
Stiddy
n.
• An anvil; also, a smith shop. See Stithy.
Stiff
a.
• Not easily bent; not flexible or pliant; not limber or flaccid; rigid; firm; as, stiff wood, paper, joints.
• Not liquid or fluid; thick and tenacious; inspissated; neither soft nor hard; as, the paste is stiff.
• Firm; strong; violent; difficult to oppose; as, a stiff gale or breeze.
• Not easily subdued; unyielding; stubborn; obstinate; pertinacious; as, a stiff adversary.
• Not natural and easy; formal; constrained; affected; starched; as, stiff behavior; a stiff style.
• Harsh; disagreeable; severe; hard to bear.
(Naut.) Bearing a press of canvas without careening much; as, a stiff vessel; — opposed to crank.
• Very large, strong, or costly; powerful; as, a stiff charge; a stiff price.
Stiffen
v. t.
• tiono make stiff; to make less pliant or flexible; as, to stiffen cloth with starch.
• To inspissate; to make more thick or viscous; as, to stiffen paste.
• To make torpid; to benumb.
v. i.
• To become stiff or stiffer, in any sense of the adjective.
Stiffener
n.
• One who, or that which, stiffens anything, as a piece of stiff cloth in a cravat.
Stiffening
n.
• Act or process of making stiff.
• Something used to make anything stiff.
Stiffish
a.
• Somewhat stiff.
Stiffly
adv.
• In a stiff manner.
Stiffness
n.
• The quality or state of being stiff; as, the stiffness of cloth or of paste; stiffness of manner; stiffness of character.
Stifftail
n.
• The ruddy duck.
Stifle
n.
(Far.) The joint next above the hock, and near the flank, in the hind leg of the horse and allied animals; the joint corresponding to the knee in man; — called also stifle joint. See Illust. under Horse.
v. t.
• To stop the breath of by crowding something into the windpipe, or introducing an irrespirable substance into the lungs; to choke; to suffocate; to cause the death of by such means; as, to stifle one with smoke or dust.
• To stop; to extinguish; to deaden; to quench; as, to stifle the breath; to stifle a fire or flame.
• To suppress the manifestation or report of; to smother; to conceal from public knowledge; as, to stifle a story; to stifle passion.
v. i.
• To die by reason of obstruction of the breath, or because some noxious substance prevents respiration.
Stifled
a.
• Stifling.
Stifler
n.
• One who, or that which, stifles.
(Mil.) See Camouflet.
Stigma
n.
• A mark made with a burning iron; a brand.
• Any mark of infamy or disgrace; sign of moral blemish; stain or reproach caused by dishonorable conduct; reproachful characterization.
(Bot.) That part of a pistil which has no epidermis, and is fitted to receive the pollen. It is usually the terminal portion, and is commonly somewhat glutinous or viscid. See Illust. of Stamen and of Flower.
(Anat.) A small spot, mark, scar, or a minute hole; — applied especially to a spot on the outer surface of a Graafian follicle, and to spots of intercellular substance in scaly epithelium, or to minute holes in such spots.
(Pathol.) A red speck upon the skin, produced either by the extravasation of blood, as in the bloody sweat characteristic of certain varieties of religious ecstasy, or by capillary congestion, as in the case of drunkards.
(Zool.) One of the external openings of the tracheae of insects, myriapods, and other arthropods; a spiracle.
• One of the apertures of the pulmonary sacs of arachnids. See Illust. of Scorpion.
• One of the apertures of the gill of an ascidian, and of Amphioxus.
(Geom.) A point so connected by any law whatever with another point, called an index, that as the index moves in any manner in a plane the first point or stigma moves in a determinate way in the same plane.
(R. C. Ch.) Marks believed to have been supernaturally impressed upon the bodies of certain persons in imitation of the wounds on the crucified body of Christ. See def. 5, above.
Stigmaria
n.
(Paleon.) The fossil root stem of a coal plant of the genus Sigillaria.
Stigmata
n.

pl.

Stigmatic
n.
• A notorious profligate or criminal who has been branded; one who bears the marks of infamy or punishment.
• A person who is marked or deformed by nature.
Stigmatically
adv.
• With a stigma, or mark of infamy or deformity.
Stigmatist
n.
• One believed to be supernaturally impressed with the marks of Christ's wounds. See Stigma, 8.
Stigmatization
n.
• The act of stigmatizing.
(R. C. Ch.) The production of stigmata upon the body. See Stigma, 8.
Stigmatize
v. t.
• To mark with a stigma, or brand; as, the ancients stigmatized their slaves and soldiers.
• To set a mark of disgrace on; to brand with some mark of reproach or infamy.
Stigmatose
a.
(Bot.) Same as Stigmatic.
Stigonomancy
n.
• Divination by writing on the bark of a tree.
Stike
n.
• Stanza.
Stilar
a.
• Of or pertaining to the style of a dial.
Stilbene
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon, C14H12, produced artificially in large, fine crystals; — called also diphenyl ethylene, toluylene, etc.
Stilbite
n.
(Min.) A common mineral of the zeolite family, a hydrous silicate of alumina and lime, usually occurring in sheaflike aggregations of crystals, also in radiated masses. It is of a white or yellowish color, with pearly luster on the cleavage surface. Called also desmine.
Stile
n.
• A pin set on the face of a dial, to cast a shadow; a style. See Style.
• Mode of composition. See Style.
n.
• A step, or set of steps, for ascending and descending, in passing a fence or wall.
(Arch.) One of the upright pieces in a frame; one of the primary members of a frame, into which the secondary members are mortised.
Stilet
n.
• A stiletto.
(Surg.) See Stylet, 2.
Stiletto
n.
• A kind of dagger with a slender, rounded, and pointed blade.
• A pointed instrument for making eyelet holes in embroidery.
• A beard trimmed into a pointed form.
v. t.
• To stab or kill with a stiletto.
Still
a.
• Motionless; at rest; quiet; as, to stand still; to lie or sit still.
• Uttering no sound; silent; as, the audience is still; the animals are still.
• Not disturbed by noise or agitation; quiet; calm; as, a still evening; a still atmosphere.
• Comparatively quiet or silent; soft; gentle; low.
• Constant; continual.
• Not effervescing; not sparkling; as, still wines.
n.
• Freedom from noise; calm; silence; as, the still of midnight.
• A steep hill or ascent.
adv.
• To this time; until and during the time now present; now no less than before; yet.
• In the future as now and before.
• In continuation by successive or repeated acts; always; ever; constantly; uniformly.
• In an increasing or additional degree; even more; — much used with comparatives.
• Notwithstanding what has been said or done; in spite of what has occured; nevertheless; — sometimes used as a conjunction. See Synonym of But.
• After that; after what is stated.
v. t.
• To stop, as motion or agitation; to cause to become quiet, or comparatively quiet; to check the agitation of; as, to still the raging sea.
• To stop, as noise; to silence.
• To appease; to calm; to quiet, as tumult, agitation, or excitement; as, to still the passions.
n.
• A vessel, boiler, or copper used in the distillation of liquids; specifically, one used for the distillation of alcoholic liquors; a retort. The name is sometimes applied to the whole apparatus used in in vaporization and condensation.
• A house where liquors are distilled; a distillery.
v. t.
• To cause to fall by drops.
• To expel spirit from by heat, or to evaporate and condense in a refrigeratory; to distill.
v. i.
• To drop, or flow in drops; to distill.
Stillage
n.
(Bleaching) A low stool to keep the goods from touching the floor.
Stillatitious
a.
• Falling in drops; drawn by a still.
Stillatory
n.
• An alembic; a vessel for distillation.
• A laboratory; a place or room in which distillation is performed.
Stillbirth
n.
• The birth of a dead fetus.
Stillborn
a.
• Dead at the birth; as, a stillborn child.
• Fig.: Abortive; as, a stillborn poem.
Stiller
n.
• One who stills, or quiets.
Stillhouse
n.
• A house in which distillation is carried on; a distillery.
Stillicide
n.
• A continual falling or succession of drops; rain water falling from the eaves.
Stillicidious
a.
• Falling in drops.
Stilliform
a.
• Having the form of a drop.
Stilling
n.
• A stillion.
Stillion
n.
• A stand, as for casks or vats in a brewery, or for pottery while drying.
Stillness
n.
• The quality or state of being still; quietness; silence; calmness; inactivity.
• Habitual silence or quiet; taciturnity.
Stillroom
n.
• A room for distilling.
• An apartment in a house where liquors, preserves, and the like, are kept.
Stillstand
n.
• A standstill.
Stilly
a.
• Still; quiet; calm.
adv.
• In a still manner; quietly; silently; softly.
Stilpnomelane
n.
(Min.) A black or greenish black mineral occurring in foliated flates, also in velvety bronze-colored incrustations. It is a hydrous silicate of iron and alumina.
Stilt
n.
• A pole, or piece of wood, constructed with a step or loop to raise the foot above the ground in walking. It is sometimes lashed to the leg, and sometimes prolonged upward so as to be steadied by the hand or arm.
• A crutch; also, the handle of a plow.
(Zool.) Any species of limicoline birds belonging to Himantopus and allied genera, in which the legs are remarkably long and slender. Called also longshanks, stiltbird, stilt plover, and lawyer.
v. t.
• To raise on stilts, or as if on stilts.
Stiltbird
n.
(Zool.) See Stilt, n., 3.
Stilted
a.
• Elevated as if on stilts; hence, pompous; bombastic; as, a stilted style; stilted declamation.
Stiltify
v. t.
• To raise upon stilts, or as upon stilts; to stilt.
Stilty
a.
• Unreasonably elevated; pompous; stilted; as, a stilty style.
Stime
n.
• A slight gleam or glimmer; a glimpse.
Stimulant
a.
• Serving to stimulate.
(Physiol.) Produced increased vital action in the organism, or in any of its parts.
n.
• That which stimulates, provokes, or excites.
(Physiol. & Med.) An agent which produces a temporary increase of vital activity in the organism, or in any of its parts; — sometimes used without qualification to signify an alcoholic beverage used as a stimulant.
Stimulate
v. t.
• To excite as if with a goad; to excite, rouse, or animate, to action or more vigorous exertion by some pungent motive or by persuasion; as, to stimulate one by the hope of reward, or by the prospect of glory.
(Physiol.) To excite; to irritate; especially, to excite the activity of (a nerve or an irritable muscle), as by electricity.
Stimulation
n.
• The act of stimulating, or the state of being stimulated.
(Physiol.) The irritating action of various agents (stimuli) on muscles, nerves, or a sensory end organ, by which activity is evoked; especially, the nervous impulse produced by various agents on nerves, or a sensory end organ, by which the part connected with the nerve is thrown into a state of activity; irritation.
Stimulative
a.
• Having the quality of stimulating.
n.
• That which stimulates.
Stimulator
n.
• One who stimulates.
Stimulatress
n.
• A woman who stimulates.
Stimulism
n.
(Med.) The theory of medical practice which regarded life as dependent upon stimulation, or excitation, and disease as caused by excess or deficiency in the amount of stimulation.
• The practice of treating disease by alcoholic stimulants.
Stimulus
n.
• A goad; hence, something that rouses the mind or spirits; an incentive; as, the hope of gain is a powerful stimulus to labor and action.
• That which excites or produces a temporary increase of vital action, either in the whole organism or in any of its parts; especially (Physiol.), any substance or agent capable of evoking the activity of a nerve or irritable muscle, or capable of producing an impression upon a sensory organ or more particularly upon its specific end organ.
Sting
n.
(Zool.) Any sharp organ of offense and defense, especially when connected with a poison gland, and adapted to inflict a wound by piercing; as the caudal sting of a scorpion. The sting of a bee or wasp is a modified ovipositor. The caudal sting, or spine, of a sting ray is a modified dorsal fin ray. The term is sometimes applied to the fang of a serpent. See Illust. of Scorpion.
(Bot.) A sharp-pointed hollow hair seated on a gland which secrets an acrid fluid, as in nettles. The points of these hairs usually break off in the wound, and the acrid fluid is pressed into it.
• Anything that gives acute pain, bodily or mental; as, the stings of remorse; the stings of reproach.
• The thrust of a sting into the flesh; the act of stinging; a wound inflicted by stinging.
• A goad; incitement.
• The point of an epigram or other sarcastic saying.
v. t.
• To pierce or wound with a sting; as, bees will sting an animal that irritates them; the nettles stung his hands.
• To pain acutely; as, the conscience is stung with remorse; to bite.
• To goad; to incite, as by taunts or reproaches.
Stingaree
n.
(Zool.) Any sting ray. See under 6th Ray.
Stingbull
n.
(Zool.) The European greater weever fish (Trachinus draco), which is capable of inflicting severe wounds with the spinous rays of its dorsal fin. See Weever.
Stinger
n.
• One who, or that which, stings.
Stingfish
n.
(Zool.) The weever.
Stingily
adv.
• In a stingy manner.
Stinginess
n.
• The quality or state of being stingy.
Stinging
a.
• Piercing, or capable of piercing, with a sting; inflicting acute pain as if with a sting, goad, or pointed weapon; pungent; biting; as, stinging cold; a stinging rebuke.
Stingless
a.
• Having no sting.
Stingo
n.
• Old beer; sharp or strong liquor.
Stingtail
n.
(Zool.) A sting ray.
Stingy
a.
• Stinging; able to sting.
a.
• Extremely close and covetous; meanly avaricious; niggardly; miserly; penurious; as, a stingy churl.
Stink
v. i.
• To emit a strong, offensive smell; to send out a disgusting odor.
v. t.
• To cause to stink; to affect by a stink.
n.
• A strong, offensive smell; a disgusting odor; a stench.
Stinkard
n.
• A mean, stinking, paltry fellow.
(Zool.) The teledu of the East Indies. It emits a disagreeable odor.
Stinkball
n.
• A composition of substances which in combustion emit a suffocating odor; — used formerly in naval warfare.
Stinker
n.
• One who, or that which, stinks.
(Zool.) Any one of the several species of large antarctic petrels which feed on blubber and carrion and have an offensive odor, as the giant fulmar.
Stinkhorn
n.
(Bot.) A kind of fungus of the genus Phallus, which emits a fetid odor.
Stinking
a. & n.
• from Stink, v.
Stinkingly
adv.
• In a stinking manner; with an offensive smell.
Stinkpot
n.
• An earthen jar charged with powder, grenades, and other materials of an offensive and suffocating smell, — sometimes used in boarding an enemy's vessel.
• A vessel in which disinfectants are burned.
(Zool.) The musk turtle, or musk tortoise. See under Musk.
Stinkstone
n.
(Min.) One of the varieties of calcite, barite, and feldspar, which emit a fetid odor on being struck; — called also swinestone.
Stinkweed
n.
(Bot.) Stramonium. See Jamestown weed, and Datura.
Stinkwood
n.
(Bot.) A name given to several kinds of wood with an unpleasant smell, as that of the Foetidia Mauritiana of the Mauritius, and that of the South African Ocotea bullata.
Stint
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of small sandpipers, as the sanderling of Europe and America, the dunlin, the little stint of India (Tringa minuta), etc. Called also pume.
• A phalarope.
v. t.
• To restrain within certain limits; to bound; to confine; to restrain; to restrict to a scant allowance.
• To put an end to; to stop.
• To assign a certain (i. e., limited) task to (a person), upon the performance of which one is excused from further labor for the day or for a certain time; to stent.
• To serve successfully; to get with foal; — said of mares.
v. i.
• To stop; to cease.
n.
• Limit; bound; restraint; extent.
• Quantity or task assigned; proportion allotted.
Stintance
n.
• Restraint; stoppage.
Stintedness
n.
• The state of being stinted.
Stinter
n.
• One who, or that which, stints.
Stintless
a.
• Without stint or restraint.
Stipe
n.
(Bot.) The stalk or petiole of a frond, as of a fern.
• The stalk of a pistil.
• The trunk of a tree.
• The stem of a fungus or mushroom.
Stipel
n.
(Bot.) The stipule of a leaflet.
Stipellate
a.
(Bot.) Having stipels.
Stipend
n.
• Settled pay or compensation for services, whether paid daily, monthly, or annually.
v. t.
• To pay by settled wages.
Stipendiarian
a.
• Acting from mercenary considerations; stipendiary.
Stipendiary
a.
• Receiving wages, or salary; performing services for a stated price or compensation.
n.
• One who receives a stipend.
Stipendiate
v. t.
• To provide with a stipend, or salary; to support; to pay.
Stipendless
a.
• Having no stipend.
Stipes
n.
(Zool.) The second joint of a maxilla of an insect or a crustacean.
• An eyestalk.
Stipitate
a.
(Bot.) Supported by a stipe; elevated on a stipe, as the fronds of most ferns, or the pod of certain cruciferous plants.
Stipitiform
a.
(Bot.) Having the shape of a stalk; stalklike.
Stipple
v. t.
• To engrave by means of dots, in distinction from engraving in lines.
• To paint, as in water colors, by small, short touches which together produce an even or softly graded surface.
Stiptic
a. & n.
(Med.) See Styptic.
Stipula
n.
(Bot.) A stipule.
(Zool.) A newly sprouted feather.
Stipulary
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to stipules; stipular.
Stipulate
a.
(Bot.) Furnished with stipules; as, a stipulate leaf.
v. i.
• To make an agreement or covenant with any person or company to do or forbear anything; to bargain; to contract; to settle terms; as, certain princes stipulated to assist each other in resisting the armies of France.
Stipulation
n.
• The act of stipulating; a contracting or bargaining; an agreement.
• That which is stipulated, or agreed upon; that which is definitely arranged or contracted; an agreement; a covenant; a contract or bargain; also, any particular article, item, or condition, in a mutual agreement; as, the stipulations of the allied powers to furnish each his contingent of troops.
(Law) A material article of an agreement; an undertaking in the nature of bail taken in the admiralty courts; a bargain.
n.
(Bot.) The situation, arrangement, and structure of the stipules.
Stipulator
n.
• One who stipulates, contracts, or covenants.
Stipule
n.
(Bot.) An appendage at the base of petioles or leaves, usually somewhat resembling a small leaf in texture and appearance.
Stipuled
a.
(Bot.) Furnished with stipules, or leafy appendages.
Stir
v. t.
• To change the place of in any manner; to move.
• To disturb the relative position of the particles of, as of a liquid, by passing something through it; to agitate; as, to stir a pudding with a spoon.
• To bring into debate; to agitate; to moot.
• To incite to action; to arouse; to instigate; to prompt; to excite.
v. i.
• To move; to change one's position.
• To be in motion; to be active or bustling; to exert or busy one's self.
• To become the object of notice; to be on foot.
• To rise, or be up, in the morning.
n.
• The act or result of stirring; agitation; tumult; bustle; noise or various movements.
• Public disturbance or commotion; tumultuous disorder; seditious uproar.
• Agitation of thoughts; conflicting passions.
Stirabout
n.
• A dish formed of oatmeal boiled in water to a certain consistency and frequently stirred, or of oatmeal and dripping mixed together and stirred about in a pan; a hasty pudding.
Stiriated
a.
• Adorned with pendants like icicles.
Stirious
a.
• Resembling icicles.
Stirk
n.
• A young bullock or heifer.
Stirless
a.
• Without stirring; very quiet; motionless.
Stirp
n.
• Stock; race; family.
Stirpiculture
n.
• The breeding of special stocks or races.
Stirps
n.
(Law) Stock; race; family.
(Bot.) A race, or a fixed and permanent variety.
Stirrage
n.
• The act of stirring; stir; commotion.
Stirrer
n.
• One who, or that which, stirs something; also, one who moves about, especially after sleep; as, an early stirrer.
Stirring
a.
• Putting in motion, or being in motion; active; active in business; habitually employed in some kind of business; accustomed to a busy life.
Stirrup
n.
• A kind of ring, or bent piece of metal, wood, leather, or the like, horizontal in one part for receiving the foot of a rider, and attached by a strap to the saddle, — used to assist a person in mounting a horse, and to enable him to sit steadily in riding, as well as to relieve him by supporting a part of the weight of the body.
(Carp. & Mach.) Any piece resembling in shape the stirrup of a saddle, and used as a support, clamp, etc. See Bridle iron.
(Naut.) A rope secured to a yard, with a thimble in its lower end for supporting a footrope.
Stirt
p. p.
v. i.
• Started; leaped.
Stirte
• imp. of Start, v. i. & t.
Stitch
n.
• A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.
• A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn; as, to let down, or drop, a stitch; to take up a stitch.
• A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle; hence, by extension, any space passed over; distance.
• A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle; as, a stitch in the side.
• A contortion, or twist.
• Any least part of a fabric or dress; as, to wet every stitch of clothes.
• A furrow.
v. t.
• To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches; as, to stitch a shirt bosom.
• To sew, or unite together by stitches; as, to stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet.
(Agric.) To form land into ridges.
v. i.
• To practice stitching, or needlework.
Stitchel
n.
• A kind of hairy wool.
Stitcher
n.
• One who stitches; a seamstress.
Stitchery
n.
• Needlework; — in comtempt.
Stitching
n.
• The act of one who stitches.
• Work done by sewing, esp. when a continuous line of stitches is shown on the surface; stitches, collectively.
Stitchwort
n.
(Bot.) See Stichwort.
Stith
a.
• Strong; stiff; rigid.
n.
• An anvil; a stithy.
Stithy
n.
• An anvil.
• A smith's shop; a smithy; a smithery; a forge.
v. t.
• To forge on an anvil.
Stive
v. t.
• To stuff; to crowd; to fill full; hence, to make hot and close; to render stifling.
v. i.
• To be stifled or suffocated.
n.
• The floating dust in flour mills caused by the operation or grinding.
Stiver
n.
• A Dutch coin, and money of account, of the value of two cents, or about one penny sterling; hence, figuratively, anything of little worth.
Stives
n. pl.
• Stews; a brothel.
Stoak
v. t.
(Naut.) To stop; to choke.
Stoat
n.
(Zool.) The ermine in its summer pelage, when it is reddish brown, but with a black tip to the tail. The name is sometimes applied also to other brown weasels.
Stocah
n.
• A menial attendant.
Stoccade
n. & v.
• See Stockade.
Stoccado
n.
• A stab; a thrust with a rapier.
Stochastic
a.
• Conjectural; able to conjecture.
Stock
n.
• The stem, or main body, of a tree or plant; the fixed, strong, firm part; the trunk.
• The stem or branch in which a graft is inserted.
• A block of wood; something fixed and solid; a pillar; a firm support; a post.
• Hence, a person who is as dull and lifeless as a stock or post; one who has little sense.
• The principal supporting part; the part in which others are inserted, or to which they are attached.
• The wood to which the barrel, lock, etc., of a musket or like firearm are secured; also, a long, rectangular piece of wood, which is an important part of several forms of gun carriage.
• The handle or contrivance by which bits are held in boring; a bitstock; a brace.
(Joinery) The block of wood or metal frame which constitutes the body of a plane, and in which the plane iron is fitted; a plane stock.
(Naut.) The wooden or iron crosspiece to which the shank of an anchor is attached. See Illust. of Anchor.
• The support of the block in which an anvil is fixed, or of the anvil itself.
• A handle or wrench forming a holder for the dies for cutting screws; a diestock.
• The part of a tally formerly struck in the exchequer, which was delivered to the person who had lent the king money on account, as the evidence of indebtedness. See Counterfoil.
• The original progenitor; also, the race or line of a family; the progenitor of a family and his direct descendants; lineage; family.
• Money or capital which an individual or a firm employs in business; fund; in the United States, the capital of a bank or other company, in the form of transferable shares, each of a certain amount; money funded in government securities, called also the public funds; in the plural, property consisting of shares in joint-stock companies, or in the obligations of a government for its funded debt; — so in the United States, but in England the latter only are called stocks, and the former shares.
(Bookkeeping) Same as Stock account, below.
• Supply provided; store; accumulation; especially, a merchant's or manufacturer's store of goods; as, to lay in a stock of provisions.
(Agric.) Domestic animals or beasts collectively, used or raised on a farm; as, a stock of cattle or of sheep, etc.; — called also live stock.
(Card Playing) That portion of a pack of cards not distributed to the players at the beginning of certain games, as gleek, etc., but which might be drawn from afterward as occasion required; a bank.
• A thrust with a rapier; a stoccado.
• A covering for the leg, or leg and foot; as, upper stocks (breeches); nether stocks (stockings).
• A kind of stiff, wide band or cravat for the neck; as, a silk stock.
• A frame of timber, with holes in which the feet, or the feet and hands, of criminals were formerly confined by way of punishment.
(Shipbuilding) The frame or timbers on which a ship rests while building.
• Red and gray bricks, used for the exterior of walls and the front of buildings.
(Bot.) Any cruciferous plant of the genus Matthiola; as, common stock (Matthiola incana) (see Gilly-flower); ten-weeks stock (M. annua).
(Geol.) An irregular metalliferous mass filling a large cavity in a rock formation, as a stock of lead ore deposited in limestone.
• A race or variety in a species.
(Biol.) In tectology, an aggregate or colony of persons (see Person), as trees, chains of salpae, etc.
• The beater of a fulling mill.
(Cookery) A liquid or jelly containing the juices and soluble parts of meat, and certain vegetables, etc., extracted by cooking; — used in making soup, gravy, etc.
v. t.
• To lay up; to put aside for future use; to store, as merchandise, and the like.
• To provide with material requisites; to store; to fill; to supply; as, to stock a warehouse, that is, to fill it with goods; to stock a farm, that is, to supply it with cattle and tools; to stock land, that is, to occupy it with a permanent growth, especially of grass.
• To suffer to retain milk for twenty-four hours or more previous to sale, as cows.
• To put in the stocks.
a.
• Used or employed for constant service or application, as if constituting a portion of a stock or supply; standard; permanent; standing; as, a stock actor; a stock play; a stock sermon.
Stockade
n.
(Mil.) A line of stout posts or timbers set firmly in the earth in contact with each other (and usually with loopholes) to form a barrier, or defensive fortification.
• An inclosure, or pen, made with posts and stakes.
v. t.
• To surround, fortify, or protect with a stockade.
Stockbroker
n.
• A broker who deals in stocks.
Stockdove
n.
(Zool.) A common European wild pigeon (Columba aenas), so called because at one time believed to be the stock of the domestic pigeon, or, according to some, from its breeding in the stocks, or trunks, of trees.
Stocker
n.
• One who makes or fits stocks, as of guns or gun carriages, etc.
Stockfish
n.
• Salted and dried fish, especially codfish, hake, ling, and torsk; also, codfish dried without being salted.
(Zool.) Young fresh cod.
Stockholder
n.
• One who is a holder or proprietor of stock in the public funds, or in the funds of a bank or other stock company.
Stockinet
n.
• An elastic textile fabric imitating knitting, of which stockings, under-garments, etc., are made.
Stocking
n.
• A close-fitting covering for the foot and leg, usually knit or woven.
v. t.
• To dress in GBs.
Stockinger
n.
• A stocking weaver.
Stockish
a.
• Like a stock; stupid; blockish.
Stockjobber
n.
• One who speculates in stocks for gain; one whose occupation is to buy and sell stocks. In England a jobber acts as an intermediary between brokers.
Stockjobbing
n.
• The act or art of dealing in stocks; the business of a stockjobber.
Stockman
n.
• A herdsman; a ranchman; one owning, or having charge of, herds of live stock.
Stockwork
n.
(Mining) A system of working in ore, etc., when it lies not in strata or veins, but in solid masses, so as to be worked in chambers or stories.
(Geol.) A metalliferous deposit characterized by the impregnation of the mass of rock with many small veins or nests irregularly grouped. This kind of deposit is especially common with tin ore. Such deposits are worked in floors or stories.
Stocky
a.
• Short and thick; thick rather than tall or corpulent.
• Headstrong.
Stodgy
a.
• Wet.
Stoic
n.
• A disciple of the philosopher Zeno; one of a Greek sect which held that men should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and should submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity, by which all things are governed.
• Hence, a person not easily excited; an apathetic person; one who is apparently or professedly indifferent to pleasure or pain.
Stoichiological
a.
• Of or pertaining to stoichiology.
Stoichiology
n.
• That part of the science of physiology which treats of the elements, or principles, composing animal tissues.
(Logic) The doctrine of the elementary requisites of mere thought.
• The statement or discussion of the first principles of any science or art.
Stoichiometry
n.
• The art or process of calculating the atomic proportions, combining weights, and other numerical relations of chemical elements and their compounds.
Stoicism
n.
• The opinions and maxims of the Stoics.
• A real or pretended indifference to pleasure or pain; insensibility; impassiveness.
Stoicity
n.
• Stoicism.
Stoke
v. t.
• To stick; to thrust; to stab.
• To poke or stir up, as a fire; hence, to tend, as the fire of a furnace, boiler, etc.
v. i.
• To poke or stir up a fire; hence, to tend the fires of furnaces, steamers, etc.
Stokehole
n.
• The mouth to the grate of a furnace; also, the space in front of the furnace, where the stokers stand.
Stoker
n.
• One who is employed to tend a furnace and supply it with fuel, especially the furnace of a locomotive or of a marine steam boiler; also, a machine for feeding fuel to a fire.
• A fire poker.
Stokey
a.
• Close; sultry.
Stola
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A long garment, descending to the ankles, worn by Roman women.
Stole
• imp. of Steal.
n.
(Bot.) A stolon.
n.
• A long, loose garment reaching to the feet.
(Eccl.) A narrow band of silk or stuff, sometimes enriched with embroidery and jewels, worn on the left shoulder of deacons, and across both shoulders of bishops and priests, pendent on each side nearly to the ground. At Mass, it is worn crossed on the breast by priests. It is used in various sacred functions.
Stoled
a.
• Having or wearing a stole.
Stolen
• p. p. of Steal.
Stolid
a.
• Hopelessly insensible or stupid; not easily aroused or excited; dull; impassive; foolish.
Stolidity
n.
• The state or quality of being stolid; dullness of intellect; obtuseness; stupidity.
Stolidness
n.
• Same as Stolidity.
Stolon
n.
(Bot.) A trailing branch which is disposed to take root at the end or at the joints; a stole.
(Zool.) An extension of the integument of the body, or of the body wall, from which buds are developed, giving rise to new zooids, and thus forming a compound animal in which the zooids usually remain united by the stolons. Such stolons are often present in Anthozoa, Hydroidea, Bryozoa, and social ascidians. See Illust. under Scyphistoma.
Stoloniferous
a.
• Producing stolons; putting forth suckers.
Stoma
n.
(Anat.) One of the minute apertures between the cells in many serous membranes.
(Bot.) The minute breathing pores of leaves or other organs opening into the intercellular spaces, and usually bordered by two contractile cells.
• The line of dehiscence of the sporangium of a fern. It is usually marked by two transversely elongated cells. See Illust. of Sporangium.
(Zool.) A stigma. See Stigma, n., 6 (a) & (b).
Stomach
n.
(Anat.) An enlargement, or series of enlargements, in the anterior part of the alimentary canal, in which food is digested; any cavity in which digestion takes place in an animal; a digestive cavity. See Digestion, and Gastric juice, under Gastric.
• The desire for food caused by hunger; appetite; as, a good stomach for roast beef.
• Hence appetite in general; inclination; desire.
• Violence of temper; anger; sullenness; resentment; willful obstinacy; stubbornness.
• Pride; haughtiness; arrogance.
v. t.
• To resent; to remember with anger; to dislike.
• To bear without repugnance; to brook.
v. i.
• To be angry.
Stomachal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the stomach; gastric.
• Helping the stomach; stomachic; cordial.
n.
• A stomachic.
Stomacher
n.
• One who stomachs.
• An ornamental covering for the breast, worn originally both by men and women. Those worn by women were often richly decorated.
Stomachful
a.
• Willfully obstinate; stubborn; perverse.
Stomachic
n.
(Med.) A medicine that strengthens the stomach and excites its action.
Stomaching
n.
• Resentment.
Stomachless
a.
• Being without a stomach.
• Having no appetite.
Stomachous
a.
• Stout; sullen; obstinate.
Stomachy
a.
• Obstinate; sullen; haughty.
Stomapod
n.
(Zool.) One of the Stomapoda.
Stomapoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of Crustacea including the squillas. The maxillipeds are leglike in form, and the large claws are comblike. They have a large and elongated abdomen, which contains a part of the stomach and heart; the abdominal appendages are large, and bear the gills. Called also Gastrula, Stomatopoda, and Squilloidea.
Stomate
n.
(Bot.) A stoma.
Stomatic
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to a stoma; of the nature of a stoma.
n.
(Med.) A medicine for diseases of the mouth.
Stomatiferous
a.
• Having or producing stomata.
Stomatitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the mouth.
Stomatoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Protozoa in which a mouthlike opening exists.
Stomatodaeum
n.
(Anat.) Same as Stomodaeum.
Stomatode
a.
(Zool.) Having a mouth; — applied to certain Protozoa.
n.
• One of the Stomatoda.
Stomatogastric
a.
• Of or pertaining to the mouth and the stomach; as, the stomatogastric ganglion of certain Mollusca.
Stomatoplastic
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to the operation of forming a mouth where the aperture has been contracted, or in any way deformed.
Stomatopod
n.
(Zool.) One of the Stomatopoda.
Stomatopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Stomapoda.
Stomatopodous
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Stomatopoda.
Stomatoscope
n.
(Med.) An apparatus for examining the interior of the mouth.
Stomatous
a.
• Having a stoma.
Stomodaeum
n.
(Anat.) A part of the alimentary canal. See under Mesenteron.
(Zool.) The primitive mouth and esophagus of the embryo of annelids and arthropods.
Stomp
v. i.
• To stamp with the foot.
Stond
n.
• Stop; halt; hindrance.
• A stand; a post; a station.
v. i.
• To stand.
Stone
n.
• Concreted earthy or mineral matter; also, any particular mass of such matter; as, a house built of stone; the boy threw a stone; pebbles are rounded stones.
• A precious stone; a gem.
• Something made of stone. Specifically: -
• The glass of a mirror; a mirror.
• A monument to the dead; a gravestone.
(Med.) A calculous concretion, especially one in the kidneys or bladder; the disease arising from a calculus.
• One of the testes; a testicle.
(Bot.) The hard endocarp of drupes; as, the stone of a cherry or peach. See Illust. of Endocarp.
• A weight which legally is fourteen pounds, but in practice varies with the article weighed.
• Fig.: Symbol of hardness and insensibility; torpidness; insensibility; as, a heart of stone.
(Print.) A stand or table with a smooth, flat top of stone, commonly marble, on which to arrange the pages of a book, newspaper, etc., before printing; — called also imposing stone.
v. t.
• To pelt, beat, or kill with stones.
• To make like stone; to harden.
• To free from stones; also, to remove the seeds of; as, to stone a field; to stone cherries; to stone raisins.
• To wall or face with stones; to line or fortify with stones; as, to stone a well; to stone a cellar.
• To rub, scour, or sharpen with a stone.
Stonebird
n.
• The yellowlegs; — called also stone snipe. See Tattler, 2.
Stonebow
n.
• A kind of crossbow formerly used for shooting stones.
Stonebrash
n.
• A subsoil made up of small stones or finely-broken rock; brash.
Stonebrearer
n.
• A machine for crushing or hammering stone.
Stonebuck
n.
(Zool.) See Steinbock.
Stonechat
n.
(Zool.) A small, active, and very common European singing bird (Pratincola rubicola); — called also chickstone, stonechacker, stonechatter, stoneclink, stonesmith.
• The wheatear.
• The blue titmouse.
Stonecray
n.
• A distemper in hawks.
Stonecrop
n.
• A sort of tree.
(Bot.) Any low succulent plant of the genus Sedum, esp. Sedum acre, which is common on bare rocks in Europe, and is spreading in parts of America. See Orpine.
Stonecutter
n.
• One whose occupation is to cut stone; also, a machine for dressing stone.
Stonecutting
n.
• Hewing or dressing stone.
Stonegall
n.
(Zool.) See Stannel.
Stonehatch
n.
(Zool.) The ring plover, or dotterel.
Stonehenge
n.
• An assemblage of upright stones with others placed horizontally on their tops, on Salisbury Plain, England, — generally supposed to be the remains of an ancient Druidical temple.
Stoner
n.
• One who stones; one who makes an assault with stones.
• One who walls with stones.
Stoneroot
n.
(Bot.) A North American plant (Collinsonia Canadensis) having a very hard root; horse balm. See Horse balm, under Horse.
Stonerunner
n.
(Zool.) The ring plover, or the ringed dotterel.
• The dotterel.
Stonesmickle
n.
(Zool.) The stonechat; — called also stonesmitch.
Stoneware
n.
• A species of coarse potter's ware, glazed and baked.
Stoneweed
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Lithospermum, herbs having a fruit composed of four stony nutlets.
Stonework
n.
• Work or wall consisting of stone; mason's work of stone.
Stonewort
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Chara; — so called because they are often incrusted with carbonate of lime. See Chara.
Stonily
adv.
• In a stony manner.
Stoniness
n.
• The quality or state of being stony.
Stonish
a.
• Stony.
Stont
• 3d pers. sing. present of Stand.
Stony
a.
• Of or pertaining to stone, consisting of, or abounding in, stone or stones; resembling stone; hard; as, a stony tower; a stony cave; stony ground; a stony crust.
• Converting into stone; petrifying; petrific.
• Inflexible; cruel; unrelenting; pitiless; obdurate; perverse; cold; morally hard; appearing as if petrified; as, a stony heart; a stony gaze.
Stood
• imp. & p. p. of Stand.
Stook
n.
(Agric.) A small collection of sheaves set up in the field; a shock; in England, twelve sheaves.
v. t.
(Agric.) To set up, as sheaves of grain, in stooks.
Stool
n.
(Hort.) A plant from which layers are propagated by bending its branches into the soil.
v. i.
(Agric.) To ramfy; to tiller, as grain; to shoot out suckers.
n.
• A single seat with three or four legs and without a back, made in various forms for various uses.
• A seat used in evacuating the bowels; hence, an evacuation; a discharge from the bowels.
• A stool pigeon, or decoy bird.
(Naut.) A small channel on the side of a vessel, for the dead-eyes of the backstays.
• A bishop's seat or see; a bishop-stool.
• A bench or form for resting the feet or the knees; a footstool; as, a kneeling stool.
• Material, such as oyster shells, spread on the sea bottom for oyster spat to adhere to.
Stoolball
n.
• A kind of game with balls, formerly common in England, esp. with young women.
Stoom
v. t.
• To stum.
Stoop
n.
(Arch.) Originally, a covered porch with seats, at a house door; the Dutch stoep as introduced by the Dutch into New York. Afterward, an out-of-door flight of stairs of from seven to fourteen steps, with platform and parapets, leading to an entrance door some distance above the street; the French perron. Hence, any porch, platform, entrance stairway, or small veranda, at a house door.
n.
• A vessel of liquor; a flagon.
n.
• A post fixed in the earth.
v. i.
• To bend the upper part of the body downward and forward; to bend or lean forward; to incline forward in standing or walking; to assume habitually a bent position.
• To yield; to submit; to bend, as by compulsion; to assume a position of humility or subjection.
• To descend from rank or dignity; to condescend.
• To come down as a hawk does on its prey; to pounce; to souse; to swoop.
• To sink when on the wing; to alight.
v. t.
• To bend forward and downward; to bow down; as, to stoop the body.
• To cause to incline downward; to slant; as, to stoop a cask of liquor.
• To cause to submit; to prostrate.
• To degrade.
n.
• The act of stooping, or bending the body forward; inclination forward; also, an habitual bend of the back and shoulders.
• Descent, as from dignity or superiority; condescension; an act or position of humiliation.
• The fall of a bird on its prey; a swoop.
Stooper
n.
• One who stoops.
Stooping
a. & n.
• from Stoop.
Stoor
v. i.
• To rise in clouds, as dust.
Stop
v. t.
• To close, as an aperture, by filling or by obstructing; as, to stop the ears; hence, to stanch, as a wound.
• To obstruct; to render impassable; as, to stop a way, road, or passage.
• To arrest the progress of; to hinder; to impede; to shut in; as, to stop a traveler; to stop the course of a stream, or a flow of blood.
• To hinder from acting or moving; to prevent the effect or efficiency of; to cause to cease; to repress; to restrain; to suppress; to interrupt; to suspend; as, to stop the execution of a decree, the progress of vice, the approaches of old age or infirmity.
(Mus.) To regulate the sounds of, as musical strings, by pressing them against the finger board with the finger, or by shortening in any way the vibrating part.
• To point, as a composition; to punctuate.
(Naut.) To make fast; to stopper.
v. i.
• To cease to go on; to halt, or stand still; to come to a stop.
• To cease from any motion, or course of action.
• To spend a short time; to reside temporarily; to stay; to tarry; as, to stop with a friend.
n.
• The act of stopping, or the state of being stopped; hindrance of progress or of action; cessation; repression; interruption; check; obstruction.
• That which stops, impedes, or obstructs; as obstacle; an impediment; an obstruction.
(Mach.) A device, or piece, as a pin, block, pawl, etc., for arresting or limiting motion, or for determining the position to which another part shall be brought.
(Mus.) The closing of an aperture in the air passage, or pressure of the finger upon the string, of an instrument of music, so as to modify the tone; hence, any contrivance by which the sounds of a musical instrument are regulated.
• In the organ, one of the knobs or handles at each side of the organist, by which he can draw on or shut off any register or row of pipes; the register itself; as, the vox humana stop.
(Arch.) A member, plain or molded, formed of a separate piece and fixed to a jamb, against which a door or window shuts. This takes the place, or answers the purpose, of a rebate. Also, a pin or block to prevent a drawer from sliding too far.
• A point or mark in writing or printing intended to distinguish the sentences, parts of a sentence, or clauses; a mark of punctuation. See Punctuation.
(Opt.) The diaphragm used in optical instruments to cut off the marginal portions of a beam of light passing through lenses.
(Zool.) The depression in the face of a dog between the skull and the nasal bones. It is conspicuous in the bulldog, pug, and some other breeds.
(Phonetics) Some part of the articulating organs, as the lips, or the tongue and palate, closed (a) so as to cut off the passage of breath or voice through the mouth and the nose (distinguished as a lip-stop, or a front-stop, etc., as in p, t, d, etc.), or (b) so as to obstruct, but not entirely cut off, the passage, as in l, n, etc.; also, any of the consonants so formed.
Stopcock
n.
• A bib, faucet, or short pipe, fitted with a turning stopper or plug for permitting or restraining the flow of a liquid or gas; a cock or valve for checking or regulating the flow of water, gas, etc., through or from a pipe, etc.
• The turning plug, stopper, or spigot of a faucet.
Stope
n.
(Mining) A horizontal working forming one of a series, the working faces of which present the appearance of a flight of steps.
v. t.
(Mining) To excavate in the form of stopes.
• To fill in with rubbish, as a space from which the ore has been worked out.
Stoping
n.
(Mining) The act of excavating in the form of stopes.
Stopless
a.
• Not to be stopped.
Stoppage
n.
• The act of stopping, or arresting progress, motion, or action; also, the state of being stopped; as, the stoppage of the circulation of the blood; the stoppage of commerce.
Stopped
a.
(Phonetics) Made by complete closure of the mouth organs; shut; — said of certain consonants (p, b, t, d, etc.).
Stopper
n.
• One who stops, closes, shuts, or hinders; that which stops or obstructs; that which closes or fills a vent or hole in a vessel.
(Naut.) A short piece of rope having a knot at one or both ends, with a lanyard under the knot, — used to secure something.
(Bot.) A name to several trees of the genus Eugenia, found in Florida and the West Indies; as, the red stopper. See Eugenia.
v. t.
• To close or secure with a stopper.
Stopping
n.
• Material for filling a cavity.
(Mining) A partition or door to direct or prevent a current of air.
(Far.) A pad or poultice of dung or other material applied to a horse's hoof to keep it moist.
Stopple
n.
• That which stops or closes the mouth of a vessel; a stopper; as, a glass stopple; a cork stopple.
v. t.
• To close the mouth of anything with a stopple, or as with a stopple.
Stopship
n.
(Zool.) A remora. It was fabled to stop ships by attaching itself to them.
Stor
a.
• See Stoor.
Storage
n.
• The act of depositing in a store or warehouse for safe keeping; also, the safe keeping of goods in a warehouse.
• Space for the safe keeping of goods.
• The price changed for keeping goods in a store.
Storax
n.
• Any one of a number of similar complex resins obtained from the bark of several trees and shrubs of the Styrax family. The most common of these is liquid storax, a brown or gray semifluid substance of an agreeable aromatic odor and balsamic taste, sometimes used in perfumery, and in medicine as an expectorant.
Store
n.
• That which is accumulated, or massed together; a source from which supplies may be drawn; hence, an abundance; a great quantity, or a great number.
• A place of deposit for goods, esp. for large quantities; a storehouse; a warehouse; a magazine.
• Any place where goods are sold, whether by wholesale or retail; a shop.
• Articles, especially of food, accumulated for some specific object; supplies, as of provisions, arms, ammunition, and the like; as, the stores of an army, of a ship, of a family.
a.
• Accumulated; hoarded.
v. t.
• To collect as a reserved supply; to accumulate; to lay away.
• To furnish; to supply; to replenish; esp., to stock or furnish against a future time.
• To deposit in a store, warehouse, or other building, for preservation; to warehouse; as, to store goods.
Stored
a.
• Collected or accumulated as a reserve supply; as, stored electricity.
Storehouse
n.
• A building for keeping goods of any kind, especially provisions; a magazine; a repository; a warehouse.
• A mass or quality laid up.
Storekeeper
n.
• A man in charge of stores or goods of any kind; as, a naval storekeeper.
• One who keeps a "store;" a shopkeeper. See 1st Store, 3.
Storer
n.
• One who lays up or forms a store.
Storeroom
n.
• Room in a storehouse or repository; a room in which articles are stored.
Storeship
n.
• A vessel used to carry naval stores for a fleet, garrison, or the like.
Storey
n.
• See Story.
Storge
n.
• Parental affection; the instinctive affection which animals have for their young.
Storial
a.
• Historical.
Storied
a.
• Told in a story.
• Having a history; interesting from the stories which pertain to it; venerable from the associations of the past.
• Having (such or so many) stories; — chiefly in composition; as, a two-storied house.
Storier
n.
• A relater of stories; an historian.
Storify
v. t.
• To form or tell stories of; to narrate or describe in a story.
Stork
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of large wading birds of the family Ciconidae, having long legs and a long, pointed bill. They are found both in the Old World and in America, and belong to Ciconia and several allied genera. The European white stork (Ciconia alba) is the best known. It commonly makes its nests on the top of a building, a chimney, a church spire, or a pillar. The black stork (C. nigra) is native of Asia, Africa, and Europe.
Storm
n.
• A violent disturbance of the atmosphere, attended by wind, rain, snow, hail, or thunder and lightning; hence, often, a heavy fall of rain, snow, or hail, whether accompanied with wind or not.
• A violent agitation of human society; a civil, political, or domestic commotion; sedition, insurrection, or war; violent outbreak; clamor; tumult.
• A heavy shower or fall, any adverse outburst of tumultuous force; violence.
(Mil.) A violent assault on a fortified place; a furious attempt of troops to enter and take a fortified place by scaling the walls, forcing the gates, or the like.
v. t.
(Mil.) To assault; to attack, and attempt to take, by scaling walls, forcing gates, breaches, or the like; as, to storm a fortified town.
v. i.
• To raise a tempest.
• To blow with violence; also, to rain, hail, snow, or the like, usually in a violent manner, or with high wind; — used impersonally; as, it storms.
• To rage; to be in a violent passion; to fume.
Stormcock
n.
(Zool.) The missel thrush.
• The fieldfare.
• The green woodpecker.
Stormfinch
n.
(Zool.) The storm petrel.
Stormful
a.
• Abounding with storms.
Stormglass
n.
• A glass vessel, usually cylindrical, filled with a solution which is sensitive to atmospheric changes, indicating by a clouded appearance, rain, snow, etc., and by clearness, fair weather.
Stormily
adv.
• In a stormy manner.
Storminess
n.
• The state of being stormy; tempestuousness; biosteruousness; impetuousness.
Storming
a. & n.
• from Storm, v.
Stormless
a.
• Without storms.
Stormwind
n.
• A heavy wind; a wind that brings a storm; the blast of a storm.
Stormy
a.
• Characterized by, or proceeding from, a storm; subject to storms; agitated with furious winds; biosterous; tempestous; as, a stormy season; a stormy day or week.
• Proceeding from violent agitation or fury; as, a stormy sound; stormy shocks.
• Violent; passionate; rough; as, stormy passions.
Storthing
n.
• The Parliament of Norway, chosen by indirect election once in three years, but holding annual sessions.
Storven
• p. p. of Starve.
Story
n.
• A set of rooms on the same floor or level; a floor, or the space between two floors. Also, a horizontal division of a building's exterior considered architecturally, which need not correspond exactly with the stories within.
n.
• A narration or recital of that which has occurred; a description of past events; a history; a statement; a record.
• The relation of an incident or minor event; a short narrative; a tale; especially, a fictitious narrative less elaborate than a novel; a short romance.
• A euphemism or child's word for "a lie;" a fib; as, to tell a story.
v. t.
• To tell in historical relation; to make the subject of a story; to narrate or describe in story.
Storybook
n.
• A book containing stories, or short narratives, either true or false.
Stot
n.
• A horse.
• A young bull or ox, especially one three years old.
Stote
n.
(Zool.) See Stoat.
Stound
v. i.
• To be in pain or sorrow.
a.
• Stunned.
n.
• A sudden, severe pain or grief; peril; alarm.
• Astonishment; amazement.
n.
• Hour; time; season.
• A brief space of time; a moment.
n.
• A vessel for holding small beer.
Stoup
n.
• A flagon; a vessel or measure for liquids.
(Eccl.) A basin at the entrance of Roman Catholic churches for containing the holy water with which those who enter, dipping their fingers in it, cross themselves; — called also holy-water stoup.
Stour
n.
• A battle or tumult; encounter; combat; disturbance; passion.
a.
• Tall; strong; stern.
Stout
a.
• Strong; lusty; vigorous; robust; sinewy; muscular; hence, firm; resolute; dauntless.
• Proud; haughty; arrogant; hard.
• Firm; tough; materially strong; enduring; as, a stout vessel, stick, string, or cloth.
• Large; bulky; corpulent.
n.
• A strong malt liquor; strong porter.
Stoutish
a.
• Somewhat stout; somewhat corpulent.
Stoutly
adv.
• In a stout manner; lustily; boldly; obstinately; as, he stoutly defended himself.
Stoutness
n.
• The state or quality of being stout.
Stove
• imp. of Stave.
n.
• A house or room artificially warmed or heated; a forcing house, or hothouse; a drying room; — formerly, designating an artificially warmed dwelling or room, a parlor, or a bathroom, but now restricted, in this sense, to heated houses or rooms used for horticultural purposes or in the processes of the arts.
• An apparatus, consisting essentially of a receptacle for fuel, made of iron, brick, stone, or tiles, and variously constructed, in which fire is made or kept for warming a room or a house, or for culinary or other purposes.
v. t.
• To keep warm, in a house or room, by artificial heat; as, to stove orange trees.
• To heat or dry, as in a stove; as, to stove feathers.
Stovehouse
n.
• A hothouse.
Stovepipe
n.
• Pipe made of sheet iron in length and angular or curved pieces fitting together, — used to connect a portable stove with a chimney flue.
Stover
n.
• Fodder for cattle, especially straw or coarse hay.
Stow
v. t.
• To place or arrange in a compact mass; to put in its proper place, or in a suitable place; to pack; as, to stowbags, bales, or casks in a ship's hold; to stow hay in a mow; to stow sheaves.
• To put away in some place; to hide; to lodge.
• To arrange anything compactly in; to fill, by packing closely; as, to stow a box, car, or the hold of a ship.
Stowage
n.
• The act or method of stowing; as, the stowage of provisions in a vessel.
• Room in which things may be stowed.
• The state of being stowed, or put away.
• Things stowed or packed.
• Money paid for stowing goods.
Stowaway
n.
• One who conceals himself board of a vessel about to leave port, or on a railway train, in order to obtain a free passage.
Stowboard
n.
• A place into which rubbish is put.
Stowce
n.
(Mining) A windlass.
• A wooden landmark, to indicate possession of mining land.
Stowing
n.
(Mining) A method of working in which the waste is packed into the space formed by excavating the vein.

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