Dictionary Of The English Language "Seq"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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Sequacious
a.
• Inclined to follow a leader; following; attendant.
• Hence, ductile; malleable; pliant; manageable.
• Having or observing logical sequence; logically consistent and rigorous; consecutive in development or transition of thought.
Sequaciousness
n.
• Quality of being sequacious.
Sequacity
n.
• Quality or state of being sequacious; sequaciousness.
Sequel
n.
• That which follows; a succeeding part; continuation; as, the sequel of a man's advantures or history.
• Consequence; event; effect; result; as, let the sun cease, fail, or swerve, and the sequel would be ruin.
• Conclusion; inference.
Sequela
n.
• One who, or that which, follows.
• An adherent, or a band or sect of adherents
• That which follows as the logical result of reasoning; inference; conclusion; suggestion.
(Med.) A morbid phenomenon left as the result of a disease; a disease resulting from another
Sequence
n.
• The state of being sequent; succession; order of following; arrangement.
• That which follows or succeeds as an effect; sequel; consequence; result.
(Philos.) Simple succession, or the coming after in time, without asserting or implying causative energy; as, the reactions of chemical agents may be conceived as merely invariable sequences.
(Mus.) Any succession of chords (or harmonic phrase) rising or falling by the regular diatonic degrees in the same scale; a succession of similar harmonic steps.
• A melodic phrase or passage successively repeated one tone higher; a rosalia.
(R.C.Ch.) A hymn introduced in the Mass on certain festival days, and recited or sung immediately before the gospel, and after the gradual or introit, whence the name.
(Card Playing)(Whist) Three or more cards of the same suit in immediately consecutive order of value; as, ace, king, and queen; or knave, ten, nine, and eight.
(Poker) All five cards, of a hand, in consecutive order as to value, but not necessarily of the same suit; when of one suit, it is called a sequence flush.
Sequent
a.
• Following; succeeding; in continuance.
• Following as an effect; consequent.
n.
• A follower.
• That which follows as a result; a sequence.
Sequential
a.
• Succeeding or following in order.
Sequester
v. t.
(Law) To separate from the owner for a time; to take from parties in controversy and put into the possession of an indifferent person; to seize or take possession of, as property belonging to another, and hold it till the profits have paid the demand for which it is taken, or till the owner has performed the decree of court, or clears himself of contempt; in international law, to confiscate.
• To cause (one) to submit to the process of sequestration; to deprive (one) of one's estate, property, etc.
• To set apart; to put aside; to remove; to separate from other things.
• To cause to retire or withdraw into obscurity; to seclude; to withdraw; — often used reflexively.
v. i.
• To withdraw; to retire.
(Law) To renounce (as a widow may) any concern with the estate of her husband.
n.
• Sequestration; separation.
(Law) A person with whom two or more contending parties deposit the subject matter of the controversy; one who mediates between two parties; a mediator; an umpire or referee.
(Med.) Same as Sequestrum.
Sequestered
a.
• Retired; secluded.
Sequestrable
a.
• Capable of being sequestered; subject or liable to sequestration.
Sequestral
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to a sequestrum.
Sequestrate
v. t.
• To sequester.
Sequestrator
n.
(Law) One who sequesters property, or takes the possession of it for a time, to satisfy a demand out of its rents or profits.
• One to whom the keeping of sequestered property is committed.
Sequestrum
n.
(Med.) A portion of dead bone which becomes separated from the sound portion, as in necrosis.
Sequin
n.
• An old gold coin of Italy and Turkey. It was first struck at Venice about the end of the 13th century, and afterward in the other Italian cities, and by the Levant trade was introduced into Turkey. It is worth about 9s. 3d. sterling, or about $2.25. The different kinds vary somewhat in value.
Sequoia
n.
(Bot.) A genus of coniferous trees, consisting of two species, Sequoia Washingtoniana, syn. S. gigantea, the "big tree" of California, and S. sempervirens, the redwood, both of which attain an immense height.
Sequoiene
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon (C13H10) obtained in white fluorescent crystals, in the distillation products of the needles of the California "big tree" (Sequoia gigantea).
Seraglio
n.
• An inclosure; a place of separation.
• The palace of the Grand Seignior, or Turkish sultan, at Constantinople, inhabited by the sultan himself, and all the officers and dependents of his court. In it are also kept the females of the harem.
• A harem; a place for keeping wives or concubines; sometimes, loosely, a place of licentious pleasure; a house of debauchery.
Serai
n.
• A palace; a seraglio; also, in the East, a place for the accommodation of travelers; a caravansary, or rest house.
Seralbumen
n.
(Physiol. CHem.) Serum albumin.
Serang
n.
• The boatswain of a Lascar or East Ondian crew.
Serape
n.
• A blanket or shawl worn as an outer garment by the Spanish Americans, as in Mexico.
Seraph
n.
• One of an order of celestial beings, each having three pairs of wings. In ecclesiastical art and in poetry, a seraph is represented as one of a class of angels.
Seraphicism
n.
• The character, quality, or state of a seraph; seraphicalness.
Seraphim
n.
• The Hebrew plural of Seraph. Cf. Cherubim.
Seraphina
n.
• A seraphine.
Seraphine
n.
(Mus.) A wind instrument whose sounding parts are reeds, consisting of a thin tongue of brass playing freely through a slot in a plate. It has a case, like a piano, and is played by means of a similar keybord, the bellows being worked by the foot. The melodeon is a portable variety of this instrument.
Serapis
n.
(Myth.) An Egyptian deity, at first a symbol of the Nile, and so of fertility; later, one of the divinities of the lower world. His worship was introduced into Greece and Rome.
Seraskier
n.
• A general or commander of land forces in the Turkish empire; especially, the commander-in-chief of minister of war.
Seraskierate
n.
• The office or authority of a seraskier.
Serbonian
a.
• Relating to the lake of Serbonis in Egypt, which by reason of the sand blowing into it had a deceptive appearance of being solid land, but was a bog.
Sere
a.
• Dry; withered. Same as Sear.
n.
• Claw; talon.
Serein
n.
(Meteorol.) A mist, or very fine rain, which sometimes falls from a clear sky a few moments after sunset.
Serenade
n.
(Mus.) Music sung or performed in the open air at nights; — usually applied to musical entertainments given in the open air at night, especially by gentlemen, in a spirit of gallantry, under the windows of ladies.
• A piece of music suitable to be performed at such times.
v. t.
• To entertain with a serenade.
v. i.
• To perform a serenade.
Serenader
n.
• One who serenades.
Serene
a.
• Bright; clear; unabscured; as, a serene sky.
• Calm; placid; undisturbed; unruffled; as, a serene aspect; a serene soul.
n.
• Serenity; clearness; calmness.
• Evening air; night chill.
v. t.
• To make serene.
Serenely
adv.
• In a serene manner; clearly.
• With unruffled temper; coolly; calmly.
Sereneness
n.
• Serenity.
Serenitude
n.
• Serenity.
Serenity
n.
• The quality or state of being serene; clearness and calmness; quietness; stillness; peace.
• Calmness of mind; eveness of temper; undisturbed state; coolness; composure.
Serf
n.
• A servant or slave employed in husbandry, and in some countries attached to the soil and transferred with it, as formerly in Russia.
Serge
n.
• A woolen twilled stuff, much used as material for clothing for both sexes.
n.
• A large wax candle used in the ceremonies of various churches.
Sergeancy
n.
• The office of a sergeant; sergeantship.
Sergeant
n.
• Formerly, in England, an officer nearly answering to the more modern bailiff of the hundred; also, an officer whose duty was to attend on the king, and on the lord high steward in court, to arrest traitors and other offenders. He is now called sergeant-at-arms, and two of these officers, by allowance of the sovereign, attend on the houses of Parliament (one for each house) to execute their commands, and another attends the Court Chancery.
(Mil.) In a company, battery, or troop, a noncommissioned officer next in rank above a corporal, whose duty is to instruct recruits in discipline, to form the ranks, etc.
(Law) A lawyer of the highest rank, answering to the doctor of the civil law; — called also serjeant at law.
• A title sometimes given to the servants of the sovereign; as, sergeant surgeon, that is, a servant, or attendant, surgeon.
(Zool.) The cobia.
Sergeantcy
n.
• Same as Sergeancy.
Sergeantry
n.
• See Sergeanty.
Sergeantship
n.
• The office of sergeant.
Sergeanty
n.
(Eng. Law) Tenure of lands of the crown by an honorary kind of service not due to any lord, but to the king only.
Serial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a series; consisting of a series; appearing in successive parts or numbers; as, a serial work or publication.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to rows.
n.
• A publication appearing in a series or succession of part; a tale, or other writing, published in successive numbers of a periodical.
Seriality
n.
• The quality or state of succession in a series; sequence.
Serially
adv.
• In a series, or regular order; in a serial manner; as, arranged serially; published serially.
Seriate
a.
• Arranged in a series or succession; pertaining to a series.
Seriatim
adv.
• In regular order; one after the other; severally.
Seriation
n.
(Chem.) Arrangement or position in a series.
Sericeous
a.
• Of or pertaining to silk; consisting of silk; silky.
(Bot.) Covered with very soft hairs pressed close to the surface; as, a sericeous leaf.
(Zool.) Having a silklike luster, usually due to fine, close hairs.
Sericin
n.
(Chem.) A gelatinous nitrogenous material extracted from crude silk and other similar fiber by boiling water; — called also silk gelatin.
Sericite
n.
(Min.) A kind of muscovite occuring in silky scales having a fibrous structure. It is characteristic of sericite schist.
Sericterium
n.
(Zool.) A silk gland, as in the silkworms.
Sericulture
n.
• The raising of silkworms.
Serie
n.
• Series.
Seriema
n.
(Zool.) A large South American bird (Dicholophus, or Cariama cristata) related to the cranes. It is often domesticated. Called also cariama.
Series
n.
• A number of things or events standing or succeeding in order, and connected by a like relation; sequence; order; course; a succession of things; as, a continuous series of calamitous events.
(Biol.) Any comprehensive group of animals or plants including several subordinate related groups.
(Math.) An indefinite number of terms succeeding one another, each of which is derived from one or more of the preceding by a fixed law, called the law of the series; as, an arithmetical series; a geometrical series.
Serin
n.
(Zool.) A European finch (Serinus hortulanus) closely related to the canary.
Serine
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline nitrogenous substance obtained by the action of dilute sulphuric acid on silk gelatin.
Serious
a.
• Grave in manner or disposition; earnest; thoughtful; solemn; not light, gay, or volatile.
• Really intending what is said; being in earnest; not jesting or deceiving.
• Important; weighty; not trifling; grave.
• Hence, giving rise to apprehension; attended with danger; as, a serious injury.
Seriph
n.
(Type Founding) See Ceriph.
Sermocination
n.
• The making of speeches or sermons; sermonizing.
Sermocinator
n.
• One who makes sermons or speeches.
Sermon
n.
• A discourse or address; a talk; a writing; as, the sermens of Chaucer.
• Specifically, a discourse delivered in public, usually by a clergyman, for the purpose of religious instruction and grounded on some text or passage of Scripture.
• Hence, a serious address; a lecture on one's conduct or duty; an exhortation or reproof; a homily; — often in a depreciatory sense.
v. i.
• To speak; to discourse; to compose or deliver a sermon.
v. t.
• To discourse to or of, as in a sermon.
• To tutor; to lecture.
Sermoneer
n.
• A sermonizer.
Sermoner
n.
• A preacher; a sermonizer.
Sermonet
n.
• A short sermon.
Sermoning
n.
• The act of discoursing; discourse; instruction; preaching.
Sermonish
a.
• Resembling a sermon.
Sermonist
n.
• See Sermonizer.
Sermonize
v. i.
• To compose or write a sermon or sermons; to preach.
• To inculcate rigid rules.
v. t.
• To preach or discourse to; to affect or influence by means of a sermon or of sermons.
Sermonizer
n.
• One who sermonizes.
Serolin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A peculiar fatty substance found in the blood, probably a mixture of fats, cholesterin, etc.
• A body found in fecal matter and thought to be formed in the intestines from the cholesterin of the bile; — called also stercorin, and stercolin.
Serose
a.
• Serous.
Serosity
n.
• The quality or state of being serous.
(Physiol.) A thin watery animal fluid, as synovial fluid and pericardial fluid.
Serotine
n.
(Zool.) The European long-eared bat (Vesperugo serotinus).
Serotinous
a.
(Biol.) Appearing or blossoming later in the season than is customary with allied species.
Serous
a.
(Physiol.) Thin; watery; like serum; as the serous fluids.
• Of or pertaining to serum; as, the serous glands, membranes, layers. See Serum.
Serpens
n.
(Astron.) A constellation represented as a serpent held by Serpentarius.
Serpent
n.
(Zool.) Any reptile of the order Ophidia; a snake, especially a large snake. See Illust. under Ophidia.
• Fig.: A subtle, treacherous, malicious person.
• A species of firework having a serpentine motion as it passess through the air or along the ground.
(Astron.) The constellation Serpens.
(Mus.) A bass wind instrument, of a loud and coarse tone, formerly much used in military bands, and sometimes introduced into the orchestra; — so called from its form.
v. i.
• To wind like a serpent; to crook about; to meander.
v. t.
• To wind; to encircle.
Serpentaria
a.
(Med.) The fibrous aromatic root of the Virginia snakeroot (Aristolochia Serpentaria).
Serpentarius
n.
(Astron.) A constellation on the equator, lying between Scorpio and Hercules; — called also Ophiuchus.
Serpentiform
a.
• Having the form of a serpent.
Serpentigenous
a.
• Bred of a serpent.
Serpentine
a.
• Resembling a serpent; having the shape or qualities of a serpent; subtle; winding or turning one way and the other, like a moving serpent; anfractuous; meandering; sinuous; zigzag; as, serpentine braid.
n.
(Min.) A mineral or rock consisting chiefly of the hydrous silicate of magnesia. It is usually of an obscure green color, often with a spotted or mottled appearance resembling a serpent's skin. Precious, or noble, serpentine is translucent and of a rich oil-green color.
(Ordnance) A kind of ancient cannon.
v. i.
• To serpentize.
Serpentinely
adv.
• In a serpentine manner.
Serpentinian
n.
(Eccl.) See 2d Ophite.
Serpentinize
v. t.
(Min.) To convert (a magnesian silicate) into serpentine.
Serpentinous
a.
• Relating to, or like, serpentine; as, a rock serpentinous in character.
Serpentize
v. i.
• To turn or bend like a serpent, first in one direction and then in the opposite; to meander; to wind; to serpentine.
Serpentry
n.
• A winding like a serpent's.
• A place inhabited or infested by serpents.
Serpet
n.
• A basket.
Serpette
n.
• A pruning knife with a curved blade.
Serpiginous
a.
(Med.) Creeping; — said of lesions which heal over one portion while continuing to advance at another.
Serpigo
n.
(Med.) A dry, scaly eruption on the skin; especially, a ringworm.
Serpolet
n.
(Bot.) Wild thyme.
Serpula
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of tubicolous annelids of the genus Serpula and allied genera of the family Serpulidae. They secrete a calcareous tube, which is usually irregularly contorted, but is sometimes spirally coiled. The worm has a wreath of plumelike and often bright-colored gills around its head, and usually an operculum to close the aperture of its tube when it retracts.
Serpulite
n.
• A fossil serpula shell.
Serr
v. t.
• To crowd, press, or drive together.
Serranoid
n.
(Zool.) Any fish of the family Serranidae, which includes the striped bass, the black sea bass, and many other food fishes.
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Serranidae.
Serration
n.
• Condition of being serrate; formation in the shape of a saw.
• One of the teeth in a serrate or serrulate margin.
Serratirostral
a.
(Zool.) Having a toothed bill, like that of a toucan.
Serrator
n.
(Zool.) The ivory gull (Larus eburneus).
Serrature
n.
• A notching, like that between the teeth of a saw, in the edge of anything.
• One of the teeth in a serrated edge; a serration.
Serricated
a.
• Covered with fine silky down.
Serricorn
a.
(Zool.) Having serrated antenn.
n.
(Zool.) Any one of a numerous tribe of beetles (Serricornia). The joints of the antennae are prominent, thus producing a serrate appearance. See Illust. under Antenna.
Serried
a.
• Crowded; compact; dense; pressed together.
Serrifera
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Hymenoptera comprising the sawflies.
Serrirostres
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Lamellirostres.
Serrous
a.
• Like the teeth off a saw; jagged.
Serrula
n.
(Zool.) The red-breasted merganser.
Serrulation
n.
• The state of being notched minutely, like a fine saw.
• One of the teeth in a serrulate margin.
Serry
v. t.
• To crowd; to press together.
Sertularia
n.
(Zool.) A genus of delicate branching hydroids having small sessile hydrothecae along the sides of the branches.
Sertularian
n.
(Zool.) Any species of Sertularia, or of Sertularidae, a family of hydroids having branched chitinous stems and simple sessile hydrothecae. Also used adjectively.
Serum
n.
(Physiol.) The watery portion of certain animal fluids, as blood, milk, etc.
• A thin watery fluid, containing more or less albumin, secreted by the serous membranes of the body, such as the pericardium and peritoneum.
Servable
a.
• Capable of being served.
• Capable of being preserved.
Servage
n.
• Serfage; slavery; servitude.
Serval
n.
(Zool.) An African wild cat (Felis serval) of moderate size. It has rather long legs and a tail of moderate length. Its color is tawny, with black spots on the body and rings of black on the tail.
Servaline
a.
(Zool.) Related to, or resembling, the serval.
Servant
n.
• One who serves, or does services, voluntarily or on compulsion; a person who is employed by another for menial offices, or for other labor, and is subject to his command; a person who labors or exerts himself for the benefit of another, his master or employer; a subordinate helper.
• One in a state of subjection or bondage.
• A professed lover or suitor; a gallant.
v. t.
• To subject.
Servantess
n.
• A maidservant.
Servantry
n.
• A body of servants; servants, collectively.
Serve
v. t.
• To work for; to labor in behalf of; to exert one's self continuously or statedly for the benefit of; to do service for; to be in the employment of, as an inferior, domestic, serf, slave, hired assistant, official helper, etc.; specifically, in a religious sense, to obey and worship.
• To be subordinate to; to act a secondary part under; to appear as the inferior of; to minister to.
• To be suitor to; to profess love to.
• To wait upon; to supply the wants of; to attend; specifically, to wait upon at table; to attend at meals; to supply with food; as, to serve customers in a shop.
• Hence, to bring forward, arrange, deal, or distribute, as a portion of anything, especially of food prepared for eating; — often with up; formerly with in.
• To perform the duties belonging to, or required in or for; hence, to be of use to; as, a curate may serve two churches; to serve one's country.
• To contribute or conduce to; to promote; to be sufficient for; to satisfy; as, to serve one's turn.
• To answer or be (in the place of something) to; as, a sofa serves one for a seat and a couch.
• To treat; to behave one's self to; to requite; to act toward; as, he served me very ill.
• To work; to operate; as, to serve the guns.
(Law) To bring to notice, deliver, or execute, either actually or constructively, in such manner as the law requires; as, to serve a summons.
• To make legal service opon (a person named in a writ, summons, etc.); as, to serve a witness with a subp&oe;na.
• To pass or spend, as time, esp. time of punishment; as, to serve a term in prison.
• To copulate with; to cover; as, a horse serves a mare; — said of the male.
(Tennis) To lead off in delivering (the ball).
(Naut.) To wind spun yarn, or the like, tightly around (a rope or cable, etc.) so as to protect it from chafing or from the weather. See under Serving.
v. i.
• To be a servant or a slave; to be employed in labor or other business for another; to be in subjection or bondage; to render menial service.
• To perform domestic offices; to be occupied with household affairs; to prepare and dish up food, etc.
• To be in service; to do duty; to discharge the requirements of an office or employment. Specifically, to act in the public service, as a soldier, seaman. etc.
• To be of use; to answer a purpose; to suffice; to suit; to be convenient or favorable.
(Tennis) To lead off in delivering the ball.
Server
n.
• One who serves.
• A tray for dishes; a salver.
Servian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Servia, a kingdom of Southern Europe.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Servia.
Service
n.
• The act of serving; the occupation of a servant; the performance of labor for the benefit of another, or at another's command; attendance of an inferior, hired helper. slave, etc., on a superior, employer, master, or the like; also, spiritual obedience and love.
• The deed of one who serves; labor performed for another; duty done or required; office.
• Office of devotion; official religious duty performed; religious rites appropriate to any event or ceremonial; as, a burial service.
• Hence, a musical composition for use in churches.
• Duty performed in, or appropriate to, any office or charge; official function; hence, specifically, military or naval duty; performance of the duties of a soldier.
• Useful office; advantage conferred; that which promotes interest or happiness; benefit; avail.
• Profession of respect; acknowledgment of duty owed.
• The act and manner of bringing food to the persons who eat it; order of dishes at table; also, a set or number of vessels ordinarily used at table; as, the service was tardy and awkward; a service of plate or glass.
(Law) The act of bringing to notice, either actually or constructively, in such manner as is prescribed by law; as, the service of a subp&oe;na or an attachment.
(Naut.) The materials used for serving a rope, etc., as spun yarn, small lines, etc.
(Tennis) The act of serving the ball.
• Act of serving or covering. See Serve, v. t., 13.
Serviceable
a.
• Doing service; promoting happiness, interest, advantage, or any good; useful to any end; adapted to any good end use; beneficial; advantageous.
• Prepared for rendering service; capable of, or fit for, the performance of duty; hence, active; diligent.
Serviceage
n.
• Servitude.
Servient
a.
• Subordinate.
Serviette
n.
• A table napkin.
Servifor
n.
• One who serves; a servant; an attendant; one who acts under another; a follower or adherent.
(Univ. of Oxford, Eng.) An undergraduate, partly supported by the college funds, whose duty it formerly was to wait at table. A servitor corresponded to a sizar in Cambridge and Dublin universities.
Servile
a.
• Of or pertaining to a servant or slave; befitting a servant or a slave; proceeding from dependence; hence, meanly submissive; slavish; mean; cringing; fawning; as, servile flattery; servile fear; servile obedience.
• Held in subjection; dependent; enslaved.
(Gram.) Not belonging to the original root; as, a servile letter.
• Not itself sounded, but serving to lengthen the preceeding vowel, as e in tune.
n.
(Gram.) An element which forms no part of the original root; — opposed to radical.
Servilely
adv.
• In a servile manner; slavishly.
Servileness
n.
• Quality of being servile; servility.
Servility
n.
• The quality or state of being servile; servileness.
Serving
• a & n. from Serve.
Servite
n.
(R.C.Ch.) One of the order of the Religious Servants of the Holy Virgin, founded in Florence in 1223.
Servitorship
n.
• The office, rank, or condition of a servitor.
Servitude
n.
• The state of voluntary or compulsory subjection to a master; the condition of being bound to service; the condition of a slave; slavery; bondage; hence, a state of slavish dependence.
• Servants, collectively.
(Law) A right whereby one thing is subject to another thing or person for use or convenience, contrary to the common right.
Serviture
n.
• Servants, collectively.
Servitute
n.
• Servitude.
Serye
n.
• A series.
Sesame
n.
(Bot.) Either of two annual herbaceous plants of the genus Sesamum (S. Indicum, and S. orientale), from the seeds of which an oil is expressed; also, the small obovate, flattish seeds of these plants, sometimes used as food. See Benne.
Sesamoid
a.
• Resembling in shape the seeds of sesame.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sesamoid bones or cartilages; sesamoidal.
n.
(Anat.) A sesamoid bone or cartilage.
Sesamoidal
a.
(Anat.) Sesamoid.
Sesban
n.
(Bot.) A leguminous shrub (Sesbania aculeata) which furnishes a fiber used for making ropes.
Sesquialter
a.
• Sesquialteral.
Sesquialterous
a.
• Sesquialteral.
Sesquibasic
a.
(Chem.) Containing, or acting as, a base in the proportions of a sesqui compound.
Sesquiduplicate
a.
• Twice and a half as great (as another thing); having the ratio of two and a half to one.
Sesquioxide
n.
(Chem.) An oxide containing three atoms of oxygen with two atoms (or radicals) of some other substance; thus, alumina, Al2O3 is a sesquioxide.
Sesquiplicate
a.
(Math.) Subduplicate of the triplicate; — a term applied to ratios; thus, a and a' are in the sesquiplicate ratio of b and b', when a is to a' as the square root of the cube of b is to the square root of the cube of b', or a:a'::&root;b3:&root;b'3.
Sesquisalt
n.
(Chem.) A salt derived from a sesquioxide base, or made up on the proportions of a sesqui compound.
Sesquisulphide
n.
(Chem.) A sulphide, analogous to a sesquioxide, containing three atoms of sulphur to two of the other ingredient; — formerly called also sesquisulphuret; as, orpiment, As2S3 is arsenic sesquisulphide.
Sesquitertial
a.
• Sesquitertian.
Sesquitone
n.
(Mus.) A minor third, or interval of three semitones.
Sesqyipedality
n.
• The quality or condition of being sesquipedal.
• The use of sesquipedalian words; style characterized by the use of long words; sesquipedalism.
Sess
v. t.
• To lay a tax upon; to assess.
n.
• A tax; an assessment. See Cess.
Sessa
interj.
• Hurry; run.
Sessile
a.
• Attached without any sensible projecting support.
(Bot.) Resting directly upon the main stem or branch, without a petiole or footstalk; as, a sessile leaf or blossom.
(Zool.) Permanently attached; — said of the gonophores of certain hydroids which never became detached.
Session
n.
• The act of sitting, or the state of being seated.
• The actual sitting of a court, council, legislature, etc., or the actual assembly of the members of such a body, for the transaction of business.
• Hence, also, the time, period, or term during which a court, council, legislature, etc., meets daily for business; or, the space of time between the first meeting and the prorogation or adjournment; thus, a session of Parliaments is opened with a speech from the throne, and closed by prorogation. The session of a judicial court is called a term.
Sessional
a.
• Of or pertaining to a session or sessions.
Sesspool
n.
• Same as Cesspool.
Sesterce
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A Roman coin or denomination of money, in value the fourth part of a denarius, and originally containing two asses and a half, afterward four asses, — equal to about two pence sterling, or four cents.
Sestet
n.
(Mus.) A piece of music composed for six voices or six instruments; a sextet; — called also sestuor.
(Poet.) The last six lines of a sonnet.
Sestetto
n.
(Mus.) A sestet.
Sestine
n.
• See Sextain.
Sestuor
n.
• A sestet.
Set
v. t.
• To cause to sit; to make to assume a specified position or attitude; to give site or place to; to place; to put; to fix; as, to set a house on a stone foundation; to set a book on a shelf; to set a dish on a table; to set a chest or trunk on its bottom or on end.
• Hence, to attach or affix (something) to something else, or in or upon a certain place.
• To make to assume specified place, condition, or occupation; to put in a certain condition or state (described by the accompanying words); to cause to be.
• To fix firmly; to make fast, permanent, or stable; to render motionless; to give an unchanging place, form, or condition to.
• To cause to stop or stick; to obstruct; to fsten to a spot; hence, to occasion difficulty to; to embarrass; as, to set a coach in the mud
• To fix beforehand; to determine; hence, to make unyielding or obstinate; to render stiff, unpliant, or rigid; as, to set one's countenance
• To fix in the ground, as a post or a tree; to plant; as, to set pear trees in an orchard
• To fix, as a precious stone, in a border of metal; to place in a setting; hence, to place in or amid something which serves as a setting; as, to set glass in a sash
• To render stiff or solid; especially, to convert into curd; to curdle; as, to set milk for cheese
• To put into a desired position or condition; to adjust; to regulate; to adapt.
• To put in order in a particular manner; to prepare; as, to set (that is, to hone) a razor; to set a saw
• To extend and bring into position; to spread; as, to set the sails of a ship
• To give a pitch to, as a tune; to start by fixing the keynote; as, to set a psalm
• To reduce from a dislocated or fractured state; to replace; as, to set a broken bone
• To make to agree with some standard; as, to set a watch or a clock
(Masonry) To lower into place and fix silidly, as the blocks of cut stone in a structure
• To stake at play; to wager; to risk.
• To fit with music; to adapt, as words to notes; to prepare for singing.
• To determine; to appoint; to assign; to fix; as, to set a time for a meeting; to set a price on a horse.
• To adorn with something infixed or affixed; to stud; to variegate with objects placed here and there.
• To value; to rate; — with at.
• To point out the seat or position of, as birds, or other game; — said of hunting dogs.
• To establish as a rule; to furnish; to prescribe; to assign; as, to set an example; to set lessons to be learned.
• To suit; to become; as, it sets him ill.
(Print.) To compose; to arrange in words, lines, etc.; as, to set type; to set a page.
v. i.
• To pass below the horizon; to go down; to decline; to sink out of sight; to come to an end.
• To fit music to words.
• To place plants or shoots in the ground; to plant.
• To be fixed for growth; to strike root; to begin to germinate or form; as, cuttings set well; the fruit has set well (i. e., not blasted in the blossom).
• To become fixed or rigid; to be fastened.
• To congeal; to concrete; to solidify.
• To have a certain direction in motion; to flow; to move on; to tend; as, the current sets to the north; the tide sets to the windward.
• To begin to move; to go out or forth; to start; — now followed by out.
• To indicate the position of game; — said of a dog; as, the dog sets well; also, to hunt game by the aid of a setter.
• To apply one's self; to undertake earnestly; — now followed by out.
• To fit or suit one; to sit; as, the coat sets well.
a.
• Fixed in position; immovable; rigid; as, a set line; a set countenance.
• Firm; unchanging; obstinate; as, set opinions or prejudices.
• Regular; uniform; formal; as, a set discourse; a set battle.
• Established; prescribed; as, set forms of prayer.
• Adjusted; arranged; formed; adapted.
n.
• The act of setting, as of the sun or other heavenly body; descent; hence, the close; termination.
• That which is set, placed, or fixed.
• A young plant for growth; as, a set of white thorn
• That which is staked; a wager; a venture; a stake; hence, a game at venture.
(Mech.) Permanent change of figure in consequence of excessive strain, as from compression, tension, bending, twisting, etc.; as, the set of a spring.
• A kind of punch used for bending, indenting, or giving shape to, metal; as, a saw set.
(Pile Driving) A piece placed temporarily upon the head of a pile when the latter cannot be reached by the weight, or hammer, except by means of such an intervening piece
(Carp.) A short steel spike used for driving the head of a nail below the surface
• A number of things of the same kind, ordinarily used or classed together; a collection of articles which naturally complement each other, and usually go together; an assortment; a suit; as, a set of chairs, of china, of surgical or mathematical instruments, of books, etc.
• A number of persons associated by custom, office, common opinion, quality, or the like; a division; a group; a clique.
• Direction or course; as, the set of the wind, or of a current.
• In dancing, the number of persons necessary to execute a quadrille; also, the series of figures or movements executed.
• The deflection of a tooth, or of the teeth, of a saw, which causes the the saw to cut a kerf, or make an opening, wider than the blade.
• A young oyster when first attached.
• Collectively, the crop of young oysters in any locality.
(Tennis) A series of as many games as may be necessary to enable one side to win six. If at the end of the tenth game the score is a tie, the set is usually called a deuce set, and decided by an application of the rules for playing off deuce in a game. See Deuce.
(Type Founding) That dimension of the body of a type called by printers the width.
Seta
n.
(Biol.) Any slender, more or less rigid, bristlelike organ or part; as the hairs of a caterpillar, the slender spines of a crustacean, the hairlike processes of a protozoan, the bristles or stiff hairs on the leaves of some plants, or the pedicel of the capsule of a moss.
(Zool.) One of the movable chitinous spines or hooks of an annelid. They usually arise in clusters from muscular capsules, and are used in locomotion and for defense. They are very diverse in form.
• One of the spinelike feathers at the base of the bill of certain birds.
Setaceous
a.
• Set with, or consisting of, bristles; bristly; as, a stiff, setaceous tail.
• Bristelike in form or texture; as, a setaceous feather; a setaceous leaf.
Setback
n.
(Arch.) Offset, n., 4.
• A backset; a countercurrent; an eddy.
• A backset; a check; a repulse; a reverse; a relapse.
Setbolt
n.
(Shipbuilding) An iron pin, or bolt, for fitting planks closely together.
• A bolt used for forcing another bolt out of its hole.
Setdown
n.
• The humbling of a person by act or words, especially by a retort or a reproof; the retort or the reproof which has such effect.
Setee
n.
(Naut.) See 2d Settee.
Seten
• obs. imp. pl. of Sit. Sat.
Setewale
n.
• See Cetewale.
Setfoil
n.
• See Septfoil.
Sethen
adv. & conj.
• See Since.
Sethic
a.
• See Sothic.
Setiferous
a.
• Producing, or having one or more, bristles.
Setiform
a.
• Having the form or structure of setae.
Setiger
n.
(Zool.) An annelid having setae; a chaetopod.
Setigerous
a.
• Covered with bristles; having or bearing a seta or setae; setiferous; as, setigerous glands; a setigerous segment of an annelid; specifically (Bot.), tipped with a bristle.
Setim
n.
• See Shittim.
Setiparous
a.
(Zool.) Producing setae; — said of the organs from which the setae of annelids arise.
Setireme
n.
(Zool.) A swimming leg (of an insect) having a fringe of hairs on the margin.
Setness
n.
• The quality or state of being set; formality; obstinacy.
Seton
n.
(Med. & Far.) A few silk threads or horsehairs, or a strip of linen or the like, introduced beneath the skin by a knife or needle, so as to form an issue; also, the issue so formed.
Setout
n.
• A display, as of plate, equipage, etc.; that which is displayed.
Sett
n.
• See Set, n., 2 (e) and 3.
Settee
n.
• A long seat with a back, — made to accommodate several persons at once.
n.
(Naut.) A vessel with a very long, sharp prow, carrying two or three masts with lateen sails, — used in the Mediterranean.
Setter
n.
• One who, or that which, sets; — used mostly in composition with a noun, as typesetter; or in combination with an adverb, as a setter on (or inciter), a setter up, a setter forth.
(Zool.) A hunting dog of a special breed originally derived from a cross between the spaniel and the pointer. Modern setters are usually trained to indicate the position of game birds by standing in a fixed position, but originally they indicated it by sitting or crouching.
• One who hunts victims for sharpers.
• One who adapts words to music in composition.
• An adornment; a decoration; — with off.
(Pottery) A shallow seggar for porcelain.
v. t.
• To cut the dewlap (of a cow or an ox), and to insert a seton, so as to cause an issue.
Setterwort
n.
(Bot.) The bear's-foot (Helleborus f&oe;tidus); — so called because the root was used in settering, or inserting setons into the dewlaps of cattle. Called also pegroots.
Setting
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, sets; as, the setting of type, or of gems; the setting of the sun; the setting (hardening) of moist plaster of Paris; the setting (set) of a current.
• The act of marking the position of game, as a setter does; also, hunting with a setter.
• Something set in, or inserted.
• That in which something, as a gem, is set; as, the gold setting of a jeweled pin.
Settle
n.
• A seat of any kind.
• A bench; especially, a bench with a high back.
• A place made lower than the rest; a wide step or platform lower than some other part.
v. t.
• To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; esp., to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home, or the like.
• To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish; as, to settle a minister.
• To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to render quiet; to still; to calm; to compose.
• To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; — said of a liquid; as, to settle coffee, or the grounds of coffee.
• To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; — said of the ground, of roads, and the like; as, clear weather settles the roads.
• To cause to sink; to lower; to depress; hence, also, to render close or compact; as, to settle the contents of a barrel or bag by shaking it.
• To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from unscertainty or wavering; to make sure, firm, or constant; to establish; to compose; to quiet; as, to settle the mind when agitated; to settle questions of law; to settle the succession to a throne; to settle an allowance.
• To adjust, as something in discussion; to make up; to compose; to pacify; as, to settle a quarrel.
• To adjust, as accounts; to liquidate; to balance; as, to settle an account.
• Hence, to pay; as, to settle a bill.
• To plant with inhabitants; to colonize; to people; as, the French first settled Canada; the Puritans settled New England; Plymouth was settled in 1620.
v. i.
• To become fixed or permanent; to become stationary; to establish one's self or itself; to assume a lasting form, condition, direction, or the like, in place of a temporary or changing state.
• To fix one's residence; to establish a dwelling place or home; as, the Saxons who settled in Britain.
• To enter into the married state, or the state of a householder.
• To be established in an employment or profession; as, to settle in the practice of law.
• To become firm, dry, and hard, as the ground after the effects of rain or frost have disappeared; as, the roads settled late in the spring.
• To become clear after being turbid or obscure; to clarify by depositing matter held in suspension; as, the weather settled; wine settles by standing.
• To sink to the bottom; to fall to the bottom, as dregs of a liquid, or the sediment of a reserveir.
• To sink gradually to a lower level; to subside, as the foundation of a house, etc.
• To become calm; to cease from agitation.
• To adjust differences or accounts; to come to an agreement; as, he has settled with his creditors.
• To make a jointure for a wife.
Settledness
n.
• The quality or state of being settled; confirmed state.
Settlement
n.
• The act of setting, or the state of being settled.
• Establishment in life, in business, condition, etc.; ordination or installation as pastor.
• The act of peopling, or state of being peopled; act of planting, as a colony; colonization; occupation by settlers; as, the settlement of a new country
• The act or process of adjusting or determining; composure of doubts or differences; pacification; liquidation of accounts; arrangement; adjustment; as, settlement of a controversy, of accounts, etc.
• Bestowal, or giving possession, under legal sanction; the act of giving or conferring anything in a formal and permanent manner
(Law) A disposition of property for the benefit of some person or persons, usually through the medium of trustees, and for the benefit of a wife, children, or other relatives; jointure granted to a wife, or the act of granting it
• That which settles, or is settled, established, or fixed.
• Matter that subsides; settlings; sediment; lees; dregs
• A colony newly established; a place or region newly settled; as, settlement in the West
• That which is bestowed formally and permanently; the sum secured to a person; especially, a jointure made to a woman at her marriage; also, in the United States, a sum of money or other property formerly granted to a pastor in additional to his salary
(Arch.) The gradual sinking of a building, whether by the yielding of the ground under the foundation, or by the compression of the joints or the material.
• Fractures or dislocations caused by settlement.
(Law) A settled place of abode; residence; a right growing out of residence; legal residence or establishment of a person in a particular parish or town, which entitles him to maintenance if a pauper, and subjects the parish or town to his support.
Settler
n.
• One who settles, becomes fixed, established, etc.
• Especially, one who establishes himself in a new region or a colony; a colonist; a planter; as, the first settlers of New England.
• That which settles or finishes; hence, a blow, etc., which settles or decides a contest.
• A vessel, as a tub, in which something, as pulverized ore suspended in a liquid, is allowed to settle.
Settling
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, settles; the act of establishing one's self, of colonizing, subsiding, adjusting, etc.
• That which settles at the bottom of a liquid; lees; dregs; sediment.
Setula
n.
• A small, short hair or bristle; a small seta.
Setule
n.
• A setula.
Setulose
a.
• Having small bristles or setae.
Setwall
n.
(Bot.) A plant formerly valued for its restorative qualities (Valeriana officinalis, or V. Pyrenaica).
Seven
a.
• One more than six; six and one added; as, seven days make one week.
n.
• The number greater by one than six; seven units or objects.
• A symbol representing seven units, as 7, or vii.
Sevenfold
a.
• Repeated seven times; having seven thicknesses; increased to seven times the size or amount.
adv.
• Seven times as much or as often.
Sevennight
n.
• A week; any period of seven consecutive days and nights. See Sennight.
Sevenscore
n. & a.
• Seven times twenty, that is, a hundred and forty.
Seventeen
a.
• One more than sixteen; ten and seven added; as, seventeen years.
n.
• The number greater by one than sixteen; the sum of ten and seven; seventeen units or objects.
• A symbol denoting seventeen units, as 17, or xvii.
Seventeenth
a.
• Next in order after the sixteenth; coming after sixteen others.
• Constituting or being one of seventeen equal parts into which anything is divided.
n.
• The next in order after the sixteenth; one coming after sixteen others.
• The quotient of a unit divided by seventeen; one of seventeen equal parts or divisions of one whole.
(Mus.) An interval of two octaves and a third.
Seventh
a.
• Next in order after the sixth;; coming after six others.
• Constituting or being one of seven equal parts into which anything is divided; as, the seventh part.
n.
• One next in order after the sixth; one coming after six others.
• The quotient of a unit divided by seven; one of seven equal parts into which anything is divided.
(Mus.) An interval embracing seven diatonic degrees of the scale.
• A chord which includes the interval of a seventh whether major, minor, or diminished.
Seventhly
adv.
• In the seventh place.
Seventieth
a.
• Next in order after the sixty-ninth; as, a man in the seventieth year of his age.
• Constituting or being one of seventy equal parts.
n.
• One next in order after the sixty-ninth.
• The quotient of a unit divided by seventy; one of seventy equal parts or fractions.
Seventy
a.
• Seven times ten; one more than sixty-nine.
n.
• The sum of seven times ten; seventy units or objects.
• A symbol representing seventy units, as 70, or lxx.
Sever
v. t.
• To separate, as one from another; to cut off from something; to divide; to part in any way, especially by violence, as by cutting, rending, etc.; as, to sever the head from the body.
• To cut or break open or apart; to divide into parts; to cut through; to disjoin; as, to sever the arm or leg.
• To keep distinct or apart; to except; to exempt.
(Law) To disunite; to disconnect; to terminate; as, to sever an estate in joint tenancy.
v. i.
• To suffer disjunction; to be parted, or rent asunder; to be separated; to part; to separate.
• To make a separation or distinction; to distinguish.
Severable
a.
• Capable of being severed.
Several
a.
• Separate; distinct; particular; single.
• Diverse; different; various.
• Consisting of a number more than two, but not very many; divers; sundry; as, several persons were present when the event took place.
adv.
• By itself; severally.
n.
• Each particular taken singly; an item; a detail; an individual.
• Persons oe objects, more than two, but not very many.
• An inclosed or separate place; inclosure.
Severality
n.
• Each particular taken singly; distinction.
Severalize
v. t.
• To distinguish.
Severally
adv.
• Separately; distinctly; apart from others; individually.
Severalty
n.
• A state of separation from the rest, or from all others; a holding by individual right.
Severance
n.
• The act of severing, or the state of being severed; partition; separation.
(Law) The act of dividing; the singling or severing of two or more that join, or are joined, in one writ; the putting in several or separate pleas or answers by two or more disjointly; the destruction of the unity of interest in a joint estate.
Severe
a.
• Serious in feeeling or manner; sedate; grave; austere; not light, lively, or cheerful.
• Very strict in judgment, discipline, or government; harsh; not mild or indulgent; rigorous; as, severe criticism; severe punishment.
• Rigidly methodical, or adherent to rule or principle; exactly conformed to a standard; not allowing or employing unneccessary ornament, amplification, etc.; strict; — said of style, argument, etc.
• Sharp; afflictive; distressing; violent; extreme; as, severe pain, anguish, fortune; severe cold.
• Difficult to be endured; exact; critical; rigorous; as, a severe test.
Severity
n.
• The quality or state of being severe.
• Gravity or austerity; extreme strictness; rigor; harshness; as, the severity of a reprimand or a reproof; severity of discipline or government; severity of penalties
• The quality or power of distressing or paining; extreme degree; extremity; intensity; inclemency; as, the severity of pain or anguish; the severity of cold or heat; the severity of the winter
• Harshness; cruel treatment; sharpness of punishment; as, severity practiced on prisoners of war
• Exactness; rigorousness; strictness; as, the severity of a test
Severy
n.
(Arch.) A bay or compartment of a vaulted ceiling.
Sevocation
n.
• A calling aside.
Sew
n.
• Juice; gravy; a seasoned dish; a delicacy.
v. t.
• To follow; to pursue; to sue.
v. t.
• To unite or fasten together by stitches, as with a needle and thread.
• To close or stop by ssewing; — often with up; as, to sew up a rip.
• To inclose by sewing; — sometimes with up; as, to sew money in a bag.
v. i.
• To practice sewing; to work with needle and thread.
v. t.
• To drain, as a pond, for taking the fish.
Sewage
n.
• The contents of a sewer or drain; refuse liquids or matter carried off by sewers
• Sewerage, 2.
Sewe
v. i.
• To perform the duties of a sewer. See 3d Sewer.
Sewel
n.
• A scarecrow, generally made of feathers tied to a string, hung up to prevent deer from breaking into a place.
Sewellel
n.
(Zool.) A peculiar gregarious burrowing rodent (Haplodon rufus), native of the coast region of the Northwestern United States. It somewhat resembles a muskrat or marmot, but has only a rudimentary tail. Its head is broad, its eyes are small and its fur is brownish above, gray beneath. It constitutes the family Haplodontidae. Called also boomer, showt'l, and mountain beaver.
Sewen
n.
(Zool.) A British trout usually regarded as a variety (var. Cambricus) of the salmon trout.
Sewer
n.
• One who sews, or stitches.
(Zool.) A small tortricid moth whose larva sews together the edges of a leaf by means of silk; as, the apple-leaf sewer (Phoxopteris nubeculana)
n.
• A drain or passage to carry off water and filth under ground; a subterraneous channel, particularly in cities.
n.
• Formerly, an upper servant, or household officer, who set on and removed the dishes at a feast, and who also brought water for the hands of the guests.
Sewerage
n.
• The construction of a sewer or sewers.
• The system of sewers in a city, town, etc.; the general drainage of a city or town by means of sewers.
• The material collected in, and discharged by, sewers.
Sewin
n.
(Zool.) Same as Sewen.
Sewing
n.
• The act or occupation of one who sews.
• That which is sewed with the needle.
Sewster
n.
• A seamstress.
Sex
n.
• The distinguishing peculiarity of male or female in both animals and plants; the physical difference between male and female; the assemblage of properties or qualities by which male is distinguished from female.
• One of the two divisions of organic beings formed on the distinction of male and female.
(Bot.) The capability in plants of fertilizing or of being fertilized; as, staminate and pistillate flowers are of opposite sexes.
• One of the groups founded on this distinction.
Sexagenarian
n.
• A person who is sixty years old.
Sexagenary
a.
• Pertaining to, or designating, the number sixty; poceeding by sixties; sixty years old.
n.
• Something composed of sixty parts or divisions.
• A sexagenarian.
Sexagesima
n.
(Eccl.) The second Sunday before Lent; — so called as being about the sixtieth day before Easter.
Sexagesimal
a.
• Pertaining to, or founded on, the number sixty.
n.
• A sexagesimal fraction.
Sexangle
n.
(Geom.) A hexagon.
Sexangularly
adv.
• Hexagonally.
Sexavalent
a.
• See Sexivalent.
Sexdigitism
n.
• The state of having six fingers on a hand, or six toes on a foot.
Sexdigitist
n.
• One who has six fingers on a hand, or six toes on a foot.
Sexed
a.
• Belonging to sex; having sex; distinctively male of female; as, the sexed condition.
Sexenary
a.
• Proceeding by sixes; sextuple; — applied especially to a system of arithmetical computation in which the base is six.
Sexennial
a.
• Lasting six years, or happening once in six years.
n.
• A sexennial event.
Sexennially
adv.
• Once in six years.
Sexisyllabic
a.
• Having six syllables.
Sexisyllable
n.
• A word of six syllables.
Sexivalent
a.
(hem.) Hexavalent.
Sexless
a.
• Having no sex.
Sexlocular
a.
(Bot.) Having six cells for seeds; six-celled; as, a sexlocular pericarp.
Sexly
a.
• Pertaining to sex.
Sexradiate
a.
(Zool.) Having six rays; — said of certain sponge spicules. See Illust. of Spicule.
Sext
n.
(R.C.Ch.) The office for the sixth canonical hour, being a part of the Breviary.
• The sixth book of the decretals, added by Pope Boniface VIII.
Sextain
n.
(Pros.) A stanza of six lines; a sestine.
Sextans
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A Roman coin, the sixth part of an as.
(Astron.) A constellation on the equator south of Leo; the Sextant.
Sextant
n.
(Math.) The sixth part of a circle.
• An instrument for measuring angular distances between objects, — used esp. at sea, for ascertaining the latitude and longitude. It is constructed on the same optical principle as Hadley's quadrant, but usually of metal, with a nicer graduation, telescopic sight, and its arc the sixth, and sometimes the third, part of a circle. See Quadrant.
(Astron.) The constellation Sextans.
Sextary
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) An ancient Roman liquid and dry measure, about equal to an English pint.
n.
• A sacristy.
Sexteyn
n.
• A sacristan.
Sextic
a.
(Math.) Of the sixth degree or order.
n.
(Alg.) A quantic of the sixth degree.
Sextile
a.
(Astrol.) Measured by sixty degrees; fixed or indicated by a distance of sixty degrees.
n.
(Astrol.) The aspect or position of two planets when distant from each other sixty degrees, or two signs. This position is marked thus:
Sextillion
n.
• According to the method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-one ciphers annexed. According to the English method, a million raised to the sixth power, or the number expressed by a unit with thirty-six ciphers annexed. See Numeration.
Sexto
n.
• A book consisting of sheets each of which is folded into six leaves.
Sextodecimo
a.
• Having sixteen leaves to a sheet; of, or equal to, the size of one fold of a sheet of printing paper when folded so as to make sixteen leaves, or thirty-two pages; as, a sextodecimo volume.
n.
• A book composed of sheets each of which is folded into sixteen leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of a book; — usually written 16mo, or 16°.
Sextolet
n.
(Mus.) A double triplet; a group of six equal notes played in the time of four.
Sexton
n.
• An under officer of a church, whose business is to take care of the church building and the vessels, vestments, etc., belonging to the church, to attend on the officiating clergyman, and to perform other duties pertaining to the church, such as to dig graves, ring the bell, etc.
Sextoness
n.
• A female sexton; a sexton's wife.
Sextonry
n.
• Sextonship.
Sextonship
n.
• The office of a sexton.
Sextry
n.
• See Sacristy.
Sextuple
a.
• Six times as much; sixfold.
(Mus.) Divisible by six; having six beats; as, sixtuple measure.
Sexual
a.
• Of or pertaining to sex, or the sexes; distinguishing sex; peculiar to the distinction and office of male or female; relating to the distinctive genital organs of the sexes; proceeding from, or based upon, sex; as, sexual characteristics; sexual intercourse, connection, or commerce; sexual desire; sexual diseases; sexual generation.
Sexualist
n.
(Bot.) One who classifies plants by the sexual method of Linnaeus.
Sexuality
n.
• The quality or state of being distinguished by sex.
Sexualize
v. t.
• To attribute sex to.
Sexually
adv.
• In a sexual manner or relation.
Seynd
obs. p. p.
• of Senge, to singe.
Seynt
n.
• A gridle. See 1st Seint.
Sfumato
a.
(Paint.) Having vague outlines, and colors and shades so mingled as to give a misty appearance; — said of a painting.
Sgraffito
a.
(Paint.) Scratched; — said of decorative painting of a certain style, in which a white overland surface is cut or scratched through, so as to form the design from a dark ground underneath.
Shab
n.
• The itch in animals; also, a scab.
v. t.
• To play mean tricks; to act shabbily.
v. t.
• To scratch; to rub.
Shabbed
a.
• Shabby.
Shabbily
adv.
• In a shabby manner.
Shabbiness
n.
• The quality or state of being sghabby.
Shabby
a.
• Torn or worn to rage; poor; mean; ragged.
• Clothed with ragged, much worn, or soiled garments.
• Mean; paltry; despicable; as, shabby treatment.
Shabrack
n.
(Mil.) The saddlecloth or housing of a cavalry horse.
Shack
v. t.
• To shed or fall, as corn or grain at harvest.
• To feed in stubble, or upon waste corn.
• To wander as a vagabond or a tramp.
n.
• The grain left after harvest or gleaning; also, nuts which have fallen to the ground.
• Liberty of winter pasturage.
• A shiftless fellow; a low, itinerant beggar; a vagabond; a tramp.
Shackatory
n.
• A hound.
Shackle
n.
• Stubble.
n.
• Something which confines the legs or arms so as to prevent their free motion; specifically, a ring or band inclosing the ankle or wrist, and fastened to a similar shackle on the other leg or arm, or to something else, by a chain or a strap; a gyve; a fetter.
• Hence, that which checks or prevents free action.
• A fetterlike band worn as an ornament.
• A link or loop, as in a chain, fitted with a movable bolt, so that the parts can be separated, or the loop removed; a clevis.
• A link for connecting railroad cars; — called also drawlink, draglink, etc.
• The hinged and curved bar of a padlock, by which it is hung to the staple.
v. t.
• To tie or confine the limbs of, so as to prevent free motion; to bind with shackles; to fetter; to chain.
• Figuratively: To bind or confine so as to prevent or embarrass action; to impede; to cumber.
• To join by a link or chain, as railroad cars.
Shacklock
n.
• A sort of shackle.
Shackly
a.
• Shaky; rickety.
Shad
n. sing. & pl.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring family. The American species (Clupea sapidissima), which is abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European allice shad, or alose (C. alosa), and the twaite shad. (C. finta), are less important species.
Shadbird
n.
(Zool.) The American, or Wilson's, snipe. See under Snipe. So called because it appears at the same time as the shad.
• The common European sandpiper.
Shadd
n.
(Mining.) Rounded stones containing tin ore, lying at the surface of the ground, and indicating a vein.
Shadde
• obs. imp. of Shed.
Shaddock
n.
(Bot.) A tree (Citrus decumana) and its fruit, which is a large species of orange; — called also forbidden fruit, and pompelmous.
Shade
n.
• Comparative obscurity owing to interception or interruption of the rays of light; partial darkness caused by the intervention of something between the space contemplated and the source of light.
• Darkness; obscurity; — often in the plural.
• An obscure place; a spot not exposed to light; hence, a secluded retreat.
• That which intercepts, or shelters from, light or the direct rays of the sun; hence, also, that which protects from heat or currents of air; a screen; protection; shelter; cover; as, a lamp shade.
• Shadow.
• The soul after its separation from the body; — so called because the ancients it to be perceptible to the sight, though not to the touch; a spirit; a ghost; as, the shades of departed heroes.
(Painting, Drawing, etc.) The darker portion of a picture; a less illuminated part. See Def. 1, above.
• Degree or variation of color, as darker or lighter, stronger or paler; as, a delicate shade of pink.
• A minute difference or variation, as of thought, belief, expression, etc.; also, the quality or degree of anything which is distinguished from others similar by slight differences; as, the shades of meaning in synonyms.
v. t.
• To shelter or screen by intercepting the rays of light; to keep off illumination from.
• To shelter; to cover from injury; to protect; to screen; to hide; as, to shade one's eyes.
• To obscure; to dim the brightness of.
• To pain in obscure colors; to darken.
• To mark with gradations of light or color.
• To present a shadow or image of; to shadow forth; to represent.
Shadeful
a.
• Full of shade; shady.
Shadeless
a.
• Being without shade; not shaded.
Shader
n.
• One who, or that which, shades.
Shadily
adv.
• In a shady manner.
Shadiness
• , n. Quality or state of being shady.
Shading
n.
• Act or process of making a shade.
• That filling up which represents the effect of more or less darkness, expressing rotundity, projection, etc., in a picture or a drawing.
Shadoof
n.
• A machine, resembling a well sweep, used in Egypt for raising water from the Nile for irrigation.
Shadow
n.
• Shade within defined limits; obscurity or deprivation of light, apparent on a surface, and representing the form of the body which intercepts the rays of light; as, the shadow of a man, of a tree, or of a tower. See the Note under Shade, n., 1.
• Darkness; shade; obscurity.
• A shaded place; shelter; protection; security.
• A reflected image, as in a mirror or in water.
• That which follows or attends a person or thing like a shadow; an inseparable companion; hence, an obsequious follower.
• A spirit; a ghost; a shade; a phantom.
• An imperfect and faint representation; adumbration; indistinct image; dim bodying forth; hence, mystical reprresentation; type.
• A small degree; a shade.
• An uninvited guest coming with one who is invited.
v. t.
• To cut off light from; to put in shade; to shade; to throw a shadow upon; to overspead with obscurity.
• To conceal; to hide; to screen.
• To protect; to shelter from danger; to shroud.
• To mark with gradations of light or color; to shade.
• To represent faintly or imperfectly; to adumbrate; hence, to represent typically.
• To cloud; to darken; to cast a gloom over.
• To attend as closely as a shadow; to follow and watch closely, especially in a secret or unobserved manner; as, a detective shadows a criminal.
Shadowiness
n.
• The quality or state of being shadowy.
Shadowing
n.
• Shade, or gradation of light and color; shading.
• A faint representation; an adumbration.
Shadowish
a.
• Shadowy; vague.
Shadowless
a.
• Having no shadow.
Shadowy
a.
• Full of shade or shadows; causing shade or shadow.
• Hence, dark; obscure; gloomy; dim.
• Not brightly luminous; faintly light.
• Faintly representative; hence, typical.
• Unsubstantial; unreal; as, shadowy honor.
Shadrach
n.
(Metal.) A mass of iron on which the operation of smelting has failed of its intended effect; — so called from Shadrach, one of the three Hebrews who came forth unharmed from the fiery furnace of Nebuchadnezzar. (See Dan. iii. 26, 27.)
Shady
a.
• Abounding in shade or shades; overspread with shade; causing shade.
• Sheltered from the glare of light or sultry heat.
• Of or pertaining to shade or darkness; hence, unfit to be seen or known; equivocal; dubious or corrupt.
Shaffle
v. i.
• To hobble or limp; to shuffle.
Shaffler
n.
• A hobbler; one who limps; a shuffer.
Shafiite
n.
• A member of one of the four sects of the Sunnites, or Orthodox Mohammedans; — so called from its founder, Mohammed al-Shafei.
Shaft
n.
• The slender, smooth stem of an arrow; hence, an arrow.
• The long handle of a spear or similar weapon; hence, the weapon itself; () anything regarded as a shaft to be thrown or darted; as, shafts of light.
• That which resembles in some degree the stem or handle of an arrow or a spear; a long, slender part, especially when cylindrical.
(Bot.) The trunk, stem, or stalk of a plant
(Zool.) The stem or midrib of a feather
• The pole, or tongue, of a vehicle; also, a thill
• The part of a candlestick which supports its branches.
• The handle or helve of certain tools, instruments, etc., as a hammer, a whip, etc.
• A pole, especially a Maypole
(Arch.) The body of a column; the cylindrical pillar between the capital and base (see Illust. of Column). Also, the part of a chimney above the roof. Also, the spire of a steeple.
• A column, an obelisk, or other spire-shaped or columnar monument
(Weaving) A rod at the end of a heddle
(Mach.) A solid or hollow cylinder or bar, having one or more journals on which it rests and revolves, and intended to carry one or more wheels or other revolving parts and to transmit power or motion; as, the shaft of a steam engine
(Zool.) A humming bird (Thaumastura cora) having two of the tail feathers next to the middle ones very long in the male; — called also cora humming bird.
(Mining) A well-like excavation in the earth, perpendicular or nearly so, made for reaching and raising ore, for raising water, etc.
• A long passage for the admission or outlet of air; an air shaft.
• The chamber of a blast furnace.
Shafted
a.
• Furnished with a shaft, or with shafts; as, a shafted arch.
(Her.) Having a shaft; — applied to a spear when the head and the shaft are of different tinctures.
Shafting
n.
(Mach.) Shafts, collectivelly; a system of connected shafts for communicating motion.
Shag
n.
• Coarse hair or nap; rough, woolly hair.
• A kind of cloth having a long, coarse nap.
(Com.) A kind of prepared tobacco cut fine.
(Zool.) Any species of cormorant.
a.
• Hairy; shaggy.
v. t.
• To make hairy or shaggy; hence, to make rough.
Shagbark
n.
(Bot.) A rough-barked species of hickory (Carya alba), its nut. Called also shellbark. See Hickory.
• The West Indian Pithecolobium micradenium, a legiminous tree with a red coiled-up pod.
Shagebush
n.
• A sackbut.
Shagged
a.
• Shaggy; rough.
Shagginess
n.
• The quality or state of being shaggy; roughness; shaggedness.
Shaggy
a.
• Rough with long hair or wool.
• Rough; rugged; jaggy.
Shagreen
v. t.
• To chagrin.
n.
• A kind of untanned leather prepared in Russia and the East, from the skins of horses, asses, and camels, and grained so as to be covered with small round granulations. This characteristic surface is produced by pressing small seeds into the grain or hair side when moist, and afterward, when dry, scraping off the roughness left between them, and then, by soaking, causing the portions of the skin which had been compressed or indented by the seeds to swell up into relief. It is used for covering small cases and boxes.
• The skin of various small sharks and other fishes when having small, rough, bony scales. The dogfishes of the genus Scyllium furnish a large part of that used in the arts.
Shah
n.
• The title of the supreme ruler in certain Eastern countries, especially Persia.
Shahin
n.
(Zool.) A large and swift Asiatic falcon (Falco pregrinator) highly valued in falconry.
Shaik
n.
• See Sheik.
Shail
v. i.
• To walk sidewise.
Shake
• obs. p. p. of Shake.
v. t.
• To cause to move with quick or violent vibrations; to move rapidly one way and the other; to make to tremble or shiver; to agitate.
• Fig.: To move from firmness; to weaken the stability of; to cause to waver; to impair the resolution of.
(Mus.) To give a tremulous tone to; to trill; as, to shake a note in music.
• To move or remove by agitating; to throw off by a jolting or vibrating motion; to rid one's self of; — generally with an adverb, as off, out, etc.; as, to shake fruit down from a tree.
v. i.
• To be agitated with a waving or vibratory motion; to tremble; to shiver; to quake; to totter.
n.
• The act or result of shaking; a vacillating or wavering motion; a rapid motion one way and other; a trembling, quaking, or shivering; agitation.
• A fissure or crack in timber, caused by its being dried too suddenly.
• A fissure in rock or earth.
(Mus.) A rapid alternation of a principal tone with another represented on the next degree of the staff above or below it; a trill.
(Naut.) One of the staves of a hogshead or barrel taken apart.
• A shook of staves and headings.
(Zool.) The redshank; — so called from the nodding of its head while on the ground.
Shakedown
n.
• A temporary substitute for a bed, as one made on the floor or on chairs; — perhaps originally from the shaking down of straw for this purpose.
Shakefork
n.
• A fork for shaking hay; a pitchfork.
Shaken
a.
• Caused to shake; agitated; as, a shaken bough.
• Cracked or checked; split. See Shake, n., 2.
• Impaired, as by a shock.
Shaker
n.
• A person or thing that shakes, or by means of which something is shaken.
• One of a religious sect who do not marry, popularly so called from the movements of the members in dancing, which forms a part of their worship.
(Zool.) A variety of pigeon.
Shakeress
n.
• A female Shaker.
Shakerism
n.
• Doctrines of the Shakers.
Shakespearean
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or in the style of, Shakespeare or his works.
Shakiness
n.
• Quality of being shaky.
Shakings
n. pl.
(Naut.) Deck sweepings, refuse of cordage, canvas, etc.
Shako
n.
• A kind of military cap or headress.
Shaky
a.
• Shaking or trembling; as, a shaky spot in a marsh; a shaky hand.
• Full of shakes or cracks; cracked; as, shaky timber.
• Easily shaken; tottering; unsound; as, a shaky constitution; shaky business credit.
Shale
n.
• A shell or husk; a cod or pod.
(Geol.) A fine-grained sedimentary rock of a thin, laminated, and often friable, structure.
v. t.
• To take off the shell or coat of; to shell.
Shall
v. i. & auxiliary.
• To owe; to be under obligation for.
• To be obliged; must.
• As an auxiliary, shall indicates a duty or necessity whose obligation is derived from the person speaking; as, you shall go; he shall go; that is, I order or promise your going. It thus ordinarily expresses, in the second and third persons, a command, a threat, or a promise. If the auxillary be emphasized, the command is made more imperative, the promise or that more positive and sure. It is also employed in the language of prophecy; as, "the day shall come when . . . , " since a promise or threat and an authoritative prophecy nearly coincide in significance. In shall with the first person, the necessity of the action is sometimes implied as residing elsewhere than in the speaker; as, I shall suffer; we shall see; and there is always a less distinct and positive assertion of his volition than is indicated by will. "I shall go" implies nearly a simple futurity; more exactly, a foretelling or an expectation of my going, in which, naturally enough, a certain degree of plan or intention may be included; emphasize the shall, and the event is described as certain to occur, and the expression approximates in meaning to our emphatic "I will go." In a question, the relation of speaker and source of obligation is of course transferred to the person addressed; as, "Shall you go?" (answer, "I shall go"); "Shall he go?" i. e., "Do you require or promise his going?" (answer, "He shall go".) The same relation is transferred to either second or third person in such phrases as "You say, or think, you shall go;" "He says, or thinks, he shall go." After a conditional conjunction (as if, whether) shall is used in all persons to express futurity simply; as, if I, you, or he shall say they are right. Should is everywhere used in the same connection and the same senses as shall, as its imperfect. It also expresses duty or moral obligation; as, he should do it whether he will or not. In the early English, and hence in our English Bible, shall is the auxiliary mainly used, in all the persons, to express simple futurity. (Cf. Will, v. t.) Shall may be used elliptically; thus, with an adverb or other word expressive of motion go may be omitted.
Shalli
n.
• See Challis.
Shallon
n.
(Bot.) An evergreen shrub (Gaultheria Shallon) of Northwest America; also, its fruit. See Salal-berry.
Shalloon
n.
• A thin, loosely woven, twilled worsted stuff.
Shallop
n.
(Naut.) A boat.
Shallot
n.
(Bot.) A small kind of onion (Allium Ascalonicum) growing in clusters, and ready for gathering in spring; a scallion, or eschalot.
Shallow
a.
• Not deep; having little depth; shoal.
• Not deep in tone.
• Not intellectually deep; not profound; not penetrating deeply; simple; not wise or knowing; ignorant; superficial; as, a shallow mind; shallow learning.
n.
• A place in a body of water where the water is not deep; a shoal; a flat; a shelf.
(Zool.) The rudd.
v. t.
• To make shallow.
v. i.
• To become shallow, as water.
Shallowly
adv.
• In a shallow manner.
Shallowness
n.
• Quality or state of being shallow.
Shalm
n.
• See Shawm.
Shalt
• 2d per. sing. of Shall.
Shaly
a.
• Resembling shale in structure.
Sham
n.
• That which deceives expectation; any trick, fraud, or device that deludes and disappoint; a make-believe; delusion; imposture, humbug.
• A false front, or removable ornamental covering.
a.
• False; counterfeit; pretended; feigned; unreal; as, a sham fight.
v. t.
• To trick; to cheat; to deceive or delude with false pretenses.
• To obtrude by fraud or imposition.
• To assume the manner and character of; to imitate; to ape; to feign.
v. i.
• To make false pretenses; to deceive; to feign; to impose.
Shama
n.
(Zool.) A saxicoline singing bird (Kittacincla macroura) of India, noted for the sweetness and power of its song. In confinement it imitates the notes of other birds and various animals with accuracy. Its head, neck, back, breast, and tail are glossy black, the rump white, the under parts chestnut.
Shaman
n.
• A priest of Shamanism; a wizard among the Shamanists.
Shamanic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Shamanism.
Shamanism
n.
• The type of religion which once prevalied among all the Ural-Altaic peoples (Tungusic, Mongol, and Turkish), and which still survives in various parts of Northern Asia. The Shaman, or wizard priest, deals with good as well as with evil spirits, especially the good spirits of ancestors.
Shamanist
n.
• An adherent of Shamanism.
Shamble
n.
(Mining) One of a succession of niches or platforms, one above another, to hold ore which is thrown successively from platform to platform, and thus raised to a higher level.
• A place where butcher's meat is sold.
• A place for slaughtering animals for meat.
v. i.
• To walk awkwardly and unsteadily, as if the knees were weak; to shuffle along.
Shambling
a.
• Characterized by an awkward, irregular pace; as, a shambling trot; shambling legs.
n.
• An awkward, irregular gait.
Shame
n.
• A painful sensation excited by a consciousness of guilt or impropriety, or of having done something which injures reputation, or of the exposure of that which nature or modesty prompts us to conceal.
• Reproach incurred or suffered; dishonor; ignominy; derision; contempt.
• The cause or reason of shame; that which brings reproach, and degrades a person in the estimation of others; disgrace.
• The parts which modesty requires to be covered; the private parts.
v. t.
• To make ashamed; to excite in (a person) a comsciousness of guilt or impropriety, or of conduct derogatory to reputation; to put to shame.
• To cover with reproach or ignominy; to dishonor; to disgrace.
• To mock at; to deride.
v. i.
• To be ashamed; to feel shame.
Shamefaced
a.
• Easily confused or put out of countenance; diffident; bashful; modest.
Shamefast
a.
• Modest; shamefaced.
Shameful
a.
• Bringing shame or disgrace; injurious to reputation; disgraceful.
• Exciting the feeling of shame in others; indecent; as, a shameful picture; a shameful sight.
Shameless
a.
• Destitute of shame; wanting modesty; brazen-faced; insensible to disgrace.
• Indicating want of modesty, or sensibility to disgrace; indecent; as, a shameless picture or poem.
Shamer
n.
• One who, or that which, disgraces, or makes ashamed.
Shammer
n.
• One who shams; an impostor.
Shammy
n.
(Zool.) The chamois.
• A soft, pliant leather, prepared originally from the skin of the chamois, but now made also from the skin of the sheep, goat, kid, deer, and calf. See Shamoying.
Shamoying
n.
• A process used in preparing certain kinds of leather, which consists in frizzing the skin, and working oil into it to supply the place of the astringent (tannin, alum, or the like) ordinarily used in tanning.
Shampoo
v. t.
• To press or knead the whole surface of the body of (a person), and at the same time to stretch the limbs and joints, in connection with the hot bath.
• To wash throughly and rub the head of (a person), with the fingers, using either soap, or a soapy preparation, for the more thorough cleansing.
n.
• The act of shampooing.
Shampooer
n.
• One who shampoos.
Shamrock
n.
(Bot.) A trifoliate plant used as a national emblem by the Irish. The legend is that St. Patrick once plucked a leaf of it for use in illustrating the doctrine of the trinity.
Shan't
• A contraction of shall not.
Shandrydan
n.
• A jocosely depreciative name for a vehicle.
Shandygaff
n.
• A mixture of strong beer and ginger beer
Shanghai
v. t.
• To intoxicate and ship (a person) as a sailor while in this condition.
n.
(Zool.) A large and tall breed of domestic fowl.
Shank
n.
(Zool.) See Chank.
n.
• The part of the leg from the knee to the foot; the shin; the shin bone; also, the whole leg.
• Hence, that part of an instrument, tool, or other thing, which connects the acting part with a handle or other part, by which it is held or moved.
• That part of a key which is between the bow and the part which enters the wards of the lock
• The middle part of an anchor, or that part which is between the ring and the arms
• That part of a hoe, rake, knife, or the like, by which it is secured to a handle
• A loop forming an eye to a button.
(Arch.) The space between two channels of the Doric triglyph.
(Founding) A large ladle for molten metal, fitted with long bars for handling it.
(Print.) The body of a type.
(Shoemaking) The part of the sole beneath the instep connecting the broader front part with the heel.
(Zool.) A wading bird with long legs; as, the green-legged shank, or knot; the yellow shank, or tattler; — called also shanks.
• Flat-nosed pliers, used by opticians for nipping off the edges of pieces of glass to make them round.
v. i.
• To fall off, as a leaf, flower, or capsule, on account of disease affecting the supporting footstalk; — usually followed by off.
Shankbeer
n.
• See Schenkbeer.
Shanked
a.
• Having a shank.
Shanker
n.
(Med.) See Chancre.
Shanny
n.
(Zool.) The European smooth blenny (Blennius pholis). It is olive-green with irregular black spots, and without appendages on the head.
Shanty
a.
• Jaunty; showy.
n.
• A small, mean dwelling; a rough, slight building for temporary use; a hut.
v. i.
• To inhabit a shanty.
Shapable
a.
• That may be shaped.
• Shapely.
Shape
v. t.
• To form or create; especially, to mold or make into a particular form; to give proper form or figure to.
• To adapt to a purpose; to regulate; to adjust; to direct; as, to shape the course of a vessel.
• To image; to conceive; to body forth.
• To design; to prepare; to plan; to arrange.
v. i.
• To suit; to be adjusted or conformable.
n.
• Character or construction of a thing as determining its external appearance; outward aspect; make; figure; form; guise; as, the shape of a tree; the shape of the head; an elegant shape.
• That which has form or figure; a figure; an appearance; a being.
• A model; a pattern; a mold.
• Form of embodiment, as in words; form, as of thought or conception; concrete embodiment or example, as of some quality.
• Dress for disguise; guise.
(Iron Manuf.) A rolled or hammered piece, as a bar, beam, angle iron, etc., having a cross section different from merchant bar.
• A piece which has been roughly forged nearly to the form it will receive when completely forged or fitted.
Shapeless
a.
• Destitute of shape or regular form; wanting symmetry of dimensions; misshapen; — opposed to shapely.
Shapeliness
n.
• The quality or state of being shapely.
Shapely
a.
• Well-formed; having a regular shape; comely; symmetrical.
• Fit; suitable.
Shaper
n.
• One who shapes; as, the shaper of one's fortunes.
• That which shapes; a machine for giving a particular form or outline to an object.
(Metal Working) A kind of planer in which the tool, instead of the work, receives a reciprocating motion, usually from a crank.
(Wood Working) A machine with a vertically revolving cutter projecting above a flat table top, for cutting irregular outlines, moldings, etc.
Shapoo
n.
(Zool.) The oorial.
Shard
n.
• A plant; chard.
n.
• A piece or fragment of an earthen vessel, or a like brittle substance, as the shell of an egg or snail.
(Zool.) The hard wing case of a beetle.
• A gap in a fence.
• A boundary; a division.
Sharded
a.
(Zool.) Having elytra, as a beetle.
Shardy
a.
• Having, or consisting of, shards.
Share
n.
• The part (usually an iron or steel plate) of a plow which cuts the ground at the bottom of a furrow; a plowshare.
• The part which opens the ground for the reception of the seed, in a machine for sowing seed.
n.
• A certain quantity; a portion; a part; a division; as, a small share of prudence.
• Especially, the part allotted or belonging to one, of any property or interest owned by a number; a portion among others; an apportioned lot; an allotment; a dividend.
• Hence, one of a certain number of equal portions into which any property or invested capital is divided; as, a ship owned in ten shares.
• The pubes; the sharebone.
v. t.
• To part among two or more; to distribute in portions; to divide.
• To partake of, use, or experience, with others; to have a portion of; to take and possess in common; as, to share a shelter with another.
• To cut; to shear; to cleave; to divide.
v. i.
• To have part; to receive a portion; to partake, enjoy, or suffer with others.
Sharebeam
n.
• The part of the plow to which the share is attached.
Sharebone
n.
(Anat.) The public bone.
Sharebroker
n.
• A broker who deals in railway or other shares and securities.
Shareholder
n.
• One who holds or owns a share or shares in a joint fund or property.
Sharer
n.
• One who shares; a participator; a partaker; also, a divider; a distributer.
Sharewort
n.
(Bot.) A composite plant (Aster Tripolium) growing along the seacoast of Europe.
Shark
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of elasmobranch fishes of the order Plagiostomi, found in all seas.
• A rapacious, artful person; a sharper.
• Trickery; fraud; petty rapine; as, to live upon the shark.
v. t.
• To pick or gather indiscriminately or covertly.
v. i.
• To play the petty thief; to practice fraud or trickery; to swindle.
• To live by shifts and stratagems.
Sharker
n.
• One who lives by sharking.
Sharking
n.
• Petty rapine; trick; also, seeking a livelihood by shifts and dishonest devices.
Sharock
n.
• An East Indian coin of the value of 12
Sharp
a.
• Having a very thin edge or fine point; of a nature to cut or pierce easily; not blunt or dull; keen.
• Terminating in a point or edge; not obtuse or rounded; somewhat pointed or edged; peaked or ridged; as, a sharp hill; sharp features.
• Affecting the sense as if pointed or cutting, keen, penetrating, acute: to the taste or smell, pungent, acid, sour, as ammonia has a sharp taste and odor; to the hearing, piercing, shrill, as a sharp sound or voice; to the eye, instantaneously brilliant, dazzling, as a sharp flash.
(Mus.) High in pitch; acute; as, a sharp note or tone.
• Raised a semitone in pitch; as, C sharp (C♯), which is a half step, or semitone, higher than C.
• So high as to be out of tune, or above true pitch; as, the tone is sharp; that instrument is sharp. Opposed in all these senses to flat.
• Very trying to the feelings; pierching; keen; severe; painful; distressing; as, sharp pain, weather; a sharp and frosty air.
• Cutting in language or import; biting; sarcastic; cruel; harsh; rigorous; severe; as, a sharp rebuke.
• Of keen perception; quick to discern or distinguish; having nice discrimination; acute; penetrating; sagacious; clever; as, a sharp eye; sharp sight, hearing, or judgment.
• Eager in pursuit; keen in quest; impatient for gratification; keen; as, a sharp appetite.
• Fierce; ardent; fiery; violent; impetuous.
• Keenly or unduly attentive to one's own interest; close and exact in dealing; shrewd; as, a sharp dealer; a sharp customer.
• Composed of hard, angular grains; gritty; as, sharp sand.
• Steep; precipitous; abrupt; as, a sharp ascent or descent; a sharp turn or curve.
(Phonetics) Uttered in a whisper, or with the breath alone, without voice, as certain consonants, such as p, k, t, f; surd; nonvocal; aspirated.
adv.
• To a point or edge; piercingly; eagerly; sharply.
• Precisely; exactly; as, we shall start at ten o'clock sharp.
n.
• A sharp tool or weapon.
(Mus.) The character [♯] used to indicate that the note before which it is placed is to be raised a half step, or semitone, in pitch.
• A sharp tone or note.
• A portion of a stream where the water runs very rapidly.
• A sewing needle having a very slender point; a needle of the most pointed of the three grades, blunts, betweens, and sharps.
• Same as Middlings, 1.
• An expert.
v. t.
• To sharpen.
(Mus.) To raise above the proper pitch; to elevate the tone of; especially, to raise a half step, or semitone, above the natural tone.
v. i.
• To play tricks in bargaining; to act the sharper.
(Mus.) To sing above the proper pitch.
Sharpen
v. t.
• To make sharp.
• To give a keen edge or fine point to; to make sharper; as, to sharpen an ax, or the teeth of a saw
• To render more quick or acute in perception; to make more ready or ingenious.
• To make more eager; as, to sharpen men's desires
• To make more pungent and intense; as, to sharpen a pain or disease
• To make biting, sarcastic, or severe
• To render more shrill or piercing
• To make more tart or acid; to make sour; as, the rays of the sun sharpen vinegar(Mus.
• ) To raise, as a sound, by means of a sharp; to apply a sharp to
v. i.
• To grow or become sharp.
Sharper
n.
• A person who bargains closely, especially, one who cheats in bargains; a swinder; also, a cheating gamester.
Sharpie
n.
(Naut.) A long, sharp, flat-bottomed boat, with one or two masts carrying a triangular sail. They are often called Fair Haven sharpies, after the place on the coast of Connecticut where they originated.
Sharpling
n.
(Zool.) A stickleback.
Sharply
adv.
• In a sharp manner,; keenly; acutely.
Sharpness
n.
• The quality or condition of being sharp; keenness; acuteness.
Sharpsaw
n.
(Zool.) The great titmouse; — so called from its harsh call notes.
Sharpshooter
n.
• One skilled in shooting at an object with exactness; a good marksman.
Sharpshooting
n.
• A shooting with great precision and effect; hence, a keen contest of wit or argument.
Sharptail
n.
(Zool.) The pintail duck.
• The pintail grouse, or prairie chicken.
Shash
n.
• The scarf of a turban.
• A sash.
Shathmont
n.
• A shaftment
Shatter
v. t.
• To break at once into many pieces; to dash, burst, or part violently into fragments; to rend into splinters; as, an explosion shatters a rock or a bomb; too much steam shatters a boiler; an oak is shattered by lightning.
• To disorder; to derange; to render unsound; as, to be shattered in intellect; his constitution was shattered; his hopes were shattered.
• To scatter about.
v. i.
• To be broken into fragments; to fal or crumble to pieces by any force applied.
n.
• A fragment of anything shattered; — used chiefly or soley in the phrase into shatters; as, to break a glass into shatters.
Shattery
a.
• Easily breaking into pieces; not compact; loose of texture; brittle; as, shattery spar.
Shave
• obs. p. p. of Shave.
v. t.
• To cut or pare off from the surface of a body with a razor or other edged instrument; to cut off closely, as with a razor; as, to shave the beard.
• To make bare or smooth by cutting off closely the surface, or surface covering, of; especially, to remove the hair from with a razor or other sharp instrument; to take off the beard or hair of; as, to shave the face or the crown of the head; he shaved himself.
• To cut off thin slices from; to cut in thin slices.
• To skim along or near the surface of; to pass close to, or touch lightly, in passing.
• To strip; to plunder; to fleece.
v. i.
• To use a razor for removing the beard; to cut closely; hence, to be hard and severe in a bargain; to practice extortion; to cheat.
n.
• A thin slice; a shaving.
• A cutting of the beard; the operation of shaving.
• An exorbitant discount on a note.
• A premium paid for an extension of the time of delivery or payment, or for the right to vary a stock contract in any particular.
• A hand tool consisting of a sharp blade with a handle at each end; a drawing knife; a spokeshave.
• The act of passing very near to, so as almost to graze; as, the bullet missed by a close shave.
Shaveling
n.
• A man shaved; hence, a monk, or other religious; — used in contempt.
Shaver
n.
• One who shaves; one whose occupation is to shave.
• One who is close in bargains; a sharper.
• One who fleeces; a pillager; a plunderer.
• A boy; a lad; a little fellow.
(Mech.) A tool or machine for shaving.
Shaving
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, shaves; specifically, the act of cutting off the beard with a razor.
• That which is shaved off; a thin slice or strip pared off with a shave, a knife, a plane, or other cutting instrument.
Shaw
n.
• A thicket; a small wood or grove.
• The leaves and tops of vegetables, as of potatoes, turnips, etc.
Shawfowl
n.
• The representation or image of a fowl made by fowlers to shoot at.
Shawl
n.
• A square or oblong cloth of wool, cotton, silk, or other textile or netted fabric, used, especially by women, as a loose covering for the neck and shoulders.
v. t.
• To wrap in a shawl.
Shawm
n.
(Mus.) A wind instrument of music, formerly in use, supposed to have resembled either the clarinet or the hautboy in form.
Shawnees
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe of North American Indians who occupied Western New York and part of Ohio, but were driven away and widely dispersed by the Iroquois.
Shay
n.
• A chaise.
She
pron.
• This or that female; the woman understood or referred to; the animal of the female sex, or object personified as feminine, which was spoken of.
• A woman; a female; — used substantively.
Sheading
n.
• A tithing, or division, in the Isle of Man, in which there is a coroner, or chief constable. The island is divided into six sheadings.
Sheaf
n.
(Mech.) A sheave.
n.
• A quantity of the stalks and ears of wheat, rye, or other grain, bound together; a bundle of grain or straw.
• Any collection of things bound together; a bundle; specifically, a bundle of arrows sufficient to fill a quiver, or the allowance of each archer, — usually twenty-four.
v. t.
• To gather and bind into a sheaf; to make into sheaves; as, to sheaf wheat.
v. i.
• To collect and bind cut grain, or the like; to make sheaves.
Sheafy
a.
• Pertaining to, or consisting of, a sheaf or sheaves; resembling a sheaf.
Sheal
n.
• Same as Sheeling.
v. t.
• To put under a sheal or shelter.
v. t.
• To take the husks or pods off from; to shell; to empty of its contents, as a husk or a pod.
n.
• A shell or pod.
Shealing
n.
• The outer husk, pod, or shell, as of oats, pease, etc.; sheal; shell.
n.
• Same as Sheeling.
Shear
v. t.
• To cut, clip, or sever anything from with shears or a like instrument; as, to shear sheep; to shear cloth.
• To separate or sever with shears or a similar instrument; to cut off; to clip (something) from a surface; as, to shear a fleece.
• To reap, as grain.
• Fig.: To deprive of property; to fleece.
(Mech.) To produce a change of shape in by a shear. See Shear, n., 4.
n.
• A pair of shears; — now always used in the plural, but formerly also in the singular. See Shears.
• A shearing; — used in designating the age of sheep.
(Engin.) An action, resulting from applied forces, which tends to cause two contiguous parts of a body to slide relatively to each other in a direction parallel to their plane of contact; — also called shearing stress, and tangential stress.
(Mech.) A strain, or change of shape, of an elastic body, consisting of an extension in one direction, an equal compression in a perpendicular direction, with an unchanged magnitude in the third direction.
v. i.
• To deviate. See Sheer.
(Engin.) To become more or less completely divided, as a body under the action of forces, by the sliding of two contiguous parts relatively to each other in a direction parallel to their plane of contact.
Shearbill
n.
(Zool.) The black skimmer. See Skimmer.
Sheard
n.
• See Shard.
Shearer
n.
• One who shears.
• A reaper.
Shearing
n.
• The act or operation of clipping with shears or a shearing machine, as the wool from sheep, or the nap from cloth.
• The product of the act or operation of clipping with shears or a shearing machine; as, the whole shearing of a flock; the shearings from cloth.
• Same as Shearling.
• The act or operation of reaping.
• The act or operation of dividing with shears; as, the shearing of metal plates.
• The process of preparing shear steel; tilting.
(Mining) The process of making a vertical side cutting in working into a face of coal.
Shearling
n.
• A sheep but once sheared.
Shearman
n.
• One whose occupation is to shear cloth.
Shearn
n.
• Dung; excrement.
Shears
n. pl.
• A cutting instrument.
• An instrument consisting of two blades, commonly with bevel edges, connected by a pivot, and working on both sides of the material to be cut, — used for cutting cloth and other substances
• A similar instrument the blades of which are extensions of a curved spring, — used for shearing sheep or skins
• A shearing machine; a blade, or a set of blades, working against a resisting edge
• Anything in the form of shears.
• A pair of wings
• An apparatus for raising heavy weights, and especially for stepping and unstepping the lower masts of ships. It consists of two or more spars or pieces of timber, fastened together near the top, steadied by a guy or guys, and furnished with the necessary tackle.
(Mach.) The bedpiece of a machine tool, upon which a table or slide rest is secured; as, the shears of a lathe or planer. See Illust. under Lathe.
Sheartail
n.
(Zool.) The common tern.
• Any one of several species of humming birds of the genus Thaumastura having a long forked tail.
Shearwater
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of long-winged oceanic birds of the genus Puffinus and related genera. They are allied to the petrels, but are larger. The Manx shearwater (P. Anglorum), the dusky shearwater (P. obscurus), and the greater shearwater (P. major), are well-known species of the North Atlantic. See Hagdon.
Sheatfish
n.
(Zool.) A European siluroid fish (Silurus glanis) allied to the cat-fishes. It is the largest fresh-water fish of Europe, sometimes becoming six feet or more in length. See Siluroid.
Sheath
n.
• A case for the reception of a sword, hunting knife, or other long and slender instrument; a scabbard.
• Any sheathlike covering, organ, or part.
(Bot.) The base of a leaf when sheathing or investing a stem or branch, as in grasses
(Zool.) One of the elytra of an insect.
Sheathbill
n.
(Zool.) Either one of two species of birds composing the genus Chionis, and family Chionidae, native of the islands of the Antarctic.seas.
Sheathe
v. t.
• To put into a sheath, case, or scabbard; to inclose or cover with, or as with, a sheath or case.
• To fit or furnish, as with a sheath.
• To case or cover with something which protects, as thin boards, sheets of metal, and the like; as, to sheathe a ship with copper.
• To obtund or blunt, as acrimonious substances, or sharp particles.
Sheathed
a.
• Povided with, or inclosed in, sheath.
(Bot.) Invested by a sheath, or cylindrical membranaceous tube, which is the base of the leaf, as the stalk or culm in grasses; vaginate.
Sheather
n.
• One who sheathes.
Sheathfish
n.
(Zool.) Same as Sheatfish.
Sheathing
p. pr. & a.
• from Sheathe. Inclosing with a sheath; as, the sheathing leaves of grasses; the sheathing stipules of many polygonaceous plants.
n.
• That which sheathes.
• The casing or covering of a ship's bottom and sides; the materials for such covering; as, copper sheathing.
(Arch.) The first covering of boards on the outside wall of a frame house or on a timber roof; also, the material used for covering; ceiling boards in general.
Sheathless
a.
• Without a sheath or case for covering; unsheathed.
Sheathy
a.
• Forming or resembling a sheath or case.
Sheave
n.
• A wheel having a groove in the rim for a rope to work in, and set in a block, mast, or the like; the wheel of a pulley.
v. t.
• To gather and bind into a sheaf or sheaves; hence, to collect.
Sheaved
a.
• Made of straw.
Shebander
n.
• A harbor master, or ruler of a port, in the East Indies.
Shebang
n.
• A jocosely depreciative name for a dwelling or shop.
Shebeen
n.
• A low public house; especially, a place where spirits and other excisable liquors are illegally and privately sold.
Shechinah
n.
• See Shekinah.
Shecklaton
n.
• A kind of gilt leather. See Checklaton.
Shed
n.
• A slight or temporary structure built to shade or shelter something; a structure usually open in front; an outbuilding; a hut; as, a wagon shed; a wood shed.
v. t.
• To separate; to divide.
• To part with; to throw off or give forth from one's self; to emit; to diffuse; to cause to emanate or flow; to pour forth or out; to spill; as, the sun sheds light; she shed tears; the clouds shed rain.
• To let fall; to throw off, as a natural covering of hair, feathers, shell; to cast; as, fowls shed their feathers; serpents shed their skins; trees shed leaves.
• To cause to flow off without penetrating; as, a tight roof, or covering of oiled cloth, sheeds water.
• To sprinkle; to intersperse; to cover.
(Weaving) To divide, as the warp threads, so as to form a shed, or passageway, for the shuttle.
v. i.
• To fall in drops; to pour.
• To let fall the parts, as seeds or fruit; to throw off a covering or envelope.
n.
• A parting; a separation; a division.
• The act of shedding or spilling; — used only in composition, as in bloodshed.
• That which parts, divides, or sheds; — used in composition, as in watershed.
(Weaving) The passageway between the threads of the warp through which the shuttle is thrown, having a sloping top and bottom made by raising and lowering the alternate threads.
Shedder
n.
• One who, or that which, sheds; as, a shedder of blood; a shedder of tears.
(Zool.) A crab in the act of casting its shell, or immediately afterwards while still soft; — applied especially to the edible crabs, which are most prized while in this state.
Shedding
n.
• The act of shedding, separating, or casting off or out; as, the shedding of blood.
• That which is shed, or cast off.
Sheeling
n.
• A hut or small cottage in an expessed or a retired place (as on a mountain or at the seaside) such as is used by shepherds, fishermen, sportsmen, etc.; a summer cottage; also, a shed.
Sheely
n.
(Zool.) Same as Sheelfa.
Sheen
a.
• Bright; glittering; radiant; fair; showy; sheeny.
v. i.
• To shine; to glisten.
n.
• Brightness; splendor; glitter.
Sheenly
adv.
• Brightly
Sheeny
a.
• Bright; shining; radiant; sheen.
Sheep
n. sing. & pl.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of ruminants of the genus Ovis, native of the higher mountains of both hemispheres, but most numerous in Asia.
• A weak, bashful, silly fellow.
• Fig.: The people of God, as being under the government and protection of Christ, the great Shepherd.
Sheepback
n.
(Geol.) A rounded knoll of rock resembling the back of a sheep. — produced by glacial action. Called also roche moutonnee; — usually in the plural.
Sheepberry
n.
(Bot.) The edible fruit of a small North American tree of the genus Viburnum (V. Lentago), having white flowers in flat cymes; also, the tree itself. Called also nannyberry.
Sheepbite
v. i.
• To bite or nibble like a sheep; hence, to practice petty thefts.
Sheepbiter
n.
• One who practices petty thefts.
Sheepfold
n.
• A fold or pen for sheep; a place where sheep are collected or confined.
Sheephook
n.
• A hook fastened to pole, by which shepherds lay hold on the legs or necks of their sheep; a shepherd's crook.
Sheepish
a.
• Of or pertaining to sheep.
• Like a sheep; bashful; over-modest; meanly or foolishly diffident; timorous to excess.
Sheepmaster
n.
• A keeper or feeder of sheep; also, an owner of sheep.
Sheeprack
n.
(Zool.) The starling.
Sheepshank
n.
(Naut.) A hitch by which a rope may be temporarily shortened.
Sheepshead
n.
(Zool.) A large and valuable sparoid food fish (Archosargus, or Diplodus, probatocephalus) found on the Atlantic coast of the United States. It often weighs from ten to twelve pounds.
Sheepskin
n.
• The skin of a sheep; or, leather prepared from it.
• A diploma; — so called because usually written or printed on parchment prepared from the skin of the sheep.
Sheepsplit
n.
• A split of a sheepskin; one of the thin sections made by splitting a sheepskin with a cutting knife or machine.
Sheepy
a.
• Resembling sheep; sheepish.
Sheer
a.
• Bright; clear; pure; unmixed.
• Very thin or transparent; — applied to fabrics; as, sheer muslin.
• Being only what it seems to be; obvious; simple; mere; downright; as, sheer folly; sheer nonsense.
• Stright up and down; vertical; prpendicular.
adv.
• Clean; quite; at once.
v. t.
• To shear.
v. i.
• To decline or deviate from the line of the proper course; to turn aside; to swerve; as, a ship sheers from her course; a horse sheers at a bicycle.
n.
(Naut.) The longitudinal upward curvature of the deck, gunwale, and lines of a vessel, as when viewed from the side.
• The position of a vessel riding at single anchor and swinging clear of it.
• A turn or change in a course.
• Shears See Shear.
Sheerly
adv.
• At once; absolutely.
Sheerwater
n.
(Zool.) The shearwater.
Sheet
n.
• In general, a large, broad piece of anything thin, as paper, cloth, etc.; a broad, thin portion of any substance; an expanded superficies.
• A broad piece of cloth, usually linen or cotton, used for wrapping the body or for a covering; especially, one used as an article of bedding next to the body.
• A broad piece of paper, whether folded or unfolded, whether blank or written or printed upon; hence, a letter; a newspaper, etc.
• A single signature of a book or a pamphlet; in pl., the book itself. (d) A broad, thinly expanded portion of metal or other substance; as, a sheet of copper, of glass, or the like; a plate; a leaf
• A broad expanse of water, or the like
• A sail
(Geol.) An extensive bed of an eruptive rock intruded between, or overlying, other strata
(Naut.) A rope or chain which regulates the angle of adjustment of a sail in relation in relation to the wind; — usually attached to the lower corner of a sail, or to a yard or a boom.
• The space in the forward or the after part of a boat where there are no rowers; as, fore sheets; stern sheets.
v. t.
• To furnish with a sheet or sheets; to wrap in, or cover with, a sheet, or as with a sheet.
• To expand, as a sheet.
Sheetful
n.
• Enough to fill a sheet; as much as a sheet can hold.
Sheeting
n.
• Cotton or linen cloth suitable for bed sheets. It is sometimes made of double width.
(Hydraul. Engin.) A lining of planks or boards (rarely of metal) for protecting an embankment.
• The act or process of forming into sheets, or flat pieces; also, material made into sheets.
Sheik
n.
• The head of an Arab family, or of a clan or a tribe; also, the chief magistrate of an Arab village. The name is also applied to Mohammedan ecclesiastics of a high grade.
Shekel
n.
• An ancient weight and coin used by the Jews and by other nations of the same stock.
• A jocose term for money.
Shekinah
n.
• The visible majesty of the Divine Presence, especially when resting or dwelling between the cherubim on the mercy seat, in the Tabernacle, or in the Temple of Solomon; — a term used in the Targums and by the later Jews, and adopted by Christians.
Sheld
a.
• Variegated; spotted; speckled; piebald.
Sheldfowl
n.
(Zool.) The common sheldrake.
Sheldrake
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of large Old World ducks of the genus Tadorna and allied genera, especially the European and Asiatic species. (T. cornuta, or tadorna), which somewhat resembles a goose in form and habit, but breeds in burrows.
• Any one of the American mergansers.
Shelduck
n.
(Zool.) The sheldrake.
Shelf
n.
(Arch.) A flat tablet or ledge of any material set horizontally at a distance from the floor, to hold objects of use or ornament.
• A sand bank in the sea, or a rock, or ledge of rocks, rendering the water shallow, and dangerous to ships.
(Mining) A stratum lying in a very even manner; a flat, projecting layer of rock.
(Naut.) A piece of timber running the whole length of a vessel inside the timberheads.
Shelfy
a.
• Abounding in shelves; full of dangerous shallows.
• Full of strata of rock.
Shell
n.
• A hard outside covering, as of a fruit or an animal.
• The covering, or outside part, of a nut; as, a hazelnut shell
• A pod
• The hard covering of an egg.
(Zool.) The hard calcareous or chitinous external covering of mollusks, crustaceans, and some other invertebrates. In some mollusks, as the cuttlefishes, it is internal, or concealed by the mantle. Also, the hard covering of some vertebrates, as the armadillo, the tortoise, and the like.
(Zool.) Hence, by extension, any mollusks having such a covering
(Mil.) A hollow projectile, of various shapes, adapted for a mortar or a cannon, and containing an explosive substance, ignited with a fuse or by percussion, by means of which the projectile is burst and its fragments scattered. See Bomb.
• The case which holds the powder, or charge of powder and shot, used with breechloading small arms.
• Any slight hollow structure; a framework, or exterior structure, regarded as not complete or filled in; as, the shell of a house.
• A coarse kind of coffin; also, a thin interior coffin inclosed in a more substantial one.
• An instrument of music, as a lyre, — the first lyre having been made, it is said, by drawing strings over a tortoise shell.
• An engraved copper roller used in print works.
• The husks of cacao seeds, a decoction of which is often used as a substitute for chocolate, cocoa, etc.
(Naut.) The outer frame or case of a block within which the sheaves revolve.
• A light boat the frame of which is covered with thin wood or with paper; as, a racing shell.
v. t.
• To strip or break off the shell of; to take out of the shell, pod, etc.; as, to shell nuts or pease; to shell oysters.
• To separate the kernels of (an ear of Indian corn, wheat, oats, etc.) from the cob, ear, or husk.
• To throw shells or bombs upon or into; to bombard; as, to shell a town.
v. i.
• To fall off, as a shell, crust, etc.
• To cast the shell, or exterior covering; to fall out of the pod or husk; as, nuts shell in falling.
• To be disengaged from the ear or husk; as, wheat or rye shells in reaping.
Shellapple
n.
(Zool.) See Sheldafle.
Shellbark
n.
(Bot.) A species of hickory (Carya alba) whose outer bark is loose and peeling; a shagbark; also, its nut.
Shelled
a.
(Zool.) Having a shell.
Sheller
n.
• One who, or that which, shells; as, an oyster sheller; a corn sheller.
Shellfish
n.
(Zool.) Any aquatic animal whose external covering consists of a shell, either testaceous, as in oysters, clams, and other mollusks, or crustaceous, as in lobsters and crabs.
Shelling
n.
• Groats; hulled oats.
Shellproof
a.
• Capable of resisting bombs or other shells; bombproof.
Shellwork
n.
• Work composed of shells, or adorned with them.
Shelly
a.
• Abounding with shells; consisting of shells, or of a shell.
Shelter
n.
• That which covers or defends from injury or annoyance; a protection; a screen.
• One who protects; a guardian; a defender.
• The state of being covered and protected; protection; security.
v. t.
• To be a shelter for; to provide with a shelter; to cover from injury or annoyance; to shield; to protect.
• To screen or cover from notice; to disguise.
• To betake to cover, or to a safe place; — used reflexively.
v. i.
• To take shelter.
Shelterless
a.
• Destitute of shelter or protection.
Sheltery
a.
• Affording shelter.
Shelve
v. t.
• To furnish with shelves; as, to shelve a closet or a library.
• To place on a shelf. Hence: To lay on the shelf; to put aside; to dismiss from service; to put off indefinitely; as, to shelve an officer; to shelve a claim.
v. i.
• To incline gradually; to be slopping; as, the bottom shelves from the shore.
Shelving
a.
• Sloping gradually; inclining; as, a shelving shore.
n.
• The act of fitting up shelves; as, the job of shelving a closet.
• The act of laying on a shelf, or on the shelf; putting off or aside; as, the shelving of a claim.
• Material for shelves; shelves, collectively.
Shelvy
a.
• Sloping gradually; shelving.
Shemite
n.
• A descendant of Shem.
Shemitism
n.
• See Semitism.
Shend
v. t.
• To injure, mar, spoil, or harm.
• To blame, reproach, or revile; to degrade, disgrace, or put to shame.
Shendful
a.
• Destructive; ruinous; disgraceful.
Shendship
n.
• Harm; ruin; also, reproach; disgrace.
Shent
• obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of Shend, for shendeth.
v. t.
• To shend.
Sheol
n.
• The place of departed spirits; Hades; also, the grave.
Shepen
n.
• A stable; a shippen.
Shepherd
n.
• A man employed in tending, feeding, and guarding sheep, esp. a flock grazing at large.
• The pastor of a church; one with the religious guidance of others.
v. t.
• To tend as a shepherd; to guard, herd, lead, or drive, as a shepherd.
Shepherdess
n.
• A woman who tends sheep; hence, a rural lass.
Shepherdia
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs having silvery scurfy leaves, and belonging to the same family as Elaeagnus; also, any plant of this genus. See Buffalo berry, under Buffalo.
Shepherdish
n.
• Resembling a shepherd; suiting a shepherd; pastoral.
Shepherdism
n.
• Pastoral life or occupation.
Shepherdling
n.
• A little shepherd.
Shepherdly
a.
• Resembling, or becoming to, a shepherd; pastoral; rustic.
Shepster
n.
• A seamstress.
Sherbet
n.
• A refreshing drink, common in the East, made of the juice of some fruit, diluted, sweetened, and flavored in various ways; as, orange sherbet; lemon sherbet; raspberry sherbet, etc.
• A flavored water ice.
• A preparation of bicarbonate of soda, tartaric acid, sugar, etc., variously flavored, for making an effervescing drink; — called also sherbet powder.
Sherd
n.
• A fragment; — now used only in composition, as in potsherd. See Shard.
Sheriat
n.
• The sacred law of the Turkish empire.
Sheriff
n.
• The chief officer of a shire or county, to whom is intrusted the execution of the laws, the serving of judicial writs and processes, and the preservation of the peace.
Shern
n.
• See Shearn.
Sherris
n.
• Sherry.
Sherry
n.
• A Spanish light-colored dry wine, made in Andalusia. As prepared for commerce it is colored a straw color or a deep amber by mixing with it cheap wine boiled down.
Sherryvallies
n. pl.
• Trousers or overalls of thick cloth or leather, buttoned on the outside of each leg, and generally worn to protect other trousers when riding on horseback.
Shet
v. t. & i.
• To shut.
Shete
v. t. & i.
• To shoot.
Sheth
n.
• The part of a plow which projects downward beneath the beam, for holding the share and other working parts; — also called standard, or post.
Shew
v. t. & i.
• See Show.
n.
• Show.
Shewbread
• See Showbread.
Shewel
n.
• A scarecrow.
Shewer
n.
• One who shews. See Shower.
Shewn
• p. p. of Shew.
Shiah
n.
• Same as Shiite.
Shibboleth
n.
• A word which was made the criterion by which to distinguish the Ephraimites from the Gileadites. The Ephraimites, not being able to pronounce sh, called the word sibboleth. See Judges xii.
• Also in an extended sense
• Hence, the criterion, test, or watchword of a party; a party cry or pet phrase.
Shide
n.
• A thin board; a billet of wood; a splinter.
Shie
v. t.
• See Shy, to throw.
Shied
• imp. & p. p. of Shy.
Shiel
n.
• A sheeling.
Shield
n.
• A broad piece of defensive armor, carried on the arm, — formerly in general use in war, for the protection of the body. See Buckler.
• Anything which protects or defends; defense; shelter; protection.
• Figuratively, one who protects or defends.
(Bot.) In lichens, a Hardened cup or disk surrounded by a rim and containing the fructification, or asci.
(Her.) The escutcheon or field on which are placed the bearings in coats of arms. Cf. Lozenge. See Illust. of Escutcheon.
(Mining & Tunneling) A framework used to protect workmen in making an adit under ground, and capable of being pushed along as excavation progresses.
• A spot resembling, or having the form of, a shield.
• A coin, the old French crown, or ecu, having on one side the figure of a shield.
v. t.
• To cover with, or as with, a shield; to cover from danger; to defend; to protect from assault or injury.
• To ward off; to keep off or out.
• To avert, as a misfortune; hence, as a supplicatory exclamation, forbid!
Shielddrake
n.
(Zool.) A sheldrake.
Shieldless
a.
• Destitute of a shield, or of protection.
Shieldtail
n.
(Zool.) Any species of small burrowing snakes of the family Uropeltidae, native of Ceylon and Southern Asia. They have a small mouth which can not be dilated.
Shieling
n.
• A hut or shelter for shepherds of fishers. See Sheeling.
Shiff
v. i.
• To divide; to distribute.
• To make a change or changes; to change position; to move; to veer; to substitute one thing for another; — used in the various senses of the transitive verb.
• To resort to expedients for accomplishing a purpose; to contrive; to manage.
• To practice indirect or evasive methods.
(Naut.) To slip to one side of a ship, so as to destroy the equilibrum; — said of ballast or cargo; as, the cargo shifted.
Shift
n.
• The act of shifting.
• The act of putting one thing in the place of another, or of changing the place of a thing; change; substitution
• Something frequently shifted; especially, a woman's under-garment; a chemise.
• The change of one set of workmen for another; hence, a spell, or turn, of work; also, a set of workmen who work in turn with other sets; as, a night shift.
• In building, the extent, or arrangement, of the overlapping of plank, brick, stones, etc., that are placed in courses so as to break joints.
(Mining) A breaking off and dislocation of a seam; a fault.
(Mus.) A change of the position of the hand on the finger board, in playing the violin.
Shift
v. t.
• To divide; to distribute; to apportion.
• To change the place of; to move or remove from one place to another; as, to shift a burden from one shoulder to another; to shift the blame.
• To change the position of; to alter the bearings of; to turn; as, to shift the helm or sails.
• To exchange for another of the same class; to remove and to put some similar thing in its place; to change; as, to shift the clothes; to shift the scenes.
• To change the clothing of; — used reflexively.
• To put off or out of the way by some expedient.
Shiftable
a.
• Admitting of being shifted.
Shifter
n.
• One who, or that which, shifts; one who plays tricks or practices artifice; a cozener.
(Naut.) An assistant to the ship's cook in washing, steeping, and shifting the salt provisions.
(Mach.) An arrangement for shifting a belt sidewise from one pulley to another.
(Knitting Mach.) A wire for changing a loop from one needle to another, as in narrowing, etc.
Shiftiness
n.
• The quality or state of being shifty.
Shifting
a.
• Changing in place, position, or direction; varying; variable; fickle; as, shifting winds; shifting opinions or principles.
• Adapted or used for shifting anything.
Shiftingly
adv.
• In a shifting manner.
Shiftless
a.
• Destitute of expedients, or not using successful expedients; characterized by failure, especially by failure to provide for one's own support, through negligence or incapacity; hence, lazy; improvident; thriftless; as, a shiftless fellow; shiftless management.
Shifty
a.
• Full of, or ready with, shifts; fertile in expedients or contrivance.
Shilf
n.
• Straw.
Shill
v. t.
• To shell.
v. t.
• To put under cover; to sheal.
Shilling
n.
• A silver coin, and money of account, of Great Britain and its dependencies, equal to twelve pence, or the twentieth part of a pound, equivalent to about twenty-four cents of the United States currency.
• In the United States, a denomination of money, differing in value in different States. It is not now legally recognized.
• The Spanish real, of the value of one eight of a dollar, or 12 cets; — formerly so called in New York and some other States. See Note under 2.
Shiloh
n.
(Script.) A word used by Jacob on his deathbed, and interpreted variously, as "the Messiah," or as the city "Shiloh," or as "Rest."
Shily
adv.
• See Shyly.
Shim
n.
• A kind of shallow plow used in tillage to break the ground, and clear it of weeds.
(Mach.) A thin piece of metal placed between two parts to make a fit.
Shimmer
v. i.
• To shine with a tremulous or intermittent light; to shine faintly; to gleam; to glisten; to glimmer.
n.
• A faint, tremulous light; a gleaming; a glimmer.
Shimmering
n.
• A gleam or glimmering.
Shimmy
n.
• A chemise.
Shin
n.
• The front part of the leg below the knee; the front edge of the shin bone; the lower part of the leg; the shank.
(Railbroad) A fish plate for rails.
v. i.
• To climb a mast, tree, rope, or the like, by embracing it alternately with the arms and legs, without help of steps, spurs, or the like; — used with up; as, to shin up a mast.
• To run about borrowing money hastily and temporarily, as for the payment of one's notes at the bank.
v. t.
• To climb (a pole, etc.) by shinning up.
Shindle
n.
• A shingle; also, a slate for roofing.
v. t.
• To cover or roof with shindles.
Shindy
n.
• An uproar or disturbance; a spree; a row; a riot.
• Hockey; shinney.
• A fancy or liking.
Shine
v. i.
• To emit rays of light; to give light; to beam with steady radiance; to exhibit brightness or splendor; as, the sun shines by day; the moon shines by night.
• To be bright by reflection of light; to gleam; to be glossy; as, to shine like polished silver.
• To be effulgent in splendor or beauty.
• To be eminent, conspicuous, or distinguished; to exhibit brilliant intellectual powers; as, to shine in courts; to shine in conversation.
v. t.
• To cause to shine, as a light.
• To make bright; to cause to shine by reflected light; as, in hunting, to shine the eyes of a deer at night by throwing a light on them.
n.
• The quality or state of shining; brightness; luster, gloss; polish; sheen.
• Sunshine; fair weather.
• A liking for a person; a fancy.
• Caper; antic; row.
a.
• Shining; sheen.
Shiner
n.
• That which shines.
• A luminary
• A bright piece of money.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small freshwater American cyprinoid fishes, belonging to Notropis, or Minnilus, and allied genera; as the redfin (Notropis megalops), and the golden shiner (Notemigonus chrysoleucus) of the Eastern United States; also loosely applied to various other silvery fishes, as the dollar fish, or horsefish, menhaden, moonfish, sailor's choice, and the sparada
(Zool.) The common Lepisma, or furniture bug
Shiness
n.
• See Shyness.
Shingle
n.
(Geol.) Round, water-worn, and loose gravel and pebbles, or a collection of roundish stones, such as are common on the seashore and elsewhere.
n.
• A piece of wood sawed or rived thin and small, with one end thinner than the other, — used in covering buildings, especially roofs, the thick ends of one row overlapping the thin ends of the row below.
• A sign for an office or a shop; as, to hang out one's shingle.
v. t.
• To cover with shingles; as, to shingle a roof.
• To cut, as hair, so that the ends are evenly exposed all over the head, as shingles on a roof.
v. t.
• To subject to the process of shindling, as a mass of iron from the pudding furnace.
Shingler
n.
• One who shingles.
• A machine for shingling puddled iron.
Shingles
n.
(Med.) A kind of herpes (Herpes zoster) which spreads half way around the body like a girdle, and is usually attended with violent neuralgic pain.
Shingling
n.
• The act of covering with shingles; shingles, collectively; a covering made of shingles.
(Metal) The process of expelling scoriae and other impurities by hammering and squeezing, in the production of wrought iron.
Shingly
a.
• Abounding with shingle, or gravel.
Shinhopple
n.
• The hobblebush.
Shining
a.
• Emitting light, esp. in a continuous manner; radiant; as, shining lamps; also, bright by the reflection of light; as, shining armor.
• Splendid; illustrious; brilliant; distinguished; conspicious; as, a shining example of charity.
• Having the surface smooth and polished; — said of leaves, the surfaces of shells, etc.
n.
• Emission or reflection of light.
Shiningness
n.
• Brightness.
Shinney
n.
• The game of hockey; — so called because of the liability of the players to receive blows on the shin.
Shinplaster
n.
• Formerly, a jocose term for a bank note greatly depreciated in value; also, for paper money of a denomination less than a dollar.
Shintoist
n.
• An adherent of Shintoism.
Shinty
n.
• A Scotch game resembling hockey; also, the club used in the game.
Shiny
a.
• Bright; luminous; clear; unclouded.
Ship
n.
• Pay; reward.
n.
• Any large seagoing vessel.
• Specifically, a vessel furnished with a bowsprit and three masts (a mainmast, a foremast, and a mizzenmast), each of which is composed of a lower mast, a topmast, and a topgallant mast, and square-rigged on all masts. See Illustation in Appendix.
• A dish or utensil (originally fashioned like the hull of a ship) used to hold incense.
v. t.
• To put on board of a ship, or vessel of any kind, for transportation; to send by water.
• By extension, in commercial usage, to commit to any conveyance for transportation to a distance; as, to ship freight by railroad.
• Hence, to send away; to get rid of.
• To engage or secure for service on board of a ship; as, to ship seamen.
• To receive on board ship; as, to ship a sea.
• To put in its place; as, to ship the tiller or rudder.
v. i.
• To engage to serve on board of a vessel; as, to ship on a man-of-war.
• To embark on a ship.
Shipboard
n.
• A ship's side; hence, by extension, a ship; — found chiefly in adverbial phrases; as, on shipboard; a shipboard.
Shipbuilder
n.
• A person whose occupation is to construct ships and other vessels; a naval architect; a shipwright.
Shipbuilding
n.
• Naval architecturel the art of constructing ships and other vessels.
Shipful
n.
• As much or as many as a ship will hold; enough to fill a ship.
Shipholder
n.
• A shipowner.
Shipless
a.
• Destitute of ships.
Shiplet
n.
• A little ship.
Shipload
n.
• The load, or cargo, of a ship.
Shipman
n.
• A seaman, or sailor.
Shipmaster
n.
• The captain, master, or commander of a ship.
Shipmate
n.
• One who serves on board of the same ship with another; a fellow sailor.
Shipment
n.
• The act or process of shipping; as, he was engaged in the shipment of coal for London; an active shipment of wheat from the West.
• That which is shipped.
Shipowner
n.
• Owner of a ship or ships.
Shippen
n.
• A stable; a cowhouse.
Shipper
n.
• One who sends goods from one place to another not in the same city or town, esp. one who sends goods by water.
Shipping
a.
• Relating to ships, their ownership, transfer, or employment; as, shiping concerns.
• Relating to, or concerned in, the forwarding of goods; as, a shipping clerk.
n.
• The act of one who, or of that which, ships; as, the shipping of flour to Liverpool.
• The collective body of ships in one place, or belonging to one port, country, etc.; vessels, generally; tonnage.
• Navigation.
Shippon
n.
• A cowhouse; a shippen.
Shipshape
a.
• Arranged in a manner befitting a ship; hence, trim; tidy; orderly.
adv.
• In a shipshape or seamanlike manner.
Shipworm
n.
(Zool.) Any long, slender, worm-shaped bivalve mollusk of Teredo and allied genera. The shipworms burrow in wood, and are destructive to wooden ships, piles of wharves, etc. See Teredo.
Shipwreck
n.
• The breaking in pieces, or shattering, of a ship or other vessel by being cast ashore or driven against rocks, shoals, etc., by the violence of the winds and waves.
• A ship wrecked or destroyed upon the water, or the parts of such a ship; wreckage.
• Fig.: Destruction; ruin; irretrievable loss.
v. t.
• To destroy, as a ship at sea, by running ashore or on rocks or sandbanks, or by the force of wind and waves in a tempest.
• To cause to experience shipwreck, as sailors or passengers. Hence, to cause to suffer some disaster or loss; to destroy or ruin, as if by shipwreck; to wreck; as, to shipwreck a business.
Shipwright
n.
• One whose occupation is to construct ships; a builder of ships or other vessels.
Shipyard
n.
• A yard, place, or inclosure where ships are built or repaired.
Shiraz
n.
• A kind of Persian wine; — so called from the place whence it is brought.
Shire
n.
• A portion of Great Britain originally under the supervision of an earl; a territorial division, usually identical with a county, but sometimes limited to a smaller district; as, Wiltshire, Yorkshire, Richmondshire, Hallamshire.
• A division of a State, embracing several contiguous townships; a county.
Shirk
v. t.
• To procure by petty fraud and trickery; to obtain by mean solicitation.
• To avoid; to escape; to neglect; — implying unfaithfulness or fraud; as, to shirk duty.
v. i.
• To live by shifts and fraud; to shark.
• To evade an obligation; to avoid the performance of duty, as by running away.
n.
• One who lives by shifts and tricks; one who avoids the performance of duty or labor.
Shirker
n.
• One who shirks.
Shirky
a.
• Disposed to shirk.
Shirl
a.
• Shrill.
n.
(Min.) See Schorl.
Shirley
n.
(Zool.) The bullfinch.
Shirr
n.
(Sewing) A series of close parallel runnings which are drawn up so as to make the material between them set full by gatherings; — called also shirring, and gauging.
Shirred
a.
(Sewing) Made or gathered into a shirr; as, a shirred bonnet.
(Cookery) Broken into an earthen dish and baked over the fire; — said of eggs.
Shirt
n.
• A loose under-garment for the upper part of the body, made of cotton, linen, or other material; — formerly used of the under-garment of either sex, now commonly restricted to that worn by men and boys.
v. t. & i.
• To cover or clothe with a shirt, or as with a shirt.
Shirting
n.
• Cloth, specifically cotton cloth, suitable for making shirts.
Shirtless
a.
• Not having or wearing a shirt.
Shittle
n.
• A shuttle.
a.
• Wavering; unsettled; inconstant.
Shittlecock
n.
• A shuttlecock.
Shittleness
n.
• Instability; inconstancy.
Shive
n.
• A slice; as, a shive of bread.
• A thin piece or fragment; specifically, one of the scales or pieces of the woody part of flax removed by the operation of breaking.
• A thin, flat cork used for stopping a wide-mouthed bottle; also, a thin wooden bung for casks.
Shiver
n.
• One of the small pieces, or splinters, into which a brittle thing is broken by sudden violence; — generally used in the plural.
• A thin slice; a shive.
(Geol.) A variety of blue slate.
(Naut.) A sheave or small wheel in a pulley.
• A small wedge, as for fastening the bolt of a window shutter.
• A spindle.
v. t.
• To break into many small pieces, or splinters; to shatter; to dash to pieces by a blow; as, to shiver a glass goblet.
v. i.
• To separate suddenly into many small pieces or parts; to be shattered.
v. i.
• To tremble; to vibrate; to quiver; to shake, as from cold or fear.
v. t.
(Naut.) To cause to shake or tremble, as a sail, by steering close to the wind.
n.
• The act of shivering or trembling.
Shiveringly
adv.
• In a shivering manner.
Shivery
a.
• Tremulous; shivering.
• Easily broken; brittle; shattery.
Shoad
n.
(Mining) A train of vein material mixed with rubbish; fragments of ore which have become separated by the action of water or the weather, and serve to direct in the discovery of mines.
Shoading
n.
(Mining) The tracing of veins of metal by shoads.
Shoal
n.
• A great multitude assembled; a crowd; a throng; — said especially of fish; as, a shoal of bass.
v. i.
• To assemble in a multitude; to throng; as, the fishes shoaled about the place.
a.
• Having little depth; shallow; as, shoal water.
n.
• A place where the water of a sea, lake, river, pond, etc., is shallow; a shallow.
• A sandbank or bar which makes the water shoal.
v. i.
• To become shallow; as, the color of the water shows where it shoals.
v. t.
• To cause to become more shallow; to come to a more shallow part of; as, a ship shoals her water by advancing into that which is less deep.
Shoaliness
n.
• The quality or state of being shoaly; little depth of water; shallowness.
Shoaling
a.
• Becoming shallow gradually.
Shoaly
a.
• Full of shoals, or shallow places.
Shoar
n.
• A prop. See 3d Shore.
Shoat
n.
• A young hog. Same as Shote.
Shock
n.
• A pile or assemblage of sheaves of grain, as wheat, rye, or the like, set up in a field, the sheaves varying in number from twelve to sixteen; a stook.
(Com.) A lot consisting of sixty pieces; — a term applied in some Baltic ports to loose goods.
v. t.
• To collect, or make up, into a shock or shocks; to stook; as, to shock rye.
v. i.
• To be occupied with making shocks.
n.
• A sudden agitation of the mind or feelings; a sensation of pleasure or pain caused by something unexpected or overpowering; also, a sudden agitating or overpowering event.
(Med.) A sudden depression of the vital forces of the entire body, or of a port of it, marking some profound impression produced upon the nervous system, as by severe injury, overpowering emotion, or the like.
(Elec.) The sudden convulsion or contraction of the muscles, with the feeling of a concussion, caused by the discharge, through the animal system, of electricity from a charged body.
v. t.
• To give a shock to; to cause to shake or waver; hence, to strike against suddenly; to encounter with violence.
• To strike with surprise, terror, horror, or disgust; to cause to recoil; as, his violence shocked his associates.
v. i.
• To meet with a shock; to meet in violent encounter.
n.
(Zool.) A dog with long hair or shag; — called also shockdog.
• A thick mass of bushy hair; as, a head covered with a shock of sandy hair.
a.
• Bushy; shaggy; as, a shock hair.
Shockdog
n.
(Zool.) See 7th Shock, 1.
Shocking
a.
• Causing to shake or tremble, as by a blow; especially, causing to recoil with horror or disgust; extremely offensive or disgusting.
Shod
imp. & p. p.
• f Shoe.
Shoddy
n.
• A fibrous material obtained by "deviling," or tearing into fibers, refuse woolen goods, old stockings, rags, druggets, etc. See Mungo.
• A fabric of inferior quality made of, or containing a large amount of, shoddy.
a.
• Made wholly or in part of shoddy; containing shoddy; as, shoddy cloth; shoddy blankets; hence, colloquially, not genuine; sham; pretentious; as, shoddy aristocracy.
Shoddyism
n.
• The quality or state of being shoddy. See the Note under Shoddy, n.
Shode
n.
• The parting of the hair on the head.
• The top of the head; the head.
Shoder
n.
• A package of gold beater's skins in which gold is subjected to the second process of beating.
Shoe
n.
• A covering for the human foot, usually made of leather, having a thick and somewhat stiff sole and a lighter top. It differs from a boot on not extending so far up the leg.
• Anything resembling a shoe in form, position, or use.
• A plate or rim of iron nailed to the hoof of an animal to defend it from injury.
• A band of iron or steel, or a ship of wood, fastened to the bottom of the runner of a sleigh, or any vehicle which slides on the snow.
• A drag, or sliding piece of wood or iron, placed under the wheel of a loaded vehicle, to retard its motion in going down a hill.
• The part of a railroad car brake which presses upon the wheel to retard its motion.
(Arch.) A trough-shaped or spout-shaped member, put at the bottom of the water leader coming from the eaves gutter, so as to throw the water off from the building.
(Milling.) The trough or spout for conveying the grain from the hopper to the eye of the millstone.
• An inclined trough in an ore-crushing mill.
• An iron socket or plate to take the thrust of a strut or rafter.
• An iron socket to protect the point of a wooden pile.
(Mach.) A plate, or notched piece, interposed between a moving part and the stationary part on which it bears, to take the wear and afford means of adjustment; — called also slipper, and gib.
v. t.
• To furnish with a shoe or shoes; to put a shoe or shoes on; as, to shoe a horse, a sled, an anchor.
• To protect or ornament with something which serves the purpose of a shoe; to tip.
Shoebill
n.
(Zool.) A large African wading bird (Balaeniceps rex) allied to the storks and herons, and remarkable for its enormous broad swollen bill. It inhabits the valley of the White Nile. See Illust. (l.) of Beak.
Shoeblack
n.
• One who polishes shoes.
Shoeless
a.
• Destitute of shoes.
Shoemaker
n.
• One whose occupation it is to make shoes and boots.
(Zool.) The threadfish.
• The runner, 12.
Shoemaking
n.
• The business of a shoemaker.
Shoer
n.
• One who fits shoes to the feet; one who furnishes or puts on shoes; as, a shoer of horses.
Shog
n.
• A shock; a jog; a violent concussion or impulse.
v. t.
• To shake; to shock.
v. i.
• To jog; to move on.
Shoggle
v. t.
• To joggle.
Shogun
n.
• A title originally conferred by the Mikado on the military governor of the eastern provinces of Japan. By gradual usurpation of power the Shoguns (known to foreigners as Tycoons) became finally the virtual rulers of Japan. The title was abolished in 1867.
Shogunate
n.
• The office or dignity of a Shogun.
Shola
n.
(Bot.) See Sola.
Shole
n.
• A plank fixed beneath an object, as beneath the rudder of a vessel, to protect it from injury; a plank on the ground under the end of a shore or the like.
n.
• See Shoal.
Shonde
n.
• Harm; disgrace; shame.
Shone
• imp. & p. p. of Shine.
Shoo
interj.
• Begone; away; — an expression used in frightening away animals, especially fowls.
Shooi
n.
(Zool.) The Richardson's skua (Stercorarius parasiticus);- so called from its cry.
Shook
• imp. & obs. or p. p. of Shake.
n.
(Com.) A set of staves and headings sufficient in number for one hogshead, cask, barrel, or the like, trimmed, and bound together in compact form.
• A set of boards for a sugar box.
• The parts of a piece of house furniture, as a bedstead, packed together.
v. t.
• To pack, as staves, in a shook.
Shoon
n.
• pl. of Shoe.
Shoop
• imp. of Shape. Shaped.
Shoot
n.
• An inclined plane, either artificial or natural, down which timber, coal, etc., are caused to slide; also, a narrow passage, either natural or artificial, in a stream, where the water rushes rapidly; esp., a channel, having a swift current, connecting the ends of a bend in the stream, so as to shorten the course.
v. t.
• To let fly, or cause to be driven, with force, as an arrow or a bullet; — followed by a word denoting the missile, as an object.
• To discharge, causing a missile to be driven forth; — followed by a word denoting the weapon or instrument, as an object; — often with off; as, to shoot a gun.
• To strike with anything shot; to hit with a missile; often, to kill or wound with a firearm; — followed by a word denoting the person or thing hit, as an object.
• To send out or forth, especially with a rapid or sudden motion; to cast with the hand; to hurl; to discharge; to emit.
• To push or thrust forward; to project; to protrude; — often with out; as, a plant shoots out a bud.
(Carp.) To plane straight; to fit by planing.
• To pass rapidly through, over, or under; as, to shoot a rapid or a bridge; to shoot a sand bar.
• To variegate as if by sprinkling or intermingling; to color in spots or patches.
v. i.
• To cause an engine or weapon to discharge a missile; — said of a person or an agent; as, they shot at a target; he shoots better than he rides.
• To discharge a missile; — said of an engine or instrument; as, the gun shoots well.
• To be shot or propelled forcibly; — said of a missile; to be emitted or driven; to move or extend swiftly, as if propelled; as, a shooting star.
• To penetrate, as a missile; to dart with a piercing sensation; as, shooting pains.
• To feel a quick, darting pain; to throb in pain.
• To germinate; to bud; to sprout.
• To grow; to advance; as, to shoot up rapidly.
• To change form suddenly; especially, to solidify.
• To protrude; to jut; to project; to extend; as, the land shoots into a promontory.
(Naut.) To move ahead by force of momentum, as a sailing vessel when the helm is put hard alee.
n.
• The act of shooting; the discharge of a missile; a shot; as, the shoot of a shuttle.
• A young branch or growth.
• A rush of water; a rapid.
(Min.) A vein of ore running in the same general direction as the lode.
(Weaving) A weft thread shot through the shed by the shuttle; a pick.
• A shoat; a young hog.
Shooter
n.
• One who shoots, as an archer or a gunner.
• That which shoots.
• A firearm; as, a five-shooter
• A shooting star.
Shooting
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, shoots; as, the shooting of an archery club; the shooting of rays of light.
• A wounding or killing with a firearm; specifically (Sporting), the killing of game; as, a week of shooting.
• A sensation of darting pain; as, a shooting in one's head.
a.
• Of or pertaining to shooting; for shooting; darting.
Shooty
a.
• Sprouting or coming up freely and regularly.
Shop
• imp. of Shape. Shaped.
n.
• A building or an apartment in which goods, wares, drugs, etc., are sold by retail.
• A building in which mechanics or artisans work; as, a shoe shop; a car shop.
v. i.
• To visit shops for the purpose of purchasing goods.
Shopboard
n.
• A bench or board on which work is performed; a workbench.
Shopbook
n.
• A book in which a tradesman keeps his accounts.
Shopboy
n.
• A boy employed in a shop.
Shopen
• p. p. of Shape.
Shopgirl
n.
• A girl employed in a shop.
Shopkeeper
n.
• A trader who sells goods in a shop, or by retail; — in distinction from one who sells by wholesale.
Shoplifter
n.
• One who steals anything in a shop, or takes goods privately from a shop; one who, under pretense of buying goods, takes occasion to steal.
Shoplifting
n.
• Larceny committed in a shop; the stealing of anything from a shop.
Shoplike
a.
• Suiting a shop; vulgar.
Shopmaid
n.
• A shopgirl.
Shopman
n.
• A shopkeeper; a retailer.
• One who serves in a shop; a salesman.
• One who works in a shop or a factory.
Shopper
n.
• One who shops.
Shoppish
a.
• Having the appearance or qualities of a shopkeeper, or shopman.
Shoppy
a.
• Abounding with shops.
• Of or pertaining to shops, or one's own shop or business; as, shoppy talk.
Shopshift
n.
• The trick of a shopkeeper; deception.
Shopwalker
n.
• One who walks about in a shop as an overseer and director. Cf. Floorwalker.
Shopwoman
n.
• A woman employed in a shop.
Shopworn
a.
• Somewhat worn or damaged by having been kept for a time in a shop.
Shorage
n.
• Duty paid for goods brought on shore.
Shore
• imp. of Shear.
n.
• A sewer.
n.
• A prop, as a timber, placed as a brace or support against the side of a building or other structure; a prop placed beneath anything, as a beam, to prevent it from sinking or sagging.
v. t.
• To support by a shore or shores; to prop; — usually with up; as, to shore up a building.
n.
• The coast or land adjacent to a large body of water, as an ocean, lake, or large river.
v. t.
• To set on shore.
Shoreless
a.
• Having no shore or coast; of indefinite or unlimited extent; as, a shoreless ocean.
Shoreling
n.
• See Shorling.
Shorer
n.
• One who, or that which, shores or props; a prop; a shore.
Shoreward
adv.
• Toward the shore.
Shoring
n.
• The act of supporting or strengthening with a prop or shore.
• A system of props; props, collectively.
Shorling
n.
• The skin of a sheen after the fleece is shorn off, as distinct from the morling, or skin taken from the dead sheep; also, a sheep of the first year's shearing.
• A person who is shorn; a shaveling; hence, in contempt, a priest.
Shorn
• p. p. of Shear.
Short
a.
• Not long; having brief length or linear extension; as, a short distance; a short piece of timber; a short flight.
• Not extended in time; having very limited duration; not protracted; as, short breath.
• Limited in quantity; inadequate; insufficient; scanty; as, a short supply of provisions, or of water.
• Insufficiently provided; inadequately supplied; scantily furnished; lacking; not coming up to a resonable, or the ordinary, standard; — usually with of; as, to be short of money.
• Deficient; defective; imperfect; not coming up, as to a measure or standard; as, an account which is short of the trith.
• Not distant in time; near at hand.
• Limited in intellectual power or grasp; not comprehensive; narrow; not tenacious, as memory.
• Less important, efficaceous, or powerful; not equal or equivalent; less (than); — with of.
• Abrupt; brief; pointed; petulant; as, he gave a short answer to the question.
(Cookery) Breaking or crumbling readily in the mouth; crisp; as, short pastry.
(Metal) Brittle.
(Stock Exchange) Engaging or engaged to deliver what is not possessed; as, short contracts; to be short of stock. See The shorts, under Short, n., and To sell short, under Short, adv.
(Phon.) Not prolonged, or relatively less prolonged, in utterance; — opposed to long, and applied to vowels or to syllables. In English, the long and short of the same letter are not, in most cases, the long and short of the same sound; thus, the i in ill is the short sound, not of i in isle, but of ee in eel, and the e in pet is the short sound of a in pate, etc. See Quantity, and Guide to Pronunciation, §§22, 30.
n.
• A summary account.
• The part of milled grain sifted out which is next finer than the bran.
• Short, inferior hemp.
• Breeches; shortclothes.
(Phonetics) A short sound, syllable, or vowel.
adv.
• In a short manner; briefly; limitedly; abruptly; quickly; as, to stop short in one's course; to turn short.
v. t.
• To shorten.
v. i.
• To fail; to decrease.
Shortage
n.
• Amount or extent of deficiency, as determined by some requirement or standard; as, a shortage in money accounts.
Shortcake
n.
• An unsweetened breakfast cake shortened with butter or lard, rolled thin, and baked.
Shortclothes
n.
• Coverings for the legs of men or boys, consisting of trousers which reach only to the knees, — worn with long stockings.
Shortcoming
n.
• The act of falling, or coming short
• The failure of a crop, or the like
• Neglect of, or failure in, performance of duty.
Shorten
v. t.
• To make short or shorter in measure, extent, or time; as, to shorten distance; to shorten a road; to shorten days of calamity.
• To reduce or diminish in amount, quantity, or extent; to lessen; to abridge; to curtail; to contract; as, to shorten work, an allowance of food, etc.
• To make deficient (as to); to deprive; — with of.
• To make short or friable, as pastry, with butter, lard, pot liquor, or the like.
v. i.
• To become short or shorter; as, the day shortens in northern latitudes from June to December; a metallic rod shortens by cold.
Shortener
n.
• One who, or that which, shortens.
Shortening
n.
• The act of making or becoming short or shorter.
(Cookery) That which renders pastry short or friable, as butter, lard, etc.
Shorthand
n.
• A compendious and rapid method or writing by substituting characters, abbreviations, or symbols, for letters, words, etc.; short writing; stenography. See Illust. under Phonography.
Shorthead
n.
• A sucking whale less than one year old; — so called by sailors.
Shorthorn
a.
• One of a breed of large, heavy domestic cattle having short horns. The breed was developed in England.
Shortly
adv.
• In a short or brief time or manner; soon; quickly.
• In few words; briefly; abruptly; curtly; as, to express ideas more shortly in verse than in prose.
Shortness
n.
• The quality or state of being short; want of reach or extension; brevity; deficiency; as, the shortness of a journey; the shortness of the days in winter; the shortness of an essay; the shortness of the memory; a shortness of provisions; shortness of breath.
Shortsighted
a.
• Not able to see far; nearsighted; myopic. See Myopic, and Myopia.
• Fig.: Not able to look far into futurity; unable to understand things deep; of limited intellect.
• Having little regard for the future; heedless.
Shortstop
n.
(Baseball) The player stationed in the field bewtween the second and third bases.
Shortwing
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of small wrenlike Asiatic birds having short wings and a short tail. They belong to Brachypterix, Callene, and allied genera.
Shory
a.
• Lying near the shore.
Shoshones
n. pl.(Ethnol.)
Shot
• imp. & p. p. Shoot.
a.
• Woven in such a way as to produce an effect of variegation, of changeable tints, or of being figured; as, shot silks. See Shoot, v. t., 8.
n.
• A share or proportion; a reckoning; a scot.
n.
• The act of shooting; discharge of a firearm or other weapon which throws a missile.
• A missile weapon, particularly a ball or bullet; specifically, whatever is discharged as a projectile from firearms or cannon by the force of an explosive.
• Small globular masses of lead, of various sizes, — used chiefly for killing game; as, bird shot; buckshot.
• The flight of a missile, or the distance which it is, or can be, thrown; as, the vessel was distant more than a cannon shot.
• A marksman; one who practices shooting; as, an exellent shot.
v. t.
• To load with shot, as a gun.
Shote
n.
(Zool.) A fish resembling the trout.
• A young hog; a shoat.
Shotgun
n.
• A light, smooth-bored gun, often double-barreled, especially designed for firing small shot at short range, and killing small game.
Shots
n. pl.
• The refuse of cattle taken from a drove.
Shotted
a.
• Loaded with shot.
(Med.) Having a shot attached; as, a shotten suture.
Shotten
n.
• Having ejected the spawn; as, a shotten herring.
• Shot out of its socket; dislocated, as a bone.
Shough
n.
(Zool.) A shockdog.
interj.
• See Shoo.
Should
imp.
• Used as an auxiliary verb, to express a conditional or contingent act or state, or as a supposition of an actual fact; also, to express moral obligation (see Shall); e. g.: they should have come last week; if I should go; I should think you could go.
Shoulder
n.
(Anat.) The joint, or the region of the joint, by which the fore limb is connected with the body or with the shoulder girdle; the projection formed by the bones and muscles about that joint.
• The flesh and muscles connected with the shoulder joint; the upper part of the back; that part of the human frame on which it is most easy to carry a heavy burden; — often used in the plural.
• Fig.: That which supports or sustains; support.
• That which resembles a human shoulder, as any protuberance or projection from the body of a thing.
• The upper joint of the fore leg and adjacent parts of an animal, dressed for market; as, a shoulder of mutton.
(Fort.) The angle of a bastion included between the face and flank. See Illust. of Bastion.
• An abrupt projection which forms an abutment on an object, or limits motion, etc., as the projection around a tenon at the end of a piece of timber, the part of the top of a type which projects beyond the base of the raised character, etc.
v. t.
• To push or thrust with the shoulder; to push with violence; to jostle.
• To take upon the shoulder or shoulders; as, to shoulder a basket; hence, to assume the burden or responsibility of; as, to shoulder blame; to shoulder a debt.
Shouldered
a.
• Having shoulders; — used in composition; as, a broad-shouldered man.
Shout
v. i.
• To utter a sudden and loud outcry, as in joy, triumph, or exultation, or to attract attention, to animate soldiers, etc.
v. t.
• To utter with a shout; to cry; — sometimes with out; as, to shout, or to shout out, a man's name.
• To treat with shouts or clamor.
n.
• A loud burst of voice or voices; a vehement and sudden outcry, especially of a multitudes expressing joy, triumph, exultation, or animated courage.
Shouter
n.
• One who shouts.
Shove
v. t.
• To drive along by the direct and continuous application of strength; to push; especially, to push (a body) so as to make it move along the surface of another body; as, to shove a boat on the water; to shove a table across the floor.
• To push along, aside, or away, in a careless or rude manner; to jostle.
v. i.
• To push or drive forward; to move onward by pushing or jostling.
• To move off or along by an act pushing, as with an oar a pole used by one in a boat; sometimes with off.
n.
• The act of shoving; a forcible push.
• p. p. of Shove.
Shovel
n.
• An implement consisting of a broad scoop, or more or less hollow blade, with a handle, used for lifting and throwing earth, coal, grain, or other loose substances.
v. t.
• To take up and throw with a shovel; as, to shovel earth into a heap, or into a cart, or out of a pit.
• To gather up as with a shovel.
Shovelard
n.
(Zool.) Shoveler.
Shovelbill
n.
(Zool.) The shoveler.
Shovelboard
n.
• A board on which a game is played, by pushing or driving pieces of metal or money to reach certain marks; also, the game itself. Called also shuffleboard, shoveboard, shovegroat, shovelpenny.
• A game played on board ship in which the aim is to shove or drive with a cue wooden disks into divisions chalked on the deck; — called also shuffleboard.
Shoveler
n.
• One who, or that which, shovels.
(Zool.) A river duck (Spatula clypeata), native of Europe and America. It has a large bill, broadest towards the tip. The male is handsomely variegated with green, blue, brown, black, and white on the body; the head and neck are dark green. Called also broadbill, spoonbill, shovelbill, and maiden duck. The Australian shoveler, or shovel-nosed duck (S. rhynchotis), is a similar species.
Shovelful
n.
• As much as a shovel will hold; enough to fill a shovel.
Shovelhead
n.
(Zool.) A shark (Sphryna tiburio) allied to the hammerhead, and native of the warmer parts of the Atlantic and Pacific oceans; — called also bonnet shark.
Shovelnose
n.
(Zool.) The common sand shark. See under Snad.
• A small California shark (Heptranchias maculatus), which is taken for its oil.
• A Pacific Ocean shark (Hexanchus corinus).
• A ganoid fish of the Sturgeon family (Scaphirhynchus platyrhynchus) of the Mississippi and Ohio rivers; — called also white sturgeon.
Shoven
• p. p. of Shove.
Show
v. t.
• To exhibit or present to view; to place in sight; to display; — the thing exhibited being the object, and often with an indirect object denoting the person or thing seeing or beholding; as, to show a house; show your colors; shopkeepers show customers goods (show goods to customers).
• To exhibit to the mental view; to tell; to disclose; to reveal; to make known; as, to show one's designs.
• Specifically, to make known the way to (a person); hence, to direct; to guide; to asher; to conduct; as, to show a person into a parlor; to show one to the door.
• To make apparent or clear, as by evidence, testimony, or reasoning; to prove; to explain; also, to manifest; to evince; as, to show the truth of a statement; to show the causes of an event.
• To bestow; to confer; to afford; as, to show favor.
v. i.
• To exhibit or manifest one's self or itself; to appear; to look; to be in appearance; to seem.
• To have a certain appearance, as well or ill, fit or unfit; to become or suit; to appear.
n.
• The act of showing, or bringing to view; exposure to sight; exhibition.
• That which os shown, or brought to view; that which is arranged to be seen; a spectacle; an exhibition; as, a traveling show; a cattle show.
• Proud or ostentatious display; parade; pomp.
• Semblance; likeness; appearance.
• False semblance; deceitful appearance; pretense.
(Med.) A discharge, from the vagina, of mucus streaked with blood, occuring a short time before labor.
(Mining) A pale blue flame, at the top of a candle flame, indicating the presence of fire damp.
Showbread
n.
(Jewish Antiq.) Bread of exhibition; loaves to set before God; — the term used in translating the various phrases used in the Hebrew and Greek to designate the loaves of bread which the priest of the week placed before the Lord on the golden table in the sanctuary. They were made of fine flour unleavened, and were changed every Sabbath. The loaves, twelve in number, represented the twelve tribes of Israel. They were to be eaten by the priests only, and in the Holy Place.
Shower
n.
• One who shows or exhibits.
• That which shows; a mirror.
n.
• A fall or rain or hail of short duration; sometimes, but rarely, a like fall of snow.
• That which resembles a shower in falling or passing through the air copiously and rapidly.
• A copious supply bestowed.
v. t.
• To water with a shower; to t copiously with rain.
• To bestow liberally; to destribute or scatter in undance; to rain.
v. i.
• To rain in showers; to fall, as in a hower or showers.
Showerful
a.
• Full of showers.
Showeriness
n.
• Quality of being showery.
Showerless
a.
• Rainless; freo from showers.
Showery
a.
• Raining in showers; abounding with frequent showers of rain.
• Of or pertaining to a shower or showers.
Showily
adv.
• In a showy manner; pompously; with parade.
Showiness
n.
• The quality or state of being showy; pompousness; great parade; ostentation.
Showing
n.
• Appearance; display; exhibition.
• Presentation of facts; statement.
Showish
a.
• Showy; ostentatious.
Showman
n.
• One who exhibits a show; a proprietor of a show.
Shown
• p. p. of Show.
Showroom
n.
• A room or apartment where a show is exhibited.
• A room where merchandise is exposed for sale, or where samples are displayed.
Showy
• , a. Making a show; attracting attention; presenting a marked appearance; ostentatious; gay; gaudy.
Shrag
n.
• A twig of a tree cut off.
v. t.
• To trim, as trees; to lop.
Shragger
n.
• One who lops; one who trims trees.
Shram
v. t.
• To cause to shrink or shrivel with cold; to benumb.
Shrank
• imp. of Shrink.
Shrapnel
a.
• Applied as an appellation to a kind of shell invented by Gen. H. Shrapnel of the British army.
n.
• A shrapnel shell; shrapnel shells, collectively.
Shred
n.
• A long, narrow piece cut or torn off; a strip.
• In general, a fragment; a piece; a particle.
v. t.
• To cut or tear into small pieces, particularly narrow and long pieces, as of cloth or leather.
• To lop; to prune; to trim.
Shredcook
n.
(Zool.) The fieldfare; — so called from its harsh cry before rain.
Shredding
n.
• The act of cutting or tearing into shreds.
• That which is cut or torn off; a piece.
Shreddy
a.
• Consisting of shreds.
Shredless
a.
• Having no shreds; without a shred.
Shrew
a.
• Wicked; malicious.
n.
• Originally, a brawling, turbulent, vexatious person of either sex, but now restricted in use to females; a brawler; a scold.
(Zool.) Any small insectivore of the genus Sorex and several allied genera of the family Sorecidae. In form and color they resemble mice, but they have a longer and more pointed nose. Some of them are the smallest of all mammals.
v. t.
• To beshrew; to curse.
Shrewd
a.
• Inclining to shrew; disposing to curse or scold; hence, vicious; malicious; evil; wicked; mischievous; vexatious; rough; unfair; shrewish.
• Artful; wily; cunning; arch.
• Able or clever in practical affairs; sharp in business; astute; sharp-witted; sagacious; keen; as, a shrewd observer; a shrewd design; a shrewd reply.
Shrewish
a.
• having the qualities of a shrew; having a scolding disposition; froward; peevish.
Shrewmouse
n.
(Zool.) A shrew; especially, the erd shrew.
Shriek
v. i.
• To utter a loud, sharp, shrill sound or cry, as do some birds and beasts; to scream, as in a sudden fright, in horror or anguish.
v. t.
• To utter sharply and shrilly; to utter in or with a shriek or shrieks.
n.
• A sharp, shrill outcry or scream; a shrill wild cry such as is caused by sudden or extreme terror, pain, or the like.
Shrieker
n.
• One who utters a shriek.
Shrieval
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sheriff.
Shrievalty
n.
• The office, or sphere of jurisdiction, of a sheriff; sheriffalty.
Shrieve
n.
• A sheriff.
v. t.
• To shrive; to question.
Shrift
n.
• The act of shriving.
• Confession made to a priest, and the absolution consequent upon it.
Shright
• imp. & p. p. of Shriek.
n.
• A shriek; shrieking.
Shrike
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of oscinine birds of the family Laniidae, having a strong hooked bill, toothed at the tip. Most shrikes are insectivorous, but the common European gray shrike (Lanius excubitor), the great northern shrike (L. borealis), and several others, kill mice, small birds, etc., and often impale them on thorns, and are, on that account called also butcher birds. See under Butcher.
Shrill
a.
• Acute; sharp; piercing; having or emitting a sharp, piercing tone or sound; — said a sound, or of that which produces a sound.
n.
• A shrill sound.
v. i.
• To utter an acute, piercing sound; to sound with a sharp, shrill tone; to become shrill.
v. t.
• To utter or express in a shrill tone; to cause to make a shrill sound.
Shrillness
n.
• The quality or state of being shrill.
Shrilly
adv.
• In a shrill manner; acutely; with a sharp sound or voice.
a.
• Somewhat shrill.
Shrimp
v. t.
• To contract; to shrink.
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of macruran Crustacea belonging to Crangon and various allied genera, having a slender body and long legs. Many of them are used as food. The larger kinds are called also prawns. See Illust. of Decapoda.
• In a more general sense, any species of the macruran tribe Caridea, or any species of the order Schizopoda, having a similar form.
• In a loose sense, any small crustacean, including some amphipods and even certain entomostracans; as, the fairy shrimp, and brine shrimp. See under Fairy, and Brine.
• Figuratively, a little wrinkled man; a dwarf; — in contempt.
Shrimper
n.
• One who fishes for shrimps.
Shrine
n.
• A case, box, or receptacle, especially one in which are deposited sacred relics, as the bones of a saint.
• Any sacred place, as an altar, tromb, or the like.
• A place or object hallowed from its history or associations; as, a shrine of art.
v. t.
• To enshrine; to place reverently, as in a shrine.
Shrink
v. i.
• To wrinkle, bend, or curl; to shrivel; hence, to contract into a less extent or compass; to gather together; to become compacted.
• To withdraw or retire, as from danger; to decline action from fear; to recoil, as in fear, horror, or distress.
• To express fear, horror, or pain by contracting the body, or part of it; to shudder; to quake.
v. t.
• To cause to contract or shrink; as, to shrink finnel by imersing it in boiling water.
• To draw back; to withdraw.
n.
• The act shrinking; shrinkage; contraction; also, recoil; withdrawal.
Shrinkage
n.
• The act of shrinking; a contraction into less bulk or measurement.
• The amount of such contraction; the bulk or dimension lost by shrinking, as of grain, castings, etc.
• Decrease in value; depreciation.
Shrinker
n.
• One who shrinks; one who withdraws from danger.
Shrinking
a. & n.
• from Shrink.
Shrinkingly
adv.
• In a shrinking manner.
Shrivalty
n.
• Shrievalty.
Shrive
v. t.
• To hear or receive the confession of; to administer confession and absolution to; — said of a priest as the agent.
• To confess, and receive absolution; — used reflexively.
v. i.
• To receive confessions, as a priest; to administer confession and absolution.
Shrivel
v. i.
• To draw, or be drawn, into wrinkles; to shrink, and form corrugations; as, a leaf shriveles in the hot sun; the skin shrivels with age; — often with up.
v. t.
• To cause to shrivel or contract; to cause to shrink onto corruptions.
Shriven
• p. p. of Shrive.
Shriver
n.
• One who shrives; a confessor.
Shriving
n.
• Shrift; confession.
Shroff
n.
• A banker, or changer of money.
Shroffage
n.
• The examination of coins, and the separation of the good from the debased.
Shrood
v. t.
• To trim; to lop.
Shroud
n.
• That which clothes, covers, conceals, or protects; a garment.
• Especially, the dress for the dead; a winding sheet.
• That which covers or shelters like a shroud.
• A covered place used as a retreat or shelter, as a cave or den; also, a vault or crypt.
• The branching top of a tree; foliage.
(Naut.) A set of ropes serving as stays to support the masts. The lower shrouds are secured to the sides of vessels by heavy iron bolts and are passed around the head of the lower masts.
(Mach.) One of the two annular plates at the periphery of a water wheel, which form the sides of the buckets; a shroud plate.
v. t.
• To cover with a shroud; especially, to inclose in a winding sheet; to dress for the grave.
• To cover, as with a shroud; to protect completely; to cover so as to conceal; to hide; to veil.
v. i.
• To take shelter or harbor.
v. t.
• To lop. See Shrood.
Shrouded
a.
• Provided with a shroud or shrouds.
Shrouding
n.
• The shrouds. See Shroud, n., 7.
Shroudless
a.
• Without a shroud.
Shroudy
a.
• Affording shelter.
Shrove
• imp. of Shrive.
v. i.
• To join in the festivities of Shrovetide; hence, to make merry.
Shrovetide
n.
• The days immediately preceding Ash Widnesday, especially the period between the evening before Quinguagesima Sunday and the morning of Ash Wednesday.
Shroving
n.
• The festivity of Shrovetide.
Shrow
n.
• A shrew.
Shrowd
v. t.
• See Shrood.
Shrub
n.
• A liquor composed of vegetable acid, especially lemon juice, and sugar, with spirit to preserve it.
n.
(Bot.) A woody plant of less size than a tree, and usually with several stems from the same root.
v. t.
• To lop; to prune.
Shrubbery
n.
• A collection of shrubs.
• A place where shrubs are planted.
Shrubbiness
n.
• Quality of being shrubby.
Shrubby
a.
• Full of shrubs.
• Of the nature of a shrub; resembling a shrub.
Shrubless
a.
• having no shrubs.
Shruff
n.
• Rubbish. Specifically: (a) Dross or refuse of metals. (b) Light, dry wood, or stuff used for fuel.
Shrug
v. t.
• To draw up or contract (the shoulders), especially by way of expressing dislike, dread, doubt, or the like.
v. i.
• To raise or draw up the shoulders, as in expressing dislike, dread, doubt, or the like.
n.
• A drawing up of the shoulders, — a motion usually expressing dislike, dread, or doubt.
Shrunken
p. p. & a.
• from Shrink.
Shuck
n.
• A shock of grain.
n.
• A shell, husk, or pod; especially, the outer covering of such nuts as the hickory nut, butternut, peanut, and chestnut.
• The shell of an oyster or clam.
v. t.
• To deprive of the shucks or husks; as, to shuck walnuts, Indian corn, oysters, etc.
Shucker
n.
• One who shucks oysters or clams
Shudder
v. i.
• To tremble or shake with fear, horrer, or aversion; to shiver with cold; to quake.
n.
• The act of shuddering, as with fear.
Shudderingly
adv.
• In a shuddering manner.
Shude
n.
• The husks and other refuse of rice mills, used to adulterate oil cake, or linseed cake.
Shuffle
v. t.
• To shove one way and the other; to push from one to another; as, to shuffle money from hand to hand.
• To mix by pushing or shoving; to confuse; to throw into disorder; especially, to change the relative positions of, as of the cards in a pack.
• To remove or introduce by artificial confusion.
v. i.
• To change the relative position of cards in a pack; as, to shuffle and cut.
• To change one's position; to shift ground; to evade questions; to resort to equivocation; to prevaricate.
• To use arts or expedients; to make shift.
• To move in a slovenly, dragging manner; to drag or scrape the feet in walking or dancing.
n.
• The act of shuffling; a mixing confusedly; a slovenly, dragging motion.
• A trick; an artifice; an evasion.
Shuffleboard
n.
• See Shovelboard.
Shufflecap
• ,.A play performed by shaking money in a hat or cap.
Shuffler
n.
• One who shuffles.
(Zool.) Either one of the three common American scaup ducks. See Scaup duck, under Scaup.
Shufflewing
n.
(Zool.) The hedg sparrow.
Shuffling
a.
• Moving with a dragging, scraping step.
• Evasive; as, a shuffling excuse.
v.
• In a shuffling manner.
Shug
v. i.
• To writhe the body so as to produce friction against one's clothes, as do those who have the itch.
• Hence, to crawl; to sneak.
Shumac
n.
(Bot.) Sumac.
Shun
v. t.
• To avoid; to keep clear of; to get out of the way of; to escape from; to eschew; as, to shun rocks, shoals, vice.
Shunless
a.
• Not to be shunned; inevitable; unavoidable.
Shunt
v. t.
• To shun; to move from.
• To cause to move suddenly; to give a sudden start to; to shove.
• To turn off to one side; especially, to turn off, as a grain or a car upon a side track; to switch off; to shift.
(Elec.) To provide with a shunt; as, to shunt a galvanometer.
v. i.
• To go aside; to turn off.
n.
(Railroad) A turning off to a side or short track, that the principal track may be left free.
(Elec.) A conducting circuit joining two points in a conductor, or the terminals of a galvanometer or dynamo, so as to form a parallel or derived circuit through which a portion of the current may pass, for the purpose of regulating the amount passing in the main circuit.
(Gunnery) The shifting of the studs on a projectile from the deep to the shallow sides of the grooves in its discharge from a shunt gun.
Shunter
n.
(Railroad) A person employed to shunt cars from one track to another.
Shut
v. t.
• To close so as to hinder ingress or egress; as, to shut a door or a gate; to shut one's eyes or mouth.
• To forbid entrance into; to prohibit; to bar; as, to shut the ports of a country by a blockade.
• To preclude; to exclude; to bar out.
• To fold together; to close over, as the fingers; to close by bringing the parts together; as, to shut the hand; to shut a book.
v. i.
• To close itself; to become closed; as, the door shuts; it shuts hard.
a.
• Closed or fastened; as, a shut door.
• Rid; clear; free; as, to get shut of a person.
(Phon.) Formed by complete closure of the mouth passage, and with the nose passage remaining closed; stopped, as are the mute consonants, p, t, k, b, d, and hard g
• Cut off sharply and abruptly by a following consonant in the same syllable, as the English short vowels, &acr;, &ecr;, &icr;, &ocr;, &urcr;, always are.
n.
• The act or time of shutting; close; as, the shut of a door.
• A door or cover; a shutter.
• The line or place where two pieces of metal are united by welding.
Shute
n.
• Same as Chute, or Shoot.
Shutter
n.
• One who shuts or closes.
• A movable cover or screen for a window, designed to shut out the light, to obstruct the view, or to be of some strength as a defense; a blind.
• A removable cover, or a gate, for closing an aperture of any kind, as for closing the passageway for molten iron from a ladle.
Shuttered
a.
• Furnished with shutters.
Shuttle
n.
• An instrument used in weaving for passing or shooting the thread of the woof from one side of the cloth to the other between the threads of the warp.
• The sliding thread holder in a sewing machine, which carries the lower thread through a loop of the upper thread, to make a lock stitch.
• A shutter, as for a channel for molten metal.
v. i.
• To move backwards and forwards, like a shuttle.
Shuttlecock
n.
• A cork stuck with feathers, which is to be struck by a battledoor in play; also, the play itself.
v. t.
• To send or toss to and fro; to bandy; as, to shuttlecock words.
Shuttlecork
n.
• See Shuttlecock.
Shuttlewise
adv.
• Back and forth, like the movement of a shuttle.
Shy
a.
• Easily frightened; timid; as, a shy bird.
• Reserved; coy; disinclined to familiar approach.
• Cautious; wary; suspicious.
v. i.
• To start suddenly aside through fright or suspicion; — said especially of horses.
v. t.
• To throw sidewise with a jerk; to fling; as, to shy a stone; to shy a slipper.
n.
• A sudden start aside, as by a horse.
• A side throw; a throw; a fling.
Shyly
adv.
• In a shy or timid manner; not familiarly; with reserve.
Shyness
n.
• The quality or state of being shy.
Shyster
n.
• A trickish knave; one who carries on any business, especially legal business, in a mean and dishonest way.
Si
(Mus.) A syllable applied, in solmization, to the note B; more recently, to the seventh tone of any major diatonic scale. It was added to Guido's scale by Le Maire about the end of the 17th century.
Siaga
n.
(Zool.) The ahu, or jairou.
Sialogogue
n.
(Med.) An agent which promotes the flow of saliva.
Siamang
n.
(Zool.) A gibbon (Hylobates syndactylus), native of Sumatra. It has the second and third toes partially united by a web.
Siamese
a.
• Of or pertaining to Siam, its native people, or their language.
n. sing. & pl.
• A native or inhabitant of Siam; pl., the people of Siam.
• The language of the Siamese.
Sib
n.
• A blood relation.
a.
• Related by blood; akin.
Sibbens
n.
(Med.) A contagious disease, endemic in Scotland, resembling the yaws. It is marked by ulceration of the throat and nose and by pustules and soft fungous excrescences upon the surface of the body. In the Orkneys the name is applied to the itch.
Siberian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Siberia, a region comprising all northern Asia and belonging to Russia; as, a Siberian winter.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Siberia.
Sibilant
a.
• Making a hissing sound; uttered with a hissing sound; hissing; as, s, z, sh, and zh, are sibilant elementary sounds.
n.
• A sibiliant letter.
Sibilate
v. t. & i.
• To pronounce with a hissing sound, like that of the letter s; to mark with a character indicating such pronunciation.
Sibilation
n.
• Utterance with a hissing sound; also, the sound itself; a hiss.
Sibilatory
a.
• Hissing; sibilant.
Sibilous
a.
• Having a hissing sound; hissing; sibilant.
Sibyl
n.
(Class. Antiq.) A woman supposed to be endowed with a spirit of prophecy.
• A female fortune teller; a pythoness; a prophetess.
Sibylist
n.
• One who believes in a sibyl or the sibylline prophecies.
Sibylline
a.
• Pertaining to the sibyls; uttered, written, or composed by sibyls; like the productions of sibyls.
Sic
a.
• Such.
adv.
• Thus.
Sicamore
n.
(Bot.) See Sycamore.
Sicca
n.
• A seal; a coining die; — used adjectively to designate the silver currency of the Mogul emperors, or the Indian rupee of 192 grains.
Siccate
v. t.
• To dry.
Siccation
n.
• The act or process of drying.
Siccative
a.
• Drying; causing to dry.
n.
• That which promotes drying.
Siccific
a.
• Causing dryness.
Siccity
n.
• Dryness; aridity; destitution of moisture.
Sice
n.
• The number six at dice.
Sicer
n.
• A strong drink; cider.
Sich
a.
• Such.
Sicilian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Sicily or its inhabitants.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Sicily.
Siciliano
n.
• A Sicilian dance, resembling the pastorale, set to a rather slow and graceful melody in 12-8 or 6-8 measure; also, the music to the dance.
Sicilienne
n.
• A kind of rich poplin.
Sick
a.
• Affected with disease of any kind; ill; indisposed; not in health. See the Synonym under Illness.
• Affected with, or attended by, nausea; inclined to vomit; as, sick at the stomach; a sick headache.
• Having a strong dislike; disgusted; surfeited; — with of; as, to be sick of flattery.
• Corrupted; imperfect; impaired; weakned.
n.
• Sickness.
v. i.
• To fall sick; to sicken.
Sicken
v. t.
• To make sick; to disease.
• To make qualmish; to nauseate; to disgust; as, to sicken the stomach.
• To impair; to weaken.
v. i.
• To become sick; to fall into disease.
• To be filled to disgust; to be disgusted or nauseated; to be filled with abhorrence or aversion; to be surfeited or satiated.
• To become disgusting or tedious.
• To become weak; to decay; to languish.
Sickening
a.
• Causing sickness; specif., causing surfeit or disgust; nauseating.
Sicker
v. i.
(Mining) To percolate, trickle, or ooze, as water through a crack.
Sickish
a.
• Somewhat sick or diseased.
• Somewhat sickening; as, a sickish taste.
Sickle
n.
• A reaping instrument consisting of a steel blade curved into the form of a hook, and having a handle fitted on a tang. The sickle has one side of the blade notched, so as always to sharpen with a serrated edge. Cf. Reaping hook, under Reap.
(Astron.) A group of stars in the constellation Leo. See Illust. of Leo.
Sicklebill
n.
(Zool.) Any one of three species of humming birds of the genus Eutoxeres, native of Central and South America. They have a long and strongly curved bill. Called also the sickle-billed hummer.
• A curlew.
• A bird of the genus Epimachus and allied genera.
Sickled
a.
• Furnished with a sickle.
Sickleman
n.
• One who uses a sickle; a reaper.
Sickler
n.
• One who uses a sickle; a sickleman; a reaper.
Sickless
a.
• Free from sickness.
Sicklewort
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Coronilla (C. scorpioides); — so named from its curved pods.
• The healall (Brunella vulgaris).
Sicklied
a.
• Made sickly. See Sickly, v.
Sickliness
n.
• The quality or state of being sickly.
Sickly
a.
• Somewhat sick; disposed to illness; attended with disease; as, a sickly body.
• Producing, or tending to, disease; as, a sickly autumn; a sickly climate.
• Appearing as if sick; weak; languid; pale.
• Tending to produce nausea; sickening; as, a sickly smell; sickly sentimentality.
adv.
• In a sick manner or condition; ill.
v. t.
• To make sick or sickly; — with over, and probably only in the past participle.
Sickness
n.
• The quality or state of being sick or diseased; illness; sisease or malady.
• Nausea; qualmishness; as, sickness of stomach.
Sicle
n.
• A shekel.
Sida
n.
(Bot.) A genus of malvaceous plants common in the tropics. All the species are mucilaginous, and some have tough ligneous fibers which are used as a substitute for hemp and flax.
Siddow
a.
• Soft; pulpy.
Side
n.
• The margin, edge, verge, or border of a surface; especially (when the thing spoken of is somewhat oblong in shape), one of the longer edges as distinguished from the shorter edges, called ends; a bounding line of a geometrical figure; as, the side of a field, of a square or triangle, of a river, of a road, etc.
• Any outer portion of a thing considered apart from, and yet in relation to, the rest; as, the upper side of a sphere; also, any part or position viewed as opposite to or contrasted with another; as, this or that side.
• One of the halves of the body, of an animals or man, on either side of the mesial plane; or that which pertains to such a half; as, a side of beef; a side of sole leather.
• The right or left part of the wall or trunk of the body; as, a pain in the side.
• A slope or declivity, as of a hill, considered as opposed to another slope over the ridge.
• The position of a person or party regarded as opposed to another person or party, whether as a rival or a foe; a body of advocates or partisans; a party; hence, the interest or cause which one maintains against another; a doctrine or view opposed to another.
• A line of descent traced through one parent as distinguished from that traced through another.
• Fig.: Aspect or part regarded as contrasted with some other; as, the bright side of poverty.
a.
• Of or pertaining to a side, or the sides; being on the side, or toward the side; lateral.
• Hence, indirect; oblique; collateral; incidental; as, a side issue; a side view or remark.
• Long; large; extensive.(Carp.)(Steam Engine)(Carp.)(Firearms)(Mach.)
v. i.
• To lean on one side.
• To embrace the opinions of one party, or engage in its interest, in opposition to another party; to take sides; as, to side with the ministerial party.
v. t.
• To be or stand at the side of; to be on the side toward.
• To suit; to pair; to match.
(Shipbuilding) To work (a timber or rib) to a certain thickness by trimming the sides.
• To furnish with a siding; as, to side a house.
Sideboard
n.
• A piece of dining-room furniture having compartments and shelves for keeping or displaying articles of table service.
Sidebone
n.
(Far.) A morbid growth or deposit of bony matter and at the sides of the coronet and coffin bone of a horse.
Sided
a.
• Having (such or so many) sides; — used in composition; as, one-sided; many-sided.
Sidehill
n.
• The side or slope of a hill; sloping ground; a descent.
Sideling
adv.
• Sidelong; on the side; laterally; also, obliquely; askew.
a.
• Inclining to one sidel directed toward one side; sloping; inclined; as, sideling ground.
Sidelong
adv.
• Laterally; obliquely; in the direction of the side.
• On the side; as, to lay a thing sidelong.
a.
• Lateral; oblique; not being directly in front; as, a sidelong glance.
Sidepiece
n.
(Joinery) The jamb, or cheek, of an opening in a wall, as of door or window.
Sider
n.
• One who takes a side.
n.
• Cider.
Sideral
a.
• Relating to the stars.
(Astrol.) Affecting unfavorably by the supposed influence of the stars; baleful.
Siderated
a.
• Planet-struck; blasted.
Sideration
n.
• The state of being siderated, or planet-struck; esp., blast in plants; also, a sudden and apparently causeless stroke of disease, as in apoplexy or paralysis.
Sidereal
a.
• Relating to the stars; starry; astral; as, sidereal astronomy.
(Astron.) Measuring by the apparent motion of the stars; designated, marked out, or accompanied, by a return to the same position in respect to the stars; as, the sidereal revolution of a planet; a sidereal day.
Siderealize
v. t.
• To elevate to the stars, or to the region of the stars; to etherealize.
Sidereous
a.
• Sidereal.
Siderite
n.
(Min.) Carbonate of iron, an important ore of iron occuring generally in cleavable masses, but also in rhombohedral crystals. It is of a light yellowish brown color. Called also sparry iron, spathic iron.
• A meteorite consisting solely of metallic iron.
• An indigo-blue variety of quartz.
• Formerly, magnetic iron ore, or loadstone.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Sideritis; ironwort.
Siderographist
n.
• One skilled in siderography.
Siderography
n.
• The art or practice of steel engraving; especially, the process, invented by Perkins, of multiplying facsimiles of an engraved steel plate by first rolling over it, when hardened, a soft steel cylinder, and then rolling the cylinder, when hardened, over a soft steel plate, which thus becomes a facsimile of the original. The process has been superseded by electrotypy.
Siderolite
n.
• A kind of meteorite. See under Meteorite.
Sideromancy
n.
• Divination by burning straws on red-hot iron, and noting the manner of their burning.
Sideroscope
n.
• An instrument for detecting small quantities of iron in any substance by means of a very delicate combination of magnetic needles.
Siderosis
n.
(Med.) A sort of pneumonia occuring in iron workers, produced by the inhalation of particles of iron.
Siderostat
n.
(Astron.) An apparatus consisting essentially of a mirror moved by clockwork so as to throw the rays of the sun or a star in a fixed direction; — a more general term for heliostat.
Sideroxylon
n.
(Bot.) A genus of tropical sapotaceous trees noted for their very hard wood; ironwood.
Sidesaddle
n.
• A saddle for women, in which the rider sits with both feet on one side of the animal mounted.
Sidesman
n.
• A party man; a partisan.
• An assistant to the churchwarden; a questman.
Sidewalk
n.
• A walk for foot passengers at the side of a street or road; a foot pavement.
Sideways
adv.
• Toward the side; sidewise.
Sidewinder
n.
(Zool.) See Horned rattler, under Horned.
• A heavy swinging blow from the side, which disables an adversary.
Sidewise
adv.
• On or toward one side; laterally; sideways.
Siding
n.
• Attaching one's self to a party.
• A side track, as a railroad; a turnout.
(Carp.) The covering of the outside wall of a frame house, whether made of weatherboards, vertical boarding with cleats, shingles, or the like.
(Shipbuilding) The thickness of a rib or timber, measured, at right angles with its side, across the curved edge; as, a timber having a siding of ten inches.
Sidle
v. t.
• To go or move with one side foremost; to move sidewise; as, to sidle through a crowd or narrow opening.
Siege
n.
• A seat; especially, a royal seat; a throne.
• Hence, place or situation; seat.
• Rank; grade; station; estimation.
• Passage of excrements; stool; fecal matter.
• The sitting of an army around or before a fortified place for the purpose of compelling the garrison to surrender; the surrounding or investing of a place by an army, and approaching it by passages and advanced works, which cover the besiegers from the enemy's fire. See the Note under Blockade.
• Hence, a continued attempt to gain possession.
• The floor of a glass-furnace.
• A workman's bench.
v. t.
• To besiege; to beset.
Siegework
n.
• A temporary fort or parallel where siege guns are mounted.
Sienite
n.
(Min.) See Syenite.
Sienitic
a.
• See Syenitic.
Sienna
n.
(Chem.) Clay that is colored red or brown by the oxides of iron or manganese, and used as a pigment. It is used either in the raw state or burnt.
Siennese
a.
• Of or pertaining to Sienna, a city of Italy.
Sierra
n.
• A ridge of mountain and craggy rocks, with a serrated or irregular outline; as, the Sierra Nevada.
Siesta
n.
• A short sleep taken about the middle of the day, or after dinner; a midday nap.
Sieur
n.
• Sir; — a title of respect used by the French.
Sieva
n.
(Bot.) A small variety of the Lima bean (Phaseolus lunatus).
Sieve
n.
• A utensil for separating the finer and coarser parts of a pulverized or granulated substance from each other. It consist of a vessel, usually shallow, with the bottom perforated, or made of hair, wire, or the like, woven in meshes.
• A kind of coarse basket.
Sifac
n.
(Zool.) The white indris of Madagascar. It is regarded by the natives as sacred.
Sifflement
n.
• The act of whistling or hissing; a whistling sound; sibilation.
Sifilet
n.
(Zool.) The six-shafted bird of paradise. See Paradise bird, under Paradise.
Sift
v. t.
• To separate with a sieve, as the fine part of a substance from the coarse; as, to sift meal or flour; to sift powder; to sift sand or lime.
• To separate or part as if with a sieve.
• To examine critically or minutely; to scrutinize.
Sifter
n.
• One who, or that which, sifts.
(Zool.) Any lamellirostral bird, as a duck or goose; — so called because it sifts or strains its food from the water and mud by means of the lamell of the beak.
Sig
n.
• Urine.
Sigaultian
a.
(Surg.) Pertaining to Sigault, a French physician. See Symphyseotomy.
Sigger
v. i.
• Same as
Sigh
v. i.
• To inhale a larger quantity of air than usual, and immediately expel it; to make a deep single audible respiration, especially as the result or involuntary expression of fatigue, exhaustion, grief, sorrow, or the like.
• Hence, to lament; to grieve.
• To make a sound like sighing.
v. t.
• To exhale (the breath) in sighs.
• To utter sighs over; to lament or mourn over.
• To express by sighs; to utter in or with sighs.
n.
• A deep and prolonged audible inspiration or respiration of air, as when fatigued or grieved; the act of sighing.
• Figuratively, a manifestation of grief; a lanent.
Sigher
n.
• One who sighs.
Sighing
a.
• Uttering sighs; grieving; lamenting.
Sight
n.
• The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; as, to gain sight of land.
• The power of seeing; the faculty of vision, or of perceiving objects by the instrumentality of the eyes.
• The state of admitting unobstructed vision; visibility; open view; region which the eye at one time surveys; space through which the power of vision extends; as, an object within sight.
• A spectacle; a view; a show; something worth seeing.
• The instrument of seeing; the eye.
• Inspection; examination; as, a letter intended for the sight of only one person.
• Mental view; opinion; judgment; as, in their sight it was harmless.
• A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained; as, the sight of a quadrant.
• A small piece of metal, fixed or movable, on the breech, muzzle, center, or trunnion of a gun, or on the breech and the muzzle of a rifle, pistol, etc., by means of which the eye is guided in aiming.
• In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame or the like, the open space, the opening.
• A great number, quantity, or sum; as, a sight of money.
v. t.
• To get sight of; to see; as, to sight land; to sight a wreck.
• To look at through a sight; to see accurately; as, to sight an object, as a star.
• To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight; as, to sight a rifle or a cannon.
v. i.
(Mil.) To take aim by a sight.
Sighted
a.
• Having sight, or seeing, in a particular manner; — used in composition; as, long-sighted, short-sighted, quick-sighted, sharp-sighted, and the like.
Sightful
a.
• Easily or clearly seen; distinctly visible; perspicuous.
Sightfulness
n.
• The state of being sightful; perspicuity.
Sighting
a & n.
• from Sight, v. t.
Sightless
a.
• Wanting sight; without sight; blind.
• That can not be seen; invisible.
• Offensive or unpleasing to the eye; unsightly; as, sightless stains.
Sightliness
n.
• The state of being sightly; comeliness; conspicuousness.
Sightly
a.
• Pleasing to the sight; comely.
• Open to sight; conspicuous; as, a house stands in a sightly place.
Sightproof
a.
• Undiscoverable to sight.
Sightsman
n.
(Mus.) One who reads or performs music readily at first sight.
Sigil
n.
• A seal; a signature.
Sigillaria
n. pl.
(Rom. Antic.) Little images or figures of earthenware exposed for sale, or given as presents, on the last two days of the Saturnalia; hence, the last two, or the sixth and seventh, days of the Saturnalia.
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of fossil trees principally found in the coal formation; — so named from the seallike leaf scars in vertical rows on the surface.
Sigillarid
n.
(Paleon.) One of an extinct family of cryptagamous trees, including the genus Sigillaria and its allies.
Sigillated
a.
• Decorated by means of stamps; — said of pottery.
Sigillative
a.
• Fit to seal; belonging to a seal; composed of wax.
Sigillum
n.
(Rom. & Old Eng. Law) A seal.
Sigla
n. pl.
• The signs, abbreviations, letters, or characters standing for words, shorthand, etc., in ancient manuscripts, or on coins, medals, etc.
Sigma
n.
• The Greek letter S, or s). It originally had the form of the English C.
Sigmodont
n.
(Zool.) Any one of a tribe (Sigmodontes) of rodents which includes all the indigenous rats and mice of America. So called from the form of the ridges of enamel on the crowns of the worn molars. Also used adjectively.
Sigmoidally
adv.
• In a sigmoidal manner.
Sign
n.
• That by which anything is made known or represented; that which furnishes evidence; a mark; a token; an indication; a proof.
• A remarkable event, considered by the ancients as indicating the will of some deity; a prodigy; an omen
• An event considered by the Jews as indicating the divine will, or as manifesting an interposition of the divine power for some special end; a miracle; a wonder.
• Something serving to indicate the existence, or preserve the memory, of a thing; a token; a memorial; a monument
• Any symbol or emblem which prefigures, typifles, or represents, an idea; a type; hence, sometimes, a picture
• A word or a character regarded as the outward manifestation of thought; as, words are the sign of ideas
• A motion, an action, or a gesture by which a thought is expressed, or a command or a wish made known
• Hence, one of the gestures of pantomime, or of a language of a signs such as those used by the North American Indians, or those used by the deaf and dumb
• A military emblem carried on a banner or a standard
• A lettered board, or other conspicuous notice, placed upon or before a building, room, shop, or office to advertise the business there transacted, or the name of the person or firm carrying it on; a publicly displayed token or notice
(Astron.) The twelfth part of the ecliptic or zodiac
(Alg.) A character indicating the relation of quantities, or an operation performed upon them; as, the sign + (plus); the sign — (minus); the sign of division \'f6, and the like
(Med.) An objective evidence of disease; that is, one appreciable by some one other than the patient
(Mus.) Any character, as a flat, sharp, dot, etc.
(Theol.) That which, being external, stands for, or signifies, something internal or spiritual; — a term used in the Church of England in speaking of an ordinance considered with reference to that which it represents
v. t.
• To represent by a sign; to make known in a typical or emblematic manner, in distinction from speech; to signify.
• To make a sign upon; to mark with a sign.
• To affix a signature to; to ratify by hand or seal; to subscribe in one's own handwriting.
• To assign or convey formally; — used with away.
• To mark; to make distinguishable.
v. i.
• To be a sign or omen.
• To make a sign or signal; to communicate directions or intelligence by signs.
• To write one's name, esp. as a token of assent, responsibility, or obligation.
Signable
a.
• Suitable to be signed; requiring signature; as, a legal document signable by a particular person.
Signal
n.
• A sign made for the purpose of giving notice to a person of some occurence, command, or danger; also, a sign, event, or watchword, which has been agreed upon as the occasion of concerted action.
• A token; an indication; a foreshadowing; a sign.
a.
• Noticeable; distinguished from what is ordinary; eminent; remarkable; memorable; as, a signal exploit; a signal service; a signal act of benevolence.
• Of or pertaining to signals, or the use of signals in conveying information; as, a signal flag or officer.
v. t.
• To communicate by signals; as, to signal orders.
• To notify by a signals; to make a signal or signals to; as, to signal a fleet to anchor.
Signalist
n.
• One who makes signals; one who communicates intelligence by means of signals.
Signality
n.
• The quality or state of being signal or remarkable.
Signalize
v. t.
• To make signal or eminent; to render distinguished from what is common; to distinguish.
• To communicate with by means of a signal; as, a ship signalizes its consort.
• To indicate the existence, presence, or fact of, by a signal; as, to signalize the arrival of a steamer.
Signally
adv.
• In a signal manner; eminently.
Signalman
n.
• A man whose business is to manage or display signals; especially, one employed in setting the signals by which railroad trains are run or warned.
Signalment
n.
• The act of signaling, or of signalizing; hence, description by peculiar, appropriate, or characteristic marks.
Signate
a.
(Zool.) Having definite color markings.
Signation
n.
• Sign given; marking.
Signatory
a.
• Relating to a seal; used in sealing.
• Signing; joining or sharing in a signature; as, signatory powers.
n.
• A signer; one who signs or subscribes; as, a conference of signatories.
Signature
n.
• A sign, stamp, or mark impressed, as by a seal.
• Especially, the name of any person, written with his own hand, employed to signify that the writing which precedes accords with his wishes or intentions; a sign manual; an autograph.
(Physiol.) An outward mark by which internal characteristics were supposed to be indicated.
(Old Med.) A resemblance between the external characters of a disease and those of some physical agent, for instance, that existing between the red skin of scarlet fever and a red cloth; — supposed to indicate this agent in the treatment of the disease.
(Mus.) The designation of the key (when not C major, or its relative, A minor) by means of one or more sharps or flats at the beginning of the staff, immediately after the clef, affecting all notes of the same letter throughout the piece or movement. Each minor key has the same signature as its relative major.
(Print.) A letter or figure placed at the bottom of the first page of each sheet of a book or pamphlet, as a direction to the binder in arranging and folding the sheets.
• The printed sheet so marked, or the form from which it is printed; as, to reprint one or more signatures.
(Pharm.) That part of a prescription which contains the directions to the patient. It is usually prefaced by S or Sig. (an abbreviation for the Latin signa, imperative of signare to sign or mark).
v. t.
• To mark with, or as with, a signature or signatures.
Signaturist
n.
• One who holds to the doctrine of signatures impressed upon objects, indicative of character or qualities.
Signboard
n.
• A board, placed on or before a shop, office, etc., on which ssome notice is given, as the name of a firm, of a business, or the like.
Signer
n.
• One who signs or subscribes his name; as, a memorial with a hundred signers.
Signet
n.
• A seal; especially, in England, the seal used by the sovereign in sealing private letters and grants that pass by bill under the sign manual; — called also privy signet.
Signeted
a.
• Stamped or marked with a signet.
Signifer
a.
• Bearing signs.
Significant
a.
• Fitted or designed to signify or make known somethingl having a meaning; standing as a sign or token; expressive or suggestive; as, a significant word or sound; a significant look.
• Deserving to be considered; important; momentous; as, a significant event.
n.
• That which has significance; a sign; a token; a symbol.
Significantly
adv.
• In a significant manner.
Significate
n.
(Logic) One of several things signified by a common term.
Signification
n.
• The act of signifying; a making known by signs or other means.
• That which is signified or made known; that meaning which a sign, character, or token is intended to convey; as, the signification of words.
Significative
a.
• Betokening or representing by an external sign.
• Having signification or meaning; expressive of a meaning or purpose; significant.
Significator
n.
• One who, or that which, signifies.
Significatory
a.
• Significant.
n.
• That which is significatory.
Significavit
n.
(Eng. Eccl. Law) Formerly, a writ issuing out of chancery, upon certificate given by the ordinary, of a man's standing excommunicate by the space of forty days, for the laying him up in prison till he submit himself to the authority of the church.
Signify
v. t.
• To show by a sign; to communicate by any conventional token, as words, gestures, signals, or the like; to announce; to make known; to declare; to express; as, a signified his desire to be present.
• To mean; to import; to denote; to betoken.
Signior
n.
• Sir; Mr. The English form and pronunciation for the Italian Signor and the Spanish Senor.
Signiorize
v. t.
• To exercise dominion over; to lord it over.
v. i.
• To exercise dominion; to signiorize.
Signiorship
n.
• State or position of a signior.
Signiory
n.
• Same as Seigniory.
Signora
n.
• Madam; Mrs; — a title of address or respect among the Italians.
Signorina
n.
• Miss; — a title of address among the Italians.
Signpost
n.
• A post on which a sign hangs, or on which papers are placed to give public notice of anything.
Sike
n.
• A gutter; a stream, such as is usually dry in summer.
n.
• A sick person.
v. i.
• To sigh.
n.
• A sigh.
Sikhs
n. pl.
• A religious sect noted for warlike traits, founded in the Punjab at the end of the 15th century.
Silage
n. & v.
• Short for Ensilage.
Sile
v. t.
• To strain, as fresh milk.
v. i.
• To drop; to flow; to fall.
n.
• A sieve with fine meshes.
• Filth; sediment.
n.
(Zool.) A young or small herring.
Silence
n.
• The state of being silent; entire absence of sound or noise; absolute stillness.
• Forbearance from, or absence of, speech; taciturnity; muteness.
• Secrecy; as, these things were transacted in silence.
• The cessation of rage, agitation, or tumilt; calmness; quiest; as, the elements were reduced to silence.
• Absence of mention; oblivion.
interj.
• Be silent; — used elliptically for let there be silence, or keep silence.
v. t.
• To compel to silence; to cause to be still; to still; to hush.
• To put to rest; to quiet.
• To restrain from the exercise of any function, privilege of instruction, or the like, especially from the act of preaching; as, to silence a minister of the gospel.
• To cause to cease firing, as by a vigorous cannonade; as, to silence the batteries of an enemy.
Silene
n.
(Bot.) A genus of caryophyllaceous plants, usually covered with a viscid secretion by which insects are caught; catchfly.
Silent
a.
• Free from sound or noise; absolutely still; perfectly quiet.
• Not speaking; indisposed to talk; speechless; mute; taciturn; not loquacious; not talkative.
• Keeping at rest; inactive; calm; undisturbed; as, the wind is silent.
(Pron.) Not pronounced; having no sound; quiescent; as, e is silent in
• Having no effect; not operating; inefficient.
n.
• That which is silent; a time of silence.
Silentiary
n.
• One appointed to keep silence and order in court; also, one sworn not to divulge secre of state.
Silentious
a.
• Habitually silent; taciturn; reticent.
Silently
adv.
• In a silent manner.
Silentness
n.
• State of being silent; silence.
Silenus
n.
(Zool.) See Wanderoo.
Silesia
n.
• A kind of linen cloth, originally made in Silesia, a province of Prussia.
• A twilled cotton fabric, used for dress linings.
Silesian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Silesia.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Silesia.
Silex
n.
(Min.) Silica, SiO2 as found in nature, constituting quarz, and most sands and sandstones. See Silica, and Silicic.
Silhouette
n.
• A representation of the outlines of an object filled in with a black color; a profile portrait in black, such as a shadow appears to be.
v. t.
• To represent by a silhouette; to project upon a background, so as to be like a silhouette.
Silica
n.
(Chem.) Silicon dioxide, SiO. It constitutes ordinary quartz (also opal and tridymite), and is artifically prepared as a very fine, white, tasteless, inodorous powder.
Silicate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of silicic acid.
Silicated
a.
(Chem.) Combined or impregnated with silicon or silica; as, silicated hydrogen; silicated rocks.
Silicatization
n.
• Silicification.
Silicea
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Silicoidea.
Siliceous
a.
• Of or pertaining to silica; containing silica, or partaking of its nature.
Silicic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, silica; specifically, designating compounds of silicon; as, silicic acid.
Silicicalcareous
a.
• Consisting of silica and calcareous matter.
Silicide
n.
(Chem.) A binary compound of silicon, or one regarded as binary.
Siliciferous
a.
• Producing silica; united with silica.
Silicification
n.
(Chem.) Thae act or process of combining or impregnating with silicon or silica; the state of being so combined or impregnated; as, the silicification of wood.
Silicified
a.
(Chem.) Combined or impregnated with silicon or silica, especially the latter; as, silicified wood.
Silicify
v. t.
(Chem.) To convert into, or to impregnate with, silica, or with the compounds of silicon.
v. i.
• To become converted into silica, or to be impregnated with silica.
Silicioidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Silicoidea.
Silicious
a.
• See Siliceous.
Silicispongiae
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Silicoidea.
Silicited
a.
• Silicified.
Silicium
n.
• See Silicon.
Siliciureted
a.
(Old. Chem.) Combined or impregnated with silicon.
Silicle
n.
(Bot.) A seed vessel resembling a silique, but about as broad as it is long. See Silique.
Silicofluoric
a.
(Chem.) Containing, or composed of, silicon and fluorine; especially, denoting the compounds called silicofluorides.
Silicofluoride
n.
(Chem.) A fluosilicate; a salt of silicofluoric acid.
Silicoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive order of Porifera, which includes those that have the skeleton composed mainly of siliceous fibers or spicules.
Silicon
n.
(Chem.) A nonmetalic element analogous to carbon. It always occurs combined in nature, and is artificially obtained in the free state, usually as a dark brown amorphous powder, or as a dark crystalline substance with a meetallic luster. Its oxide is silica, or common quartz, and in this form, or as silicates, it is, next to oxygen, the most abundant element of the earth's crust. Silicon is characteristically the element of the mineral kingdom, as carbon is of the organic world. Symbol Si. Atomic weight 28. Called also silicium.
Silicotungstic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, any one of a series of double acids of silicon and tungsten, known in the free state, and also in their salts (called silicotungstates).
Silicula
n.
(Bot.) A silicle.
Silicule
n.
(Bot.) A silicle.
Siliculose
a.
(Bot.) Bearing silicles; pertaining to, or resembling, silicles.
• Full of, or consisting of, husks; husky.
Siliginose
a.
• Made of fine wheat.
Siling
a. & n.
• from Sile to strain.
Siliqua
n.
(Bot.) Same as Silique.
• A weight of four grains; a carat; — a term used by jewelers, and refiners of gold.
Silique
n.
(Bot.) An oblong or elongated seed vessel, consisting of two valves with a dissepiment between, and opening by sutures at either margin. The seeds are attached to both edges of the dissepiment, alternately upon each side of it.
Siliquosa
n. pl.
(Bot.) A Linnaean order of plants including those which bear siliques.
Siliqyiform
a.
(Bot.) Having the form of a silique.
Silk
n.
• The fine, soft thread produced by various species of caterpillars in forming the cocoons within which the worm is inclosed during the pupa state, especially that produced by the larvae of Bombyx mori.
• Hence, thread spun, or cloth woven, from the above-named material.
• That which resembles silk, as the filiform styles of the female flower of maize.
Silken
a.
• Of or pertaining to silk; made of, or resembling, silk; as, silken cloth; a silken veil.
• Fig.: Soft; delicate; tender; smooth; as, silken language.
• Dressed in silk.
v. t.
• To render silken or silklike.
Silkensides
n.
• Same as Slickensides.
Silkiness
n.
• The quality or state of being silky or silken; softness and smoothness.
• Fig.: Effeminacy; weakness.
Silkman
n.
• A dealer in silks; a silk mercer.
Silkness
n.
• Silkiness.
Silkweed
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genera Asclepias and Acerates whose seed vessels contain a long, silky down; milkweed.
Silkworm
n.
(Zool.) The larva of any one of numerous species of bombycid moths, which spins a large amount of strong silk in constructing its cocoon before changing to a pupa.
Silky
a.
• Of or pertaining to silk; made of, or resembling, silk; silken; silklike; as, a silky luster.
• Hence, soft and smooth; as, silky wine.
• Covered with soft hairs pressed close to the surface, as a leaf; sericeous.
Sill
n.
• The basis or foundation of a thing; especially, a horizontal piece, as a timber, which forms the lower member of a frame, or supports a structure; as, the sills of a house, of a bridge, of a loom, and the like.
• The timber or stone at the foot of a door; the threshold.
• The timber or stone on which a window frame stands; or, the lowest piece in a window frame.
• The floor of a gallery or passage in a mine.
• A piece of timber across the bottom of a canal lock for the gates to shut against.
n.
• The shaft or thill of a carriage.
n.
• A young herring.
Sillabub
n.
• A dish made by mixing wine or cider with milk, and thus forming a soft curd; also, sweetened cream, flavored with wine and beaten to a stiff froth.
Siller
n.
• Silver.
Sillily
adv.
• In a silly manner; foolishly.
Sillimanite
n.
(Min.) Same as Fibrolite.
Silliness
n.
• The quality or state of being silly.
Sillock
n.
(Zool.) The pollock, or coalfish.
Sillon
n.
(Fort.) A work raised in the middle of a wide ditch, to defend it.
Silly
a.
• Happy; fortunate; blessed.
• Harmless; innocent; inoffensive.
• Weak; helpless; frail.
• Rustic; plain; simple; humble.
• Weak in intellect; destitute of ordinary strength of mind; foolish; witless; simple; as, a silly woman.
• Proceeding from want of understanding or common judgment; characterized by weakness or folly; unwise; absurd; stupid; as, silly conduct; a silly question.
Sillyhow
n.
• A caul. See Caul, n., 3.
Silo
n.
• A pit or vat for packing away green fodder for winter use so as to exclude air and outside moisture. See Ensilage.
Silt
n.
• Mud or fine earth deposited from running or standing water.
v. t.
• To choke, fill, or obstruct with silt or mud.
v. i.
• To flow through crevices; to percolate.
Silty
a.
• Full of silt; resembling silt.
Silure
n.
(Zool.) A fish of the genus Silurus, as the sheatfish; a siluroid.
Silurian
a.
(Geol.) Of or pertaining to the country of the ancient Silures; — a term applied to the earliest of the Paleozoic eras, and also to the strata of the era, because most plainly developed in that country.
n.
• The Silurian age.
Siluridan
n.
(Zool.) Any fish of the family Silurid or of the order Siluroidei.
Siluroid
n.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Siluroidei, or Nematognathi, an order of fishes including numerous species, among which are the American catfishes and numerous allied fresh-water species of the Old World, as the sheatfish (Silurus glanis) of Europe.
n.
• A siluroid fish.
Siluroidei
n. pl.
(zool.) An order of fishes, the Nematognathi.
Silurus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of large malacopterygious fishes of the order Siluroidei. They inhabit the inland waters of Europe and Asia.
Silva
n.
(Bot.) The forest trees of a region or country, considered collectively.
• A description or history of the forest trees of a country.
Silvan
a.
• Of or pertaining to woods; composed of woods or groves; woody.
n.
(Old Chem.) See Sylvanium.
Silvanite
n.
(Min.) See Sylvanite.
Silvate
n.
(Chem.) Same as Sylvate.
Silver
n.
(Chem.) A soft white metallic element, sonorous, ductile, very malleable, and capable of a high degree of polish. It is found native, and also combined with sulphur, arsenic, antimony, chlorine, etc., in the minerals argentite, proustite, pyrargyrite, ceragyrite, etc. Silver is one of the "noble" metals, so-called, not being easily oxidized, and is used for coin, jewelry, plate, and a great variety of articles. Symbol Ag (Argentum). Atomic weight 107.7. Specific gravity 10.5.
• Coin made of silver; silver money.
• Anything having the luster or appearance of silver.
• The color of silver.
a.
• Of or pertaining to silver; made of silver; as, silver leaf; a silver cup.
• Resembling silver.
• Bright; resplendent; white
• Precious; costly
• Giving a clear, ringing sound soft and clear
• Sweet; gentle; peaceful
v. t.
• To cover with silver; to give a silvery appearance to by applying a metal of a silvery color; as, to silver a pin; to silver a glass mirror plate with an amalgam of tin and mercury.
• To polish like silver; to impart a brightness to, like that of silver.
• To make hoary, or white, like silver.
v. i.
• To acquire a silvery color.
Silverback
n.
(Zool.) The knot.
Silverberry
n.
(Bot.) A tree or shrub (Elaeagnus argentea) with silvery foliage and fruit.
Silverbill
n.
(Zool.) An Old World finch of the genus Minia, as the M. Malabarica of India, and M. cantans of Africa.
Silverboom
n.
(Bot.) See Leucadendron.
Silverfin
n.
(Zool.) A small North American fresh-water cyprinoid fish (Notropis Whipplei).
Silverfish
n.
(Zool.) The tarpum.
• A white variety of the goldfish.
Silveriness
n.
• The state of being silvery.
Silvering
n.
(Metal.) The art or process of covering metals, wood, paper, glass, etc., with a thin film of metallic silver, or a substance resembling silver; also, the firm do laid on; as, the silvering of a glass speculum.
Silverize
v. t.
• To cover with silver.
Silverless
a.
• Having no silcver; hence, without money; impecunious.
Silverling
n.
• A small silver coin.
Silverly
adv.
• Like silver in appearance or in sound.
Silvern
a.
• Made of silver.
Silversides
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of small fishes of the family Atherinidae, having a silvery stripe along each side of the body. The common species of the American coast (Menidia notata) is very abundant. Called also silverside, sand smelt, friar, tailor, and tinker.
Silversmith
n.
• One whose occupation is to manufacture utensils, ornaments, etc., of silver; a worker in silver.
Silverspot
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of butterflies of the genus Argynnis and allied genera, having silvery spots on the under side of the wings. See Illust. under Aphrodite.
Silverware
n.
• Dishes, vases, ornaments, and utensils of various sorts, made of silver.
Silverweed
n.
(Bot.) A perennial rosaceous herb (Potentilla Anserina) having the leaves silvery white beneath.
Silvery
a.
• Resembling, or having the luster of, silver; grayish white and lustrous; of a mild luster; bright.
• Besprinkled or covered with silver.
• Having the clear, musical tone of silver; soft and clear in sound; as, silvery voices; a silvery laugh.
Silviculture
n.
• See Sylviculture.
Sima
n.
(Arch.) A cyma.
Simagre
n.
• A grimace.
Simar
n.
• A woman's long dress or robe; also light covering; a scarf.
Simarre
• See Simar.
Simblot
n.
• The harness of a drawloom.
Simia
n.
(Zool.) A Linnaean genus of Quadrumana which included the types of numerous modern genera. By modern writers it is usually restricted to the genus which includes the orang-outang.
Simial
a.
(Zool.) Simian; apelike.
Simian
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Simiadae, which, in its widest sense, includes all the Old World apes and monkeys; also, apelike.
n.
• Any Old World monkey or ape.
Similar
a.
• Exactly corresponding; resembling in all respects; precisely like.
• Nearly corresponding; resembling in many respects; somewhat like; having a general likeness.
• Homogenous; uniform.
n.
• That which is similar to, or resembles, something else, as in quality, form, etc.
Similarity
n.
• The quality or state of being similar; likeness; resemblance; as, a similarity of features.
Similarly
adv.
• In a similar manner.
Similary
a.
• Similar.
Similative
a.
• Implying or indicating likeness or resemblance.
Simile
n.
(Rhet.) A word or phrase by which anything is likened, in one or more of its aspects, to something else; a similitude; a poetical or imaginative comparison.
Similiter
n.
(Law) The technical name of the form by which either party, in pleading, accepts the issue tendered by his opponent; — called sometimes a joinder in issue.
Similitude
n.
• The quality or state of being similar or like; resemblance; likeness; similarity; as, similitude of substance.
• The act of likening, or that which likens, one thing to another; fanciful or imaginative comparison; a simile.
• That which is like or similar; a representation, semblance, or copy; a facsimile.
Similitudinary
a.
• Involving or expressing similitude.
Similize
v. t.
• To liken; to compare; as, to similize a person, thing, or act.
Similor
n.
• An alloy of copper and zinc, resembling brass, but of a golden color.
Simitar
n.
• See Scimiter.
Simmer
v. i.
• To boil gently, or with a gentle hissing; to begin to boil.
v. t.
• To cause to boil gently; to cook in liquid heated almost or just to the boiling point.
Simnel
n.
• A kind of cake made of fine flour; a cracknel.
• A kind of rich plum cake, eaten especially on Mid-Lent Sunday.
Simoniac
n.
• One who practices simony, or who buys or sells preferment in the church.
Simoniacal
a.
• Of or pertaining to simony; guilty of simony; consisting of simony.
Simonial
a.
• Simoniacal.
Simonian
n.
• One of the followers of Simon Magus; also, an adherent of certain heretical sects in the early Christian church.
Simonious
a.
• Simoniacal.
Simonist
n.
• One who practices simony.
Simony
n.
• The crime of buying or selling ecclesiastical preferment; the corrupt presentation of any one to an ecclesiastical benefice for money or reward.
Simous
a.
• Having a very flat or snub nose, with the end turned up.
Simpai
n.
(Zool.) A long-tailed monkey (Semnopitchecus melalophus) native of Sumatra. It has a crest of black hair. The forehead and cheeks are fawn color, the upper parts tawny and red, the under parts white. Called also black-crested monkey, and sinpae.
Simper
v. i.
• To smile in a silly, affected, or conceited manner.
• To glimmer; to twinkle.
n.
• A constrained, self-conscious smile; an affected, silly smile; a smirk.
Simperer
n.
• One who simpers.
Simpering
a. &. n.
• from Simper, v.
Simperingly
adv.
• In a simpering manner.
Simple
a.
• Single; not complex; not infolded or entangled; uncombined; not compounded; not blended with something else; not complicated; as, a simple substance; a simple idea; a simple sound; a simple machine; a simple problem; simple tasks.
• Plain; unadorned; as, simple dress.
• Mere; not other than; being only.
• Not given to artifice, stratagem, or duplicity; undesigning; sincere; true.
• Artless in manner; unaffected; unconstrained; natural; inartificial;; straightforward.
• Direct; clear; intelligible; not abstruse or enigmatical; as, a simple statement; simple language.
• Weak in intellect; not wise or sagacious; of but moderate understanding or attainments; hence, foolish; silly.
• Not luxurious; without much variety; plain; as, a simple diet; a simple way of living.
• Humble; lowly; undistinguished.
(BOt.) Without subdivisions; entire; as, a simple stem; a simple leaf.
(Chem.) Not capable of being decomposed into anything more simple or ultimate by any means at present known; elementary; thus, atoms are regarded as simple bodies. Cf. Ultimate, a.
(Min.) Homogenous.
(Zool.) Consisting of a single individual or zooid; as, a simple ascidian; — opposed to compound.
n.
• Something not mixed or compounded.
(Med.) A medicinal plant; — so called because each vegetable was supposed to possess its particular virtue, and therefore to constitute a simple remedy.
(Weaving) A drawloom.
• A part of the apparatus for raising the heddles of a drawloom.
(R. C. Ch.) A feast which is not a double or a semidouble.
v. i.
• To gather simples, or medicinal plants.
Simpleness
n.
• The quality or state of being simple; simplicity.
Simpler
n.
• One who collects simples, or medicinal plants; a herbalist; a simplist.
Simpless
n.
• Simplicity; silliness.
Simpleton
n.
• A person of weak intellect; a silly person.
Simplician
n.
• One who is simple.
Simplicity
n.
• The quality or state of being simple, unmixed, or uncompounded; as, the simplicity of metals or of earths.
• The quality or state of being not complex, or of consisting of few parts; as, the simplicity of a machine.
• Artlessness of mind; freedom from cunning or duplicity; lack of acuteness and sagacity.
• Freedom from artificial ornament, pretentious style, or luxury; plainness; as, simplicity of dress, of style, or of language; simplicity of diet; simplicity of life.
• Freedom from subtlety or abstruseness; clearness; as, the simplicity of a doctrine; the simplicity of an explanation or a demonstration.
• Weakness of intellect; silliness; folly.
Simplification
n.
• The act of simplifying.
Simplify
v. t.
• To make simple; to make less complex; to make clear by giving the explanation for; to show an easier or shorter process for doing or making.
Simplist
n.
• One skilled in simples, or medicinal plants; a simpler.
Simplistic
a.
• Of or pertaining to simples, or a simplist.
Simplity
n.
• Simplicity.
Simploce
n.
(Gram.) See Symploce.
Simply
adv.
• In a simple manner or state; considered in or by itself; without addition; along; merely; solely; barely.
• Plainly; without art or subtlety.
• Weakly; foolishly.
Simulacrum
n.
• A likeness; a semblance; a mock appearance; a sham; — now usually in a derogatory sense.
Simular
n.
• One who pretends to be what he is not; one who, or that which, simulates or counterfeits something; a pretender.
a.
• False; specious; counterfeit.
Simulate
a.
• Feigned; pretended.
v. t.
• To assume the mere appearance of, without the reality; to assume the signs or indications of, falsely; to counterfeit; to feign.
Simulation
n.
• The act of simulating, or assuming an appearance which is feigned, or not true; — distinguished from dissimulation, which disguises or conceals what is true.
Simulator
n.
• One who simulates, or feigns.
Simulatory
a.
• Simulated, or capable of being simulated.
Simultaneity
n.
• The quality or state of being simultaneous; simultaneousness.
Simultaneous
a.
• Existing, happening, or done, at the same time; as, simultaneous events.
Simulty
n.
• Private grudge or quarrel; as, domestic simulties.
Sin
adv., prep., & conj.
• Old form of Since.
n.
• Transgression of the law of God; disobedience of the divine command; any violation of God's will, either in purpose or conduct; moral deficiency in the character; iniquity; as, sins of omission and sins of commission.
• An offense, in general; a violation of propriety; a misdemeanor; as, a sin against good manners.
• A sin offering; a sacrifice for sin.
• An embodiment of sin; a very wicked person.(R. C. Ch.)
v. i.
• To depart voluntarily from the path of duty prescribed by God to man; to violate the divine law in any particular, by actual transgression or by the neglect or nonobservance of its injunctions; to violate any known rule of duty; — often followed by against.
• To violate human rights, law, or propriety; to commit an offense; to trespass; to transgress.
Sinalbin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside found in the seeds of white mustard (Brassica alba, formerly Sinapis alba), and extracted as a white crystalline substance.
Sinamine
n.
(Chem.) A bitter white crystalline nitrogenous substance, obtained indirectly from oil of mustard and ammonia; — called also allyl melamine.
Sinapate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of sinapic acid.
Sinapic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to sinapine; specifically, designating an acid (C11H12O5) related to gallic acid, and obtained by the decomposition of sinapine, as a white crystalline substance.
Sinapine
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid occuring in the seeds of mustard. It is extracted, in combination with sulphocyanic acid, as a white crystalline substance, having a hot, bitter taste. When sinapine is isolated it is unstable and undergoes decomposition.
Sinapis
n.
(Bot.) A disused generic name for mustard; — now called Brassica.
Sinapisin
n.
(Chem.) A substance extracted from mustard seed and probably identical with sinalbin.
Sinapism
n.
(Med.) A plaster or poultice composed principally of powdered mustard seed, or containing the volatile oil of mustard seed. It is a powerful irritant.
Sinapoleic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to mustard oil; specifically, designating an acid of the oleic acid series said to occur in mistard oil.
Sinapoline
n.
(Chem.) A nitrogenous base, CO.(NH.C3H5)2, related to urea, extracted from mustard oil, and also produced artifically, as a white crystalline substance; — called also diallyl urea.
Sincaline
n.
(Chem.) Choline.
Since
adv.
• From a definite past time until now; as, he went a month ago, and I have not seen him since.
• In the time past, counting backward from the present; before this or now; ago.
• When or that.
prep.
• From the time of; in or during the time subsequent to; subsequently to; after; — usually with a past event or time for the object.
conj.
• Seeing that; because; considering; — formerly followed by that.
Sincere
a.
• Pure; unmixed; unadulterated.
• Whole; perfect; unhurt; uninjured.
• Being in reality what it appears to be; having a character which corresponds with the appearance; not falsely assumed; genuine; true; real; as, a sincere desire for knowledge; a sincere contempt for meanness.
• Honest; free from hypocrisy or dissimulation; as, a sincere friend; a sincere person.
Sincerely
adv.
• In a sincere manner.
• Purely; without alloy.
• Honestly; unfeignedly; without dissimulation; as, to speak one's mind sincerely; to love virtue sincerely.
Sincereness
n.
• Same as Sincerity.
Sincerity
n.
• The quality or state of being sincere; honesty of mind or intention; freedom from simulation, hypocrisy, disguise, or false pretense; sincereness.
Sinch
n.
• A saddle girth made of leather, canvas, woven horsehair, or woven grass.
v. t.
• To gird with a sinch; to tighten the sinch or girth of (a saddle); as, to sinch up a sadle.
Sincipital
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sinciput; being in the region of the sinciput.
Sinciput
n.
(Anat.) The fore part of the head.
(Zool.) The part of the head of a bird between the base of the bill and the vertex.
Sindon
n.
• A wrapper.
(Surg.) A small rag or pledget introduced into the hole in the cranium made by a trephine.
Sine
n.
(Trig.) The length of a perpendicular drawn from one extremity of an arc of a circle to the diameter drawn through the other extremity.
• The perpendicular itself. See Sine of angle, below.
prep.
• Without.
Sinecural
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sinecure; being in the nature of a sinecure.
Sinecure
n.
• An ecclesiastical benefice without the care of souls.
• Any office or position which requires or involves little or no responsibility, labor, or active service.
v. t.
• To put or place in a sinecure.
Sinecurism
n.
• The state of having a sinecure.
Sinecurist
n.
• One who has a sinecure.
Sinew
n.
(Anat.) A tendon or tendonous tissue. See Tendon.
• Muscle; nerve.
• Fig.: That which supplies strength or power.
v. t.
• To knit together, or make strong with, or as with, sinews.
Sinewed
a.
• Furnished with sinews; as, a strong-sinewed youth.
• Fig.: Equipped; strengthened.
Sinewiness
n.
• Quality of being sinewy.
Sinewish
a.
• Sinewy.
Sinewless
a.
• Having no sinews; hence, having no strength or vigor.
Sinewous
a.
• Sinewy.
Sinewy
a.
• Pertaining to, consisting of, or resembling, a sinew or sinews.
• Well braced with, or as if with, sinews; nervous; vigorous; strong; firm; tough; as, the sinewy Ajax.
Sinful
a.
• Tainted with, or full of, sin; wicked; iniquitous; criminal; unholy; as, sinful men; sinful thoughts.
Sing
v. i.
• To utter sounds with musical inflections or melodious modulations of voice, as fancy may dictate, or according to the notes of a song or tune, or of a given part (as alto, tenor, etc.) in a chorus or concerted piece.
• To utter sweet melodious sounds, as birds do.
• To make a small, shrill sound; as, the air sings in passing through a crevice.
• To tell or relate something in numbers or verse; to celebrate something in poetry.
• Ti cry out; to complain.
v. t.
• To utter with musical infections or modulations of voice.
• To celebrate is song; to give praises to in verse; to relate or rehearse in numbers, verse, or poetry.
• To influence by singing; to lull by singing; as, to sing a child to sleep
• To accompany, or attend on, with singing.
Singe
v. t.
• To burn slightly or superficially; to burn the surface of; to burn the ends or outside of; as, to singe the hair or the skin.
• To remove the nap of (cloth), by passing it rapidly over a red-hot bar, or over a flame, preliminary to dyeing it.
• To remove the hair or down from (a plucked chicken or the like) by passing it over a flame.
n.
• A burning of the surface; a slight burn.
Singer
n.
• One who, or that which, singes.
• One employed to singe cloth
• A machine for singeing cloth.
n.
• One who sings; especially, one whose profession is to sing.
Singeress
n.
• A songstress.
Singhalese
n. & a.
(Ethnol.) Same as Cingalese.
Singing
a. & n.
• from Sing, v.
Singingly
adv.
• With sounds like singing; with a kind of tune; in a singing tone.
Single
a.
• One only, as distinguished from more than one; consisting of one alone; individual; separate; as, a single star.
• Alone; having no companion.
• Hence, unmarried; as, a single man or woman.
• Not doubled, twisted together, or combined with others; as, a single thread; a single strand of a rope.
• Performed by one person, or one on each side; as, a single combat.
• Uncompounded; pure; unmixed.
• Not deceitful or artful; honest; sincere.
• Simple; not wise; weak; silly.
v. t.
• To select, as an individual person or thing, from among a number; to choose out from others; to separate.
• To sequester; to withdraw; to retire.
• To take alone, or one by one.
v. i.
• To take the irrregular gait called single-foot;- said of a horse. See Single-foot.
n.
• A unit; one; as, to score a single.
• The reeled filaments of silk, twisted without doubling to give them firmness.
• A handful of gleaned grain.
(Law Tennis) A game with but one player on each side; — usually in the plural.
(Baseball) A hit by a batter which enables him to reach first base only.
Singleness
n.
• The quality or state of being single, or separate from all others; the opposite of doubleness, complication, or multiplicity.
• Freedom from duplicity, or secondary and selfish ends; purity of mind or purpose; simplicity; sincerity; as, singleness of purpose; singleness of heart.
Singles
n. pl.
• See Single, n., 2.
Singlestick
n.
• In England and Scotland, a cudgel used in fencing or fighting; a backsword.
• The game played with singlesticks, in which he who first brings blood from his adversary's head is pronounced victor; backsword; cudgeling.
Singlet
n.
• An unlined or undyed waistcoat; a single garment; — opposed to doublet.
Singleton
n.
• In certain games at cards, as whist, a single card of any suit held at the deal by a player; as, to lead a singleton.
Singletree
n.
• The pivoted or swinging bar to which the traces of a harnessed horse are fixed; a whiffletree.
Singly
adv.
• Individually; particularly; severally; as, to make men singly and personally good.
• Only; by one's self; alone.
• Without partners, companions, or associates; single-handed; as, to attack another singly.
• Honestly; sincerely; simply.
• Singularly; peculiarly.
Singsong
n.
• Bad singing or poetry.
• A drawling or monotonous tone, as of a badly executed song.
a.
• Drawling; monotonous.
v. i.
• To write poor poetry.
Singster
n.
• A songstress.
Singular
a.
• Separate or apart from others; single; distinct.
• Engaged in by only one on a side; single.
(Logic) Existing by itself; single; individual.
(Law) Each; individual; as, to convey several parcels of land, all and singular.
(Gram.) Denoting one person or thing; as, the singular number; — opposed to dual and plural.
• Standing by itself; out of the ordinary course; unusual; uncommon; strange; as, a singular phenomenon.
• Distinguished as existing in a very high degree; rarely equaled; eminent; extraordinary; exceptional; as, a man of singular gravity or attainments.
• Departing from general usage or expectations; odd; whimsical; — often implying disapproval or consure.
• Being alone; belonging to, or being, that of which there is but one; unique.
n.
• An individual instance; a particular.
(Gram) The singular number, or the number denoting one person or thing; a word in the singular number.
Singularist
n.
• One who affects singularity.
Singularity
n.
• The quality or state of being singular; some character or quality of a thing by which it is distinguished from all, or from most, others; peculiarity.
• Anything singular, rare, or curious.
• Possession of a particular or exclusive privilege, prerogative, or distinction.
• Celibacy.
Singularize
v. t.
• To make singular or single; to distinguish.
Singularly
adv.
• In a singular manner; in a manner, or to a degree, not common to others; extraordinarily; as, to be singularly exact in one's statements; singularly considerate of others.
• Strangely; oddly; as, to behave singularly.
• So as to express one, or the singular number.
Singult
n.
• A sigh or sobbing; also, a hiccough.
Singultous
a.
(Med.) Relating to, or affected with, hiccough.
Singultus
n.
(Med.) Hiccough.
Siniate
a.
• Having the margin alternately curved inward and outward; having rounded lobes separated by rounded sinuses; sinuous; wavy.
Sinical
a.
(Trig.) Of or pertaining to a sine; employing, or founded upon, sines; as, a sinical quadrant.
Sinigrin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside found in the seeds of black mustard (Brassica nigra, formerly Sinapis nigra) It resembles sinalbin, and consists of a potassium salt of myronic acid.
Sinister
a.
• On the left hand, or the side of the left hand; left; — opposed to dexter, or right.
• Unlucky; inauspicious; disastrous; injurious; evil; — the left being usually regarded as the unlucky side; as, sinister influences.
• Wrong, as springing from indirection or obliquity; perverse; dishonest; corrupt; as, sinister aims.
• Indicative of lurking evil or harm; boding covert danger; as, a sinister countenance.
Sinisterly
adv.
• In a sinister manner.
Sinistrad
adv.
(Anat. & Zool.) Toward the left side; sinistrally.
Sinistral
a.
• Of or pertaining to the left, inclining to the left; sinistrous; — opposed to dextral.
(Zool.) Having the whorls of the spire revolving or rising to the left; reversed; — said of certain spiral shells.
Sinistrality
n.
• The quality or state of being sinistral.
Sinistrally
adv.
• Toward the left; in a sinistral manner.
Sinistrin
n.
(Chem.) A mucilaginous carbohydrate, resembling achroodextrin, extracted from squill as a colorless amorphous substance; — so called because it is levorotatory.
Sinistrorsal
a.
• Rising spirally from right to left (of the spectator); sinistrorse.
Sinistrorse
a.
• Turning to the left (of the spectator) in the ascending line; — the opposite of dextrorse. See Dextrorse.
Sinistrous
a.
• Being on the left side; inclined to the left; sinistral.
• Wrong; absurd; perverse.
Sinistrously
adv.
• In a sinistrous manner; perversely; wrongly; unluckily.
• With a tendency to use the left hand.
Sink
v. i.
• To fall by, or as by, the force of gravity; to descend lower and lower; to decline gradually; to subside; as, a stone sinks in water; waves rise and sink; the sun sinks in the west.
• To enter deeply; to fall or retire beneath or below the surface; to penetrate.
• Hence, to enter so as to make an abiding impression; to enter completely.
• To be overwhelmed or depressed; to fall slowly, as so the ground, from weakness or from an overburden; to fail in strength; to decline; to decay; to decrease.
• To decrease in volume, as a river; to subside; to become diminished in volume or in apparent height.
v. t.
• To cause to sink; to put under water; to immerse or submerge in a fluid; as, to sink a ship.
• Figuratively: To cause to decline; to depress; to degrade; hence, to ruin irretrievably; to destroy, as by drowping; as, to sink one's reputation.
• To make (a depression) by digging, delving, or cutting, etc.; as, to sink a pit or a well; to sink a die.
• To bring low; to reduce in quantity; to waste.
• To conseal and appropriate.
• To keep out of sight; to suppress; to ignore.
• To reduce or extinguish by payment; as, to sink the national debt.
n.
• A drain to carry off filthy water; a jakes.
• A shallow box or vessel of wood, stone, iron, or other material, connected with a drain, and used for receiving filthy water, etc., as in a kitchen.
• A hole or low place in land or rock, where waters sink and are lost; — called also sink hole.
Sinker
n.
• One who, or that which, sinks.
• A weight on something, as on a fish line, to sink it
• In knitting machines, one of the thin plates, blades, or other devices, that depress the loops upon or between the needles.
Sinking
a & n.
• from Sink.
Sinless
a.
• Free from sin.
Sinner
n.
• One who has sinned; especially, one who has sinned without repenting; hence, a persistent and incorrigible transgressor; one condemned by the law of God.
v. i.
• To act as a sinner.
Sinneress
n.
• A woman who sins.
Sinnet
n.
• See Sennit .
Sinological
a.
• Relating to the Chinese language or literature.
Sinologist
n.
• A sinilogue.
Sinologue
n.
• A student of Chinese; one versed in the Chinese language, literature, and history.
Sinology
n.
• That branch of systemized knowledge which treats of the Chinese, their language, literature, etc.
Sinoper
n.
(Min.) Sinople.
Sinopite
n.
(Min.) A brickred ferruginous clay used by the ancients for red paint.
Sinople
n.
(Min.) Ferruginous quartz, of a blood-red or brownish red color, sometimes with a tinge of yellow.
n.
(Her.) The tincture vert; green.
Sinque
n.
• See Cinque.
Sinsring
n.
(Zool.) Same as Banxring.
Sinter
n.
(Min.) Dross, as of iron; the scale which files from iron when hammered; — applied as a name to various minerals.
Sintoc
n.
• A kind of spice used in the East Indies, consisting of the bark of a species of Cinnamomum.
Sinuate
v. i.
• To bend or curve in and out; to wind; to turn; to be sinusous.
Sinuated
a.
• Same as Sinuate.
Sinuation
n.
• A winding or bending in and out.
Sinuose
a.
• Sinuous.
Sinuosity
n.
• Quality or state of being sinuous.
• A bend, or a series of bends and turns; a winding, or a series of windings; a wave line; a curve.
Sinuous
a.
• Bending in and out; of a serpentine or undulating form; winding; crooked.
Sinupalliate
a.
(Zool.) Having a pallial sinus. See under Sinus.
Sinus
n.
• An opening; a hollow; a bending.
• A bay of the sea; a recess in the shore.
(Anat. & Zool.) A cavity; a depression.
• A cavity in a bone or other part, either closed or with a narrow opening
• A dilated vessel or canal.
(Med.) A narrow, elongated cavity, in which pus is collected; an elongated abscess with only a small orifice.
(Bot.) A depression between adjoining lobes.
Sinusoid
n.
(Geom.) The curve whose ordinates are proportional to the sines of the abscissas, the equation of the curve being y = a sin x. It is also called the curve of sines.
Sinusoidal
a.
(Geom.) Of or pertaining to a sinusoid; like a sinusoid.
Siogoon
n.
• See Shogun.
Siogoonate
n.
• See Shogunate.
Sioux
n. sing. & pl.
(Ethnol.) See Dakotas.
Sip
v. i.
• See Seep.
Sip
v. t.
• To drink or imbibe in small quantities; especially, to take in with the lips in small quantities, as a liquid; as, to sip tea.
• To draw into the mouth; to suck up; as, a bee sips nectar from the flowers.
• To taste the liquor of; to drink out of.
v. i.
• To drink a small quantity; to take a fluid with the lips; to take a sip or sips of something.
n.
• The act of sipping; the taking of a liquid with the lips.
• A small draught taken with the lips; a slight taste.
Sipage
n.
• See Seepage.
Siphilis
n.
(Med.) Syphilis.
Siphoid
n.
• A siphon bottle. See under Siphon, n.
Siphon
n.
• A device, consisting of a pipe or tube bent so as to form two branches or legs of unequal length, by which a liquid can be transferred to a lower level, as from one vessel to another, over an intermediate elevation, by the action of the pressure of the atmosphere in forcing the liquid up the shorter branch of the pipe immersed in it, while the continued excess of weight of the liquid in the longer branch (when once filled) causes a continuous flow. The flow takes place only when the discharging extremity of the pipe ia lower than the higher liquid surface, and when no part of the pipe is higher above the surface than the same liquid will rise by atmospheric pressure; that is, about 33 feet for water, and 30 inches for mercury, near the sea level.
(Zool.) One of the tubes or folds of the mantle border of a bivalve or gastropod mollusk by which water is conducted into the gill cavity. See Illust. under Mya, and Lamellibranchiata.
• The anterior prolongation of the margin of any gastropod shell for the protection of the soft siphon.
• The tubular organ through which water is ejected from the gill cavity of a cephaloid. It serves as a locomotive organ, by guiding and confining the jet of water. Called also siphuncle. See Illust. under Loligo, and Dibranchiata.
• The siphuncle of a cephalopod shell.
• The sucking proboscis of certain parasitic insects and crustaceans.
• A sproutlike prolongation in front of the mouth of many gephyreans.
• A tubular organ connected both with the esophagus and the intestine of certain sea urchins and annelids.
• A siphon bottle.
v. t.
(Chem.) To convey, or draw off, by means of a siphon, as a liquid from one vessel to another at a lower level.
Siphonage
n.
• The action of a siphon.
Siphonal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a siphon; resembling a siphon.
Siphonarid
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of limpet-shaped pulmonate gastropods of the genus Siphonaria. They cling to rocks between high and low water marks and have both lunglike organs and gills.
Siphonata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of bivalve mollusks in which the posterior mantle border is prolonged into two tubes or siphons. Called also Siphoniata. See Siphon, 2 (a), and Quahaug.
Siphonate
a.
• Having a siphon or siphons.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Siphonata.
Siphonet
n.
(Zool.) One of the two dorsal tubular organs on the hinder part of the abdomen of aphids. They give exit to the honeydew. See Illust. under Aphis.
Siphonia
n.
(Bot.) A former name for a euphorbiaceous genus (Hevea) of South American trees, the principal source of caoutchouc.
Siphoniata
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Siphonata.
Siphonic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a siphon.
Siphonifer
n.
(Zool.) Any cephalopod having a siphonate shell.
Siphoniferous
a.
(Zool.) Siphon-bearing, as the shell of the nautilus and other cephalopods.
Siphonium
n.
(Anat.) A bony tube which, in some birds, connects the tympanium with the air chambers of the articular piece of the mandible.
Siphonobranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of gastropods having the mantle border, on one or both sides, prolonged in the form of a spout through which water enters the gill cavity. The shell itself is not always siphonostomatous in this group.
Siphonobranchiate
a.
(Zool.) Having a siphon, or siphons, to convey water to the gills; belonging or pertaining to the Siphonobranchiata.
n.
• One of the Siphonobranchiata.
Siphonoglyphe
n.
(Zool.) A gonidium.
Siphonophora
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of pelagic Hydrozoa including species which form complex free-swimming communities composed of numerous zooids of various kinds, some of which act as floats or as swimming organs, others as feeding or nutritive zooids, and others as reproductive zooids. See Illust. under Physallia, and Porpita.
Siphonophoran
a.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Siphonophora.
n.
• One of the Siphonophora.
Siphonophore
n.
(Zool.) One of the Siphonophora.
Siphonopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Scaphopoda including those in which the foot terminates in a circular disk.
Siphonostomata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of parasitic copepod Crustacea including a large number of species that are parasites of fishes, as the lerneans. They have a mouth adapted to suck blood.
• An artificial division of gastropods including those that have siphonostomatous shells.
Siphonostomatous
a.
(Zool.) Having the front edge of the aperture of the shell prolonged in the shape of a channel for the protection of the siphon; — said of certain gastropods.
• Pertaining to the Siphonostomata.
Siphonostome
n.
(Zool.) Any parasitic entomostracan of the tribe Siphonostomata.
• A siphonostomatous shell.
Siphorhinal
a.
(Zool.) Having tubular nostrils, as the petrels.
Siphorhinian
n.
(Zool.) A siphorhinal bird.
Siphuncle
n.
(Zool.) The tube which runs through the partitions of chambered cephalopod shells.
Siphuncled
a.
(Zool.) Having a siphuncle; siphunculated.
Siphuncular
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the siphuncle.
Siphunculated
a.
(Zool.) Having a siphuncle.
Sipid
a.
• Having a taste or flavorl savory; sapid.
Sipper
n.
• One whi sips.
Sippet
n.
• A small sop; a small, thin piece of toasted bread soaked in milk, broth, or the like; a small piece of toasted or fried bread cut into some special shape and used for garnishing.
Sipple
v. i.
• To sip often.
Sippling
a.
• Sipping often.
Sipunculacea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of Gephyrea, including those which have the body unarmed and the intestine opening anteriorly.
Sipunculoid
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the Sipunculoidea.
n.
• One of the Sipunculoidea.
Sipunculoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Gephyrea.
• In a restricted sense, same as Sipunculacea.
Sir
n.
• A man of social authority and dignity; a lord; a master; a gentleman; — in this sense usually spelled sire.
• A title prefixed to the Christian name of a knight or a baronet.
• An English rendering of the LAtin Dominus, the academical title of a bachelor of arts; — formerly colloquially, and sometimes contemptuously, applied to the clergy.
• A respectful title, used in addressing a man, without being prefixed to his name; — used especially in speaking to elders or superiors; sometimes, also, used in the way of emphatic formality.
Siraskier
n.
• See Seraskier.
Siraskierate
n.
• See Seraskierate.
Sirbonian
a.
• See Serbonian.
Sircar
n.
• A Hindoo clerk or accountant.
• A district or province; a circar.
• The government; the supreme authority of the state.
Sirdar
n
• A native chief in Hindostan; a headman.
Sire
n.
• A lord, master, or other person in authority. See Sir.
• A tittle of respect formerly used in speaking to elders and superiors, but now only in addressing a sovereign.
• A father; the head of a family; the husband.
• A creator; a maker; an author; an originator.
• The male parent of a beast; — applied especially to horses; as, the horse had a good sire.
v. t.
• To beget; to procreate; — used of beasts, and especially of stallions.
Siredon
n.
(Zool.) The larval form of any salamander while it still has external gills; especially, one of those which, like the axolotl (Amblystoma Mexicanum), sometimes lay eggs while in this larval state, but which under more favorable conditions lose their gills and become normal salamanders. See also Axolotl.
Siren
n.
(Class. Myth.) One of three sea nymphs, — or, according to some writers, of two, — said to frequent an island near the coast of Italy, and to sing with such sweetness that they lured mariners to destruction.
• An enticing, dangerous woman.
• Something which is insidious or deceptive.
• A mermaid.
(Zool.) Any long, slender amphibian of the genus Siren or family Sirenidae, destitute of hind legs and pelvis, and having permanent external gills as well as lungs. They inhabit the swamps, lagoons, and ditches of the Southern United States. The more common species (Siren lacertina) is dull lead-gray in color, and becames two feet long.
(Acoustics) An instrument for producing musical tones and for ascertaining the number of sound waves or vibrations per second which produce a note of a given pitch. The sounds are produced by a perforated rotating disk or disks. A form with two disks operated by steam or highly compressed air is used sounding an alarm to vessels in fog.
a.
• Of or pertaining to a siren; bewitching, like a siren; fascinating; alluring; as, a siren song.
Sirene
n.
• See Siren, 6.
Sirenia
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of large aquatic herbivorous mammals, including the manatee, dugong, rytina, and several fossil genera.
Sirenian
n.
(Zool.) Any species of Sirenia.
Sirenical
a.
• Like, or appropriate to, a siren; fascinating; deceptive.
Sirenize
v. i.
• To use the enticements of a siren; to act as a siren; to fascinate.
Siriasis
n.
(Med.) A sunstroke.
• The act of exposing to a sun bath. Cf. Insolation.
Sirius
n.
(Astron.) The Dog Star. See Dog Star.
Sirkeer
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of Asiatic cuckoos of the genus Taccocua, as the Bengal sirkeer (T. sirkee).
Sirloin
n.
• A loin of beef, or a part of a loin.
Sirname
n.
• See Surname.
Siroc
n.
• See Sirocco.
Sirocco
n.
• An oppressive, relaxing wind from the Libyan deserts, chiefly experienced in Italy, Malta, and Sicily.
Sirrah
n.
• A term of address implying inferiority and used in anger, contempt, reproach, or disrespectful familiarity, addressed to a man or boy, but sometimes to a woman. In sililoquies often preceded by ah. Not used in the plural.
Sirt
n.
• A quicksand.
Sirvente
n.
• A peculiar species of poetry, for the most part devoted to moral and religious topics, and commonly satirical, — often used by the troubadours of the Middle Ages.
Sis
n.
• A colloquial abbreviation of Sister.
n.
• Six. See Sise.
Siscowet
n.
(Zool.) A large, fat variety of the namaycusa found in Lake Superior; — called also siskawet, siskiwit.
Sise
n.
• An assize.
n.
• Six; the highest number on a die; the cast of six in throwing dice.
Sisel
n.
(Zool.) The suslik.
Siser
n.
• Cider. See Sicer.
Siskin
n.
(Zool.) A small green and yellow European finch (Spinus spinus, or Carduelis spinus); — called also aberdevine.
• The American pinefinch (S. pinus); — called also pine siskin. See Pinefinch.
Siskiwit
n.
(Zool.) The siscowet.
Sismograph
n.
• See Seismograph.
Sismometer
n.
• See Seismometer.
Siss
v. i.
• To make a hissing sound; as, a flatiron hot enough to siss when touched with a wet finger.
n.
• A hissing noise.
Sissoo
n.
(Bot.) A leguminous tree (Dalbergia Sissoo) of the northern parts of India; also, the dark brown compact and durable timber obtained from it. It is used in shipbuilding and for gun carriages, railway ties, etc.
Sist
v. t.
(Scots Law) To stay, as judicial proceedings; to delay or suspend; to stop.
• To cause to take a place, as at the bar of a court; hence, to cite; to summon; to bring into court.
n.
(Scots Law) A stay or suspension of proceedings; an order for a stay of proceedings.
Sister
n.
• A female who has the same parents with another person, or who has one of them only. In the latter case, she is more definitely called a half sister. The correlative of brother.
• A woman who is closely allied to, or assocciated with, another person, as in the sdame faith, society, order, or community.
• One of the same kind, or of the same condition; — generally used adjectively; as, sister fruits.
v. t.
• To be sister to; to resemble closely.
Sisterhood
n.
• The state or relation of being a sister; the office or duty of a sister.
• A society of sisters; a society of women united in one faith or order; sisters, collectively.
Sistering
a.
• Contiguous.
Sisterly
a.
• Like a sister; becoming a sister, affectionate; as, sisterly kindness; sisterly remorse.
Sistine
a.
• Of or pertaining to Pope Sixtus.
Sistren
n. pl.
• Sisters.
Sistrum
(Mus.) An instrument consisting of a thin metal frame, through which passed a number of metal rods, and furnished with a handle by which it was shaken and made to rattle. It was peculiarly Egyptian, and used especially in the worship of Isis. It is still used in Nubia.
Sisyphean
a.
• Relating to Sisyphus; incessantly recurring; as, Sisyphean labors.
Sisyphus
n.
(Class. Myth.) A king of Corinth, son of Aolus, famed for his cunning. He was killed by Theseus, and in the lower world was condemned by Pluto to roll to the top of a hill a huge stone, which constantly rolled back again, making his task incessant.
Sit
• obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of Sit, for sitteth.
v. i.
• To rest upon the haunches, or the lower extremity of the trunk of the body; — said of human beings, and sometimes of other animals; as, to sit on a sofa, on a chair, or on the ground.
• To perch; to rest with the feet drawn up, as birds do on a branch, pole, etc.
• To remain in a state of repose; to rest; to abide; to rest in any position or condition.
• To lie, rest, or bear; to press or weigh; — with on; as, a weight or burden sits lightly upon him.
• To be adjusted; to fit; as, a coat sts well or ill.
• To suit one well or ill, as an act; to become; to befit; — used impersonally.
• To cover and warm eggs for hatching, as a fowl; to brood; to incubate.
• To have position, as at the point blown from; to hold a relative position; to have direction.
• To occupy a place or seat as a member of an official body; as, to sit in Congress.
• To hold a session; to be in session for official business; — said of legislative assemblies, courts, etc.; as, the court sits in January; the aldermen sit to-night.
• To take a position for the purpose of having some artistic representation of one's self made, as a picture or a bust; as, to sit to a painter.
v. t.
• To sit upon; to keep one's seat upon; as, he sits a horse well.
• To cause to be seated or in a sitting posture; to furnish a seat to; — used reflexively.
• To suit (well or ill); to become.
Site
n.
• The place where anything is fixed; situation; local position; as, the site of a city or of a house.
• A place fitted or chosen for any certain permanent use or occupation; as, a site for a church.
• The posture or position of a thing.
Sited
a.
• Having a site; situated.
Sitfast
a.
• Fixed; stationary; immovable.
n.
(Far.) A callosity with inflamed edges, on the back of a horse, under the saddle.
Sith
prep., adv., & conj.
• Since; afterwards; seeing that.
Sithe
v. i.
• To sigh.
n.
• A scythe.
v. t.
• To cut with a scythe; to scythe.
Sithed
a.
• Scythed.
Sitheman
n.
• A mower.
Sithen
adv. & conj.
• Since; afterwards. See 1st Sith.
Siththen
adv. & conj.
• See Sithen.
Sitology
n.
• A treatise on the regulation of the diet; dietetics.
Sitophobia
n.
(Med.) A version to food; refusal to take nourishment.
Sitten
• p. p. of Sit, for sat.
Sitter
n.
• One who sits; esp., one who sits for a portrait or a bust.
• A bird that sits or incubates.
Sittine
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Sittidae, or nuthatches.
Sitting
a.
• Being in the state, or the position, of one who, or that which, sits.
n.
• The state or act of one who sits; the posture of one who occupies a seat.
• A seat, or the space occupied by or allotted for a person, in a church, theater, etc.; as, the hall has 800 sittings.
• The act or time of sitting, as to a portrait painter, photographer, etc.
• The actual presence or meeting of any body of men in their seats, clothed with authority to transact business; a session; as, a sitting of the judges of the King's Bench, or of a commission.
• The time during which one sits while doing something, as reading a book, playing a game, etc.
• A brooding over eggs for hatching, as by fowls.
Situate
v. t.
• To place.
Situation
n.
• Manner in which an object is placed; location, esp. as related to something else; position; locality site; as, a house in a pleasant situation.
• Position, as regards the conditions and circumstances of the case.
• Relative position; circumstances; temporary state or relation at a moment of action which excites interest, as of persons in a dramatic scene.
• Permanent position or employment; place; office; as, a situation in a store; a situation under government.
Situs
n.
(Bot.) The method in which the parts of a plant are arranged; also, the position of the parts.
Siva
n.
(Hindoo Myth.) One of the triad of Hindoo gods. He is the avenger or destroyer, and in modern worship symbolizes the reproductive power of nature.
Sivan
n.
• The third month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year; — supposed to correspond nearly with our month of June.
Sivatherium
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of very large extinct ruminants found in the Tertiary formation of India. The snout was prolonged in the form of a proboscis. The male had four horns, the posterior pair being large and branched. It was allied to the antelopes, but very much larger than any exsisting species.
Siver
v. i.
• To simmer
Sivvens
n.
(Med.) See Sibbens
Siwin
n.
(Zool.) Same as Sewen.
Six
a.
• One more than five; twice three; as, six yards.
n.
• The number greater by a unit than five; the sum of three and three; six units or objects.
• A symbol representing six units, as 6, vi., or VI.
Sixfold
a.
• Six times repeated; six times as much or as many.
Sixpence
n.
• An English silver coin of the value of six pennies; half a shilling, or about twelve cents.
Sixpenny
a.
• Of the value of, or costing, sixpence; as, a sixpenny loaf.
Sixscore
a. & n.
• Six times twenty; one hundred and twenty.
Sixteen
a.
n.
• The number greater by a unit than fifteen; the sum of ten and six; sixteen units or objects.
• A symbol representing sixteen units, as 16, or xvi.
Sixteenmo
n.
• See Sextodecimo.
Sixteenth
a.
• Sixth after the tenth; next in order after the fifteenth.
• Constituting or being one of sixteen equal parts into which anything is divided.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by sixteen; one of sixteen equal parts of one whole.
• The next in order after the fifteenth; the sixth after the tenth.
(Mus.) An interval comprising two octaves and a second.
Sixth
a.
• First after the fifth; next in order after the fifth.
• Constituting or being one of six equal parts into which anything is divided.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by six; one of six equal parts which form a whole.
• The next in order after the fifth.
(Mus.) The interval embracing six diatonic degrees of the scale.
Sixthly
adv.
• In the sixth place.
Sixtieth
a.
• Next in order after the fifty-ninth.
• Constituting or being one one of sixty equal parts into which anything is divided.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by sixty; one of sixty equal parts forming a whole.
• The next in order after the fifty-ninth; the tenth after the fiftieth.
Sixty
a.
• Six times ten; fifty-nine and one more; threescore.
n.
• The sum of six times ten; sixty units or objects.
• A symbol representing sixty units, as 60, lx., or LX.
Sizable
a.
• Of considerable size or bulk.
• Being of reasonable or suitable size; as, sizable timber; sizable bulk.
Sizar
n.
• One of a body of students in the universities of Cambridge (Eng.) and Dublin, who, having passed a certain examination, are exempted from paying college fees and charges. A sizar corresponded to a servitor at Oxford.
Sizarship
n.
• The position or standing of a sizar.
Size
n.
• Six.
n.
• A thin, weak glue used in various trades, as in painting, bookbinding, paper making, etc.
• Any viscous substance, as gilder's varnish.
v. t.
• To cover with size; to prepare with size.
n.
• A settled quantity or allowance. See Assize.
(Univ. of Cambridge, Eng.) An allowance of food and drink from the buttery, aside from the regular dinner at commons; — corresponding to battel at Oxford.
• Extent of superficies or volume; bulk; bigness; magnitude; as, the size of a tree or of a mast; the size of a ship or of a rock.
• Figurative bulk; condition as to rank, ability, character, etc.; as, the office demands a man of larger size.
• A conventional relative measure of dimension, as for shoes, gloves, and other articles made up for sale.
• An instrument consisting of a number of perforated gauges fastened together at one end by a rivet, — used for ascertaining the size of pearls.
v. t.
• To fix the standard of.
• To adjust or arrange according to size or bulk.
(Mil.) To take the height of men, in order to place them in the ranks according to their stature
(Mining) To sift, as pieces of ore or metal, in order to separate the finer from the coarser parts.
• To swell; to increase the bulk of.
(Mech.) To bring or adjust anything exactly to a required dimension, as by cutting.
v. i.
• To take greater size; to increase in size.
(Univ. of Cambridge, Eng.) To order food or drink from the buttery; hence, to enter a score, as upon the buttery book.
Sized
a.
• Adjusted according to size.
• Having a particular size or magnitude; — chiefly used in compounds; as, large-sized; common-sized.
Sizel
n.
• Same as Scissel, 2.
Sizer
n.
• See Sizar.
(Mech.) An instrument or contrivance to size articles, or to determine their size by a standard, or to separate and distribute them according to size.
• An instrument or tool for bringing anything to an exact size.
Siziness
n.
• The quality or state of being sizy; viscousness.
Sizing
n.
• Act of covering or treating with size.
• A weak glue used in various trades; size.
n.
• The act of sorting with respect to size.
• The act of bringing anything to a certain size.
(Univ. of Cambridge, Eng.) Food and drink ordered from the buttery by a student.
Sizy
a.
• Sizelike; viscous; glutinous; as, sizy blood.
Sizzle
v. i.
• To make a hissing sound; to fry, or to dry and shrivel up, with a hissing sound.
n.
• A hissing sound, as of something frying over a fire.
Sizzling
a. & n.
• from Sizzle.
Skaddle
n.
• Hurt; damage.
a.
• Hurtful.
Skaddon
n.
(Zool.) The larva of a bee.
Skag
n.
(Naut.) An additional piece fastened to the keel of a boat to prevent lateral motion. See Skeg.
Skain
n.
• See Skein.
n.
• See Skean.
Skainsmate
n.
• A messmate; a companion.
Skaith
n.
• See Scatch.
Skald
n.
• See 5th Scald.
Skaldic
a.
• See Scaldic.
Skall
v. t.
• To scale; to mount.
Skart
n.
(Zool.) The shag.
Skate
n.
• A metallic runner with a frame shaped to fit the sole of a shoe, — made to be fastened under the foot, and used for moving rapidly on ice.
v. i.
• To move on skates.
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of large, flat elasmobranch fishes of the genus Raia, having a long, slender tail, terminated by a small caudal fin. The pectoral fins, which are large and broad and united to the sides of the body and head, give a somewhat rhombic form to these fishes. The skin is more or less spinose.
Skater
n.
• One who skates.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of hemipterous insects belonging to Gerris, Pyrrhocoris, Prostemma, and allied genera. They have long legs, and run rapidly over the surface of the water, as if skating.
Skatol
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A constituent of human faeces formed in the small intestines as a product of the putrefaction of albuminous matter. It is also found in reduced indigo. Chemically it is methyl indol, C9H9N.
Skayles
n.
• [&root;159.] Skittles.
Skean
n.
• A knife or short dagger, esp. that in use among the Highlanders of Scotland. [Variously spelt.]
Skedaddle
v. i.
• To betake one's self to flight, as if in a panic; to flee; to run away.
Skee
n.
• A long strip of wood, curved upwards in front, used on the foot for sliding.
Skeed
n.
• See Skid.
Skeel
n.
• A shallow wooden vessel for holding milk or cream.
Skeet
n.
(Naut.) A scoop with a long handle, used to wash the sides of a vessel, and formerly to wet the sails or deck.
Skeg
n.
• A sort of wild plum.
• A kind of oats.
(Naut.) The after part of the keel of a vessel, to which the rudder is attached.
Skegger
n.
(Zool.) The parr.
Skein
n.
• A quantity of yarn, thread, or the like, put up together, after it is taken from the reel, — usually tied in a sort of knot.
(Wagon Making) A metallic strengthening band or thimble on the wooden arm of an axle.
n.
(Zool.) A flight of wild fowl (wild geese or the like).
Skeine
n.
• See Skean.
Skelder
v. t. & i.
• To deceive; to cheat; to trick.
n.
• A vagrant; a cheat.
Skelet
n.
• A skeleton. See Scelet.
Skeletal
a.
• Pertaining to the skeleton.
Skeletogenous
a.
• Forming or producing parts of the skeleton.
Skeletology
n.
• That part of anatomy which treats of the skeleton; also, a treatise on the skeleton.
Skeleton
n.
(Anat.) The bony and cartilaginous framework which supports the soft parts of a vertebrate animal.
• The more or less firm or hardened framework of an invertebrate animal.
• A very thin or lean person
• The framework of anything; the principal parts that support the rest, but without the appendages.
• The heads and outline of a literary production, especially of a sermon
a.
• Consisting of, or resembling, a skeleton; consisting merely of the framework or outlines; having only certain leading features of anything; as, a skeleton sermon; a skeleton crystal.
Skeletonize
v. t.
• To prepare a skeleton of; also, to reduce, as a leaf, to its skeleton.
Skeletonizer
n.
(Zool.) Any small moth whose larva eats the parenchyma of leaves, leaving the skeleton; as, the apple-leaf skeletonizer.
Skellum
n.
• A scoundrel.
Skelly
v. i.
• To squint.
n.
• A squint.
Skelp
n.
• A blow; a smart stroke.
• A squall; also, a heavy fall of rain.
v. t.
• To strike; to slap.
n.
• A wrought-iron plate from which a gun barrel or pipe is made by bending and welding the edges together, and drawing the thick tube thus formed.
Skelter
v. i.
• To run off helter-skelter; to hurry; to scurry; — with away or off.
Sken
v. i.
• To squint.
Skene
n.
• See Skean.
Skep
n.
• A coarse round farm basket.
• A beehive.
Skeptic
n.
• One who is yet undecided as to what is true; one who is looking or inquiring for what is true; an inquirer after facts or reasons.
(Metaph.) A doubter as to whether any fact or truth can be certainly known; a universal doubter; a Pyrrhonist; hence, in modern usage, occasionally, a person who questions whether any truth or fact can be established on philosophical grounds; sometimes, a critical inquirer, in opposition to a dogmatist.
(Theol.) A person who doubts the existence and perfections of God, or the truth of revelation; one who disbelieves the divine origin of the Christian religion.
Skepticism
n.
• An undecided, inquiring state of mind; doubt; uncertainty.
(Metaph.) The doctrine that no fact or principle can be certainly known; the tenet that all knowledge is uncertain; Pyrrohonism; universal doubt; the position that no fact or truth, however worthy of confidence, can be established on philosophical grounds; critical investigation or inquiry, as opposed to the positive assumption or assertion of certain principles.
(Theol.) A doubting of the truth of revelation, or a denial of the divine origin of the Christian religion, or of the being, perfections, or truth of God.
Skepticize
v. i.
• To doubt; to pretend to doubt of everything.
Skerry
n.
• A rocky isle; an insulated rock.
Sketch
n.
• An outline or general delineation of anything; a first rough or incomplete draught or plan of any design; especially, in the fine arts, such a representation of an object or scene as serves the artist's purpose by recording its chief features; also, a preliminary study for an original work.
v. t.
• To draw the outline or chief features of; to make a rought of.
• To plan or describe by giving the principal points or ideas of.
v. i.
• To make sketches, as of landscapes.
Sketchbook
n.
• A book of sketches or for sketches.
Sketcher
n.
• One who sketches.
Sketchily
adv.
• In a sketchy or incomplete manner.
Sketchiness
n.
• The quality or state of being sketchy; lack of finish; incompleteness.
Sketchy
a.
• Containing only an outline or rough form; being in the manner of a sketch; incomplete.
Skew
adv.
• Awry; obliquely; askew.
a.
• Turned or twisted to one side; situated obliquely; skewed; — chiefly used in technical phrases.
n.
(Arch.) A stone at the foot of the slope of a gable, the offset of a buttress, or the like, cut with a sloping surface and with a check to receive the coping stones and retain them in place.
v. i.
• To walk obliquely; to go sidling; to lie or move obliquely.
• To start aside; to shy, as a horse.
• To look obliquely; to squint; hence, to look slightingly or suspiciously.
v. t.
• To shape or form in an oblique way; to cause to take an oblique position.
• To throw or hurl obliquely.
Skewbald
a.
• Marked with spots and patches of white and some color other than black; — usually distinguished from piebald, in which the colors are properly white and black. Said of horses.
Skewer
n.
• A pin of wood or metal for fastening meat to a spit, or for keeping it in form while roasting.
v. t.
• To fasten with skewers.
Skid
n.
• A shoe or clog, as of iron, attached to a chain, and placed under the wheel of a wagon to prevent its turning when descending a steep hill; a drag; a skidpan; also, by extension, a hook attached to a chain, and used for the same purpose.
• A piece of timber used as a support, or to receive pressure.
(Naut.) Large fenders hung over a vessel's side to protect it in handling a cargo
• One of a pair of timbers or bars, usually arranged so as to form an inclined plane, as form a wagon to a door, along which anything is moved by sliding or rolling
• One of a pair of horizontal rails or timbers for supporting anything, as a boat, a barrel, etc.
v. t.
• To protect or support with a skid or skids; also, to cause to move on skids.
• To check with a skid, as wagon wheels.
Skiddaw
n.
(Zool.) The black guillemot.
Skidpan
n.
• See Skid, n., 1.
Skied
• imp. & p. p. of Sky, v. t.
Skiey
a.
• See Skyey.
Skiff
n.
• A small, light boat.
v. t.
• To navigate in a skiff.
Skiffling
n.
(Quarrying) Rough dressing by knocking off knobs or projections; knobbing.
Skilder
v. i.
• To beg; to pilfer; to skelder.
Skilful
a.
• See Skilful.
Skill
n.
• Discrimination; judgment; propriety; reason; cause.
• Knowledge; understanding.
• The familiar knowledge of any art or science, united with readiness and dexterity in execution or performance, or in the application of the art or science to practical purposes; power to discern and execute; ability to perceive and perform; expertness; aptitude; as, the skill of a mathematician, physician, surgeon, mechanic, etc.
• Display of art; exercise of ability; contrivance; address.
• Any particular art.
v. t.
• To know; to understand.
v. i.
• To be knowing; to have understanding; to be dexterous in performance.
• To make a difference; to signify; to matter; — used impersonally.
Skilled
a.
• Having familiar knowledge united with readiness and dexterity in its application; familiarly acquainted with; expert; skillful; — often followed by in; as, a person skilled in drawing or geometry.
Skillet
n.
• A small vessel of iron, copper, or other metal, with a handle, used for culinary purpose, as for stewing meat.
Skillful
a.
• Discerning; reasonable; judicious; cunning.
• Possessed of, or displaying, skill; knowing and ready; expert; well-versed; able in management; as, a skillful mechanic; — often followed by at, in, or of; as, skillful at the organ; skillful in drawing.
Skilligalee
n.
• A kind of thin, weak broth or oatmeal porridge, served out to prisoners and paupers in England; also, a drink made of oatmeal, sugar, and water, sometimes used in the English navy or army.
Skilling
n.
• A bay of a barn; also, a slight addition to a cottage.
n.
• A money od account in Sweden, Norwey, Denmark, and North Germany, and also a coin. It had various values, from three fourths of a cent in Norway to more than two cents in Lubeck.
Skilts
n. pl.
• A kind of large, coarse, short trousers formerly worn.
Skilty
n.
• The water rail.
Skim
v. t.
• To clear (a liquid) from scum or substance floating or lying thereon, by means of a utensil that passes just beneath the surface; as, to skim milk; to skim broth.
• To take off by skimming; as, to skim cream.
• To pass near the surface of; to brush the surface of; to glide swiftly along the surface of.
• Fig.: To read or examine superficially and rapidly, in order to cull the principal facts or thoughts; as, to skim a book or a newspaper.
v. i.
• To pass lightly; to glide along in an even, smooth course; to glide along near the surface.
• To hasten along with superficial attention.
• To put on the finishing coat of plaster.
a.
• Contraction of Skimming and Skimmed.
Skimback
n.
(Zool.) The quillback.
Skimitry
n.
• See Skimmington.
Skimmer
n.
• One who, or that which, skims; esp., a utensil with which liquids are skimmed.
(Zool.) Any species of longwinged marine birds of the genus Rhynchops, allied to the terns, but having the lower mandible compressed and much longer than the upper one. These birds fly rapidly along the surface of the water, with the lower mandible immersed, thus skimming out small fishes. The American species (R. nigra) is common on the southern coasts of the United States. Called also scissorbill, and shearbill.
(Zool.) Any one of several large bivalve shells, sometimes used for skimming milk, as the sea clams, and large scallops.
Skimmerton
n.
• See Skimmington.
Skimming
n.
• The act of one who skims.
• That which is skimmed from the surface of a liquid; — chiefly used in the plural; as, the skimmings of broth.
Skimmingly
adv.
• In a skimming manner.
Skimmington
n.
• A word employed in the phrase, To ride Skimmington; that is to ride on a horse with a woman, but behind her, facing backward, carrying a distaff, and accompanied by a procession of jeering neighbors making mock music; a cavalcade in ridicule of a henpecked man. The custom was in vogue in parts of England.
Skimp
v. t.
• To slight; to do carelessly; to scamp.
• To make insufficient allowance for; to scant; to scrimp.
v. i.
• To save; to be parsimonious or niggardly.
a.
• Scanty.
Skin
n.
(Anat.) The external membranous integument of an animal.
• The hide of an animal, separated from the body, whether green, dry, or tanned; especially, that of a small animal, as a calf, sheep, or goat.
• A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids. See Bottle, 1.
• The bark or husk of a plant or fruit; the exterior coat of fruits and plants.
(Naut.) That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole.
• The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing.
v. t.
• To strip off the skin or hide of; to flay; to peel; as, to skin an animal.
• To cover with skin, or as with skin; hence, to cover superficially.
• To strip of money or property; to cheat.
v. i.
• To become covered with skin; as, a wound skins over.
• To produce, in recitation, examination, etc., the work of another for one's own, or to use in such exercise cribs, memeoranda, etc., which are prohibited.
Skinbound
a.
• Having the skin adhering closely and rigidly to the flesh; hidebound.
Skinch
v. t. & i.
• To give scant measure; to squeeze or pinch in order to effect a saving.
Skinflint
n.
• A penurious person; a miser; a niggard.
Skinful
n.
• As much as a skin can hold.
Skink
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of regularly scaled harmless lizards of the family Scincidae, common in the warmer parts of all the continents.
v. t.
• To draw or serve, as drink.
v. i.
• To serve or draw liquor.
n.
• Drink; also, pottage.
Skinker
n.
• One who serves liquor; a tapster.
Skinless
a.
• Having no skin, or a very thin skin; as, skinless fruit.
Skinner
n.
• One who skins.
• One who deals in skins, pelts, or hides.
Skinniness
n.
• Quality of being skinny.
Skinny
a.
• Consisting, or chiefly consisting, of skin; wanting flesh.
Skip
n.
• A basket. See Skep.
• A basket on wheels, used in cotton factories.
(Mining) An iron bucket, which slides between guides, for hoisting mineral and rock.
(Sugar Manuf.) A charge of sirup in the pans.
• A beehive; a skep.
v. i.
• To leap lightly; to move in leaps and hounds; — commonly implying a sportive spirit.
• Fig.: To leave matters unnoticed, as in reading, speaking, or writing; to pass by, or overlook, portions of a thing; — often followed by over.
v. t.
• To leap lightly over; as, to skip the rope.
• To pass over or by without notice; to omit; to miss; as, to skip a line in reading; to skip a lesson.
• To cause to skip; as, to skip a stone.
n.
• A light leap or bound.
• The act of passing over an interval from one thing to another; an omission of a part.
(Mus.) A passage from one sound to another by more than a degree at once.
Skipjack
n.
• An upstart.
(Zool.) An elater; a snap bug, or snapping beetle.
(Zool.) A name given to several kinds of a fish, as the common bluefish, the alewife, the bonito, the butterfish, the cutlass fish, the jurel, the leather jacket, the runner, the saurel, the saury, the threadfish, etc.
(Naut.) A shallow sailboat with a rectilinear or V-shaped cross section.
Skipper
n.
• One who, or that which, skips.
• A young, thoughtless person.
(Zool.) The saury (Scomberesox saurus).
• The cheese maggot. See Cheese fly, under Cheese.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small butterflies of the family Hesperiadae; — so called from their peculiar short, jerking flight.
n.
(Naut.) The master of a fishing or small trading vessel; hence, the master, or captain, of any vessel.
• A ship boy.
Skippet
n.
• A small boat; a skiff.
• A small round box for keeping records.
Skippingly
adv.
• In a skipping manner; by skips, or light leaps.
Skirl
v. t.& i.
• To utter in a shrill tone; to scream.
n.
• A shrill cry or sound.
Skirlcock
n.
(Zool.) The missel thrush; — so called from its harsh alarm note.
Skirlcrake
n.
• The turnstone.
Skirling
n.
• A shrill cry or sound; a crying shrilly; a skirl.
n.
(Zool.) A small trout or salmon; — a name used loosely.
Skirmish
v. i.
• To fight slightly or in small parties; to engage in a skirmish or skirmishes; to act as skirmishers.
n.
• A slight fight in war; a light or desultory combat between detachments from armies, or between detached and small bodies of troops.
• A slight contest.
Skirmisher
n.
• One who skirmishes.
(Mil.) Soldiers deployed in loose order, to cover the front or flanks of an advancing army or a marching column.
Skirr
v. t.
• To ramble over in order to clear; to scour.
v. i.
• To scour; to scud; to run.
n.
(Zool.) A tern.
Skirret
n.
(Bot.) An umbelliferous plant (Sium, or Pimpinella, Sisarum). It is a native of Asia, but has been long cultivated in Europe for its edible clustered tuberous roots, which are very sweet.
Skirrhus
n.
(Med.) See Scirrhus.
Skirt
n.
• The lower and loose part of a coat, dress, or other like garment; the part below the waist; as, the skirt of a coat, a dress, or a mantle.
• A loose edging to any part of a dress.
• Border; edge; margin; extreme part of anything
• A petticoat.
• The diaphragm, or midriff, in animals.
v. t.
• To cover with a skirt; to surround.
• To border; to form the border or edge of; to run along the edge of; as, the plain was skirted by rows of trees.
v. t.
• To be on the border; to live near the border, or extremity.
Skirting
n.
(Arch.) A skirting board.
• Skirts, taken collectivelly; material for skirts.
Skit
v. t.
• To cast reflections on; to asperse.
n.
• A reflection; a jeer or gibe; a sally; a brief satire; a squib.
• A wanton girl; a light wench.
Skittish
a.
• Easily frightened; timorous; shy; untrustworthy; as, a skittish colt.
• Wanton; restive; freakish; volatile; changeable; fickle.
Skittle
a.
• Pertaining to the game of skittles.
Skittles
n. pl.
• An English game resembling ninepins, but played by throwing wooden disks, instead of rolling balls, at the pins.
Skitty
n.
(Zool.) A rail; as, the water rail (called also skitty cock, and skitty coot); the spotted crake (Porzana maruetta), and the moor hen.
Skive
n.
• The iron lap used by diamond polishers in finishing the facets of the gem.
v. t.
• To pare or shave off the rough or thick parts of (hides or leather).
Skiver
n.
• An inferior quality of leather, made of split sheepskin, tanned by immersion in sumac, and dyed. It is used for hat linings, pocketbooks, bookbinding, etc.
• The cutting tool or machine used in splitting leather or skins, as sheepskins.
Skiving
n.
• The act of paring or splitting leather or skins.
• A piece made in paring or splitting leather; specifically, the part from the inner, or flesh, side.
Sklayre
n.
• A vell.
Sklere
v. t.
• To shelter; to cover.
Skonce
n.
• See Sconce.
Skorodite
n.
(Min.) See Scorodite.
Skout
n.
(Zool.) A guillemot.
Skowitz
n.
(Zool.) The silver salmon.
Skreen
n. & v.
• See Screen.
Skrike
v. i. & t.
• To shriek.
n.
(Zool.) The missel thrush.
Skrim
n.
• Scum; refuse.
Skrimmage
n.
• See Scrimmage.
Skrimp
v. t.
• See Scrimp.
Skringe
v. i.
• See Scringe.
Skrite
n.
(Zool.) The skrike.
Skua
n.
(Zool.) Any jager gull; especially, the Megalestris skua; — called also boatswain.
Skue
a. & n.
• See Skew.
Skulk
v. i.
• To hide, or get out of the way, in a sneaking manner; to lie close, or to move in a furtive way; to lurk.
n.
• A number of foxes together.
Skulkingly
adv.
• In a skulking manner.
Skull
n.
• A school, company, or shoal.
n.
(Anat.) The skeleton of the head of a vertebrate animal, including the brain case, or cranium, and the bones and cartilages of the face and mouth. See Illusts. of Carnivora, of Facial angles under Facial, and of Skeleton, in Appendix.
• The head or brain; the seat of intelligence; mind.
• A covering for the head; a skullcap.
• A sort of oar. See Scull.
Skullcap
n.
• A cap which fits the head closely; also, formerly, a headpiece of iron sewed inside of a cap for protection.
(Bot.) Any plant of the labiate genus Scutellaria, the calyx of whose flower appears, when inverted, like a helmet with the visor raised.
(Zool.) The Lophiomys.
Skullfish
n.
• A whaler's name for a whale more than two years old.
Skulpin
n.
(Zool.) See Sculpin.
Skun
n. & v.
• See Scum.
Skunk
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of American musteline carnivores of the genus Mephitis and allied genera. They have two glands near the anus, secreting an extremely fetid liquid, which the animal ejects at pleasure as a means of defense.
v. t.
• In games of chance and skill: To defeat (an opponent) (as in cards) so that he fails to gain a point, or (in checkers) to get a king.
Skunkball
n.
(Zool.) The surf duck.
Skunkhead
n.
(Zool.) The surf duck.
• A duck (Camptolaimus Labradorus) which formerly inhabited the Atlantic coast of New England. It is now supposed to be extinct. Called also Labrador duck, and pied duck.
Skunkish
a.
• Like the skunk, especially in odor.
Skunktop
n.
(Zool.) The surf duck.
Skunkweed
n.
(Bot.) Skunk cabbage.
Skurry
n. & v.
• See Scurry.
Skute
n.
• A boat; a small vessel.
Skutterudite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a bright metallic luster and tin-white to pale lead-gray color. It consist of arsenic and cobalt.
Sky
n.
• A cloud.
• Hence, a shadow.
• The apparent arch, or vault, of heaven, which in a clear day is of a blue color; the heavens; the firmament; — sometimes in the plural.
• The wheather; the climate.
v. t.
• To hang (a picture on exhibition) near the top of a wall, where it can not be well seen.
• To throw towards the sky; as, to sky a ball at cricket.
Skyed
a.
• Surrounded by sky.
Skyey
a.
• Like the sky; ethereal; being in the sky.
Skyish
a.
• Like the sky, or approaching the sky; lofty; ethereal.
Skylark
n.
(Zool.) A lark that mounts and sings as it files, especially the common species (Alauda arvensis) found in Europe and in some parts of Asia, and celebrated for its melodious song; — called also sky laverock. See under Lark.
Skylarking
n.
• The act of running about the rigging of a vessel in sport; hence, frolicking; scuffing; sporting; carousing.
Skylight
n.
• A window placed in the roof of a building, in the ceiling of a room, or in the deck of a ship, for the admission of light from above.
Skyrocket
n.
• A rocket that ascends high and burns as it flies; a species of fireworks.
Skysail
n.
(Naut.) The sail set next above the royal. See Illust. under Sail.
Skyward
a. & adv.
• Toward the sky.
Slab
n.
• A thin piece of anything, especially of marble or other stone, having plane surfaces.
• An outside piece taken from a log or timber in sawing it into boards, planks, etc.
(Zool.) The wryneck.
(Naut.) The slack part of a sail.
a.
• Thick; viscous.
n.
• That which is slimy or viscous; moist earth; mud; also, a puddle.
Slabber
v. i.
• To let saliva or some liquid fall from the mouth carelessly, like a child or an idiot; to drivel; to drool.
v. t.
• To wet and foul spittle, or as if with spittle.
• To spill liquid upon; to smear carelessly; to spill, as liquid foed or drink, in careless eating or drinking.
n.
• Spittle; saliva; slaver.
n.
(Mach.) A saw for cutting slabs from logs.
• A slabbing machine.
Slabberer
n.
• One who slabbers, or drools; hence, an idiot.
Slabbery
a.
• Like, or covered with, slabber or slab; slippery; sloppy.
Slabbiness
n.
• Quality of being slabby.
Slabbing
a.
• Adapted for forming slabs, or for dressing flat surfaces.
Slabby
a.
• Thick; viscous.
• Sloppy; slimy; miry. See Sloppy.
Slack
n.
• Small coal; also, coal dust; culm.
n.
• A valley, or small, shallow dell.
a.
• Lax; not tense; not hard drawn; not firmly extended; as, a slack rope.
• Weak; not holding fast; as, a slack hand.
• Remiss; backward; not using due diligence or care; not earnest or eager; as, slack in duty or service.
• Not violent, rapid, or pressing; slow; moderate; easy; as, business is slack.
adv.
• Slackly; as, slack dried hops.
n.
• The part of anything that hangs loose, having no strain upon it; as, the slack of a rope or of a sail.
Slacken
n.
(Metal.) A spongy, semivitrifled substance which miners or smelters mix with the ores of metals to prevent their fusion.
Slackly
adv.
• In a slack manner.
Slackness
n.
• The quality or state of being slack.
Slade
n.
• A little dell or valley; a flat piece of low, moist ground.
• The sole of a plow.
Slag
n.
• The dross, or recrement, of a metal; also, vitrified cinders.
• The scoria of a volcano.
Slaggy
a.
• Of or pertaining to slag; resembling slag; as, slaggy cobalt.
Slaie
n.
• A weaver's reed; a sley.
Slake
v. t.
• To allay; to quench; to extinguish; as, to slake thirst.
• To mix with water, so that a true chemical combination shall take place; to slack; as, to slake lime.
v. i.
• To go out; to become extinct.
• To abate; to become less decided.
• To slacken; to become relaxed.
• To become mixed with water, so that a true chemical combination takes place; as, the lime slakes.
Slakeless
a.
• Not capable of being slaked.
Slakin
n.
(Metal.) Slacken.
Slam
v. t.
• To shut with force and a loud noise; to bang; as, he slammed the door.
• To put in or on some place with force and loud noise; — usually with down; as, to slam a trunk down on the pavement.
• To strike with some implement with force; hence, to beat or cuff.
• To strike down; to slaughter.
• To defeat (opponents at cards) by winning all the tricks of a deal or a hand.
v. i.
• To come or swing against something, or to shut, with sudden force so as to produce a shock and noise; as, a door or shutter slams.
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, slams.
• The shock and noise produced in slamming.
(Card Playing) Winning all the tricks of a deal.
• The refuse of alum works.
Slander
n.
• A false tale or report maliciously uttered, tending to injure the reputation of another; the malicious utterance of defamatory reports; the dissemination of malicious tales or suggestions to the injury of another.
• Disgrace; reproach; dishonor; opprobrium.
(Law) Formerly, defamation generally, whether oral or written; in modern usage, defamation by words spoken; utterance of false, malicious, and defamatory words, tending to the damage and derogation of another; calumny. See the Note under Defamation.
v. t.
• To defame; to injure by maliciously uttering a false report; to tarnish or impair the reputation of by false tales maliciously told or propagated; to calumniate.
• To bring discredit or shame upon by one's acts.
Slanderer
n.
• One who slanders; a defamer; a calumniator.
Slanderous
a.
• Given or disposed to slander; uttering slander.
• Embodying or containing slander; calumnious; as, slanderous words, speeches, or reports.
Slang
• imp. of Sling. Slung.
n.
• Any long, narrow piece of land; a promontory.
n.
• A fetter worn on the leg by a convict.
n.
• Low, vulgar, unauthorized language; a popular but unauthorized word, phrase, or mode of expression; also, the jargon of some particular calling or class in society; low popular cant; as, the slang of the theater, of college, of sailors, etc.
v. t.
• To address with slang or ribaldry; to insult with vulgar language.
Slanginess
n.
• Quality of being slangy.
Slangous
a.
• Slangy.
Slangy
a.
• Of or pertaining to slang; of the nature of slang; disposed to use slang.
Slank
• imp. & p. p. of Slink.
Slant
v. i.
• To be turned or inclined from a right line or level; to lie obliquely; to slope.
v. t.
• To turn from a direct line; to give an oblique or sloping direction to; as, to slant a line.
n.
• A slanting direction or plane; a slope; as, it lies on a slant.
• An oblique reflection or gibe; a sarcastic remark.
a.
• Inclined from a direct line, whether horizontal or perpendicular; sloping; oblique.
Slanting
a.
• Oblique; sloping.
Slap
n.
• A blow, esp. one given with the open hand, or with something broad.
v. t.
• To strike with the open hand, or with something broad.
adv.
• With a sudden and violent blow; hence, quickly; instantly; directly.
Slapdash
adv.
• In a bold, careless manner; at random.
• With a slap; all at once; slap.
v. t.
• To apply, or apply something to, in a hasty, careless, or rough manner; to roughcast; as, to slapdash mortar or paint on a wall, or to slapdash a wall.
Slape
a.
• Slippery; smooth; crafty; hypocritical.
Slapeface
n.
• A soft-spoken, crafty hypocrite.
Slapjack
n.
• A flat batter cake cooked on a griddle; a flapjack; a griddlecake.
Slapper
n.
• One who, or that which, slaps.
• Anything monstrous; a whopper.
Slash
v. t.
• To cut by striking violently and at random; to cut in long slits.
• To lash; to ply the whip to.
• To crack or snap, as a whip.
v. i.
• To strike violently and at random, esp. with an edged instrument; to lay about one indiscriminately with blows; to cut hastily and carelessly.
n.
• A long cut; a cut made at random.
• A large slit in the material of any garment, made to show the lining through the openings.
• Swampy or wet lands overgrown with bushes.
Slashed
a.
• Marked or cut with a slash or slashes; deeply gashed; especially, having long, narrow openings, as a sleeve or other part of a garment, to show rich lining or under vesture.
(Bot.) Divided into many narrow parts or segments by sharp incisions; laciniate.
Slasher
n.
(Textile Manuf.) A machine for applying size to warp yarns.
Slashy
a.
• Wet and dirty; slushy.
Slat
n.
• A thin, narrow strip or bar of wood or metal; as, the slats of a window blind.
v. t.
• To slap; to strike; to beat; to throw down violently.
• To split; to crack.
• To set on; to incite. See 3d Slate.
Slatch
n.
(Naut.) The period of a transitory breeze.
• An interval of fair weather.
• The loose or slack part of a rope; slack.
Slate
n.
(Min.) An argillaceous rock which readily splits into thin plates; argillite; argillaceous schist.
• Any rock or stone having a slaty structure.
• A prepared piece of such stone.
• A thin, flat piece, for roofing or covering houses, etc.
• A tablet for writing upon.
• An artificial material, resembling slate, and used for the above purposes.
• A thin plate of any material; a flake.
(Politics) A list of candidates, prepared for nomination or for election; a list of candidates, or a programme of action, devised beforehand.
v. t.
• To cover with slate, or with a substance resembling slate; as, to slate a roof; to slate a globe.
• To register (as on a slate and subject to revision), for an appointment.
v. t.
• To set a dog upon; to bait; to slat. See 2d Slat, 3.
Slater
n.
• One who lays slates, or whose occupation is to slate buildings.
n.
(Zool.) Any terrestrial isopod crustacean of the genus Porcellio and allied genera; a sow bug.
Slating
n.
• The act of covering with slate, slates, or a substance resembling slate; the work of a slater.
• Slates, collectively; also, material for slating.
Slatt
n.
• A slab of stone used as a veneer for coarse masonry.
Slatter
v. i.
• To be careless, negligent, or aswkward, esp. with regard to dress and neatness; to be wasteful.
Slattern
n.
• A woman who is negligent of her dress or house; one who is not neat and nice.
a.
• Resembling a slattern; sluttish; slatterny.
v. t.
• To consume carelessly or wastefully; to waste; — with away.
Slatternliness
n.
• The quality or state of being slatternly; slovenliness; untidiness.
Slatternly
a.
• Resembling a slattern; sluttish; negligent; dirty.
adv.
• In a slatternly manner.
Slatterpouch
n.
• A dance or game played by boys, requiring active exercise.
Slatting
• Slats, collectively.
n.
• The violent shaking or flapping of anything hanging loose in the wind, as of a sail, when being hauled down.
Slaty
a.
• Resembling slate; having the nature, appearance, or properties, of slate; composed of thin parallel plates, capable of being separated by splitting; as, a slaty color or texture.
Slaughter
n.
• The act of killing.
• The extensive, violent, bloody, or wanton destruction of life; carnage.
• The act of killing cattle or other beasts for market
v. t.
• To visit with great destruction of life; to kill; to slay in battle.
• To butcher; to kill for the market, as beasts.
Slaughterer
n.
• One who slaughters.
Slaughterhouse
n.
• A house where beasts are butchered for the market.
Slaughterman
n.
• One employed in slaughtering.
Slaughterous
a.
• Destructive; murderous.
Slav
n.
(Ethnol.) One of a race of people occupying a large part of Eastern and Northern Europe, including the Russians, Bulgarians, Roumanians, Servo-Croats, Slovenes, Poles, Czechs, Wends or Sorbs, Slovaks, etc.
Slave
n.
• See Slav.
n.
• A person who is held in bondage to another; one who is wholly subject to the will of another; one who is held as a chattel; one who has no freedom of action, but whose person and services are wholly under the control of another.
• One who has lost the power of resistance; one who surrenders himself to any power whatever; as, a slave to passion, to lust, to strong drink, to ambition.
• A drudge; one who labors like a slave.
• An abject person; a wretch.
v. i.
• To drudge; to toil; to labor as a slave.
v. t.
• To enslave.
Slaveborn
a.
• Born in slavery.
Slaveholder
n.
• One who holds slaves.
Slaveholding
a.
• Holding persons in slavery.
Slaveocracy
n.
• See Slavocracy.
Slaver
n.
• A vessel engaged in the slave trade; a slave ship.
• A person engaged in the purchase and sale of slaves; a slave merchant, or slave trader.
v. i.
• To suffer spittle, etc., to run from the mouth.
• To be besmeared with saliva.
v. t.
• To smear with saliva issuing from the mouth; to defile with drivel; to slabber.
n.
• Saliva driveling from the mouth.
Slaverer
n.
• A driveler; an idiot.
Slavering
a.
• Drooling; defiling with saliva.
Slavery
n.
• The condition of a slave; the state of entire subjection of one person to the will of another.
• A condition of subjection or submission characterized by lack of freedom of action or of will.
• The holding of slaves.
Slavey
n.
• A maidservant.
Slavic
a.
• Slavonic.
n.
• The group of allied languages spoken by the Slavs.
Slavish
a.
• Of or pertaining to slaves; such as becomes or befits a slave; servile; excessively laborious; as, a slavish life; a slavish dependance on the great.
Slavism
n.
• The common feeling and interest of the Slavonic race.
Slavocracy
n.
• The persons or interest formerly representing slavery politically, or wielding political power for the preservation or advancement of slavery.
Slavonian
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Slavonia; ethnologically, a Slav.
Slaw
n.
• Sliced cabbage served as a salad, cooked or uncooked.
Slay
v. t.
• To put to death with a weapon, or by violence; hence, to kill; to put an end to; to destroy.
Slayer
n.
• One who slays; a killer; a murderer; a destrroyer of life.
Slazy
a.
• See Sleazy.
Sle
v. t.
• To slay.
Sleave
n.
• The knotted or entangled part of silk or thread.
• Silk not yet twisted; floss; — called also sleave silk.
v. t.
• To separate, as threads; to divide, as a collection of threads; to sley; — a weaver's term.
Sleaved
a.
• Raw; not spun or wrought; as, sleaved thread or silk.
Sleaziness
n.
• Quality of being sleazy.
Sleazy
a.
• Wanting firmness of texture or substance; thin; flimsy; as, sleazy silk or muslin.
Sled
n.
• A vehicle on runners, used for conveying loads over the snow or ice; — in England called sledge.
• A small, light vehicle with runners, used, mostly by young persons, for sliding on snow or ice.
v. t.
• To convey or transport on a sled; as, to sled wood or timber.
Sledding
n.
• The act of transporting or riding on a sled.
• The state of the snow which admits of the running of sleds; as, the sledding is good.
Sledge
n.
• A strong vehicle with low runners or low wheels; or one without wheels or runners, made of plank slightly turned up at one end, used for transporting loads upon the snow, ice, or bare ground; a sled.
• A hurdle on which, formerly, traitors were drawn to the place of execution.
• A sleigh.
• A game at cards; — called also old sledge, and all fours.
v. i. & t.
• To travel or convey in a sledge or sledges.
n.
• A large, heavy hammer, usually wielded with both hands; — called also sledge hammer.
Slee
v. t.
• To slay.
Sleek
a.
• Having an even, smooth surface; smooth; hence, glossy; as, sleek hair.
• Not rough or harsh.
adv.
• With ease and dexterity.
n.
• That which makes smooth; varnish.
v. t.
• To make even and smooth; to render smooth, soft, and glossy; to smooth over.
Sleekly
adv.
• In a sleek manner; smoothly.
Sleekness
n.
• The quality or state of being sleek; smoothness and glossiness of surface.
Sleeky
a.
• Of a sleek, or smooth, and glossy appearance.
• Fawning and deceitful; sly.
Sleep
• imp. of Sleep. Slept.
v. i.
• To take rest by a suspension of the voluntary exercise of the powers of the body and mind, and an apathy of the organs of sense; to slumber.
• To be careless, inattentive, or uncouncerned; not to be vigilant; to live thoughtlessly.
• To be dead; to lie in the grave
• To be, or appear to be, in repose; to be quiet; to be unemployed, unused, or unagitated; to rest; to lie dormant; as, a question sleeps for the present; the law sleeps
v. t.
• To be slumbering in; — followed by a cognate object; as, to sleep a dreamless sleep.
• To give sleep to; to furnish with accomodations for sleeping; to lodge.
n.
• A natural and healthy, but temporary and periodical, suspension of the functions of the organs of sense, as well as of those of the voluntary and rational soul; that state of the animal in which there is a lessened acuteness of sensory perception, a confusion of ideas, and a loss of mental control, followed by a more or less unconscious state.
Sleeper
n.
• One who sleeps; a slumberer; hence, a drone, or lazy person.
• That which lies dormant, as a law.
• A sleeping car.
(Zool.) An animal that hibernates, as the bear.
(Zool.) A large fresh-water gobioid fish (Eleotris dormatrix).
• A nurse shark. See under Nurse.
n.
• Something lying in a reclining posture or position.
• One of the pieces of timber, stone, or iron, on or near the level of the ground, for the support of some superstructure, to steady framework, to keep in place the rails of a railway, etc.; a stringpiece.
• One of the joists, or roughly shaped timbers, laid directly upon the ground, to receive the flooring of the ground story
(Naut.) One of the knees which connect the transoms to the after timbers on the ship's quarter(Naut.
• ) The lowest, or bottom, tier of casks
Sleepful
a.
• Strongly inclined to sleep; very sleepy.
Sleepily
adv.
• In a sleepy manner; drowsily.
Sleepiness
n.
• The quality or state of being sleepy.
Sleeping
a. & n.
• from Sleep.
Sleepish
a.
• Disposed to sleep; sleepy; drowsy.
Sleepless
a.
• Having no sleep; wakeful.
• Having no rest; perpetually agitated.
Sleepmarken
n.
(Zool.) See 1st Hag, 4.
Sleepwaker
n.
• On in a state of magnetic or mesmeric sleep.
Sleepwaking
n.
• The state of one mesmerized, or in a partial and morbid sleep.
Sleepwalker
n.
• One who walks in his sleep; a somnambulist.
Sleepwalking
n.
• Walking in one's sleep.
Sleepy
a.
• Drowsy; inclined to, or overcome by, sleep.
• Tending to induce sleep; soporiferous; somniferous; as, a sleepy drink or potion.
• Dull; lazy; heavy; sluggish.
• Characterized by an absence of watchfulness; as, sleepy security.
Sleepyhead
n.
• A sleepy person.
(Zool.) The ruddy duck.
Sleer
n.
• A slayer.
Sleet
n.
(Gun.) The part of a mortar extending from the chamber to the trunnions.
n.
• Hail or snow, mingled with rain, usually falling, or driven by the wind, in fine particles.
v. i.
• To snow or hail with a mixture of rain.
Sleetch
n.
• Mud or slime, such as that at the bottom of rivers.
Sleetiness
n.
• The state of being sleety.
Sleety
a.
• Of or pertaining to sleet; characterized by sleet; as, a sleety storm; sleety weather.
Sleeve
n.
• See Sleave, untwisted thread.
n.
• The part of a garment which covers the arm; as, the sleeve of a coat or a gown.
• A narrow channel of water.
(Mach.) A tubular part made to cover, sustain, or steady another part, or to form a connection between two parts.
• A long bushing or thimble, as in the nave of a wheel.
• A short piece of pipe used for covering a joint, or forming a joint between the ends of two other pipes.
v. t.
• To furnish with sleeves; to put sleeves into; as, to sleeve a coat.
Sleeved
a.
• Having sleeves; furnished with sleeves; — often in composition; as, long-sleeved.
Sleevefish
n.
(Zool.) A squid.
Sleevehand
n.
• The part of a sleeve nearest the hand; a cuff or wristband.
Sleeveless
a.
• Having no sleeves.
• Wanting a cover, pretext, or palliation; unreasonable; profitless; bootless; useless.
Sleid
v. t.
• To sley, or prepare for use in the weaver's sley, or slaie.
Sleigh
a.
• Sly.
n.
• A vehicle moved on runners, and used for transporting persons or goods on snow or ice; — in England commonly called a sledge.
Sleighing
n.
• The act of riding in a sleigh.
• The state of the snow or ice which admits of running sleighs.
Sleight
n.
• Cunning; craft; artful practice.
• An artful trick; sly artifice; a feat so dexterous that the manner of performance escapes observation.
• Dexterous practice; dexterity; skill.
Sleightly
adv.
• Cinningly.
Sleighty
a.
• Cinning; sly.
Sleigtful
a.
• Cunning; dexterous.
Slender
a.
• Small or narrow in proportion to the length or the height; not thick; slim; as, a slender stem or stalk of a plant.
• Weak; feeble; not strong; slight; as, slender hope; a slender constitution.
• Moderate; trivial; inconsiderable; slight; as, a man of slender intelligence.
• Small; inadequate; meager; pitiful; as, slender means of support; a slender pittance.
• Spare; abstemious; frugal; as, a slender diet.
(Phon.) Uttered with a thin tone; — the opposite of broad; as, the slender vowels long e and i.
Slent
n. & v.
• See Slant.
Slep
• imp. of Sleep. Slept.
Slepez
n.
(Zool.) A burrowing rodent (Spalax typhlus), native of Russia and Asia Minor. It has the general appearance of a mole, and is destitute of eyes. Called also mole rat.
Slept
• imp. & p. p. of Sleep.
Sleuth
n.
• The track of man or beast as followed by the scent.
Sleuthhound
n.
(Zool.) A hound that tracks animals by the scent; specifically, a bloodhound.
Slew
• imp. of Slay.
v. t.
• See Slue.
Slewed
a.
• Somewhat drunk.
Slewth
n.
• Sloth; idleness.
Sley
n.
• A weaver's reed.
• A guideway in a knitting machine.
v. t.
• To separate or part the threads of, and arrange them in a reed; — a term used by weavers. See Sleave, and Sleid.
Slibber
a.
• Slippery.
Slice
n.
• A thin, broad piece cut off; as, a slice of bacon; a slice of cheese; a slice of bread.
• That which is thin and broad, like a slice.
• A broad, thin piece of plaster.
• A salver, platter, or tray.
• A knife with a thin, broad blade for taking up or serving fish; also, a spatula for spreading anything, as paint or ink.
• A plate of iron with a handle, forming a kind of chisel, or a spadelike implement, variously proportioned, and used for various purposes, as for stripping the planking from a vessel's side, for cutting blubber from a whale, or for stirring a fire of coals; a slice bar; a peel; a fire shovel.
(Shipbuilding) One of the wedges by which the cradle and the ship are lifted clear of the building blocks to prepare for launching.
(Printing) A removable sliding bottom to galley.
v. t.
• To cut into thin pieces, or to cut off a thin, broad piece from.
• To cut into parts; to divide.
• To clear by means of a slice bar, as a fire or the grate bars of a furnace.
Slicer
n.
• One who, or that which, slices; specifically, the circular saw of the lapidary.
Slick
a.
• Sleek; smooth.
v. t.
• To make sleek or smoth.
n.
(Joinery) A wide paring chisel.
Slicken
a.
• Sleek; smooth.
Slickens
n.
(Mining) The pulverized matter from a quartz mill, or the lighter soil of hydraulic mines.
Slickensides
n.
• The smooth, striated, or partially polished surfaces of a fissure or seam, supposed to have been produced by the sliding of one surface on another.
• A variety of galena found in Derbyshire, England.
Slicker
n.
• That which makes smooth or sleek.
• A kind of burnisher for leather
(Founding) A curved tool for smoothing the surfaces of a mold after the withdrawal of the pattern.
n.
• A waterproof coat.
Slicking
n.
• The act or process of smoothing.
(Min.) Narrow veins of ore.
Slickness
n.
• The state or quality of being slick; smoothness; sleekness.
Slid
• imp. & p. p. of Slide.
Slidden
• p. p. of Slide.
Slidder
v. t.
• To slide with interruption.
Slide
v. t.
• To move along the surface of any body by slipping, or without walking or rolling; to slip; to glide; as, snow slides down the mountain's side.
• Especially, to move over snow or ice with a smooth, uninterrupted motion, as on a sled moving by the force of gravity, or on the feet
• To pass inadvertently.
• To pass along smoothly or unobservedly; to move gently onward without friction or hindrance; as, a ship or boat slides through the water.
• To slip when walking or standing; to fall.
(Mus.) To pass from one note to another with no perceptible cassation of sound.
• To pass out of one's thought as not being of any consequence.
v. t.
• To cause to slide; to thrust along; as, to slide one piece of timber along another.
• To pass or put imperceptibly; to slip; as, to slide in a word to vary the sense of a question.
n.
• The act of sliding; as, a slide on the ice.
• Smooth, even passage or progress.
• That on which anything moves by sliding.
• An inclined plane on which heavy bodies slide by the force of gravity, esp. one constructed on a mountain side for conveying logs by sliding them down.
• A surface of ice or snow on which children slide for amusement.
• That which operates by sliding.
• A cover which opens or closes an aperture by sliding over it.
(Mach.) A moving piece which is guided by a part or parts along which it slides.
• A clasp or brooch for a belt, or the like.
• A plate or slip of glass on which is a picture or delineation to be exhibited by means of a magic lantern, stereopticon, or the like; a plate on which is an object to be examined with a microscope.
• The descent of a mass of earth, rock, or snow down a hill or mountain side; as, a land slide, or a snow slide; also, the track of bare rock left by a land slide.
(Geol.) A small dislocation in beds of rock along a line of fissure.
(Mus.) A grace consisting of two or more small notes moving by conjoint degrees, and leading to a principal note either above or below.
• An apparatus in the trumpet and trombone by which the sounding tube is lengthened and shortened so as to produce the tones between the fundamental and its harmonics.
(Phonetics) A sound which, by a gradual change in the position of the vocal organs, passes imperceptibly into another sound.
(Steam Engine) Same as Guide bar, under Guide.
• A slide valve.
Slidegroat
n.
• The game of shovelboard.
Slider
a.
• See Slidder.
n.
• One who, or that which, slides; especially, a sliding part of an instrument or machine.
(Zool.) The red-bellied terrapin (Pseudemys rugosa).
Sliding
a.
• That slides or slips; gliding; moving smoothly.
• Slippery; elusory.
Slidometer
n.
• An instrument for indicating and recording shocks to railway cars occasioned by sudden stopping.
Slight
n.
• Sleight.
v. t.
• To overthrow; to demolish.
• To make even or level.
• To throw heedlessly.
a.
• Not decidedly marked; not forcible; inconsiderable; unimportant; insignificant; not severe; weak; gentle; — applied in a great variety of circumstances; as, a slight (i. e., feeble) effort; a slight (i. e., perishable) structure; a slight (i. e., not deep) impression; a slight (i. e., not convincing) argument; a slight (i. e., not thorough) examination; slight (i. e., not severe) pain, and the like.
• Not stout or heavy; slender.
• Foolish; silly; weak in intellect.
v. t.
• To disregard, as of little value and unworthy of notice; to make light of; as, to slight the divine commands.
n.
• The act of slighting; the manifestation of a moderate degree of contempt, as by neglect or oversight; neglect; indignity.
adv.
• Slightly.
Slighten
v. t.
• To slight.
Slighter
n.
• One who slights.
Slightful
a.
• See Sleightful.
Slighting
a.
• Characterized by neglect or disregard.
Slightingly
adv.
• In a slighting manner.
Slightly
adv.
• In a slight manner.
• Slightingly; negligently.
Slightness
n.
• The quality or state of being slight; slenderness; feebleness; superficiality; also, formerly, negligence; indifference; disregard.
Slighty
a.
• Slight.
Slik
a.
• Such.
Slily
adv.
• See Slyly.
Slim
a.
• Worthless; bad.
• Weak; slight; unsubstantial; poor; as, a slim argument.
• Of small diameter or thickness in proportion to the height or length; slender; as, a slim person; a slim tree.
Slime
n.
• Soft, moist earth or clay, having an adhesive quality; viscous mud.
• Any mucilaginous substance; any substance of a dirty nature, that is moist, soft, and adhesive.
(Script.) Bitumen.
(Mining) Mud containing metallic ore, obtained in the preparatory dressing.
(Physiol.) A mucuslike substance which exudes from the bodies of certain animals.
v. t.
• To smear with slime.
Slimily
adv.
• In a slimy manner.
Sliminess
n.
• The quality or state of being slimy.
Slimly
adv.
• In a state of slimness; in a slim manner; slenderly.
Slimness
n.
• The quality or state of being slim.
Slimsy
a.
• Flimsy; frail.
Slimy
a.
• Of or pertaining to slime; resembling slime; of the nature of slime; viscous; glutinous; also, covered or daubed with slime; yielding, or abounding in, slime.
Sliness
n.
• See Slyness.
Sling
n.
• An instrument for throwing stones or other missiles, consisting of a short strap with two strings fastened to its ends, or with a string fastened to one end and a light stick to the other. The missile being lodged in a hole in the strap, the ends of the string are taken in the hand, and the whole whirled rapidly round until, by loosing one end, the missile is let fly with centrifugal force.
• The act or motion of hurling as with a sling; a throw; figuratively, a stroke.
• A contrivance for sustaining anything by suspension
• A kind of hanging bandage put around the neck, in which a wounded arm or hand is supported.
• A loop of rope, or a rope or chain with hooks, for suspending a barrel, bale, or other heavy object, in hoisting or lowering.
• A strap attached to a firearm, for suspending it from the shoulder.
(Naut.) A band of rope or iron for securing a yard to a mast; — chiefly in the plural.
v. t.
• To throw with a sling.
• To throw; to hurl; to cast.
• To hang so as to swing; as, to sling a pack.
(Naut) To pass a rope round, as a cask, gun, etc., preparatory to attaching a hoisting or lowering tackle.
n.
• A drink composed of spirit (usually gin) and water sweetened.
Slinger
n.
• One who slings, or uses a sling.
Slink
v. t.
• To creep away meanly; to steal away; to sneak.
• To miscarry; — said of female beasts.
v. t.
• To cast prematurely; — said of female beasts; as, a cow that slinks her calf.
a.
• Produced prematurely; as, a slink calf.
• Thin; lean.
n.
• The young of a beast brought forth prematurely, esp. a calf brought forth before its time.
• A thievish fellow; a sneak.
Slinky
a.
• Thin; lank.
Slip
v. i.
• To move along the surface of a thing without bounding, rolling, or stepping; to slide; to glide.
• To slide; to lose one's footing or one's hold; not to tread firmly; as, it is necessary to walk carefully lest the foot should slip.
• To move or fly (out of place); to shoot; — often with out, off, etc.; as, a bone may slip out of its place.
• To depart, withdraw, enter, appear, intrude, or escape as if by sliding; to go or come in a quiet, furtive manner; as, some errors slipped into the work.
• To err; to fall into error or fault.
v. t.
• To cause to move smoothly and quickly; to slide; to convey gently or secretly.
• To omit; to loose by negligence.
• To cut slips from; to cut; to take off; to make a slip or slips of; as, to slip a piece of cloth or paper.
• To let loose in pursuit of game, as a greyhound.
• To cause to slip or slide off, or out of place; as, a horse slips his bridle; a dog slips his collar.
• To bring forth (young) prematurely; to slink.
n.
• The act of slipping; as, a slip on the ice.
• An unintentional error or fault; a false step.
• A twig separated from the main stock; a cutting; a scion; hence, a descendant; as, a slip from a vine.
• A slender piece; a strip; as, a slip of paper.
• A leash or string by which a dog is held; — so called from its being made in such a manner as to slip, or become loose, by relaxation of the hand.
• An escape; a secret or unexpected desertion; as, to give one the slip.
(Print.) A portion of the columns of a newspaper or other work struck off by itself; a proof from a column of type when set up and in the galley.
• Any covering easily slipped on.
• A loose garment worn by a woman.
• A child's pinafore.
• An outside covering or case; as, a pillow slip.
• The slip or sheath of a sword, and the like.
• A counterfeit piece of money, being brass covered with silver.
• Matter found in troughs of grindstones after the grinding of edge tools.
• Potter's clay in a very liquid state, used for the decoration of ceramic ware, and also as a cement for handless and other applied parts.
• A particular quantity of yarn.
• An inclined plane on which a vessel is built, or upon which it is hauled for repair.
• An opening or space for vessels to lie in, between wharves or in a dock; as, Peck slip.
• A narrow passage between buildings.
• A long seat or narrow pew in churches, often without a door.
(Mining.) A dislocation of a lead, destroying continuity.
(Engin.) The motion of the center of resistance of the float of a paddle wheel, or the blade of an oar, through the water horozontally, or the difference between a vessel's actual speed and the speed which she would have if the propelling instrument acted upon a solid; also, the velocity, relatively to still water, of the backward current of water produced by the propeller.
(Zool.) A fish, the sole.
(Cricket) A fielder stationed on the off side and to the rear of the batsman. There are usually two of them, called respectively short slip, and long slip.
Slipboard
n.
• A board sliding in grooves.
Slipes
n. pl.
• Sledge runners on which a skip is dragged in a mine.
Slipknot
n.
• knot which slips along the rope or line around which it is made.
Slippage
n.
• The act of slipping; also, the amount of slipping.
Slipper
n.
• One who, or that which, slips.
• A kind of light shoe, which may be slipped on with ease, and worn in undress; a slipshoe.
• A kind of apron or pinafore for children.
• A kind of brake or shoe for a wagon wheel.
(Mach.) A piece, usually a plate, applied to a sliding piece, to receive wear and afford a means of adjustment; — also called shoe, and gib.
a.
• Slippery.
Slippered
a.
• Wearing slippers.
Slipperily
adv.
• In a slippery manner.
Slipperiness
n.
• The quality of being slippery.
Slipperness
n.
• Slipperiness.
Slipperwort
n.
(Bot.) See Calceolaria.
Slippery
a.
• Having the quality opposite to adhesiveness; allowing or causing anything to slip or move smoothly, rapidly, and easily upon the surface; smooth; glib; as, oily substances render things slippery.
• Not affording firm ground for confidence; as, a slippery promise.
• Not easily held; liable or apt to slip away.
• Liable to slip; not standing firm.
• Unstable; changeable; mutable; uncertain; inconstant; fickle.
• Uncertain in effect.
• Wanton; unchaste; loose in morals.
Slippiness
n.
• Slipperiness.
Slippy
a.
• Slippery.
Slipshod
a.
• Wearing shoes or slippers down at the heel.
• Figuratively: Careless in dress, manners, style, etc.; slovenly; shuffling; as, slipshod manners; a slipshod or loose style of writing.
Slipshoe
n.
• A slipper.
Slipskin
a.
• Evasive.
Slipslop
n.
• Weak, poor, or flat liquor; weak, profitless discourse or writing.
Slipstring
n.
• One who has shaken off restraint; a prodigal.
Slipthrift
n.
• A spendthrift.
Slish
n.
• A cut; as, slish and slash.
Slit
• 3d. pers. sing. pres. of Slide.
v. t.
• To cut lengthwise; to cut into long pieces or strips; as, to slit iron bars into nail rods; to slit leather into straps.
• To cut or make a long fissure in or upon; as, to slit the ear or the nose.
• To cut; to sever; to divide.
n.
• A long cut; a narrow opening; as, a slit in the ear.
Slither
v. i.
• To slide; to glide.
Slitter
n.
• One who, or that which, slits.
Slitting
a. & n.
• from Slit.
Slive
v. i.
• To sneak.
v. t.
• To cut; to split; to separate.
Sliver
v. t.
• To cut or divide into long, thin pieces, or into very small pieces; to cut or rend lengthwise; to slit; as, to sliver wood.
n.
• A long piece cut ot rent off; a sharp, slender fragment; a splinter.
• A strand, or slender roll, of cotton or other fiber in a loose, untwisted state, produced by a carding machine and ready for the roving or slubbing which preceeds spinning.
• Bait made of pieces of small fish. Cf. Kibblings.
Sloakan
n.
(Bot.) A species of seaweed. [Spelled also slowcawn.] See 3d Laver.
Sloam
n.
(Mining) A layer of earth between coal seams.
Sloat
n.
• A narrow piece of timber which holds together large pieces; a slat; as, the sloats of a cart.
Slobber
v. t. & i.
• See Slabber.
n.
• See Slabber.
(Zool.) A jellyfish.
(Vet.) Salivation.
Slobberer
n.
• One who slobbers.
• A slovenly farmer; a jobbing tailor.
Slobbery
a.
• Wet; sloppy, as land.
Slocking
a. & n.
• from Slock.
Sloe
n.
(Bot.) A small, bitter, wild European plum, the fruit of the blackthorn (Prunus spinosa); also, the tree itself.
Slogan
n.
• The war cry, or gathering word, of a Highland clan in Scotland; hence, any rallying cry.
Sloggy
a.
• Sluggish.
Sloke
n.
(Bot.) See Sloakan.
Sloom
n.
• Slumber.
Sloomy
a.
• Sluggish; slow.
Sloop
n.
(Naut.) A vessel having one mast and fore-and-aft rig, consisting of a boom-and-gaff mainsail, jibs, staysail, and gaff topsail. The typical sloop has a fixed bowsprit, topmast, and standing rigging, while those of a cutter are capable of being readily shifted. The sloop usually carries a centerboard, and depends for stability upon breadth of beam rather than depth of keel. The two types have rapidly approximated since 1880. One radical distinction is that a slop may carry a centerboard. See Cutter, and Illustration in Appendix.
Slop
n.
• Water or other liquid carelessly spilled or thrown aboyt, as upon a table or a floor; a puddle; a soiled spot.
• Mean and weak drink or liquid food; — usually in the plural.
• Dirty water; water in which anything has been washed or rinsed; water from wash-bowls, etc.
v. t.
• To cause to overflow, as a liquid, by the motion of the vessel containing it; to spill.
• To spill liquid upon; to soil with a liquid spilled.
v. i.
• To overflow or be spilled as a liquid, by the motion of the vessel containing it; — often with over.
n.
• Any kind of outer garment made of linen or cotton, as a night dress, or a smock frock.
• A loose lower garment; loose breeches; chiefly used in the plural.
• Ready-made clothes; also, among seamen, clothing, bedding, and other furnishings.
Slope
n.
• An oblique direction; a line or direction including from a horizontal line or direction; also, sometimes, an inclination, as of one line or surface to another.
• Any ground whose surface forms an angle with the plane of the horizon.
a.
• Sloping.
adv.
• In a sloping manner.
v. t.
• To form with a slope; to give an oblique or slanting direction to; to direct obliquely; to incline; to slant; as, to slope the ground in a garden; to slope a piece of cloth in cutting a garment.
v. i.
• To take an oblique direction; to be at an angle with the plane of the horizon; to incline; as, the ground slopes.
• To depart; to disappear suddenly.
Slopeness
n.
• State of being slope.
Slopewise
adv.
• Obliquely.
Sloping
a.
• Inclining or inclined from the plane of the horizon, or from a horizontal or other right line; oblique; declivous; slanting.
Sloppiness
n.
• The quality or state of being sloppy; muddiness.
Sloppy
a.
• Wet, so as to spatter easily; wet, as with something slopped over; muddy; plashy; as, a sloppy place, walk, road.
Slopseller
n.
• One who sells slops, or ready-made clothes. See 4th Slop, 3.
Slopshop
n.
• A shop where slops. or ready-made clothes, are sold.
Slopwork
n.
• The manufacture of slops, or cheap ready-made clothing; also, such clothing; hence, hasty, slovenly work of any kind.
Slopy
a.
• Sloping; inclined.
Slot
n.
• A broad, flat, wooden bar; a slat or sloat.
• A bolt or bar for fastening a door.
• A narrow depression, perforation, or aperture; esp., one for the reception of a piece fitting or sliding in it.
v. t.
• To shut with violence; to slam; as, to slot a door.
n.
• The track of a deer; hence, a track of any kind.
Sloth
n.
• Slowness; tardiness.
• Disinclination to action or labor; sluggishness; laziness; idleness.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of arboreal edentates constituting the family Bradypodidae, and the suborder Tardigrada. They have long exserted limbs and long prehensile claws. Both jaws are furnished with teeth (see Illust. of Edentata), and the ears and tail are rudimentary. They inhabit South and Central America and Mexico.
v. i.
• To be idle.
Slothful
a.
• Addicted to sloth; inactive; sluggish; lazy; indolent; idle.
Slothhound
n.
(Zool.) See Sleuthhound.
Slotted
a.
• Having a slot.
Slotting
n.
• The act or process of making slots, or mortises.
Slouch
n.
• A hanging down of the head; a drooping attitude; a limp appearance; an ungainly, clownish gait; a sidewise depression or hanging down, as of a hat brim.
• An awkward, heavy, clownish fellow.
v. i.
• To droop, as the head.
• To walk in a clumsy, lazy manner.
v. t.
• To cause to hang down; to depress at the side; as, to slouth the hat.
Slouching
a.
• Hanging down at the side; limp; drooping; without firmness or shapeliness; moving in an ungainly manner.
Slouchy
a.
• Slouching.
Slough
a.
• Slow.
n.
• A place of deep mud or mire; a hole full of mire.

• A wet place; a swale; a side channel or inlet from a river.
• imp. of Slee, to slay. Slew.
n.
• The skin, commonly the cast-off skin, of a serpent or of some similar animal.
(Med.) The dead mass separating from a foul sore; the dead part which separates from the living tissue in mortification.
v. i.
(Med.) To form a slough; to separate in the form of dead matter from the living tissues; — often used with off, or away; as, a sloughing ulcer; the dead tissues slough off slowly.
v. t.
• To cast off; to discard as refuse.
Sloughing
n.
(Zool.) The act of casting off the skin or shell, as do insects and crustaceans; ecdysis.
Sloughy
a.
• Full of sloughs, miry.
a.
• Resembling, or of the nature of, a slough, or the dead matter which separates from living flesh.
Sloven
n.
• A man or boy habitually negligent of neathess and order; — the correlative term to slattern, or slut.
Slovenliness
n.
• The quality or state of being slovenly.
Slovenly
adv.
• a slovenly manner.
Slovenness
n.
• Slovenliness.
Slovenry
n.
• Slovenliness.
Slow
• imp. of Slee, to slay. Slew.
a.
• Moving a short space in a relatively long time; not swift; not quick in motion; not rapid; moderate; deliberate; as, a slow stream; a slow motion.
• Not happening in a short time; gradual; late.
• Not ready; not prompt or quick; dilatory; sluggish; as, slow of speech, and slow of tongue.
• Not hasty; not precipitate; acting with deliberation; tardy; inactive.
• Behind in time; indicating a time earlier than the true time; as, the clock or watch is slow.
• Not advancing or improving rapidly; as, the slow growth of arts and sciences.
• Heavy in wit; not alert, prompt, or spirited; wearisome; dull.
adv.
• Slowly.
v. t.
• To render slow; to slacken the speed of; to retard; to delay; as, to slow a steamer.
v. i.
• To go slower; — often with up; as, the train slowed up before crossing the bridge.
n.
• A moth.
Slowback
n.
• A lubber; an idle fellow; a loiterer.
Slowenly
a.
• Having the habits of a sloven; negligent of neatness and order, especially in dress.
• Characteristic of a solven; lacking neatness and order; evincing negligence; as, slovenly dress.
Slowh
• imp. of Slee,to slay.
Slowhound
n.
• A sleuthhound.
Slowly
adv.
• In a slow manner; moderately; not rapidly; not early; not rashly; not readly; tardly.
Slowness
n.
• The quality or state of being slow.
Slows
n.
(Med.) Milk sickness.
Slowworm
n.
(Zool.) A lecertilian reptile; the blindworm.
Slub
n.
• A roll of wool slightly twisted; a rove; — called also slubbing.
v. t.
• To draw out and twist slightly; — said of slivers of wool.
Slubber
v. t.
• To do lazily, imperfectly, or coarsely.
• To daub; to stain; to cover carelessly.
n.
• A slubbing machine.
Slubberdegullion
n.
• A mean, dirty wretch.
Slubberingly
adv.
• In a slovenly, or hurried and imperfect, manner.
Slubbing
a. & n.
• from Slub.
Sludge
n.
• Mud; mire; soft mud; slush.
• Small floating pieces of ice, or masses of saturated snow.
(Mining) See Slime, 4.
Sludy
a.
• Miry; slushy.
Slue
v. t.
(Naut.) To turn about a fixed point, usually the center or axis, as a spar or piece of timber; to turn; — used also of any heavy body.
• In general, to turn about; to twist; — often used reflexively and followed by round.
v. i.
• To turn about; to turn from the course; to slip or slide and turn from an expected or desired course; — often followed by round.
n.
• See Sloough, 2.
Slug
n.
• A drone; a slow, lazy fellow; a sluggard.
• A hindrance; an obstruction.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial pulmonate mollusks belonging to Limax and several related genera, in which the shell is either small and concealed in the mantle, or altogether wanting. They are closely allied to the land snails.
(Zool.) Any smooth, soft larva of a sawfly or moth which creeps like a mollusk; as, the pear slug; rose slug.
• A ship that sails slowly.
• An irregularly shaped piece of metal, used as a missile for a gun.
(Print.) A thick strip of metal less than type high, and as long as the width of a column or a page, — used in spacing out pages and to separate display lines, etc.
v. i.
• To move slowly; to lie idle.
v. t.
• To make sluggish.
v. t.
• To load with a slug or slugs; as, to slug a gun.
• To strike heavily.
v. i.
• To become reduced in diameter, or changed in shape, by passing from a larger to a smaller part of the bore of the barrel; — said of a bullet when fired from a gun, pistol, or other firearm.
Slugabed
n.
• One who indulges in lying abed; a sluggard.
Sluggard
n.
• A person habitually lazy, idle, and inactive; a drone.
a.
• Sluggish; lazy.
Sluggardize
v. t.
• To make lazy.
Sluggardy
n.
• The state of being a sluggard; sluggishness; sloth.
Slugger
n.
• A bucket for removing mud from a bored hole; a sand pump.
Slugger
n.
• One who strikes heavy blows; hence, a boxer; a prize fighter.
Sluggish
a.
• Habitually idle and lazy; slothful; dull; inactive; as, a sluggish man.
• Slow; having little motion; as, a sluggish stream.
• Having no power to move one's self or itself; inert.
• Characteristic of a sluggard; dull; stupid; tame; simple.
Sluggy
a.
• Sluggish.
Slugs
n. pl.
(Mining) Half-roasted ore.
Slugworm
n.
(Zool.) Any caterpillar which has the general appearance of a slug, as do those of certain moths belonging to Limacodes and allied genera, and those of certain sawflies.
Sluice
n.
• An artifical passage for water, fitted with a valve or gate, as in a mill stream, for stopping or regulating the flow; also, a water gate of flood gate.
• Hence, an opening or channel through which anything flows; a source of supply.
• The stream flowing through a flood gate.
(Mining) A long box or trough through which water flows, — used for washing auriferous earth.
v. t.
• To emit by, or as by, flood gates.
• To wet copiously, as by opening a sluice; as, to sluice meadows.
• To wash with, or in, a stream of water running through a sluice; as, to sluice eart or gold dust in mining.
Sluiceway
n.
• An artificial channel into which water is let by a sluice; specifically, a trough constructed over the bed of a stream, so that logs, lumber, or rubbish can be floated down to some convenient place of delivery.
Sluicy
a.
• Falling copiously or in streams, as from a sluice.
Slum
n.
• A foul back street of a city, especially one filled with a poor, dirty, degraded, and often vicious population; any low neighborhood or dark retreat; — usually in the plural; as, Westminster slums are haunts for theives.
(Mining) Same as Slimes.
Slumber
v. i.
• To sleep; especially, to sleep lightly; to doze.
• To be in a state of negligence, sloth, supineness, or inactivity.
v. t.
• To lay to sleep.
• To stun; to stupefy.
n.
• Sleep; especially, light sleep; sleep that is not deep or sound; repose.
Slumberer
n.
• One who slumbers; a sleeper.
Slumberingly
adv.
• In a slumbering manner.
Slumberless
a.
• Without slumber; sleepless.
Slumberous
a.
• Inviting slumber; soporiferous.
• Being in the repose of slumber; sleepy; drowsy.
Slumbery
a.
• Sleepy.
Slumbrous
a.
• Slumberous.
Slumming
vb. n.
• Visiting slums.
Slump
n.
• The gross amount; the mass; the lump.
v. t.
• To lump; to throw into a mess.
v. i.
• To fall or sink suddenly through or in, when walking on a surface, as on thawing snow or ice, partly frozen ground, a bog, etc., not strong enough to bear the person.
n.
• A boggy place.
• The noise made by anything falling into a hole, or into a soft, miry place.
Slumpy
a.
• Easily broken through; boggy; marshy; swampy.
Slung
• imp. & p. p. of Sling.
Slunk
• imp. & p. p. of Slink.
Slur
v. t.
• To soil; to sully; to contaminate; to disgrace.
• To disparage; to traduce.
• To cover over; to disguise; to conceal; to pass over lightly or with little notice.
• To cheat, as by sliding a die; to trick.
• To pronounce indistinctly; as, to slur syllables.
(Mus.) To sing or perform in a smooth, gliding style; to connect smoothly in performing, as several notes or tones.
(Print.) To blur or double, as an impression from type; to mackle.
n.
• A mark or stain; hence, a slight reproach or disgrace; a stigma; a reproachful intimation; an innuendo.
• A trick played upon a person; an imposition.
(Mus.) A mark, thus [&upslur; or &downslur;], connecting notes that are to be sung to the same syllable, or made in one continued breath of a wind instrument, or with one stroke of a bow; a tie; a sign of legato.
• In knitting machines, a contrivance for depressing the sinkers successively by passing over them.
Slurred
a.
(Mus.) Marked with a slur; performed in a smooth, gliding style, like notes marked with a slur.
Slush
n.
• Soft mud.
• A mixture of snow and water; half-melted snow.
• A soft mixture of grease and other materials, used for lubrication.
• The refuse grease and fat collected in cooking, especially on shipboard.
(Mach.) A mixture of white lead and lime, with which the bright parts of machines, such as the connecting rods of steamboats, are painted to be preserved from oxidation.
v. t.
• To smear with slush or grease; as, to slush a mast.
• To paint with a mixture of white lead and lime.
Slushy
a.
• Abounding in slush; characterized by soft mud or half-melted snow; as, the streets are slushy; the snow is slushy.
Slut
n.
• An untidy woman; a slattern.
• A servant girl; a drudge.
• A female dog; a bitch.
Slutch
n.
• Slush.
Slutchy
a.
• Slushy.
Sluthhound
n.
• Sleuthhound.
Sluttery
n.
• The qualities and practices of a slut; sluttishness; slatternlines.
Sluttish
a.
• Like a slut; untidy; indecently negligent of cleanliness; disorderly; as, a sluttish woman.
Sly
a.
• Dexterous in performing an action, so as to escape notice; nimble; skillful; cautious; shrewd; knowing; — in a good sense.
• Artfully cunning; secretly mischievous; wily.
• Done with, and marked by, artful and dexterous secrecy; subtle; as, a sly trick.
• Light or delicate; slight; thin.
adv.
• Slyly.
Slyboots
n.
• A humerous appellation for a sly, cunning, or waggish person.
Slyly
adv.
• In a sly manner; shrewdly; craftily.
Slyness
n.
• The quality or state of being sly.
Slype
n.
(Arch.) A narrow passage between two buildings, as between the transept and chapter house of a monastery.
Smack
n.
(Naut.) A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade.
n.
• Taste or flavor, esp. a slight taste or flavor; savor; tincture; as, a smack of bitter in the medicine. Also used figuratively.
• A small quantity; a taste.
• A loud kiss; a buss.
• A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip.
• A quick, smart blow; a slap.
adv.
• As if with a smack or slap.
v. i.
• To have a smack; to be tinctured with any particular taste.
• To have or exhibit indications of the presence of any character or quality.
• To kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate; to kiss with a sharp noise; to buss.
• To make a noise by the separation of the lips after tasting anything.
v. t.
• To kiss with a sharp noise; to buss.
• To open, as the lips, with an inarticulate sound made by a quick compression and separation of the parts of the mouth; to make a noise with, as the lips, by separating them in the act of kissing or after tasting.
• To make a sharp noise by striking; to crack; as, to smack a whip.
Smacking
n.
• A sharp, quick noise; a smack.
a.
• Making a sharp, brisk sound; hence, brisk; as, a smacking breeze.
Small
a.
• Having little size, compared with other things of the same kind; little in quantity or degree; diminutive; not large or extended in dimension; not great; not much; inconsiderable; as, a small man; a small river.
• Being of slight consequence; feeble in influence or importance; unimportant; trivial; insignificant; as, a small fault; a small business.
• Envincing little worth or ability; not large-minded; — sometimes, in reproach, paltry; mean.
• Not prolonged in duration; not extended in time; short; as, after a small space.
• Weak; slender; fine; gentle; soft; not loud.
adv.
• In or to small extent, quantity, or degree; little; slightly.
• Not loudly; faintly; timidly.
n.
• The small or slender part of a thing; as, the small of the leg or of the back.
• Smallclothes.
• Same as Little go. See under Little, a.
v. t.
• To make little or less.
Smallage
n.
(Bot.) A biennial umbelliferous plant (Apium graveolens) native of the seacoats of Europe and Asia. When deprived of its acrid and even poisonous properties by cultivation, it becomes celery.
Smallclothes
n. pl.
• A man's garment for the hips and thighs; breeches. See Breeches.
Smallish
a.
• Somewhat small.
Smallness
n.
• The quality or state of being small.
Smallpox
n.
(Med.) A contagious, constitutional, febrile disease characterized by a peculiar eruption; variola. The cutaneous eruption is at first a collection of papules which become vesicles (first flat, subsequently umbilicated) and then pustules, and finally thick crusts which slough after a certain time, often leaving a pit, or scar.
Smalls
n. pl.
• See Small, n., 2, 3.
Smallsword
n.
• A light sword used for thrusting only; especially, the sword worn by civilians of rank in the eighteenth century.
Smally
adv.
• In a small quantity or degree; with minuteness.
Smalt
n.
• A deep blue pigment or coloring material used in various arts. It is a vitreous substance made of cobalt, potash, and calcined quartz fused, and reduced to a powder.
Smaragd
n.
• The emerald.
Smaragdine
a.
• Of or pertaining to emerald; resembling emerald; of an emerald green.
Smaragdite
n.
(Min.) A green foliated kind of amphibole, observed in eclogite and some varietis of gabbro.
Smart
v. i.
• To feel a lively, pungent local pain; — said of some part of the body as the seat of irritation; as, my finger smarts; these wounds smart.
• To feel a pungent pain of mind; to feel sharp pain or grief; to suffer; to feel the sting of evil.
v. t.
• To cause a smart in.
n.
• Quick, pungent, lively pain; a pricking local pain, as the pain from puncture by nettles.
• Severe, pungent pain of mind; pungent grief; as, the smart of affliction.
• A fellow who affects smartness, briskness, and vivacity; a dandy.
• Smart money (see below).
a.
• Causing a smart; pungent; pricking; as, a smart stroke or taste.
• Keen; severe; poignant; as, smart pain.
• Vigorous; sharp; severe.
• Accomplishing, or able to accomplish, results quickly; active; sharp; clever.
• Efficient; vigorous; brilliant.
• Marked by acuteness or shrewdness; quick in suggestion or reply; vivacious; witty; as, a smart reply; a smart saying.
• Pretentious; showy; spruce; as, a smart gown.
• Brisk; fresh; as, a smart breeze.
Smarten
v. t.
• To make smart or spruce; — usually with up.
Smartle
v. i.
• To waste away.
Smartly
adv.
• In a smart manner.
Smartness
n.
• The quality or state of being smart.
Smartweed
n.
(Bot.) An acrid plant of the genus Polygonum (P. Hydropiper), which produces smarting if applied where the skin is tender.
Smash
v. t.
• To break in pieces by violence; to dash to pieces; to crush.
v. i.
• To break up, or to pieces suddenly, as the result of collision or pressure.
n.
• A breaking or dashing to pieces; utter destruction; wreck.
• Hence, bankruptcy.
Smasher
n.
• One who, or that which, smashes or breaks things to pieces.
• Anything very large or extraordinary.
• One who passes counterfeit coin.
Smatch
n.
• Taste; tincture; smack.
v. i.
• To smack.
Smatter
v. i.
• To talk superficially or ignorantly; to babble; to chatter.
• To have a slight taste, or a slight, superficial knowledge, of anything; to smack.
v. t.
• To talk superficially about.
• To gain a slight taste of; to acquire a slight, superficial knowledge of; to smack.
n.
• Superficial knowledge; a smattering.
Smatterer
n.
• One who has only a slight, superficial knowledge; a sciolist.
Smattering
n.
• A slight, superficial knowledge of something; sciolism.
Smear
v. t.
• To overspread with anything unctuous, viscous, or adhesive; to daub; as, to smear anything with oil.
• To soil in any way; to contaminate; to pollute; to stain morally; as, to be smeared with infamy.
n.
• A fat, oily substance; oinment.
• Hence, a spot made by, or as by, an unctuous or adhesive substance; a blot or blotch; a daub; a stain.
Smeared
a.
(Zool.) Having the color mark ings ill defined, as if rubbed; as, the smeared dagger moth (Apatela oblinita).
Smeary
a.
• Tending to smear or soil; adhesive; viscous.
Smeath
n.
(Zool.) The smew.
Smectite
n.
(Min.) A hydrous silicate of alumina, of a greenish color, which, in certain states of humidity, appears transparent and almost gelatinous.
Smee
n.
(Zool.) The pintail duck.
• The widgeon.
• The poachard.
• The smew.
Smeeth
v. t.
• To smoke; to blacken with smoke; to rub with soot.
v. t.
• To smooth.
Smegma
n.
(Physiol.) The matter secreted by any of the sebaceous glands.
• The soapy substance covering the skin of newborn infants
• The cheesy, sebaceous matter which collects between the glans penis and the foreskin.
Smegmatic
a.
• Being of the nature of soap; soapy; cleansing; detersive.
Smeir
n.
• A salt glaze on pottery, made by adding common salt to an earthenware glaze.
Smell
v. t.
• To perceive by the olfactory nerves, or organs of smell; to have a sensation of, excited through the nasal organs when affected by the appropriate materials or qualities; to obtain the scent of; as, to smell a rose; to smell perfumes.
• To detect or perceive, as if by the sense of smell; to scent out; — often with out.
• To give heed to.
v. i.
• To affect the olfactory nerves; to have an odor or scent; — often followed by of; as, to smell of smoke, or of musk.
• To have a particular tincture or smack of any quality; to savor; as, a report smells of calumny.
• To exercise the sense of smell.
• To exercise sagacity.
n.
(Physiol.) The sense or faculty by which certain qualities of bodies are perceived through the instrumentally of the olfactory nerves. See Sense.
• The quality of any thing or substance, or emanation therefrom, which affects the olfactory organs; odor; scent; fragrance; perfume; as, the smell of mint.
Smeller
n.
• One who smells, or perceives by the sense of smell; one who gives out smell.
• The nose.
Smelling
n.
• The act of one who smells.
• The sense by which odors are perceived; the sense of smell.
Smelt
imp. & p. p.
• of Smell.
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small silvery salmonoid fishes of the genus Osmerus and allied genera, which ascend rivers to spawn, and sometimes become landlocked in lakes. They are esteemed as food, and have a peculiar odor and taste.
• Fig.: A gull; a simpleton.
v. t.
(Metal.) To melt or fuse, as, ore, for the purpose of separating and refining the metal; hence, to reduce; to refine; to flux or scorify; as, to smelt tin.
Smelter
n.
• One who, or that which, smelts.
Smeltery
n.
• A house or place for smelting.
Smeltie
n.
• A fish, the bib.
Smelting
• a. & n. from Smelt.
Smerk
n. & v.
• See Smirk.
Smerlin
n.
(Zool.) A small loach.
Smew
n.
(Zool.) small European merganser (Mergus albellus) which has a white crest; — called also smee, smee duck, white merganser, and white nun.
• The hooded merganser.
Smicker
v. i.
• To look amorously or wantonly; to smirk.
a.
• Amorous; wanton; gay; spruce.
Smickering
n.
• Amorous glance or inclination.
Smicket
n.
• A woman's under-garment; a smock.
Smickly
adv.
• Smugly; finically.
Smiddy
n.
• A smithy.
Smift
n.
• A match for firing a charge of powder, as in blasting; a fuse.
Smight
v. t.
• To smite.
Smilacin
n.
(Chem.) See Parrilin.
Smilax
n.
(Bot.) A genus of perennial climbing plants, usually with a prickly woody stem; green brier, or cat brier. The rootstocks of certain species are the source of the medicine called sarsaparilla.
• A delicate trailing plant (Myrsiphyllum asparagoides) much used for decoration. It is a native of the Cape of Good Hope.
Smile
v. i.
• To express amusement, pleasure, moderate joy, or love and kindness, by the features of the face; to laugh silently.
• To express slight contempt by a look implying sarcasm or pity; to sneer.
• To look gay and joyous; to have an appearance suited to excite joy; as, smiling spring; smilimg plenty.
• To be propitious or favorable; to favor; to countenance; — often with on; as, to smile on one's labors.
v. t.
• To express by a smile; as, to smile consent; to smile a welcome to visitors.
• To affect in a certain way with a smile.
n.
• The act of smiling; a peculiar change or brightening of the face, which expresses pleasure, moderate joy, mirth, approbation, or kindness; — opposed to frown.
• A somewhat similar expression of countenance, indicative of satisfaction combined with malevolent feelings, as contempt, scorn, etc; as, a scornful smile.
• Favor; countenance; propitiousness; as, the smiles of Providence.
• Gay or joyous appearance; as, the smiles of spring.
Smileless
a.
• Not having a smile.
Smiler
n.
• One who smiles.
Smilet
n.
• A little smile.
Smilingly
adv.
• In a smiling manner.
Smilingness
n.
• Quality or state of being smiling.
Smilodon
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct genus of saber-toothed tigers. See Machrodus.
Smilt
v. i.
• To melt.
Sminthurid
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous small species of springtails, of the family Sminthurid, — usually found on flowers. See Illust. under Collembola.
Smirch
v. t.
• To smear with something which stains, or makes dirty; to smutch; to begrime; to soil; to sully.
n.
• A smutch; a dirty stain.
Smirk
v. i.
• To smile in an affected or conceited manner; to smile with affected complaisance; to simper.
n.
• A forced or affected smile; a simper.
a.
• Nice,; smart; spruce; affected; simpering.
Smirkingly
adv.
• With smirking; with a smirk.
Smirky
a.
• Smirk; smirking.
Smit
• imp. & p. p. of Smite.
• 3d. pers. sing. pres. of Smite.
Smite
v. t.
• To strike; to inflict a blow upon with the hand, or with any instrument held in the hand, or with a missile thrown by the hand; as, to smite with the fist, with a rod, sword, spear, or stone.
• To cause to strike; to use as an instrument in striking or hurling.
• To destroy the life of by beating, or by weapons of any kind; to slay by a blow; to kill; as, to smite one with the sword, or with an arrow or other instrument.
• To put to rout in battle; to overthrow by war.
• To blast; to destroy the life or vigor of, as by a stroke or by some visitation.
• To afflict; to chasten; to punish.
• To strike or affect with passion, as love or fear.
v. i.
• To strike; to collide; to beat.
n.
• The act of smiting; a blow.
Smiter
n.
• One who smites.
Smith
n.
• One who forgess with the hammer; one who works in metals; as, a blacksmith, goldsmith, silversmith, and the like.
• One who makes or effects anything.
v. t.
• To beat into shape; to fprge.
Smithcraft
n.
• The art or occupation of a smith; smithing.
Smither
n.
• Light, fine rain.
• Fragments; atoms; finders.
Smithereens
n. pl.
• Fragments; atoms; smithers.
Smithery
n.
• The workshop of a smith; a smithy or stithy.
• Work done by a smith; smithing.
Smithing
n.
• The act or art of working or forging metals, as iron, into any desired shape.
Smithsonian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Englishman J.L.M. Smithson, or to the national institution of learning which he endowed at Washington, D.C.; as, the Smithsonian Institution; Smithsonian Reports.
n.
• The Smithsonian Institution.
Smithsonite
n.
(Min.) Native zinc carbonate. It generally occurs in stalactitic, reniform, or botryoidal shapes, of a white to gray, green, or brown color. See Note under Calamine.
Smithy
n.
• The workshop of a smith, esp. a blacksmith; a smithery; a stithy.
Smitt
n.
• Fine clay or ocher made up into balls, used for marking sheep
Smitten
• p. p. of Smite.
Smittle
v. t.
• To infect.
n.
• Infection.
Smock
n.
• A woman's under-garment; a shift; a chemise.
• A blouse; a smoock frock.
a.
• Of or pertaining to a smock; resembling a smock; hence, of or pertaining to a woman.
v. t.
• To provide with, or clothe in, a smock or a smock frock.
Smockless
a.
• Wanting a smock.
Smokable
a.
• Capable of being smoked; suitable or ready to be smoked; as, smokable tobacco.
Smoke
n.
• The visible exhalation, vapor, or substance that escapes, or expelled, from a burning body, especially from burning vegetable matter, as wood, coal, peat, or the like.
• That which resembles smoke; a vapor; a mist.
• Anything unsubstantial, as idle talk.
• The act of smoking, esp. of smoking tobacco; as, to have a smoke.
v. i.
• To emit smoke; to throw off volatile matter in the form of vapor or exhalation; to reek.
• Hence, to burn; to be kindled; to rage.
• To raise a dust or smoke by rapid motion.
• To draw into the mouth the smoke of tobacco burning in a pipe or in the form of a cigar, cigarette, etc.; to habitually use tobacco in this manner.
• To suffer severely; to be punished.
v. t.
• To apply smoke to; to hang in smoke; to disinfect, to cure, etc., by smoke; as, to smoke or fumigate infected clothing; to smoke beef or hams for preservation.
• To fill or scent with smoke; hence, to fill with incense; to perfume.
• To smell out; to hunt out; to find out; to detect.
• To ridicule to the face; to quiz.
• To inhale and puff out the smoke of, as tobacco; to burn or use in smoking; as, to smoke a pipe or a cigar.
• To subject to the operation of smoke, for the purpose of annoying or driving out; — often with out; as, to smoke a woodchuck out of his burrow.
Smokehouse
n.
• A building where meat or fish is cured by subjecting it to a dense smoke.
Smokejack
n.
• A contrivance for turning a spit by means of a fly or wheel moved by the current of ascending air in a chimney.
Smokeless
a.
• Making or having no smoke.
Smoker
n.
• One who dries or preserves by smoke.
• One who smokes tobacco or the like.
• A smoking car or compartment.
Smokestack
n.
• A chimney; esp., a pipe serving as a chimney, as the pipe which carries off the smoke of a locomotive, the funnel of a steam vessel, etc.
Smokily
adv.
• In a smoky manner.
Smokiness
n.
• The quality or state of being smoky.
Smoking
a. & n.
• from Smoke.
Smoky
a.
• Emitting smoke, esp. in large quantities or in an offensive manner; fumid; as, smoky fires.
• Having the appearance or nature of smoke; as, a smoky fog.
• Filled with smoke, or with a vapor resembling smoke; thick; as, a smoky atmosphere.
• Subject to be filled with smoke from chimneys or fireplace; as, a smoky house.
• Tarnished with smoke; noisome with smoke; as, smoky rafters; smoky cells.
• Suspicious; open to suspicion.
Smolt
n.
(Zool.) A young salmon two or three years old, when it has acquired its silvery color.
Smooch
v. t.
• See Smutch.
Smoor
v. t.
• To suffocate or smother.
Smooth
a.
• Having an even surface, or a surface so even that no roughness or points can be perceived by the touch; not rough; as, smooth glass; smooth porcelain.
• Evenly spread or arranged; sleek; as, smooth hair.
• Gently flowing; moving equably; not ruffled or obstructed; as, a smooth stream.
• Flowing or uttered without check, obstruction, or hesitation; not harsh; voluble; even; fluent.
• Bland; mild; smoothing; fattering.
(Mech. & Physics) Causing no resistance to a body sliding along its surface; frictionless.
adv.
• Smoothly.
n.
• The act of making smooth; a stroke which smooths.
• That which is smooth; the smooth part of anything.
v. t.
• To make smooth; to make even on the surface by any means; as, to smooth a board with a plane; to smooth cloth with an iron.
• To free from obstruction; to make easy
• To free from harshness; to make flowing
• To palliate; to gloze; as, to smooth over a fault
• To give a smooth or calm appearance to
• To ease; to regulate
v. i.
• To flatter; to use blandishment.
Smoothbore
a.
(Gun.) Having a bore of perfectly smooth surface; — distinguished from rifled.
n.
• A smoothbore firearm.
Smoothen
v. t.
• To make smooth.
Smoother
n.
• One who, or that which, smooths.
Smoothing
a. & n.
• fr. Smooth, v.
Smoothly
adv.
• In a smooth manner.
Smoothness
n.
• Quality or state of being smooth.
Smore
v. t.
• To smother. See Smoor.
Smote
• imp. (∧ rare p. p.) of Smite.
Smoterlich
a.
• Dirty foul.
Smother
v. t.
• To destroy the life of by suffocation; to deprive of the air necessary for life; to cover up closely so as to prevent breathing; to suffocate; as, to smother a child.
• To affect as by suffocation; to stife; to deprive of air by a thick covering, as of ashes, of smoke, or the like; as, to smother a fire.
• Hence, to repress the action of; to cover from public view; to suppress; to conceal; as, to smother one's displeasure.
v. i.
• To be suffocated or stifled.
• To burn slowly, without sufficient air; to smolder.
n.
• Stifling smoke; thick dust.
• A state of suppression.
Smotheriness
n.
• The quality or state of being smothery.
Smotheringly
adv.
• In a smothering manner.
Smothery
a.
• Tending to smother; stifling.
Smouch
v. t.
• To kiss closely.
v. t.
• To smutch; to soil; as, to smouch the face.
n.
• A dark soil or stain; a smutch.
Smoulder
v. i.
• See Smolder.
Smouldry
a.
• See Smoldry.
Smudge
n.
• A suffocating smoke.
• A heap of damp combustibles partially ignited and burning slowly, placed on the windward side of a house, tent, or the like, in order, by the thick smoke, to keep off mosquitoes or other insects.
• That which is smeared upon anything; a stain; a blot; a smutch; a smear.
v. t.
• To stifle or smother with smoke; to smoke by means of a smudge.
• To smear; to smutch; to soil; to blacken with smoke.
Smudginess
n.
• The quality or state of being smudged, soiled, or blurred.
Smug
a.
• Studiously neat or nice, especially in dress; spruce; affectedly precise; smooth and prim.
v. t.
• To make smug, or spruce.
Smuggle
v. t.
• To import or export secretly, contrary to the law; to import or export without paying the duties imposed by law; as, to smuggle lace.
• Fig.: To convey or introduce clandestinely.
v. i.
• To import or export in violation of the customs laws.
Smuggler
n.
• One who smuggles.
• A vessel employed in smuggling.
Smugly
adv.
• In a smug manner.
Smugness
n.
• The quality or state of being smug.
Smut
n.
• Foul matter, like soot or coal dust; also, a spot or soil made by such matter.
(Mining) Bad, soft coal, containing much earthy matter, found in the immediate locality of faults.
(Bot.) An affection of cereal grains producing a swelling which is at length resolved into a powdery sooty mass. It is caused by parasitic fungi of the genus Ustilago. Ustilago segetum, or U. Carbo, is the commonest kind; that of Indian corn is Ustilago maydis.
• Obscene language; ribaldry; obscenity.
v. t.
• To stain or mark with smut; to blacken with coal, soot, or other dirty substance.
• To taint with mildew, as grain.
• To blacken; to sully or taint; to tarnish.
• To clear of smut; as, to smut grain for the mill.
v. i.
• To gather smut; to be converted into smut; to become smutted.
• To give off smut; to crock.
Smutch
n.
• A stain; a dirty spot.
v. t.
• To blacken with smoke, soot, or coal.
Smutchin
n.
• Snuff.
Smutty
a.
• Soiled with smut; smutted.
• Tainted with mildew; as, smutty corn.
• Obscene; not modest or pure; as, a smutty saying.
Smyrniot
a.
• Of or pertaining to Smyrna.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Smyrna.
Snack
n.
• A share; a part or portion; — obsolete, except in the colloquial phrase, to go snacks, i. e., to share.
• A slight, hasty repast.
Snacket
n.
• See Snecket.
Snacot
n.
(Zool.) A pipefish of the genus Syngnathus. See Pipefish.
Snaffle
n.
• A kind of bridle bit, having a joint in the part to be placed in the mouth, and rings and cheek pieces at the ends, but having no curb; — called also snaffle bit.
v. t.
• To put a snaffle in the mouth of; to subject to the snaffle; to bridle.
Snag
n.
• A stump or base of a branch that has been lopped off; a short branch, or a sharp or rough branch; a knot; a protuberance.
• A tooth projecting beyond the rest; contemptuously, a broken or decayed tooth.
• A tree, or a branch of a tree, fixed in the bottom of a river or other navigable water, and rising nearly or quite to the surface, by which boats are sometimes pierced and sunk.
(Zool.) One of the secondary branches of an antler.
v. t.
• To cut the snags or branches from, as the stem of a tree; to hew roughly.
• To injure or destroy, as a steamboat or other vessel, by a snag, or projecting part of a sunken tree.
Snagged
a.
• Full of snags; snaggy.
Snaggy
a.
• Full of snags; full of short, rough branches or sharp points; abounding with knots.
• Snappish; cross; ill-tempered.
Snail
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial air-breathing gastropods belonging to the genus Helix and many allied genera of the family Helicidae. They are abundant in nearly all parts of the world except the arctic regions, and feed almost entirely on vegetation; a land sanil.
• Any gastropod having a general resemblance to the true snails, including fresh-water and marine species. See Pond snail, under Pond, and Sea snail.
• Hence, a drone; a slow-moving person or thing.
(Mech.) A spiral cam, or a flat piece of metal of spirally curved outline, used for giving motion to, or changing the position of, another part, as the hammer tail of a striking clock.
• A tortoise; in ancient warfare, a movable roof or shed to protect besiegers; a testudo.
(Bot.) The pod of the sanil clover.
Snailfish
n.
(Zool.) See Sea snail (a).
Snake
n.
(Zool.) Any species of the order Ophidia; an ophidian; a serpent, whether harmless or venomous. See Ophidia, and Serpent.
v. t.
• To drag or draw, as a snake from a hole; — often with out.
(Naut.) To wind round spirally, as a large rope with a smaller, or with cord, the small rope lying in the spaces between the strands of the large one; to worm.
v. i.
• To crawl like a snake.
Snakebird
n.
(Zool.) Any one of four species of aquatic birds of the genus Anhinga or Plotus. They are allied to the gannets and cormorants, but have very long, slender, flexible necks, and sharp bills.
(Zool.) The wryneck.
Snakefish
n.
(Zool.) The band fish.
• The lizard fish.
Snakehead
n.
• A loose, bent-up end of one of the strap rails, or flat rails, formerly used on American railroads. It was sometimes so bent by the passage of a train as to slip over a wheel and pierce the bottom of a car.
(Bot.) The turtlehead.
• The Guinea-hen flower. See Snake's-head, and under Guinea.
Snakeneck
n.
(Zool.) The snakebird, 1.
Snakeroot
n.
(Bot.) Any one of several plants of different genera and species, most of which are (or were formerly) reputed to be efficacious as remedies for the bites of serpents; also, the roots of any of these.
Snakestone
n.
• A kind of hone slate or whetstone obtained in Scotland.
(Paleon.) An ammonite; — so called from its form, which resembles that of a coiled snake.
Snakeweed
n.
(Bot.) A kind of knotweed (Polygonum Bistorta).
• The Virginia snakeroot. See Snakeroot.
Snakewood
n.
(Bot.) An East Indian climbing plant (Strychnos colubrina) having a bitter taste, and supposed to be a remedy for the bite of the hooded serpent.
• An East Indian climbing shrub (Ophioxylon serpentinum) which has the roots and stems twisted so as to resemble serpents.
• Same as Trumpetwood.
• A tropical American shrub (Plumieria rubra) which has very fragrant red blossoms.
• Same as Letterwood.
Snakish
a.
• Having the qualities or characteristics of a snake; snaky.
Snaky
a.
• Of or pertaining to a snake or snakes; resembling a snake; serpentine; winding.
• Sly; cunning; insinuating; deceitful.
• Covered with serpents; having serpents; as, a snaky rod or wand.
Snap
v. t.
• To break at once; to break short, as substances that are brittle.
• To strike, to hit, or to shut, with a sharp sound.
• To bite or seize suddenly, especially with the teeth.
• To break upon suddenly with sharp, angry words; to treat snappishly; — usually with up.
• To crack; to cause to make a sharp, cracking noise; as, to snap a whip.
• To project with a snap.
v. i.
• To break short, or at once; to part asunder suddenly; as, a mast snaps; a needle snaps.
• To give forth, or produce, a sharp, cracking noise; to crack; as, blazing firewood snaps.
• To make an effort to bite; to aim to seize with the teeth; to catch eagerly (at anything); — often with at; as, a dog snapsat a passenger; a fish snaps at the bait.
• To utter sharp, harsh, angry words; — often with at; as, to snap at a child.
• To miss fire; as, the gun snapped.
n.
• A sudden breaking or rupture of any substance.
• A sudden, eager bite; a sudden seizing, or effort to seize, as with the teeth.
• A sudden, sharp motion or blow, as with the finger sprung from the thumb, or the thumb from the finger.
• A sharp, abrupt sound, as that made by the crack of a whip; as, the snap of the trigger of a gun.
• A greedy fellow.
• That which is, or may be, snapped up; something bitten off, seized, or obtained by a single quick movement; hence, a bite, morsel, or fragment; a scrap.
• A sudden severe interval or spell; — applied to the weather; as, a cold snap.
• A small catch or fastening held or closed by means of a spring, or one which closes with a snapping sound, as the catch of a bracelet, necklace, clasp of a book, etc.
(Zool.) A snap beetle.
• A thin, crisp cake, usually small, and flavored with ginger; — used chiefly in the plural.
• Briskness; vigor; energy; decision.
• Any circumstance out of which money may be made or an advantage gained.
Snapdragon
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the scrrophulariaceous genus Antirrhinum, especially the cultivated A. majus, whose showy flowers are fancifully likened to the face of a dragon.
• A West Indian herb (Ruellia tuberosa) with curiously shaped blue flowers.
• A play in which raisins are snatched from a vessel containing burning brandy, and eaten; also, that which is so eaten. See Flapdragon.
Snape
v. t.
(Shipbuilding) To bevel the end of a timber to fit against an inclined surface.
Snaphance
n.
• A spring lock for discharging a firearm; also, the firearm to which it is attached.
• A trifling or second-rate thing or person.
Snaphead
n.
• A hemispherical or rounded head to a rivet or bolt; also, a swaging tool with a cavity in its face for forming such a rounded head.
Snapper
n.
• One who, or that which, snaps; as, a snapper up of trifles; the snapper of a whip.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of large sparoid food fishes of the genus Lutjanus, abundant on the southern coasts of the United States and on both coasts of tropical America.
(Zool.) A snapping turtle; as, the alligator snapper.
(Zool.) The green woodpecker, or yaffle.
(Zool.) A snap beetle.
Snapping
• a. & n. from Snap, v.
Snappish
a.
• Apt to snap at persons or things; eager to bite; as, a snapping cur.
• Sharp in reply; apt to speak angrily or testily; easily provoked; tart; peevish.
Snappy
a.
• Snappish.
Snapsack
n.
• A knapsack.
Snapweed
n.
(Bot.) See Impatiens.
Snar
v. i.
• To snarl.
Snare
n.
• A contrivance, often consisting of a noose of cord, or the like, by which a bird or other animal may be entangled and caught; a trap; a gin.
• Hence, anything by which one is entangled and brought into trouble.
• The gut or string stretched across the lower head of a drum.
(Med.) An instrument, consisting usually of a wireloop or noose, for removing tumors, etc., by avulsion.
v. t.
• To catch with a snare; to insnare; to entangle; hence, to bring into unexpected evil, perplexity, or danger.
Snarer
n.
• One who lays snares, or entraps.
Snarl
v. t.
• To form raised work upon the outer surface of (thin metal ware) by the repercussion of a snarling iron upon the inner surface.
v. t.
• To entangle; to complicate; to involve in knots; as, to snarl a skein of thread.
• To embarrass; to insnare.
n.
• A knot or complication of hair, thread, or the like, difficult to disentangle; entanglement; hence, intricate complication; embarrassing difficulty.
v. i.
• To growl, as an angry or surly dog; to gnarl; to utter grumbling sounds.
• To speak crossly; to talk in rude, surly terms.
n.
• The act of snarling; a growl; a surly or peevish expression; an angry contention.
Snarler
n.
• One who snarls; a surly, growling animal; a grumbling, quarrelsome fellow.
n.
• One who makes use of a snarling iron.
Snarling
a. & n.
• from Snarl, v.
Snary
a.
• Resembling, or consisting of, snares; entangling; insidious.
Snast
n.
• The snuff, or burnt wick, of a candle.
Snatch
n.
• The handle of a scythe; a snead.
Snatch
v. t.
• To take or seize hastily, abruptly, or without permission or ceremony; as, to snatch a loaf or a kiss.
• To seize and transport away; to rap.
v. i.
• To attempt to seize something suddenly; to catch; — often with at; as, to snatch at a rope.
n.
• A hasty catching or seizing; a grab; a catching at, or attempt to seize, suddenly.
• A short period of vigorous action; as, a snatch at weeding after a shower.
• A small piece, fragment, or quantity; a broken part; a scrap.
Snatcher
n.
• One who snatches, or takes abruptly.
Snatchingly
adv.
• By snatching; abruptly.
Snathe
v. t.
• To lop; to prune.
Snattock
n.
• A chip; a alice.
Snaw
n.
• Snow.
Snead
n.
• A snath.
• A line or cord; a string.
Sneak
v. i.
• To creep or steal (away or about) privately; to come or go meanly, as a person afraid or ashamed to be seen; as, to sneak away from company.
imp. & p. p.
• To act in a stealthy and cowardly manner; to behave with meanness and servility; to crouch.
v. t.
• To hide, esp. in a mean or cowardly manner.
n.
• A mean, sneaking fellow.
(Cricket) A ball bowled so as to roll along the ground; — called also grub.
Sneaker
n.
• One who sneaks.
• A vessel of drink.
Sneakiness
n.
• The quality of being sneaky.
Sneaking
a.
• Marked by cowardly concealment; deficient in openness and courage; underhand; mean; crouching. —
Sneaksby
n.
• A paltry fellow; a sneak.
Sneaky
n.
• Like a sneak; sneaking.
Sneap
v. t.
• To check; to reprimand; to rebuke; to chide.
• To nip; to blast; to blight.
n.
• A reprimand; a rebuke.
Sneb
v. t.
• To reprimand; to sneap.
Sneck
v. t.
• To fasten by a hatch; to latch, as a door.
n.
• A door latch.
Snecket
n.
• A door latch, or sneck.
Sned
v. t.
• To lop; to snathe.
Sneer
v. i.
• To show contempt by turning up the nose, or by a particular facial expression.
• To inssinuate contempt by a covert expression; to speak derisively.
• To show mirth awkwardly.
v. t.
• To utter with a grimace or contemptuous expression; to utter with a sneer; to say sneeringly; as, to sneer fulsome lies at a person.
• To treat with sneers; to affect or move by sneers.
n.
• The act of sneering.
• A smile, grin, or contortion of the face, indicative of contempt; an indirect expression or insinuation of contempt.
Sneerer
n.
• One who sneers.
Sneerful
a.
• Given to sneering.
Sneeringly
adv.
• In a sneering manner.
Sneeze
v. i.
• To emit air, chiefly through the nose, audibly and violently, by a kind of involuntary convulsive force, occasioned by irritation of the inner membrane of the nose.
n.
• A sudden and violent ejection of air with an audible sound, chiefly through the nose.
Sneezeweed
n.
(Bot.) A yellow-flowered composite plant (Helenium autumnale) the odor of which is said to cause sneezing.
Sneezewood
n.
(Bot.) The wood of a South African tree. See Neishout.
Sneezewort
n.
(Bot.) A European herbaceous plant (Achillea Ptarmica) allied to the yarrow, having a strong, pungent smell.
Sneezing
n.
(Physiol.) The act of violently forcing air out through the nasal passages while the cavity of the mouth is shut off from the pharynx by the approximation of the soft palate and the base of the tongue.
Snell
a.
• Active; brisk; nimble; quick; sharp.
n.
• A short line of horsehair, gut, etc., by which a fishhook is attached to a longer line.
Snet
n.
• The fat of a deer.
v. t.
• The clear of mucus; to blow.
Snew
v. i.
• To snow; to abound.
Snib
v. t.
• To check; to sneap; to sneb.
n.
• A reprimand; a snub.
Snick
n.
• A small cut or mark.
(Cricket) A slight hit or tip of the ball, often unintentional.
(Fiber) A knot or irregularity in yarn.
(Furriery) A snip or cut, as in the hair of a beast.
v. t.
• To cut slightly; to strike, or strike off, as by cutting.
(Cricket) To hit (a ball) lightly.
n. & v. t.
• See Sneck.
Snicker
v. i.
• To laugh slyly; to laugh in one's sleeve.
• To laugh with audible catches of voice, as when persons attempt to suppress loud laughter.
n.
• A half suppressed, broken laugh.
Snide
a.
• Tricky; deceptive; contemptible; as, a snide lawyer; snide goods.
Sniff
v. i.
• To draw air audibly up the nose; to snuff; — sometimes done as a gesture of suspicion, offense, or contempt.
v. t.
• To draw in with the breath through the nose; as, to sniff the air of the country.
• To perceive as by sniffing; to snuff, to scent; to smell; as, to sniff danger.
n.
• The act of sniffing; perception by sniffing; that which is taken by sniffing; as, a sniff of air.
Sniffing
n.
(Physiol.) A rapid inspiratory act, in which the mouth is kept shut and the air drawn in through the nose.
Sniffle
v. i.
• To snuffle, as one does with a catarrh.
Snift
v. i.
• To snort.
• To sniff; to snuff; to smell.
n.
• A moment.
• Slight snow; sleet.
Snifting
a. & n.
• from Snift.
Snig
v. t.
• To chop off; to cut.
v. i.
• To sneak.
Snigger
n.
• See Snicker.
Sniggger
v. i.
• See Snicker.
Sniggle
v. i.
• To fish for eels by thrusting the baited hook into their holes or hiding places.
v. t.
• To catch, as an eel, by sniggling; hence, to hook; to insnare.
Snip
v. t.
• To cut off the nip or neb of, or to cut off at once with shears or scissors; to clip off suddenly; to nip; hence, to break off; to snatch away.
n.
• A single cut, as with shears or scissors; a clip.
• A small shred; a bit cut off.
• A share; a snack.
• A tailor.
• Small hand shears for cutting sheet metal.
Snipe
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of limicoline game birds of the family Scolopacidae, having a long, slender, nearly straight beak.
• A fool; a blockhead.
Snipebill
n.
• A plane for cutting deep grooves in moldings.
• A bolt by which the body of a cart is fastened to the axle.
Snipefish
n.
(Zool.) The bellows fish.
• A long, slender deep-sea fish (Nemichthys scolopaceus) with a slender beak.
Snippack
n.
(Zool.) The common snipe.
Snipper
n.
• One who snips.
Snippet
n.
• A small part or piece.
Snippety
a.
• Ridiculously small; petty.
Snite
n.
• A snipe.
v. t.
• To blow, as the nose; to snuff, as a candle.
Snivel
v. i.
• To run at the nose; to make a snuffling noise.
• To cry or whine with snuffling, as children; to cry weakly or whiningly.
n.
• Mucus from the nose; snot.
Sniveler
n.
• One who snivels, esp. one who snivels habitually.
Snively
a.
• Running at the nose; sniveling pitiful; whining.
Snob
n.
• A vulgar person who affects to be better, richer, or more fashionable, than he really is; a vulgar upstart; one who apes his superiors.
(Eng. Univ.) A townsman.
• A journeyman shoemaker.
• A workman who accepts lower than the usual wages, or who refuses to strike when his fellows do; a rat; a knobstick.
Snobbery
n.
• The quality of being snobbish; snobbishness.
Snobbish
a.
• Of or pertaining to a snob; characteristic of, or befitting, a snob; vulgarly pretentious.
Snobbishness
n.
• Vulgar affectation or ostentation; mean admiration of mean things; conduct or manners of a snob.
Snobbism
n.
• Snobbery.
Snobby
a.
• Snobbish.
Snobling
n.
• A little snob.
Snobocracy
n.
• Snobs, collectively.
Snod
n.
• A fillet; a headband; a snood.
a.
• Trimmed; smooth; neat; trim; sly; cunning; demure.
Snoff
n.
(Mining) A short candle end used for igniting a fuse.
Snood
n.
• The fillet which binds the hair of a young unmarried woman, and is emblematic of her maiden character.
• A short line (often of horsehair) connecting a fishing line with the hook; a snell; a leader.
v. t.
• To bind or braid up, as the hair, with a snood.
Snooded
a.
• Wearing or having a snood.
Snook
v. i.
• To lurk; to lie in ambush.
n.
(Zool.) A large perchlike marine food fish (Centropomus undecimalis) found both on the Atlantic and Pacific coasts of tropical America; — called also ravallia, and robalo.
• The cobia.
• The garfish.
Snooze
n.
• A short sleep; a nap.
v. i.
• To doze; to drowse; to take a short nap; to slumber.
Snore
v. i.
• To breathe with a rough, hoarse, nasal voice in sleep.
n.
• A harsh nasal noise made in sleep.
Snorer
n.
• One who snores.
Snoring
n.
(Physiol.) The act of respiring through the open mouth so that the currents of inspired and expired air cause a vibration of the uvula and soft palate, thus giving rise to a sound more or less harsh. It is usually unvoluntary, but may be produced voluntarily.
Snort
v. i.
• To force the air with violence through the nose, so as to make a noise, as do high-spirited horsed in prancing and play.
• To snore.
• To laugh out loudly.
n.
• The act of snorting; the sound produced in snorting.
v. t.
• To expel throught the nostrils with a snort; to utter with a snort.
Snorter
n.
• One who snorts.
(Zool.) The wheather; — so called from its cry.
Snot
n.
• Mucus secreted in, or discharged from, the nose.
• A mean, insignificant fellow.
v. t.
• To blow, wipe, or clear, as the nose.
Snotter
v. i.
• To snivel; to cry or whine.
n.
(Naut.) A rope going over a yardarm, used to bend a tripping line to, in sending down topgallant and royal yards in vessels of war; also, the short line supporting the heel of the sprit in a small boat.
Snottery
n.
• Filth; abomination.
Snotty
a.
• Foul with snot; hence, mean; dirty.
Snout
n.
• The long, projecting nose of a beast, as of swine.
• The nose of a man; — in contempt.
• The nozzle of a pipe, hose, etc.
(Zool.) The anterior prolongation of the head of a gastropod; — called also rostrum.
• The anterior prolongation of the head of weevils and allied beetles.
v. t.
• To furnish with a nozzle or point.
Snouty
a.
• Resembling a beast's snout.
Snow
n.
(Naut.) A square-rigged vessel, differing from a brig only in that she has a trysail mast close abaft the mainmast, on which a large trysail is hoisted.
n.
• Watery particles congealed into white or transparent crystals or flakes in the air, and falling to the earth, exhibiting a great variety of very beautiful and perfect forms.
• Fig.: Something white like snow, as the white color (argent) in heraldry; something which falls in, or as in, flakes.
v. i.
• To fall in or as snow; — chiefly used impersonally; as, it snows; it snowed yesterday.
v. t.
• To scatter like snow; to cover with, or as with, snow.
Snowball
n.
• A round mass of snow pressed or roller together, or anything resembling such a mass.
(Bot.) The Guelder-rose.
v. t.
• To pelt with snowballs; to throw snowballs at.
v. i.
• To throw snowballs.
Snowberry
n.
(Bot.) A name of several shrubs with white berries; as, the Symphoricarpus racemosus of the Northern United States, and the Chiococca racemosa of Florida and tropical America.
Snowbird
n.
(Zool.) An arctic finch (Plectrophenax, or Plectrophanes, nivalis) common, in winter, both in Europe and the United States, and often appearing in large flocks during snowstorms. It is partially white, but variously marked with chestnut and brown. Called also snow bunting, snowflake, snowfleck, and snowflight.
• Any finch of the genus Junco which appears in flocks in winter time, especially J. hyemalis in the Eastern United States; — called also blue snowbird. See Junco.
• The fieldfare.
Snowcap
n.
(Zool.) A very small humming bird (Microchaera albocoronata) native of New Grenada.
Snowdrift
n.
• A bank of drifted snow.
Snowdrop
n.
(Bot.) A bulbous plant (Galanthus nivalis) bearing white flowers, which often appear while the snow is on the ground. It is cultivated in gardens for its beauty.
Snowflake
n.
• A flake, or small filmy mass, of snow.
(Zool.) See Snowbird, 1.
(Bot.) A name given to several bulbous plants of the genus Leucoium (L. vernum, aestivum, etc.) resembling the snowdrop, but having all the perianth leaves of equal size.
Snowfleck
n.
(Zool.) See Snowbird, 1.
Snowl
n.
(Zool.) The hooded merganser.
Snowless
a.
• Destitute of snow.
Snowshed
n.
• A shelter to protect from snow, esp. a long roof over an exposed part of a railroad.
Snowshoe
n.
• A slight frame of wood three or four feet long and about one third as wide, with thongs or cords stretched across it, and having a support and holder for the foot; — used by persons for walking on soft snow.
Snowshoeing
n.
• Traveling on snowshoes.
Snowshoer
n.
• One who travels on snowshoes; an expert in using snowshoes.
Snowslip
n.
• A large mass or avalanche of snow which slips down the side of a mountain, etc.
Snowstorm
n.
• A storm with falling snow.
Snowy
a.
• White like snow.
• Abounding with snow; covered with snow.
• Fig.: Pure; unblemished; unstained; spotless.
Snub
v. i.
• To sob with convulsions.
v. t.
• To clip or break off the end of; to check or stunt the growth of; to nop.
• To check, stop, or rebuke, with a tart, sarcastic reply or remark; to reprimand; to check.
• To treat with contempt or neglect, as a forward or pretentious person; to slight designedly.
n.
• A knot; a protuberance; a song.
• A check or rebuke; an intended slight.
Snudge
v. i.
• To lie snug or quiet
n.
• A miser; a sneaking fellow.
Snuff
n.
• The part of a candle wick charred by the flame, whether burning or not.
v. t.
• To crop the snuff of, as a candle; to take off the end of the snuff of.
v. t.
• To draw in, or to inhale, forcibly through the nose; to sniff.
• To perceive by the nose; to scent; to smell.
v. i.
• To inhale air through the nose with violence or with noise, as do dogs and horses.
• To turn up the nose and inhale air, as an expression of contempt; hence, to take offense.
n.
• The act of snuffing; perception by snuffing; a sniff.
• Pulverized tobacco, etc., prepared to be taken into the nose; also, the amount taken at once.
• Resentment, displeasure, or contempt, expressed by a snuffing of the nose.
Snuffbox
n.
• A small box for carrying snuff about the person.
Snuffer
n.
• One who snuffs.
(Zool.) The common porpoise.
Snuffers
n. pl.
• An instrument for cropping and holding the snuff of a candle.
Snuffingly
adv.
• In a snuffing manner.
Snuffle
v. i.
• To speak through the nose; to breathe through the nose when it is obstructed, so as to make a broken sound.
n.
• The act of snuffing; a sound made by the air passing through the nose when obstructed.
• An affected nasal twang; hence, cant; hypocrisy.
• Obstruction of the nose by mucus; nasal catarrh of infants or children.
Snuffler
n.
• One who snuffles; one who uses cant.
Snuffy
a.
• Soiled with snuff.
• Sulky; angry; vexed.
Snug
a.
• Close and warm; as, an infant lies snug.
• Close; concealed; not exposed to notice.
• Compact, convenient, and comfortable; as, a snug farm, house, or property.
n.
(Mach.) Same as Lug, n., 3.
v. i.
• To lie close; to snuggle; to snudge; — often with up, or together; as, a child snugs up to its mother.
v. t.
• To place snugly.
• To rub, as twine or rope, so as to make it smooth and improve the finish.
Snuggery
n.
• A snug, cozy place.
Snuggle
v. t.
• To move one way and the other so as to get a close place; to lie close for comfort; to cuddle; to nestle.
Snugly
adv.
• In a snug manner; closely; safely.
Snugness
n.
• The quality or state of being snug.
Sny
n.
• An upward bend in a piece of timber; the sheer of a vessel.
Snying
n.
(Naut.) A curved plank, placed edgewise, to work in the bows of a vessel.
Snypy
a.
• Like a snipe.
So
adv.
• In that manner or degree; as, indicated (in any way), or as implied, or as supposed to be known.
• In like manner or degree; in the same way; thus; for like reason; whith equal reason; — used correlatively, following as, to denote comparison or resemblance; sometimes, also, following inasmuch as.
• In such manner; to such degree; — used correlatively with as or that following; as, he was so fortunate as to escape.
• Very; in a high degree; that is, in such a degree as can not well be expressed; as, he is so good; he planned so wisely.
• In the same manner; as has been stated or suggested; in this or that condition or state; under these circumstances; in this way; — with reflex reference to something just asserted or implied; used also with the verb to be, as a predicate.
• The case being such; therefore; on this account; for this reason; on these terms; — used both as an adverb and a conjuction.
• It is well; let it be as it is, or let it come to pass; — used to express assent.
• Well; the fact being as stated; — used as an expletive; as, so the work is done, is it?
• Is it thus? do you mean what you say? — with an upward tone; as, do you say he refuses? So?
• About the number, time, or quantity specified; thereabouts; more or less; as, I will spend a week or so in the country; I have read only a page or so.
conj.
• Provided that; on condition that; in case that; if.
interj.
• Be as you are; stand still; stop; that will do; right as you are; — a word used esp. to cows; also used by sailors.
Soak
v. t.
• To cause or suffer to lie in a fluid till the substance has imbibed what it can contain; to macerate in water or other liquid; to steep, as for the purpose of softening or freshening; as, to soak cloth; to soak bread; to soak salt meat, salt fish, or the like.
• To drench; to wet thoroughly.
• To draw in by the pores, or through small passages; as, a sponge soaks up water; the skin soaks in moisture.
• To make (its way) by entering pores or interstices; — often with through.
• Fig.: To absorb; to drain.
v. i.
• To lie steeping in water or other liquid; to become sturated; as, let the cloth lie and soak.
• To enter (into something) by pores or interstices; as, water soaks into the earth or other porous matter.
• To drink intemperately or gluttonously.
Soakage
n.
• The act of soaking, or the state of being soaked; also, the quantity that enters or issues by soaking.
Soaker
n.
• One who, or that which, soaks.
• A hard drinker.
Soaking
a.
• Wetting thoroughly; drenching; as, a soaking rain.
Soaky
a.
• Full of moisture; wet; soppy.
Soal
n.
• The sole of a shoe.
(Zool.) See Sole, the fish.
n.
• A dirty pond.
Soam
n.
• A chain by which a leading horse draws a plow.
Soap
n.
• A substance which dissolves in water, thus forming a lather, and is used as a cleansing agent. Soap is produced by combining fats or oils with alkalies or alkaline earths, usually by boiling, and consists of salts of sodium, potassium, etc., with the fatty acids (oleic, stearic, palmitic, etc.). See the Note below, and cf. Saponification. By extension, any compound of similar composition or properties, whether used as a cleaning agent or not.(Med.)(Bot.)(Bot.)
v. t.
• To rub or wash over with soap.
• To flatter; to wheedle.
Soapfish
n.
(Zool.) Any serranoid fish of the genus Rhypticus; — so called from the soapy feeling of its skin.
Soapiness
n.
• Quality or state of being soapy.
Soaproot
n.
(Bot.) A perennial herb (Gypsophila Struthium) the root of which is used in Spain as a substitute for soap.
Soapstone
n.
• See Steatite, and Talc.
Soapsuds
n. pl.
• Suds made with soap.
Soapwort
n.
(Bot.) A common plant (Saponaria officinalis) of the Pink family; — so called because its bruised leaves, when agitated in water, produce a lather like that from soap. Called also Bouncing Bet.
Soapy
a.
• Resembling soap; having the qualities of, or feeling like, soap; soft and smooth.
• Smeared with soap; covered with soap.
Soar
v. i.
• To fly aloft, as a bird; to mount upward on wings, or as on wings.
• Fig.: To rise in thought, spirits, or imagination; to be exalted in mood.
n.
• The act of soaring; upward flight.
a.
• See 3d Sore.
a.
• See Sore, reddish brown.
Soaring
a. & n.
• from Soar.
Soave
a.
(Mus.) Sweet.
Soavemente
adv.
(Mus.) Sweetly.
Sob
v. t.
• To soak.
v. i.
• To sigh with a sudden heaving of the breast, or with a kind of convulsive motion; to sigh with tears, and with a convulsive drawing in of the breath.
n.
• The act of sobbing; a convulsive sigh, or inspiration of the breath, as in sorrow.
• Any sorrowful cry or sound.
Sobbing
n.
• A series of short, convulsive inspirations, the glottis being suddenly closed so that little or no air enters into the lungs.
Sober
a.
• Temperate in the use of spirituous liquors; habitually temperate; as, a sober man.
• Not intoxicated or excited by spirituous liquors; as, the sot may at times be sober.
• Not mad or insane; not wild, visionary, or heated with passion; exercising cool, dispassionate reason; self-controlled; self-possessed.
• Not proceeding from, or attended with, passion; calm; as, sober judgment; a man in his sober senses.
• Serious or subdued in demeanor, habit, appearance, or color; solemn; grave; sedate.
v. t.
• To make sober.
v. i.
• To become sober; — often with down.
Soberize
v. t. & i.
• To sober.
Soberly
adv.
• In a sober manner; temperately; cooly; calmly; gravely; seriously.
a.
• Grave; serious; solemn; sad.
Soberness
n.
• The quality or state of being sober.
Soboles
n.
(Bot.) A shoot running along under ground, forming new plants at short distances.
• A sucker, as of tree or shrub.
Soboliferous
a.
(Bot.) Producing soboles. See Illust. of Houseleek.
Sobriety
n.
• Habitual soberness or temperance as to the use of spirituous liquors; as, a man of sobriety.
• Habitual freedom from enthusiasm, inordinate passion, or overheated imagination; calmness; coolness; gravity; seriousness; as, the sobriety of riper years.
Sobriquet
n.
• An assumed name; a fanciful epithet or appellation; a nickname.

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