Dictionary Of The English Language "S"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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S the nineteenth letter of the English alphabet, is a consonanat, and is often called a sibilant, in allusion to its hissing sound. It has two principal sounds; one a more hissing, as in sack, this; the other a vocal hissing (the same as that of z), as in is, wise. Besides these it sometimes has the sounds of sh and zh, as in sure, measure. It generally has its hissing sound at the beginning of words, but in the middle and at the end of words its sound is determined by usage. In a few words it is silent, as in isle, debris. With the letter h it forms the digraph sh. Both the form and the name of the letter S are derived from the Latin, which got the letter through the Greek from the Phoenician. the ultimate origin is Egyptian. S is etymologically most nearly related to c, z, t, and r; as, in ice, OE. is; E. hence, OE. hennes; E. rase, raze; erase, razor; that, G. das; E. reason, F. raison, L. ratio; E. was, were; chair, chaise.
Saan
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) Same as Bushmen.
Sabadilla
n.
(Bot.) A Mexican liliaceous plant (Schaenocaulon officinale); also, its seeds, which contain the alkaloid veratrine. It was formerly used in medicine as an emetic and purgative.
Sabaean
a. & n.
• Same as Sabianism.
Sabaeanism
n.
• Same as Sabianism.
Sabal
n.
(Bot.) A genus of palm trees including the palmetto of the Southern United States.
Sabaoth
n. pl.
• Armies; hosts.
• Incorrectly, the Sabbath.
Sabbat
n.
• In mediaeval demonology, the nocturnal assembly in which demons and sorcerers were thought to celebrate their orgies.
Sabbatarian
n.
• One who regards and keeps the seventh day of the week as holy, aggreeably to the letter of the fourth commandment in the Decalogue.
• A strict observer of the Sabbath.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Sabbath, or the tenets of Sabbatarians.
Sabbatarianism
n.
• The tenets of Sabbatarians.
Sabbath
n.
• A season or day of rest; one day in seven appointed for rest or worship, the observance of which was enjoined upon the Jews in the Decalogue, and has been continued by the Christian church with a transference of the day observed from the last to the first day of the week, which is called also Lord's Day.
• The seventh year, observed among the Israelites as one of rest and festival.
• Fig.: A time of rest or repose; intermission of pain, effort, sorrow, or the like.
Sabbathless
a.
• Without Sabbath, or intermission of labor; hence, without respite or rest.
Sabbatism
n.
• Intermission of labor, as upon the Sabbath; rest.
Sabbaton
n.
• A round-toed, armed covering for the feet, worn during a part of the sixteenth century in both military and civil dress.
Sabean
a. & n.
• Same as Sabian.
Sabeism
n.
• Same as Sabianism.
Sabella
n.
(Zool.) A genus of tubiculous annelids having a circle of plumose gills around head.
Sabellian
a.
• Pertaining to the doctrines or tenets of Sabellius. See Sabellian, n.
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Sabellius, a presbyter of Ptolemais in the third century, who maintained that there is but one person in the Godhead, and that the Son and Holy Spirit are only different powers, operations, or offices of the one God the Father.
Sabellianism
n.
(Eccl.) The doctrines or tenets of Sabellius. See Sabellian, n.
Sabelloid
a.
(Zool.) Like, or related to, the genus Sabella. —
Sabian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Saba in Arabia, celebrated for producing aromatic plants.
• Relating to the religion of Saba, or to the worship of the heavenly bodies.
n.
• An adherent of the Sabian religion; a worshiper of the heavenly bodies.
Sabianism
n.
• The doctrine of the Sabians; the Sabian religion; that species of idolatry which consists in worshiping the sun, moon, and stars; heliolatry.
Sabicu
n.
• The very hard wood of a leguminous West Indian tree (Lysilona Sabicu), valued for shipbuilding.
Sabine
a.
• Of or pertaining to the ancient Sabines, a people of Italy.
n.
• One of the Sabine people.
n.
(Bot.) See Savin.
Sable
n.
(Zool.) A carnivorous animal of the Weasel family (Mustela zibellina) native of the northern latitudes of Europe, Asia, and America, — noted for its fine, soft, and valuable fur.
• The fur of the sable.
• A mouring garment; a funeral robe; — generally in the plural.
(Her.) The tincture black; — represented by vertical and horizontal lines each other.
a.
• Of the color of the sable's fur; dark; black; — used chiefly in poetry.
v. t.
• To render sable or dark; to drape darkly or in black.
Sabot
n.
• A kind of wooden shoe worn by the peasantry in France, Belgium, Sweden, and some other European countries.
(Mil.) A thick, circular disk of wood, to which the cartridge bag and projectile are attached, in fixed ammunition for cannon; also, a piece of soft metal attached to a projectile to take the groove of the rifling.
Sabotiere
n.
• A kind of freezer for ices.
Sabre
n. & v.
• See Saber.
Sabretasche
n.
(Mil.) A leather case or pocket worn by cavalry at the left side, suspended from the sword belt.
Sabulose
a.
(Bot.) Growing in sandy places.
Sabulosity
n.
• The quality of being sabulous; sandiness; grittiness.
Sabulous
a.
• Sandy; gritty.
Sac
n.
(Ethnol.) See Sace.
n.
(O.Eng. Law) The privilege formerly enjoyed the lord of a manor, of holding courts, trying causes, and imposing fines.
n.
• See 2d Sack.
(Biol.) A cavity, bag, or receptacle, usually containing fluid, and either closed, or opening into another cavity to the exterior; a sack.
Sacalait
n.
(Zool.) A kind of fresh-water bass; the crappie.
Sacar
n.
• See Saker.
Saccade
n.
(Man.) A sudden, violent check of a horse by drawing or twitching the reins on a sudden and with one pull.
Saccate
a.
(Biol.) Having the form of a sack or pouch; furnished with a sack or pouch, as a petal.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Saccata, a suborder of ctenophores having two pouches into which the long tentacles can be retracted.
Saccharate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of saccharic acid.
• In a wider sense, a compound of saccharose, or any similar carbohydrate, with such bases as the oxides of calcium, barium, or lead; a sucrate.
Saccharic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, saccharine substances; specifically, designating an acid obtained, as a white amorphous gummy mass, by the oxidation of mannite, glucose, sucrose, etc.
Sacchariferous
a.
• Producing sugar; as, sacchariferous canes.
Saccharify
v. t.
• Toconvert into, or to impregnate with, sugar.
Saccharilla
n.
• A kind of muslin.
Saccharimeter
n.
• An instrument for ascertain the quantity of saccharine matter in any solution, as the juice of a plant, or brewers' and distillers' worts.
Saccharimetrical
a.
• Of or pertaining to saccharimetry; obtained saccharimetry.
Saccharimetry
n.
• The act, process or method of determining the amount and kind of sugar present in sirup, molasses, and the like, especially by the employment of polarizing apparatus.
Saccharin
n.
(Chem.) A bitter white crystalline substance obtained from the saccharinates and regarded as the lactone of saccharinic acid; — so called because formerly supposed to be isomeric with cane sugar (saccharose).
Saccharinate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of saccharinic acid.
• A salt of saccharine.
Saccharine
a.
• Of or pertaining to sugar; having the qualities of sugar; producing sugar; sweet; as, a saccharine taste; saccharine matter.
n.
(Chem.) A trade name for benzoic sulphinide.
Saccharinic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, saccharin; specifically, designating a complex acid not known in the free state but well known in its salts, which are obtained by boiling dextrose and levulose (invert sugar) with milk of lime.
Saccharize
v. t.
• To convert into, or to impregnate with, sugar.
Saccharometer
n.
• A saccharimeter.
Saccharomyces
n.
(Biol.) A genus of budding fungi, the various species of which have the power, to a greater or less extent, or splitting up sugar into alcohol and carbonic acid. They are the active agents in producing fermentation of wine, beer, etc. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the yeast of sedimentary beer. Also called Torula.
Saccharomycetes
n. pl.
(Biol.) A family of fungi consisting of the one genus Saccharomyces.
Saccharonate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of saccharonic acid.
Saccharone
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance, C6H8O6, obtained by the oxidation of saccharin, and regarded as the lactone of saccharonic acid.
• An oily liquid, C6H10O2, obtained by the reduction of saccharin.
Saccharonic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, saccharone; specifically, designating an unstable acid which is obtained from saccharone (a) by hydration, and forms a well-known series of salts.
Saccharose
n.
(Chem.) Cane sugar; sucrose; also, in general, any one of the group of which saccharose, or sucrose proper, is the type. See Sucrose.
Saccharous
a.
• Saccharine.
Saccharum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of tall tropical grasses including the sugar cane.
Saccholactate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of saccholactactic acid; — formerly called also saccholate. See Mucate.
Saccholactic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid now called mucic acid; saccholic.
Saccholic
a.
• Saccholatic.
Sacchulmate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of sacchulmic acid.
Sacchulmic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a dark amorphous substance by the long-continued boiling of sucrose with very dilute sulphuric acid. It resembles humic acid.
Sacchulmin
n.
(Chem.) An amorphous huminlike substance resembling sacchulmic acid, and produced together with it.
Sacciferous
a.
(Biol.) Bearing a sac.
Sacciform
a.
(Biol.) Having the general form of a sac.
Saccoglossa
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Pellibranchiata.
Saccular
a.
• Like a sac; sacciform.
Sacculated
a.
• Furnished with little sacs.
Saccule
n.
• A little sac; specifically, the sacculus of the ear.
Sacculus
n.
(Anat.) A little sac; esp., a part of the membranous labyrinth of the ear. See the Note under Ear.
Saccus
n.
(Biol.) A sac.
Sacellum
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) An unroofed space consecrated to a divinity.
(Eccl.) A small monumental chapel in a church.
Sacerdotal
a.
• Of or pertaining to priests, or to the order of priests; relating to the priesthood; priesty; as, sacerdotal dignity; sacerdotal functions.
Sacerdotalism
m.
• The system, style, spirit, or character, of a priesthood, or sacerdotal order; devotion to the interests of the sacerdotal order.
Sacerdotally
adv.
• In a sacerdotal manner.
Sachel
n.
• A small bag. See Satchel.
Sachem
n.
• A chief of a tribe of the American Indians; a sagamore.
Sachemdom
n.
• The government or jurisdiction of a sachem.
Sachemship
n.
• Office or condition of a sachem.
Sachet
n.
• A scent bag, or perfume cushion, to be laid among handkerchiefe, garments, etc., to perfume them.
Saciety
n.
• Satiety.
Sack
n.
• A anme formerly given to various dry Spanish wines.
n.
• A bag for holding and carrying goods of any kind; a receptacle made of some kind of pliable material, as cloth, leather, and the like; a large pouch.
• A measure of varying capacity, according to local usage and the substance. The American sack of salt is 215 pounds; the sack of wheat, two bushels.
• Originally, a loosely hanging garnment for women, worn like a cloak about the shoulders, and serving as a decorative appendage to the gown; now, an outer garment with sleeves, worn by women; as, a dressing saek.
• A sack coat; a kind of coat worn by men, and extending from top to bottom without a cross seam.
(Biol.) See 2d Sac, 2.
v. t.
• To put in a sack; to bag; as, to sack corn.
• To bear or carry in a sack upon the back or the shoulders.
n.
• the pillage or plunder, as of a town or city; the storm and plunder of a town; devastation; ravage.
v. t.
• To plunder or pillage, as a town or city; to devastate; to ravage.
Sackage
n.
• The act of taking by storm and pillaging; sack.
Sackbut
n.
(Mus.) A brass wind instrument, like a bass trumpet, so contrived that it can be lengthened or shortened according to the tone required; — said to be the same as the trombone.
Sackcloth
n.
• Linen or cotton cloth such a sacks are made of; coarse cloth; anciently, a cloth or garment worn in mourning, distress, mortification, or penitence.
Sackclothed
a.
• Clothed in sackcloth.
Sacker
n.
• One who sacks; one who takes part in the storm and pillage of a town.
Sackful
n.
• As much as a sack will hold.
a.
• Bent on plunder.
Sacking
n.
• Stout, coarse cloth of which sacks, bags, etc., are made.
Sackless
a.
• Quiet; peaceable; harmless; innocent.
Sacque
n.
• Same as 2d Sack, 3.
Sacral
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sacrum; in the region of the sacrum.
Sacrament
n.
• The oath of allegiance taken by Roman soldiers; hence, a sacred ceremony used to impress an obligation; a solemn oath-taking; an oath.
• The pledge or token of an oath or solemn cobenant; a sacred thing; a mystery.
(Theol.) One of the solemn religious ordinances enjoined by Christ, the head of the Christian church, to be observed by his followers; hence, specifically, the eucharist; the Lord's Supper.
v. t.
• To bind by an oath.
Sacramental
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sacrament or the sacraments; of the nature of a sacrament; sacredly or solemny binding; as, sacramental rites or elements.
• Bound by a sacrament.
n.
• That which relates to a sacrament.
Sacramentalism
n.
• The doctrine and use of sacraments; attashment of excessive importance to sacraments.
Sacramentalist
n.
• One who holds the doctrine of the real objective presence of Christ;s body and blood in the holy eucharist.
Sacramentally
adv.
• In a sacrament manner.
Sacramentarian
n.
(Eccl.) A name given in the sixteenth century to those German reformers who rejected both the Roman and the Lutheran doctrine of the holy eucharist.
• One who holds extreme opinions regarding the efficacy of sacraments.
a.
• Of or pertaining a sacrament, or to the sacramentals; sacramental.
• Of or pertaining to the Sacramentarians.
Sacramentary
n.
• An ancient book of the Roman Catholic Church, written by Pope Gelasius, and revised, corrected, and abridged by St. Gregory, in which were contained the rites for Mass, the sacraments, the dedication of churches, and other ceremonies. There are several ancient books of the same kind in France and Germany.
• Same as Sacramentarian, n., 1.
Sacramentize
v. i.
• To administer the sacraments.
Sacramenttary
a.
• Of or pertaining a sacrament or the sacraments; sacramental.
• Of or pertaining to the Sacramentarians.
Sacrarium
n.
• A sort of family chapel in the houses of the Romans, devoted to a special divinity.
• The adytum of a temple.
• In a Christian church, the sanctuary.
Sacrate
v. t.
• To consecrate.
Sacration
n.
• Consecration.
Sacre
n.
• See Sakker.
v. t.
• To consecrate; to make sacred.
Sacred
a.
• Set apart by solemn religious ceremony; especially, in a good sense, made holy; set apart to religious use; consecrated; not profane or common; as, a sacred place; a sacred day; sacred service.
• Relating to religion, or to the services of religion; not secular; religious; as, sacred history.
• Designated or exalted by a divine sanction; possessing the highest title to obedience, honor, reverence, or veneration; entitled to extreme reverence; venerable.
• Hence, not to be profaned or violated; inviolable.
• Consecrated; dedicated; devoted; — with to.
• Solemnly devoted, in a bad sense, as to evil, vengeance, curse, or the like; accursed; baleful.
Sacrificable
a.
• Capable of being offered in sacrifice.
Sacrificant
n.
• One who offers a sacrifice.
Sacrificator
n.
• A sacrificer; one who offers a sacrifice.
Sacrifice
n.
• The offering of anything to God, or to a god; consecratory rite.
• Anything consecrated and offered to God, or to a divinity; an immolated victin, or an offering of any kind, laid upon an altar, or otherwise presented in the way of religious thanksgiving, atonement, or conciliation.
• Destruction or surrender of anything for the sake of something else; devotion of some desirable object in behalf of a higher object, or to a claim deemed more pressing; hence, also, the thing so devoted or given up; as, the sacrifice of interest to pleasure, or of pleasure to interest.
• A sale at a price less than the cost or the actual value.
v. t.
• To make an offering of; to consecrate or present to a divinity by way of expiation or propitiation, or as a token acknowledgment or thanksgiving; to immolate on the altar of God, in order to atone for sin, to procure favor, or to express thankfulness; as, to sacrifice an ox or a sheep.
• Hence, to destroy, surrender, or suffer to be lost, for the sake of obtaining something; to give up in favor of a higher or more imperative object or duty; to devote, with loss or suffering.
• To destroy; to kill.
• To sell at a price less than the cost or the actual value.
v. i.
• To make offerings to God, or to a deity, of things consumed on the altar; to offer sacrifice.
Sacrificer
n.
• One who sacrifices.
Sacrificial
a.
• Of or pertaining to sacrifice or sacrifices; consisting in sacrifice; performing sacrifice.
Sacrifictory
n.
• Offering sacrifice.
Sacrilege
n.
• The sin or crime of violating or profaning sacred things; the alienating to laymen, or to common purposes, what has been appropriated or consecrated to religious persons or uses.
Sacrilegious
a.
• Violating sacred things; polluted with sacrilege; involving sacrilege; profane; impious.
Sacrilegist
n.
• One guilty of sacrilege.
Sacring
• a. & n. from Sacre.
Sacrist
n.
• A sacristan; also, a person retained in a cathedral to copy out music for the choir, and take care of the books.
Sacristan
n.
• An officer of the church who has the care of the utensils or movables, and of the church in general; a sexton.
Sacristy
n.
• A apartment in a church where the sacred utensils, vestments, etc., are kept; a vestry.
Sacrosanct
a.
• Sacred; inviolable.
Sacrosciatic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to both the sacrum and the hip; as, the sacrosciatic formina formed by the sacrosciatic ligaments which connect the sacrum and hip bone.
Sacrovertebral
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sacrum and that part of the vertebral column immediately anterior to it; as, the sacrovertebral angle.
Sacs
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians, which, together with the Foxes, formerly occupied the region about Green Bay, Wisconsin.
Sad
a.
• Sated; satisfied; weary; tired.
• Heavy; weighty; ponderous; close; hard.
• Dull; grave; dark; somber; — said of colors.
• Serious; grave; sober; steadfast; not light or frivolous.
• Affected with grief or unhappiness; cast down with affliction; downcast; gloomy; mournful.
• Afflictive; calamitous; causing sorrow; as, a sad accident; a sad misfortune.
• Hence, bad; naughty; troublesome; wicked.
v. t.
• To make sorrowful; to sadden.
Sadda
n.
• A work in the Persian tongue, being a summary of the Zend-Avesta, or sacred books.
Sadden
v. t.
• To make sad.
• To render heavy or cohesive.
• To make dull- or sad-colored, as cloth
• To make grave or serious; to make melancholy or sorrowful
v. i.
• To become, or be made, sad.
Sadder
n.
• Same as Sadda.
Saddle
n.
• A seat for a rider, — usually made of leather, padded to span comfortably a horse's back, furnished with stirrups for the rider's feet to rest in, and fastened in place with a girth; also, a seat for the rider on a bicycle or tricycle.
• A padded part of a harness which is worn on a horse's back, being fastened in place with a girth. It serves various purposes, as to keep the breeching in place, carry guides for the reins, etc.
• A piece of meat containing a part of the backbone of an animal with the ribs on each side; as, a saddle of mutton, of venison, etc.
(Naut.) A block of wood, usually fastened to some spar, and shaped to receive the end of another spar.
(Mach.) A part, as a flange, which is hollowed out to fit upon a convex surface and serve as a means of attachment or support.
(Zool.) The clitellus of an earthworm.
(Arch.) The threshold of a door, when a separate piece from the floor or landing; — so called because it spans and covers the joint between two floors.
v. t.
• To put a saddle upon; to equip (a beast) for riding.
• Hence: To fix as a charge or burden upon; to load; to encumber; as, to saddle a town with the expense of bridges and highways.
Saddleback
a.
• Same as Saddle-backed.
n.
• Anything saddle-backed; esp., a hill or ridge having a concave outline at the top.
(Zool.) The harp seal.
• The great blackbacked gull (Larus marinus).
• The larva of a bombycid moth (Empretia stimulea) which has a large, bright green, saddle-shaped patch of color on the back.
Saddlebags
n. pl.
• Bags, usually of leather, united by straps or a band, formerly much used by horseback riders to carry small articles, one bag hanging on each side.
Saddlebow
n.
• The bow or arch in the front part of a saddle, or the pieces which form the front.
Saddlecloth
n.
• A cloth under a saddle, and extending out behind; a housing.
Saddled
a.
(Zool.) Having a broad patch of color across the back, like a saddle; saddle-backed.
Saddler
n. .
• One who makes saddles.
(Zool.) A harp seal.
Saddlery
n.
• The materials for making saddles and harnesses; the articles usually offered for sale in a saddler's shop.
• The trade or employment of a saddler.
Saddletree
n.
• The frame of a saddle.
Sadducaic
a.
• Pertaining to, or like, the Sadducees; as, Sadducaic reasonings.
Sadducee
n.
• One of a sect among the ancient Jews, who denied the resurrection, a future state, and the existence of angels.
Sadducize
v. i.
• To adopt the principles of the Sadducees.
Sadh
n.
• A member of a monotheistic sect of Hindoos. Sadhs resemble the Quakers in many respects.
Sadiron
n.
• An iron for smoothing clothes; a flatiron.
Sadly
adv.
• Wearily; heavily; firmly.
• Seriously; soberly; gravely.
• Grievously; deeply; sorrowfully; miserably.
Sadness
n.
• Heaviness; firmness.
• Seriousness; gravity; discretion.
• Quality of being sad, or unhappy; gloominess; sorrowfulness; dejection.
Sadr
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Ziziphus (Z. lotus); — so called by the Arabs of Barbary, who use its berries for food. See Lotus (b).
Saengerfest
n.
• A festival of singers; a German singing festival.
Safe
a.
• Free from harm, injury, or risk; untouched or unthreatened by danger or injury; unharmed; unhurt; secure; whole; as, safe from disease; safe from storms; safe from foes.
• Conferring safety; securing from harm; not exposing to danger; confining securely; to be relied upon; not dangerous; as, a safe harbor; a safe bridge, etc.
• Incapable of doing harm; no longer dangerous; in secure care or custody; as, the prisoner is safe.
n.
• A place for keeping things in safety.
• A strong and fireproof receptacle (as a movable chest of steel, etc., or a closet or vault of brickwork) for money, valuable papers, or the like.
• A ventilated or refrigerated chest or closet for securing provisions from noxious animals or insects.
v. t.
• To render safe; to make right.
Safely
adv.
• In a safe manner; danger, injury, loss, or evil consequences.
Safeness
n.
• The quality or state of being safe; freedom from hazard, danger, harm, or loss; safety; security; as the safeness of an experiment, of a journey, or of a possession.
Safequard
n.
• One who, or that which, defends or protects; defense; protection.
• A convoy or quard to protect a traveler or property.
• A pass; a passport; a safe-conduct.
v. t.
• To quard; to protect.
Safety
n.
• The condition or state of being safe; freedom from danger or hazard; exemption from hurt, injury, or loss.
• Freedom from whatever exposes one to danger or from libility to cause danger or harm; safeness; hence, the quality of making safe or secure, or of giving confidence, justifying trust, insuring against harm or loss, etc.
• Preservation from escape; close custody.
(Football) Same as Safety touchdown, below.
Safflow
n.
(Bot.) The safflower.
Safflower
n.
(Bot.) An annual composite plant (Carthamus tinctorius), the flowers of which are used as a dyestuff and in making rouge; bastard, or false, saffron.
• The died flowers of the Carthamus tinctorius.
• A dyestuff from these flowers. See Safranin (b).
Saffron
n.
(Bot.) A bulbous iridaceous plant (Crocus sativus) having blue flowers with large yellow stigmas. See Crocus.
• The aromatic, pungent, dried stigmas, usually with part of the stile, of the Crocus sativus. Saffron is used in cookery, and in coloring confectionery, liquors, varnishes, etc., and was formerly much used in medicine.
• An orange or deep yellow color, like that of the stigmas of the Crocus sativus.
a.
• Having the color of the stigmas of saffron flowers; deep orange-yellow; as, a saffron face; a saffron streamer.
v. t.
• To give color and flavor to, as by means of saffron; to spice.
Saffrony
a.
• Having a color somewhat like saffron; yellowish.
Safranin
n.
(Chem.) An orange-red dyestuff extracted from the saffron.
• A red dyestuff extracted from the safflower, and formerly used in dyeing wool, silk, and cotton pink and scarlet; — called also Spanish red, China lake, and carthamin.
• An orange-red dyestuff prepared from certain nitro compounds of creosol, and used as a substitute for the safflower dye.
Safranine
n.
(Chem.) An orange-red nitrogenous dyestuff produced artificailly by oxidizing certain aniline derivatives, and used in dyeing silk and wool; also, any one of the series of which safranine proper is the type.
Sag
v. i.
• To sink, in the middle, by its weight or under applied pressure, below a horizontal line or plane; as, a line or cable supported by its ends sags, though tightly drawn; the floor of a room sags; hence, to lean, give way, or settle from a vertical position; as, a building may sag one way or another; a door sags on its hinges.
• Fig.: To lose firmness or elasticity; to sink; to droop; to flag; to bend; to yield, as the mind or spirits, under the pressure of care, trouble, doubt, or the like; to be unsettled or unbalanced.
• To loiter in walking; to idle along; to drag or droop heavily.
v. t.
• To cause to bend or give way; to load.
n.
• State of sinking or bending; sagging.
Saga
n.
• A Scandinavian legend, or heroic or mythic tradition, among the Norsemen and kindred people; a northern European popular historical or religious tale of olden time.
Sagacious
a.
• Of quick sense perceptions; keen-scented; skilled in following a trail.
• Hence, of quick intellectual perceptions; of keen penetration and judgment; discerning and judicious; knowing; far-sighted; shrewd; sage; wise; as, a sagacious man; a sagacious remark.
Sagacity
n.
• The quality of being sagacious; quickness or acuteness of sense perceptions; keenness of discernment or penetration with soundness of judgment; shrewdness.
Sagamore
n.
• The head of a tribe among the American Indians; a chief; — generally used as synonymous with sachem, but some writters distinguished between them, making the sachem a chief of the first rank, and a sagamore one of the second rank.
• A juice used in medicine.
Sagapen
n.
• Sagapenum.
Sagapenum
n.
(Med.) A fetid gum resin obtained from a species of Ferula. It has been used in hysteria, etc., but is now seldom met with.
Sage
n.
(Bot.) A suffriticose labiate plant (Salvia officinalis) with grayish green foliage, much used in flavoring meats, etc. The name is often extended to the whole genus, of which many species are cultivated for ornament, as the scarlet sage, and Mexican red and blue sage.
• The sagebrush.
a.
• Having nice discernment and powers of judging; prudent; grave; sagacious.
• Proceeding from wisdom; well judged; shrewd; well adapted to the purpose.
• Grave; serious; solemn.
n.
• A wise man; a man of gravity and wisdom; especially, a man venerable for years, and of sound judgment and prudence; a grave philosopher.
Sagebrush
n.
• A low irregular shrub (Artemisia tridentata), of the order Compositae, covering vast tracts of the dry alkaline regions of the American plains; — called also sagebush, and wild sage.
Sagely
adv.
• In a sage manner; wisely.
Sagene
n.
• A Russian measure of length equal to about seven English feet.
Sageness
n.
• The quality or state of being sage; wisdom; sagacity; prudence; gravity.
Sagenite
n.
(Min.) Acicular rutile occurring in reticulated forms imbedded in quartz.
Sagenitic
a.
(Min.) Resembling sagenite; — applied to quartz when containing acicular crystals of other minerals, most commonly rutile, also tourmaline, actinolite, and the like.
Sagger
n.
• A pot or case of fire clay, in which fine stoneware is inclosed while baking in the kiln; a segga.
• The clay of which such pots or cases are made.
Sagging
n.
• A bending or sinking between the ends of a thing, in consequence of its own, or an imposed, weight; an arching downward in the middle, as of a ship after straining. Cf. Hogging.
Saginate
v. t.
• To make fat; to pamper.
Sagination
n.
• The act of fettening or pampering.
Sagitta
n.
(Astron.) A small constellation north of Aquila; the Arrow.
(Arch.) The keystone of an arch.
(Geom.) The distance from a point in a curve to the chord; also, the versed sine of an arc; — so called from its resemblance to an arrow resting on the bow and string.
(Anat.) The larger of the two otoliths, or ear bones, found in most fishes.
(Zool.) A genus of transparent, free-swimming marine worms having lateral and caudal fins, and capable of swimming rapidly. It is the type of the class Chaetognatha.
Sagittal
a.
• Of or pertaining to an arrow; resembling an arrow; furnished with an arowlike appendage.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sagittal suture; in the region of the sagittal suture; rabdoidal; as, the sagittal furrow, or groove, on the inner surface of the roof of the skull.
• In the mesial plane; as, a sagittal section of an animal.
Sagittarius
n.
(Astron.) The ninth of the twelve signs of the zodiac, which the sun enters about November 22, marked thus [&sagittarius;] in almanacs; the Archer.
• A zodiacal constellation, represented on maps and globes as a centaur shooting an arrow.
Sagittary
n.
(Myth.) A centaur; a fabulous being, half man, half horse, armed with a bow and quiver.
• The Arsenal in Venice; — so called from having a figure of an archer over the door.
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, an arrow.
Sagittate
a.
• Shaped like an arrowhead; triangular, with the two basal angles prolonged downward.
Sagittated
a.
• Sagittal; sagittate.
Sagittocyst
n.
(Zool.) A defensive cell containing a minute rodlike structure which may be expelled. Such cells are found in certain Turbellaria.
Sago
n.
• A dry granulated starch imported from the East Indies, much used for making puddings and as an article of diet for the sick; also, as starch, for stiffening textile fabrics. It is prepared from the stems of several East Indian and Malayan palm trees, but chiefly from the Metroxylon Sagu; also from several cycadaceous plants (Cycas revoluta, Zamia integrifolia, atc.).
Sagoin
n.
(Zool.) A marmoset; — called also sagouin.
Sagthy
n.
• A mixed woven fabric of silk and cotton; or silk and wool; sayette; also, a light woolen fabric.
Sagum
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) The military cloak of the Roman soldiers.
Sagus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of palms from which sago is obtained.
Sagy
a.
• Full of sage; seasoned with sage.
Sahibah
n.
• A lady; mistress.
Sahibic
a.
• Same as Thebaic.
Sahlite
n.
(Min.) See Salite.
Sahui
n.
(Zool.) A marmoset.
Sai
n.
(Zool.) See Capuchin, 3 (a).
Saibling
n.
(Zool.) A European mountain trout (Salvelinus alpinus); — called also Bavarian charr.
Saic
n.
(Naut.) A kind of ketch very common in the Levant, which has neither topgallant sail nor mizzen topsail.
Said
• imp. & p. p. of Say.
a.
• before-mentioned; already spoken of or specified; aforesaid; — used chiefly in legal style.
Saiga
n.
(Zool.) An antelope (Saiga Tartarica) native of the plains of Siberia and Eastern Russia. The male has erect annulated horns, and tufts of long hair beneath the eyes and ears.
Saikyr
n.
(Mil.) Same as Saker.
Sail
n.
• An extent of canvas or other fabric by means of which the wind is made serviceable as a power for propelling vessels through the water.
• Anything resembling a sail, or regarded as a sail.
• A wing; a van.
• the extended surface of the arm of a windmill.
• A sailing vessel; a vessel of any kind; a craft.
• A passage by a sailing vessel; a journey or excursion upon the water.
v. i.
• To be impelled or driven forward by the action of wind upon sails, as a ship on water; to be impelled on a body of water by the action of steam or other power.
• To move through or on the water; to swim, as a fish or a water fowl.
• To be conveyed in a vessel on water; to pass by water; as, they sailed from London to Canton.
• To set sail; to begin a voyage.
• To move smoothly through the air; to glide through the air without apparent exertion, as a bird.
v. t.
• To pass or move upon, as in a ship, by means of sails; hence, to move or journey upon(the water) by means of steam or other force.
• To fly through; to glide or move smoothly through.
• To direct or manage the motion of, as a vessel; as, to sail one's own ship.
Sailable
a.
• Capable of being sailed over; navigable; as, a sailable river.
Sailboat
n.
• A boat propelled by a sail or sails.
Sailcloth
n.
• Duck or canvas used in making sails.
Sailer
n.
• A sailor.
• A ship or other vessel; — with qualifying words descriptive of speed or manner of sailing; as, a heavy sailer; a fast sailer.
Sailfish
n.
(Zool.) The banner fish, or spikefish (Histiophorus.)
• The basking, or liver, shark.
• The quillback.
Sailing
n.
• The act of one who, or that which, sails; the motion of a vessel on water, impelled by wind or steam; the act of starting on a voyage.
(Naut.) The art of managing a vessel; seamanship; navigation; as, globular sailing; oblique sailing.
Sailless
a.
• Destitute of sails.
Sailmaker
n.
• One whose occupation is to make or repair sails.
Sailor
n.
• One who follows the business of navigating ships or other vessels; one who understands the practical management of ships; one of the crew of a vessel; a mariner; a common seaman.
Saily
a.
• Like a sail.
Saim
n.
• Lard; grease.
Saimir
n.
(Zool.) The squirrel monkey.
Sain
p. p.
• Said.
v. t.
• To sanctify; to bless so as to protect from evil influence.
Sainfoin
n.
(Bot.) A leguminous plant (Onobrychis sativa) cultivated for fodder.
• A kind of tick trefoil (Desmodium Canadense).
Saint
n.
• A person sanctified; a holy or godly person; one eminent for piety and virtue; any true Christian, as being redeemed and consecrated to God.
• One of the blessed in heaven.
(Eccl.) One canonized by the church.
v. t.
• To make a saint of; to enroll among the saints by an offical act, as of the pope; to canonize; to give the title or reputation of a saint to (some one).
v. i.
• To act or live as a saint.
Saintdom
n.
• The state or character of a saint.
Sainted
a.
• Consecrated; sacred; holy; pious.
• Entered into heaven; — a euphemism for dead.
Saintess
n.
• A female saint.
Sainthood
n.
• The state of being a saint; the condition of a saint.
• The order, or united body, of saints; saints, considered collectively.
Saintish
a.
• Somewhat saintlike; — used ironically.
Saintism
n.
• The character or quality of saints; also, hypocritical pretense of holiness.
Saintlike
a.
• Resembling a saint; suiting a saint; becoming a saint; saintly.
Saintliness
n.
• Quality of being saintly.
Saintly
a.
• Like a saint; becoming a holy person.
Saintologist
n.
(Theol.) One who writes the lives of saints.
Saintship
n.
• The character or qualities of a saint.
Saith
• 3d pers. sing. pres. of Say.
Saithe
n.
(Zool.) The pollock, or coalfish; — called also sillock.
Saiva
n.
• One of an important religious sect in India which regards Siva with peculiar veneration.
Saivism
n.
• The worship of Siva.
Sajene
n.
• Same as Sagene.
Sajou
n.
(Zool.) Same as Sapajou.
Sake
n.
• Final cause; end; purpose of obtaining; cause; motive; reason; interest; concern; account; regard or respect; — used chiefly in such phrases as, for the sake, for his sake, for man's sake, for mercy's sake, and the like; as, to commit crime for the sake of gain; to go abroad for the sake of one's health.
Saker
n.
(Zool.) A falcon (Falco sacer) native of Southern Europe and Asia, closely resembling the lanner.
• The peregrine falcon
(Mil.) A small piece of artillery.
Sakeret
n.
(Zool.) The male of the saker (a).
Saki
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of South American monkeys of the genus Pithecia. They have large ears, and a long hairy tail which is not prehensile.
n.
• The alcoholic drink of Japan. It is made from rice.
Sakti
n.
(Hind. Myth.) The divine energy, personified as the wife of a deity (Brahma, Vishnu, Siva, etc.); the female principle.
Sal
n.
(Bot.) An East Indian timber tree (Shorea robusta), much used for building purposes. It is of a light brown color, close-grained, and durable.
n.
(Chem. & Pharm.) Salt.
Salaam
n.
• Same as Salam.
v. i.
• To make or perform a salam.
Salability
n.
• The quality or condition of being salable; salableness.
Salable
a.
• Capable of being sold; fit to be sold; finding a ready market.
Salacious
n.
• Having a propensity to venery; lustful; lecherous.
Salacity
n.
• Strong propensity to venery; lust; lecherousness.
Salad
n.
• A preparation of vegetables, as lettuce, celery, water cress, onions, etc., usually dressed with salt, vinegar, oil, and spice, and eaten for giving a relish to other food; as, lettuce salad; tomato salad, etc.
• A dish composed of chopped meat or fish, esp. chicken or lobster, mixed with lettuce or other vegetables, and seasoned with oil, vinegar, mustard, and other condiments; as, chicken salad; lobster salad.
Salade
n.
• A helmet. See Sallet.
Salading
n.
• Vegetable for salad.
Salaeratus
n.
• See Saleratus.
Salagane
n.
(Zool.) The esculent swallow. See under Esculent.
Salam
n.
• A salutation or compliment of ceremony in the east by word or act; an obeisance, performed by bowing very low and placing the right palm on the forehead.
Salamander
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of Urodela, belonging to Salamandra, Amblystoma, Plethodon, and various allied genera, especially those that are more or less terrestrial in their habits.
(Zool.) The pouched gopher (Geomys tuza) of the Southern United States.
• A culinary utensil of metal with a plate or disk which is heated, and held over pastry, etc., to brown it.
• A large poker.
(Metal.) Solidofied material in a furnace hearth.
Salamandridea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Amphibia including the Salamanders and allied groups; the Urodela.
Salamandrina
n.
(Zool.) A suborder of Urodela, comprising salamanders.
Salamandrine
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a salamander; enduring fire.
Salamandroid
a
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the salamanders.
Salamstone
n.
(Min.) A kind of blue sapphire brought from Ceylon.
Salangana
n.
• The salagane.
Salaried
a.
• Receiving a salary; paid by a salary; having a salary attached; as, a salaried officer; a salaried office.
Salary
a.
• Saline
n.
• The recompense or consideration paid, or stipulated to be paid, to a person at regular intervals for services; fixed wages, as by the year, quarter, or month; stipend; hire.
v. t.
• To pay, or agree to pay, a salary to; to attach salary to; as, to salary a clerk; to salary a position.
Salcin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside found in the leaves of several species of willow (Salix) and poplar, and extracted as a bitter white crystalline substance.
Sale
n.
• See 1st Sallow.
n.
• The act of selling; the transfer of property, or a contract to transfer the ownership of property, from one person to another for a valuable consideration, or for a price in money.
• Opportunity of selling; demand; market.
• Public disposal to the highest bidder, or exposure of goods in market; auction.
Saleb
n.
(Med.) See Salep.
Salebrosity
n.
• Roughness or ruggedness.
Salebrous
a.
• Rough; rugged.
Salep
n.
• The dried tubers of various species of Orchis, and Eulophia. It is used to make a nutritious beverage by treating the powdered preparation with hot water.
Saleratus
n.
(Old Chem.) Aerated salt; a white crystalline substance having an alkaline taste and reaction, consisting of sodium bicarbonate (see under Sodium.) It is lagerly used in cooking, with sour milk (lactic acid) or cream of tartar as a substitute for yeast. It is also an ingridient of most baking powders, and is used in the preparation of effervescing drinks.
Salesman
n.
• One who sells anything; one whose occupation is to sell goods or merchandise.
Saleswoman
n.
• A woman whose occupation is to sell goods or merchandise.
Salework
n.
• Work or things made for sale; hence, work done carelessly or slightingly.
Salian
a.
• Denoting a tribe of Franks who established themselves early in the fourth century on the river Sala [now Yssel]; Salic.
n.
• A Salian Frank.
Saliant
a.
(Her.) Same as Salient.
Saliaunce
a.
• Salience; onslaught.
Salic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Salian Franks, or to the Salic law so called.
Salicaceous
a.
• Belonging or relating to the willow.
Salicyl
n.
(Chem.) The hypothetical radical of salicylic acid and of certain related compounds.
Salicylal
n.
(Chem.) A thin, fragrant, colorless oil, HO.C6H4.CHO, found in the flowers of meadow sweet (Spiraea), and also obtained by oxidation of saligenin, etc. It reddens on exposure. Called also salycylol, salicylic aldehyde, and formerly salicylous, or spiroylous, acid.
Salicylate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of salicylic acid.
Salicylic
n.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid formerly obtained by fusing salicin with potassium hydroxide, and now made in large quantities from phenol (carbolic acid) by the action of carbon dioxide on heated sodium phenolate. It is a white crystalline substance. It is used as an antiseptic, and in its salts in the treatment of rheumatism. Called also hydroxybenzoic acid.
Salicylide
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance obtained by dehydration of salicylic acid.
Salicylite
n.
(Chem.) A compound of salicylal; — named after the analogy of a salt.
Salicylol
n.
(Chem.) Same as Salicylal.
Salicylous
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a substance called salicylous acid, and now salicylal.
Salience
n.
• That quality or condition of being salient; a leaping; a springing forward; an assaulting.
• The quality or state of projecting, or being projected; projection; protrusion.
Saliency
n.
• Quality of being salient; hence, vigor.
Salient
a.
• Moving by leaps or springs; leaping; bounding; jumping.
• Shooting out up; springing; projecting.
• Hence, figuratively, forcing itself on the attention; prominent; conspicuous; noticeable.
(Math. & Fort.) Projectiong outwardly; as, a salient angle; — opposed to reentering. See Illust. of Bastion.
(Her.) Represented in a leaping position; as, a lion salient.
a.
(Fort.) A salient angle or part; a projection.
Saliently
adv.
• In a salient manner.
Saliferous
a.
• Producing, or impregnated with, salt.
Salifiable
a.
(Chem.) Capable of neutralizing an acid to form a salt; — said of bases; thus, ammonia is salifiable.
Salification
n.
(Chem.) The act, process, or result of salifying; the state of being salified.
Salify
v. t.
(Chem.) To combine or impregnate with a salt.
• To form a salt with; to convert into a salt; as, to salify a base or an acid.
Saligenin
n.
(Chem.) A phenol alcohol obtained, by the decomposition of salicin, as a white crystalline substance; — called also hydroxy-benzyl alcohol.
Saligot
n.
(Bot.) The water chestnut (Trapa natans).
Salimeter
n.
• An instrument for measuring the amount of salt present in any given solution.
Salimetry
n.
• The art or process of measuring the amount of salt in a substance.
Salina
n.
• A salt marsh, or salt pond, inclosed from the sea.
• Salt works.
Salination
n.
• The act of washing with salt water.
Saline
a.
• Consisting of salt, or containing salt; as, saline particles; saline substances; a saline cathartic.
• Of the quality of salt; salty; as, a saline taste.
n.
• A salt spring; a place where salt water is collected in the earth.
n.
(Chem.) A crude potash obtained from beet-root residues and other similar sources.
(Med. Chem.) A metallic salt; esp., a salt of potassium, sodium, lithium, or magnesium, used in medicine.
Salineness
n.
• The quality or state of being salt; saltness.
Saliniferous
a.
• Same as Saliferous.
Saliniform
a.
• Having the form or the qualities of a salt, especially of common salt.
Salinity
n.
• Salineness.
Salinometer
n.
• A salimeter.
Salinous
a.
• Saline.
Salique
a.
• Salic.
Saliretin
n.
(Chem.) A yellow amorphous resinoid substance obtained by the action of dilute acids on saligenin.
Salisburia
n.
(Bot.) The ginkgo tree (Ginkgo biloba, or Salisburia adiantifolia).
Salite
v. t.
• To season with salt; to salt.
n.
(Min.) A massive lamellar variety of pyroxene, of a dingy green color.
Saliva
n.
(Physiol.) The secretion from the salivary glands.
Salival
a.
• Salivary.
Salivant
a.
• Producing salivation.
n.
• That which produces salivation.
Salivary
a.
(Physiol.) Of or pertaining to saliva; producing or carrying saliva; as, the salivary ferment; the salivary glands; the salivary ducts, etc.
Salivate
v. t.
• To produce an abnormal flow of saliva in; to produce salivation or ptyalism in, as by the use of mercury.
Salivation
n.
(Physiol.) The act or process of salivating; an excessive secretion of saliva, often accompained with soreness of the mouth and gums; ptyalism.
Salivous
a.
• Pertaining to saliva; of the nature of saliva.
Salix
n.
(Bot.) A genus of trees or shrubs including the willow, osier, and the like, growing usually in wet grounds.
• A tree or shrub of any kind of willow.
Sallenders
n. pl.
(Far.) An eruption on the hind leg of a horse.
Sallet
n.
• A light kind of helmet, with or without a visor, introduced during the 15th century.
Salliance
n.
• Salience.
Sallow
n.
• The willow; willow twigs.
(Bot.) A name given to certain species of willow, especially those which do not have flexible shoots, as Salix caprea, S. cinerea, etc.
a.
• Having a yellowish color; of a pale, sickly color, tinged with yellow; as, a sallow skin.
v. t.
• To tinge with sallowness.
Sallowish
a.
• Somewhat sallow.
Sallowness
n.
• The quality or condition of being sallow.
Sally
v. i.
• To leap or rush out; to burst forth; to issue suddenly; as a body of troops from a fortified place to attack besiegers; to make a sally.
n.
• A leaping forth; a darting; a spring.
• A rushing or bursting forth; a quick issue; a sudden eruption; specifically, an issuing of troops from a place besieged to attack the besiegers; a sortie.
• An excursion from the usual track; range; digression; deviation.
• A flight of fancy, liveliness, wit, or the like; a flashing forth of a quick and active mind.
• Transgression of the limits of soberness or steadiness; act of levity; wild gayety; frolic; escapade.
Sallyman
n.
(Zool.) The velella; — called also saleeman.
Salm
n.
• Psalm.
Salmagundi
n.
• A mixture of chopped meat and pickled herring, with oil, vinegar, pepper, and onions.
• Hence, a mixture of various ingredients; an olio or medley; a potpourri; a miscellany.
Salmi
n.
(Cookery) Same as Salmis.
Salmiac
n.
(Old Chem.) Sal ammoniac. See under Sal.
Salmis
n.
(Cookery) A ragout or partky roasted game stewed with sauce, wine, bread, and condiments suited to provoke appetite.
Salmon
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of fishes of the genus Salmo and allied genera. The common salmon (Salmo salar) of Northern Europe and Eastern North America, and the California salmon, or quinnat, are the most important species. They are extensively preserved for food. See Quinnat.
• A reddish yellow or orange color, like the flesh of the salmon.
a.
• Of a reddish yellow or orange color, like that of the flesh of the salmon.
Salmonet
n.
(Zool.) A salmon of small size; a samlet.
Salmonoid
a.
(Zool.) Like, or pertaining to, the Salmonidae, a family of fishes including the trout and salmon.
n.
• Any fish of the family Salmonidae.
Salogen
n.
(Chem.) A halogen.
Salol
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance consisting of phenol salicylate.
Salom
n.
• An apartment for the reception of company; hence, in the plural, faschionable parties; circles of fashionable society.
Salomtry
n.
• Salimetry.
Saloon
n.
• A spacious and elegant apartment for the reception of company or for works of art; a hall of reception, esp. a hall for public entertainments or amusements; a large room or parlor; as, the saloon of a steamboat.
• Popularly, a public room for specific uses; esp., a barroom or grogshop; as, a drinking saloon; an eating saloon; a dancing saloon.
Saloop
n.
• An aromatic drink prepared from sassafras bark and other ingredients, at one time much used in London.
Salp
n.
(Zool.) Any species of Salpa, or of the family Salpidae.
Salpa
n.
(Zool.) A genus of transparent, tubular, free-swimming oceanic tunicates found abundantly in all the warmer latitudes. See Illustration in Appendix.
Salpicon
n.
• Chopped meat, bread, etc., used to stuff legs of veal or other joints; stuffing; farce.
Salpingitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the salpinx.
Salpinx
n.
(Old Anat.) The Eustachian tube, or the Fallopian tube.
Salsafy
n.
(Bot.) See Salsify.
Salsamentarious
a.
• Salt; salted; saline.
Salse
n.
• A mud volcano, the water of which is often impregnated with salts, whence the name.
Salsify
n.
(Bot.) See Oyster plant (a), under Oyster.
Salsoda
n.
• See Sal soda, under Sal.
Salsola
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants including the glasswort. See Glasswort.
Salsuginous
a.
(Bot.) Growing in brackish places or in salt marches.
Salt
n.
• The chloride of sodium, a substance used for seasoning food, for the preservation of meat, etc. It is found native in the earth, and is also produced, by evaporation and crystallization, from sea water and other water impregnated with saline particles.
• Hence, flavor; taste; savor; smack; seasoning.
• Hence, also, piquancy; wit; sense; as, Attic salt.
• A dish for salt at table; a saltcellar.
• A sailor; — usually qualified by old.
(Chem.) The neutral compound formed by the union of an acid base; thus, sulphuric acid and iron form the salt sulphate of iron or green vitriol.
• Fig.: That which preserves from corruption or error; that which purifies; a corrective; an antiseptic; also, an allowance or deduction; as, his statements must be taken with a grain of salt.
• Any mineral salt used as an aperient or cathartic, especially Epsom salts, Rochelle salt, or Glauber's salt.
• Marches flooded by the tide.
a.
• Of or relating to salt; abounding in, or containing, salt; prepared or preserved with, or tasting of, salt; salted; as, salt beef; salt water.
• Overflowed with, or growing in, salt water; as, a salt marsh; salt grass.
• Fig.: Bitter; sharp; pungent.
• Fig.: Salacious; lecherous; lustful.
v. t.
• To sprinkle, impregnate, or season with salt; to preserve with salt or in brine; to supply with salt; as, to salt fish, beef, or pork; to salt cattle.
• To fill with salt between the timbers and planks, as a ship, for the preservation of the timber.
v. i.
• To deposit salt as a saline solution; as, the brine begins to salt.
n.
• The act of leaping or jumping; a leap.
Saltant
a.
• Leaping; jumping; dancing.
(Her.) In a leaping position; springing forward; — applied especially to the squirrel, weasel, and rat, also to the cat, greyhound, monkey, etc.
Saltarella
n.
• See Saltarello.
Saltarello
n.
• A popular Italian dance in quick 3-4 or 6-8 time, running mostly in triplets, but with a hop step at the beginning of each measure. See Tarantella.
Saltate
v. i.
• To leap or dance.
Saltation
n.
• A leaping or jumping.
• Beating or palpitation; as, the saltation of the great artery.
(Biol.) An abrupt and marked variation in the condition or appearance of a species; a sudden modification which may give rise to new races.
Saltatoria
n.
(Zool.) A division of Orthoptera including grasshoppers, locusts, and crickets.
Saltatorial
a.
• Relating to leaping; saltatory; as, saltatorial exercises.
(Zool.) Same as Saltatorious.
• Of or pertaining to the Saltatoria.
Saltatorious
a.
• Capable of leaping; formed for leaping; saltatory; as, a saltatorious insect or leg.
Saltatory
a.
• Leaping or dancing; having the power of, or used in, leaping or dancing.
Saltbush
n.
(Bot.) An Australian plant (Atriplex nummularia) of the Goosefoot family.
Saltcat
n.
• A mixture of salt, coarse meal lime, etc., attractive to pigeons.
Saltcellar
n.
• Formerly a large vessel, now a small vessel of glass or other material, used for holding salt on the table.
Salter
n.
• One who makes, sells, or applies salt; one who salts meat or fish.
Saltern
n.
• A building or place where salt is made by boiling or by evaporation; salt works.
Saltfoot
n.
• A large saltcellar formerly placed near the center of the table. The superior guests were seated above the saltfoot.
Saltier
n.
• See Saltire.
Saltigradae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of spiders including those which lie in wait and leap upon their prey; the leaping spiders.
Saltigrade
a.
(Zool.) Having feet or legs formed for leaping.
n.
(Zool.) One of the Saltigradae a tribe of spiders which leap to seize their prey.
Saltimbanco
n.
• A mountebank; a quack.
Salting
n.
• The act of sprinkling, impregnating, or furnishing, with salt.
• A salt marsh.
Saltire
n.
(Her.) A St. Andrew's cross, or cross in the form of an X, — one of the honorable ordinaries.
Saltirewise
adv.
(Her.) In the manner of a saltire; — said especially of the blazoning of a shield divided by two lines drawn in the direction of a bend and a bend sinister, and crossing at the center.
Saltish
a.
• Somewhat salt.
Saltle
n.
(Zool.) The European dab.
Saltless
a.
• Destitute of salt; insipid.
Saltly
adv.
• With taste of salt; in a salt manner.
Saltmouth
n.
• A wide-mouthed bottle with glass stopper for holding chemicals, especially crystallized salts.
Saltness
n.
• The quality or state of being salt, or state of being salt, or impregnated with salt; salt taste; as, the saltness of sea water.
Saltpetrous
a.
• Pertaining to saltpeter, or partaking of its qualities; impregnated with saltpeter.
Saltwort
n.
(Bot.) A name given to several plants which grow on the seashore, as the Batis maritima, and the glasswort. See Glasswort.
Salty
a.
• Somewhat salt; saltish.
Salubrious
a.
• Favorable to health; healthful; promoting health; as, salubrious air, water, or climate.
Salubrity
n.
• The quality of being salubrious; favorableness to the preservation of health; salubriousness; wholesomeness; healthfulness; as, the salubrity of the air, of a country, or a climate.
Salue
v. t.
• To salute.
Salutary
a.
• Wholesome; healthful; promoting health; as, salutary exercise.
• Promotive of, or contributing to, some beneficial purpose; beneficial; advantageous; as, a salutary design.
Salutation
n.
• The act of saluting, or paying respect or reverence, by the customary words or actions; the act of greeting, or expressing good will or courtesy; also, that which is uttered or done in saluting or greeting.
Salutatorian
n.
• The student who pronounces the salutatory oration at the annual Commencement or like exercises of a college, — an honor commonly assigned to that member of the graduating class who ranks second in scholarship.
Salutatorily
adv.
• By way of salutation.
Salutatory
a.
• Containing or expressing salutations; speaking a welcome; greeting; — applied especially to the oration which introduces the exercises of the Commencements, or similar public exhibitions, in American colleges.
n.
• A place for saluting or greeting; a vestibule; a porch.
(American Colleges) The salutatory oration.
Salute
v. t.
• To adress, as with expressions of kind wishes and courtesy; to greet; to hail.
• Hence, to give a sign of good will; to compliment by an act or ceremony, as a kiss, a bow, etc.
(Mil. & Naval) To honor, as some day, person, or nation, by a discharge of cannon or small arms, by dipping colors, by cheers, etc.
• To promote the welfare and safety of; to benefit; to gratify.
n.
• The act of saluting, or expressing kind wishes or respect; salutation; greeting.
• A sign, token, or ceremony, expressing good will, compliment, or respect, as a kiss, a bow, etc.
(Mil. & Naval) A token of respect or honor for some distinguished or official personage, for a foreign vessel or flag, or for some festival or event, as by presenting arms, by a discharge of cannon, volleys of small arms, dipping the colors or the topsails, etc.
Saluter
n.
• One who salutes.
Salutiferous
a.
• Bringing health; healthy; salutary; beneficial; as, salutiferous air.
Salutiferously
adv.
• Salutarily.
Salvability
n.
• The quality or condition of being salvable; salvableness.
Salvable
a.
• Capable of being saved; admitting of salvation.
Salvage
n.
• The act of saving a vessel, goods, or life, goods, or life, from perils of the sea.
(Maritime Law) The compensation allowed to persons who voluntarily assist in saving a ship or her cargo from peril.
• That part of the property that survives the peril and is saved.
a. & n.
• Savage.
Salvation
n.
• The act of saving; preservation or deliverance from destruction, danger, or great calamity.
(Theol.) The redemption of man from the bondage of sin and liability to eternal death, and the conferring on him of everlasting happiness.
• Saving power; that which saves.
Salvationist
n.
• An evangelist, a member, or a recruit, of the Salvation Army.
Salvatory
n.
• A place where things are preserved; a repository.
Salve
interj.
• Hail!
v. t.
• To say "Salve" to; to greet; to salute.
n.
• An adhesive composition or substance to be applied to wounds or sores; a healing ointment.
• A soothing remedy or antidote.
v. t.
• To heal by applications or medicaments; to cure by remedial traetment; to apply salve to; as, to salve a wound.
• To heal; to remedy; to cure; to make good; to soothe, as with an ointment, especially by some device, trick, or quibble; to gloss over.
v. t. & i.
• To save, as a ship or goods, from the perils of the sea.
Salver
n.
• One who salves, or uses salve as a remedy; hence, a quacksalver, or quack.
n.
• A salvor.
n.
• A tray or waiter on which anything is presented.
Salvia
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants including the sage. See Sage.
Salvific
a.
• Tending to save or secure safety.
Salvo
n.
• An exception; a reservation; an excuse.
n.
(Mil.) A concentrated fire from pieces of artillery, as in endeavoring to make a break in a fortification; a volley.
• A salute paid by a simultaneous, or nearly simultaneous, firing of a number of cannon.
Salvor
n.
(Law) One who assists in saving a ship or goods at sea, without being under special obligation to do so.
Sam
adv.
• Together.
Samara
n.
(Bot.) A dry, indehiscent, usually one-seeded, winged fruit, as that of the ash, maple, and elm; a key or key fruit.
Samare
n.
• See Simar.
Samaritan
a.
• Of or pertaining to Samaria, in Palestine.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Samaria; also, the language of Samaria.
Samarium
n.
(Chem.) A rare metallic element of doubtful identity.
Samaroid
a.
(Bot.) Resembling a samara, or winged seed vessel.
Samarra
n.
• See Simar.
Samarskite
a.
(Min.) A rare mineral having a velvet-black color and submetallic luster. It is a niobate of uranium, iron, and the yttrium and cerium metals.
Sambo
n.
• A colloquial or humorous appelation for a negro; sometimes, the offspring of a black person and a mulatto; a zambo.
Samboo
n.
(Zool.) Same as Sumbur.
Sambucus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs and trees; the elder.
Sambuke
n.
(Mus.) An ancient stringed instrument used by the Greeks, the particular construction of which is unknown.
Sambur
n.
(Zool.) An East Indian deer (Rusa Aristotelis) having a mane on its neck. Its antlers have but three prongs. Called also gerow. The name is applied to other species of the genus Rusa, as the Bornean sambur (R. equina).
Same
a.
• Not different or other; not another or others; identical; unchanged.
• Of like kind, species, sort, dimensions, or the like; not differing in character or in the quality or qualities compared; corresponding; not discordant; similar; like.
• Just mentioned, or just about to be mentioned.
Sameliness
n.
• Sameness, 2.
Sameness
n.
• The state of being the same, identity; abscence of difference; near resemblance; correspondence; similarity; as, a sameness of person, of manner, of sound, of appearance, and the like.
• Hence, want of variety; tedious monotony.
Samette
n.
• See Samite.
Samian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the island of Samos.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Samos.
Samiel
n.
• A hot and destructive wind that sometimes blows, in Turkey, from the desert. It is identical with the simoom of Arabia and the kamsin of Syria.
Samiot
a. & n.
• Samian.
Samite
a.
• A species of silk stuff, or taffeta, generally interwoven with gold.
Samlet
n.
• The parr.
Sammier
n.
• A machine for pressing the water from skins in tanning.
Samoan
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Samoan Islands (formerly called Navigators' Islands) in the South Pacific Ocean, or their inhabitants.
n.
• An inhabitant of the Samoan Islands.
Samovar
n.
• A metal urn used in Russia for making tea. It is filled with water, which is heated by charcoal placed in a pipe, with chimney attached, which passes through the urn.
Samoyedes
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) An ignorant and degraded Turanian tribe which occupies a portion of Northern Russia and a part of Siberia.
Samp
n.
• An article of food consisting of maize broken or bruised, which is cooked by by boiling, and usually eaten with milk; coarse hominy.
Sampan
n.
(Naut.) A Chinese boat from twelve to fifteen feet long, covered with a house, and sometimes used as a permanent habitation on the inland waters.
Samphire
n.
(Bot.) A fleshy, suffrutescent, umbelliferous European plant (Crithmum maritimum). It grows among rocks and on cliffs along the seacoast, and is used for pickles.
• The species of glasswort (Salicornia herbacea); — called in England marsh samphire
• A seashore shrub (Borrichia arborescens) of the West Indies
Sample
n.
• Example; pattern.
• A part of anything presented for inspection, or shown as evidence of the quality of the whole; a specimen; as, goods are often purchased by samples.
v. t.
• To make or show something similar to; to match.
• To take or to test a sample or samples of; as, to sample sugar, teas, wools, cloth.
Sampler
n.
• One who makes up samples for inspection; one who examines samples, or by samples; as, a wool sampler.
• A pattern; a specimen; especially, a collection of needlework patterns, as letters, borders, etc., to be used as samples, or to display the skill of the worker.
Samson
n.
• An Israelite of Bible record (see Judges xiii.), distinguished for his great strength; hence, a man of extraordinary physical strength.
Sanability
n.
• The quality or state of being sanable; sanableness; curableness.
Sanable
a.
• Capable of being healed or cured; susceptible of remedy.
Sanableness
n.
• The quality of being sanable.
Sanation
n.
• The act of healing or curing.
Sanative
a.
• Having the power to cure or heal; healing; tending to heal; sanatory.
Sanatorium
n.
• An establishment for the treatment of the sick; a resort for invalids. See Sanitarium.
Sanatory
a.
• Conducive to health; tending to cure; healing; curative; sanative.
Sanbenito
n.
• Anciently, a sackcloth coat worn by penitens on being reconciled to the church.
• A garnment or cap, or sometimes both, painted with flames, figures, etc., and worn by persons who had been examined by the Inquisition and were brought forth for punishment at the auto-da-fe.
Sanctificate
v. t.
• To sanctify.
Sanctification
n.
• The act of sanctifying or making holy; the being sanctified or made holy; esp. (Theol.), the act of God's grace by which the affections of men are purified, or alienated from sin and the world, and exalted to, a supreme love to God; also, the state of being thus purified or sanctified.
• The act of consecrating, or of setting apart, for a sacred purpose; consecration.
Sanctified
a.
• Made holy; also, made to have the air of sanctity; sanctimonious.
Sanctifier
n.
• One who sanctifies, or makes holy; specifically, the Holy Spirit.
Sanctify
v. t.
• To make sacred or holy; to set apart to a holy or religious use; to consecrate by appropriate rites; to hallow.
• To make free from sin; to cleanse from moral corruption and pollution; to purify.
• To make efficient as the means of holiness; to render productive of holiness or piety.
• To impart or impute sacredness, venerableness, inviolability, title to reverence and respect, or the like, to; to secure from violation; to give sanction to.
Sanctifyingly
adv.
• In a manner or degree tending to sanctify or make holy.
Sanctiloquent
a.
• Discoursing on heavenly or holy things, or in a holy manner.
Sanctimonial
a.
• Sanctimonius.
Sanctimonious
a.
• Possessing sanctimony; holy; sacred; saintly.
• Making a show of sanctity; affecting saintliness; hypocritically devout or pious.
Sanctimony
n.
• Holiness; devoutness; scrupulous austerity; sanctity; especially, outward or artificial saintliness; assumed or pretended holiness; hypocritical devoutness.
Sanction
n.
• Solemn or ceremonious ratification; an official act of a superior by which he ratifies and gives validity to the act of some other person or body; establishment or furtherance of anything by authority to it; confirmation; approbation.
• Anything done or said to enforce the will, law, or authority of another; as, legal sanctions.
v. t.
• To give sanction to; to ratify; to confirm; to approve.
Sanctionary
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or giving, sanction.
Sanctitude
a.
• Holiness; sacredness; sanctity.
Sanctity
n.
• The state or quality of being sacred or holy; holiness; saintliness; moral purity; godliness.
• Sacredness; solemnity; inviolability; religious binding force; as, the sanctity of an oath.
• A saint or holy being.
Sanctuarize
v. t.
• To shelter by means of a sanctuary or sacred privileges.
Sanctuary
n.
• A sacred place; a consecrated spot; a holy and inviolable site.
• The most retired part of the temple at Jerusalem, called the Holy of Holies, in which was kept the ark of the covenant, and into which no person was permitted to enter except the high priest, and he only once a year, to intercede for the people; also, the most sacred part of the tabernacle; also, the temple at Jerusalem.
(Arch.) The most sacred part of any religious building, esp. that part of a Christian church in which the altar is placed.
• A house consecrated to the worship of God; a place where divine service is performed; a church, temple, or other place of worship.
• A sacred and inviolable asylum; a place of refuge and protection; shelter; refuge; protection.
Sanctum
n.
• A sacred place; hence, a place of retreat; a room reserved for personal use; as, an editor's sanctum.
Sanctus
n.
(Eccl.) A part of the Mass, or, in Protestant churches, a part of the communion service, of which the first words in Latin are Sanctus, sanctus, sanctus [Holy, holy, holy]; — called also Tersanctus.
(Mus.) An anthem composed for these words.
Sand
n.
• Fine particles of stone, esp. of siliceous stone, but not reduced to dust; comminuted stone in the form of loose grains, which are not coherent when wet.
• A single particle of such stone.
• The sand in the hourglass; hence, a moment or interval of time; the term or extent of one's life.
• Tracts of land consisting of sand, like the deserts of Arabia and Africa; also, extensive tracts of sand exposed by the ebb of the tide.
• Courage; pluck; grit.
v. t.
• To sprinkle or cover with sand.
• To drive upon the sand.
• To bury (oysters) beneath drifting sand or mud.
• To mix with sand for purposes of fraud; as, to sand sugar.
Sandal
n.
• Same as Sendal.
n.
• Sandalwood.
n.
• A kind of shoe consisting of a sole strapped to the foot; a protection for the foot, covering its lower surface, but not its upper.
• A kind of slipper.
• An overshoe with parallel openings across the instep.
Sandaled
a.
• Wearing sandals.
• Made like a sandal.
Sandaliform
a.
(Bot.) Shaped like a sandal or slipper.
Sandalwood
n.
(Bot.) The highly perfumed yellowish heartwood of an East Indian and Polynesian tree (Santalum album), and of several other trees of the same genus, as the Hawaiian Santalum Freycinetianum and S. pyrularium, the Australian S. latifolium, etc. The name is extended to several other kinds of fragrant wood.
• Any tree of the genus Santalum, or a tree which yields sandalwood.
• The red wood of a kind of buckthorn, used in Russia for dyeing leather (Rhamnus Dahuricus).
Sandbagger
n.
• An assaulter whose weapon is a sand bag. See Sand bag, under Sand.
Sanded
a.
• Covered or sprinkled with sand; sandy; barren.
• Marked with small spots; variegated with spots; speckled; of a sandy color, as a hound.
• Short-sighted.
Sandemanian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Robert Sandeman, a Scotch sectary of the eighteenth century. See Glassite.
Sandemanianism
n.
• The faith or system of the Sandemanians.
Sanderling
n.
(Zool.) A small gray and brown sandpiper (Calidris arenaria) very common on sandy beaches in America, Europe, and Asia. Called also curwillet, sand lark, stint, and ruddy plover.
Sanders
n.
• An old name of sandalwood, now applied only to the red sandalwood. See under Sandalwood.
Sandever
n.
• See Sandiver.
Sandfish
n.
(Zool.) A small marine fish of the Pacific coast of North America (Trichodon trichodon) which buries itself in the sand.
Sandglass
n.
• An instrument for measuring time by the running of sand. See Hourglass.
Sandhiller
n.
• A nickname given to any "poor white" living in the pine woods which cover the sandy hills in Georgia and South Carolina.
Sandiness
n.
• The quality or state of being sandy, or of being of a sandy color.
Sandish
a.
• Approaching the nature of sand; loose; not compact.
Sandiver
n.
• A whitish substance which is cast up, as a scum, from the materials of glass in fusion, and, floating on the top, is skimmed off; — called also glass gall.
Sandix
n.
• A kind of minium, or red lead, made by calcining carbonate of lead, but inferior to true minium.
Sandman
n.
• A mythical person who makes children sleepy, so that they rub their eyes as if there were sand in them.
Sandnecker
n.
(Zool.) A European flounder (Hippoglossoides limandoides); — called also rough dab, long fluke, sand fluke, and sand sucker.
Sandpaper
n.
• Paper covered on one side with sand glued fast, — used for smoothing and polishing.
v. t.
• To smooth or polish with sandpaper; as, to sandpaper a door.
Sandpiper
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small limicoline game birds belonging to Tringa, Actodromas, Ereunetes, and various allied genera of the family Tringidae.
(Zool.) A small lamprey eel; the pride.
Sandpit
n.
• A pit or excavation from which sand is or has been taken.
Sandre
n.
(Zool.) A Russian fish (Lucioperca sandre) which yields a valuable oil, called sandre oil, used in the preparation of caviare.
Sandstone
n.
• A rock made of sand more or less firmly united. Common or siliceous sandstone consists mainly of quartz sand.
Sandwich
n.
• Two pieces of bread and butter with a thin slice of meat, cheese, or the like, between them.
v. t.
• To make into a sandwich; also, figuratively, to insert between portions of something dissimilar; to form of alternate parts or things, or alternating layers of a different nature; to interlard.
Sandworm
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of annelids which burrow in the sand of the seashore.
• Any species of annelids of the genus Sabellaria. They construct firm tubes of agglutinated sand on rocks and shells, and are sometimes destructive to oysters.
• The chigoe, a species of flea.
Sandwort
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Arenaria, low, tufted herbs (order Caryophyllaceae.)
Sandy
a.
• Consisting of, abounding with, or resembling, sand; full of sand; covered or sprinkled with sand; as, a sandy desert, road, or soil.
• Of the color of sand; of a light yellowish red color; as, sandy hair.
Sandyx
n.
• See Sandix.
Sane
a.
• Being in a healthy condition; not deranged; acting rationally; — said of the mind.
• Mentally sound; possessing a rational mind; having the mental faculties in such condition as to be able to anticipate and judge of the effect of one's actions in an ordinary maner; — said of persons.
Saneness
n.
• The state of being sane; sanity.
Sang
• imp. of Sing.
Sangaree
n.
• Wine and water sweetened and spiced, — a favorite West Indian drink.
Sangiac
n.
• See Sanjak.
Sanguiferous
a.
(Physiol.) Conveying blood; as, sanguiferous vessels, i. e., the arteries, veins, capillaries.
Sanguification
n.
(Physiol.) The production of blood; the conversion of the products of digestion into blood; hematosis.
Sanguifier
n.
• A producer of blood.
Sanguifluous
a.
• Flowing or running with blood.
Sanguify
v. t.
• To produce blood from.
Sanguigenous
a.
• Producing blood; as, sanguigenous food.
Sanguinaceous
n.
• Of a blood-red color; sanguine.
Sanguinaria
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants of the Poppy family.
• The rootstock of the bloodroot, used in medicine as an emetic, etc.
Sanguinarily
adv.
• In a sanguinary manner.
Sanguinariness
n.
• The quality or state of being sanguinary.
Sanguinary
a.
• Attended with much bloodshed; bloody; murderous; as, a sanguinary war, contest, or battle.
• Bloodthirsty; cruel; eager to shed blood.
n.
(Bot.) The yarrow.
• The Sanguinaria.
Sanguine
a.
• Having the color of blood; red.
• Characterized by abundance and active circulation of blood; as, a sanguine bodily temperament.
• Warm; ardent; as, a sanguine temper.
• Anticipating the best; not desponding; confident; full of hope; as, sanguine of success.
n.
• Blood color; red.
• Anything of a blood-red, as cloth.
(Min.) Bloodstone.
• Red crayon. See the Note under Crayon, 1.
v. t.
• To stain with blood; to impart the color of blood to; to ensanguine.
Sanguine
adv.
• In a sanguine manner.
Sanguineless
a.
• Destitute of blood; pale.
Sanguineness
n.
• The quality of being sanguine.
Sanguineous
a.
• Abounding with blood; sanguine.
• Of or pertaining to blood; bloody; constituting blood.
• Blood-red; crimson.
Sanguinity
n.
• The quality of being sanguine; sanguineness.
Sanguinivorous
a.
• Subsisting on blood.
Sanguinolency
n.
• The state of being sanguinolent, or bloody.
Sanguinolent
a.
• Tinged or mingled with blood; bloody; as, sanguinolent sputa.
Sanguisuge
n.
(Zool.) A bloodsucker, or leech.
Sanguivorous
a.
(Zool.) Subsisting upon blood; — said of certain blood-sucking bats and other animals. See Vampire.
Sanhedrist
n.
• A member of the sanhedrin.
Sanhita
n.
• A collection of vedic hymns, songs, or verses, forming the first part of each Veda.
Sanicle
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the umbelliferous genus Sanicula, reputed to have healing powers.
Sanidine
n.
(Min.) A variety of orthoclase feldspar common in certain eruptive rocks, as trachyte; — called also glassy feldspar.
Sanies
n.
(Med.) A thin, serous fluid commonly discharged from ulcers or foul wounds.
Sanious
a.
(Med.) pertaining to sanies, or partaking of its nature and appearance; thin and serous, with a slight bloody tinge; as, the sanious matter of an ulcer.
(med.) Discharging sanies; as, a sanious ulcer.
Sanitarian
a.
• Of or pertaining to health, or the laws of health; sanitary.
n.
• An advocate of sanitary measures; one especially interested or versed in sanitary measures.
Sanitarist
n.
• A sanitarian.
Sanitarium
n.
• A health station or retreat; a sanatorium.
Sanitary
a.
• Of or pertaining to health; designed to secure or preserve health; relating to the preservation or restoration of health; hygienic; as, sanitary regulations. See the Note under Sanatory.
Sanitation
n.
• The act of rendering sanitary; the science of sanitary conditions; the preservation of health; the use of sanitary measures; hygiene.
Sanity
n.
• The condition or quality of being sane; soundness of health of body or mind, especially of the mind; saneness.
Sanjak
n.
• A district or a subvision of a vilayet.
Sank
• imp. of Sink.
Sankha
n.
• A chank shell (Turbinella pyrum); also, a shell bracelet or necklace made in India from the chank shell.
Sankhya
n.
• A Hindoo system of philosophy which refers all things to soul and a rootless germ called prakriti, consisting of three elements, goodness, passion, and darkness.
Sannop
n.
• same as Sannup.
Sannup
n.
• A male Indian; a brave; — correlative of squaw.
Sanny
n.
• The sandpiper.
Sans
prep.
• Without; deprived or destitute of. Rarely used as an English word.
Sanscrit
n.
• See Sanskrit.
Sanskrit
n.
• The ancient language of the Hindoos, long since obsolete in vernacular use, but preserved to the present day as the literary and sacred dialect of India. It is nearly allied to the Persian, and to the principal languages of Europe, classical and modern, and by its more perfect preservation of the roots and forms of the primitive language from which they are all descended, is a most important assistance in determining their history and relations. Cf. Prakrit, and Veda.
a.
• Of or pertaining to Sanskrit; written in Sanskrit; as, a Sanskrit dictionary or inscription.
Sanskritic
a.
• Sanskrit.
Sanskritist
n.
• One versed in Sanskrit.
Santal
n.
(Chem.) A colorless crystalline substance, isomeric with piperonal, but having weak acid properties. It is extracted from sandalwood.
Santalaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Santalaceae), of which the genus Santalum is the type, and which includes the buffalo nut and a few other North American plants, and many peculiar plants of the southern hemisphere.
Santalic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, sandalwood (Santalum); — used specifically to designate an acid obtained as a resinous or red crystalline dyestuff, which is called also santalin.
Santalin
n.
(Chem.) Santalic acid. See Santalic.
Santalum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of trees with entire opposite leaves and small apetalous flowers. There are less than a dozen species, occuring from India to Australia and the Pacific Islands. See Sandalwood.
Santees
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) One of the seven confederated tribes of Indians belonging to the Sioux, or Dakotas.
Santer
v. i.
• See Saunter.
Santon
n.
• A Turkish saint; a kind of dervish, regarded by the people as a saint: also, a hermit.
Santonate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of santonic acid.
Santonic
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, an acid (distinct from santoninic acid) obtained from santonin as a white crystalline substance.
Santonin
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance having a bitter taste, extracted from the buds of levant wormseed and used as an anthelmintic. It occassions a peculiar temporary color blindness, causing objects to appear as if seen through a yellow glass.
Santoninate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of santoninic acid.
Santoninic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to santonin; — used specifically to designate an acid not known in the free state, but obtained in its salts.
Sao
n.
(Zool.) Any marine annelid of the genus Hyalinaecia, especially H. tubicola of Europe, which inhabits a transparent movable tube resembling a quill in color and texture.
Sap
n.
• The juice of plants of any kind, especially the ascending and descending juices or circulating fluid essential to nutrition.
• The sapwood, or alburnum, of a tree.
• A simpleton; a saphead; a milksop.
v. t.
• To subvert by digging or wearing away; to mine; to undermine; to destroy the foundation of.
(Mil.) To pierce with saps.
• To make unstable or infirm; to unsettle; to weaken.
v. i.
• To proceed by mining, or by secretly undermining; to execute saps.
n.
(Mil.) A narrow ditch or trench made from the foremost parallel toward the glacis or covert way of a besieged place by digging under cover of gabions, etc.
Sapadillo
n.
• See Sapodila.
Sapajo
n.
(Zool.) The sapajou.
Sapajou
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of South American monkeys of the genus Cebus, having long and prehensile tails. Some of the species are called also capuchins. The bonnet sapajou (C. subcristatus), the golden-handed sapajou (C. chrysopus), and the white-throated sapajou (C. hypoleucus) are well known species. See Capuchin.
Sapful
a.
• Abounding in sap; sappy.
Saphead
n.
• A weak-minded, stupid fellow; a milksop.
Saphenous
a.
(Anat.) Manifest; — applied to the two principal superficial veins of the lower limb of man.
• Of, pertaining to, or in the region of, the saphenous veins; as, the saphenous nerves; the saphenous opening, an opening in the broad fascia of the thigh through which the internal saphenous vein passes.
Sapid
a.
• Having the power of affecting the organs of taste; possessing savor, or flavor.
Sapidity
n.
• The quality or state of being sapid; taste; savor; savoriness.
Sapidness
n.
• Quality of being sapid; sapidity.
Sapience
n.
• The quality of being sapient; wisdom; sageness; knowledge.
Sapient
a.
• Wise; sage; discerning; — often in irony or contempt.
Sapiential
a.
• Having or affording wisdom.
Sapientious
a.
• Sapiential.
Sapientize
v. t.
• To make sapient.
Sapiently
adv.
• In a sapient manner.
Sapindaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to an order of trees and shrubs (Sapindaceae), including the (Typical) genus Sapindus, the maples, the margosa, and about seventy other genera.
Sapindus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of tropical and subtropical trees with pinnate leaves and panicled flowers. The fruits of some species are used instead of soap, and their round black seeds are made into necklaces.
Sapless
a.
• Destitute of sap; not juicy.
• Fig.: Dry, old; husky; withered; spiritless.
Sapling
n.
• A young tree.
Sapodilla
n.
(Bot.) A tall, evergeen, tropical American tree (Achras Sapota); also, its edible fruit, the sapodilla plum.
Sapogenin
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance obtained by the decomposition of saponin.
Saponaceous
a.
• Resembling soap; having the qualities of soap; soapy.
Saponacity
n.
• The quality or state of being saponaceous.
Saponary
a.
• Saponaceous.
Saponifiable
a.
• Capable of conversion into soap; as, a saponifiable substance.
Saponification
n.
• The act, process, or result, of soap making; conversion into soap; specifically (Chem.), the decomposition of fats and other ethereal salts by alkalies; as, the saponification of ethyl acetate.
Saponifier
n.
(Chem.) That which saponifies; any reagent used to cause saponification.
Saponify
v. t.
• To convert into soap, as tallow or any fat; hence (Chem.), to subject to any similar process, as that which ethereal salts undergo in decomposition; as, to saponify ethyl acetate.
Saponin
n.
(Chem.) A poisonous glucoside found in many plants, as in the root of soapwort (Saponaria), in the bark of soap bark (Quillaia), etc. It is extracted as a white amorphus powder, which occasions a soapy lather in solution, and produces a local anaestesia. Formerly called also struthiin, quilaiin, senegin, polygalic acid, etc. By extension, any one of a group of related bodies of which saponin proper is the type.
Saponite
n.
(Min.) A hydrous silicate of magnesia and aluminia. It occurs in soft, soapy, amorphous masses, filling veins in serpentine and cavities in trap rock.
Saponul
n.
(Old Chem.) A soapy mixture obtained by treating an essential oil with an alkali; hence, any similar compound of an essential oil.
Sapor
n.
• Power of affecting the organs of taste; savor; flavor; taste.
Saporific
a.
• Having the power to produce the sensation of taste; producing taste, flavor, or relish.
Saporosity
n.
• The quality of a body by which it excites the sensation of taste.
Saporous
a.
• Having flavor or taste; yielding a taste.
Sapota
n.
(Bot.) The sapodilla.
Sapotaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order (Sapotaceae) of (mostly tropical) trees and shrubs, including the star apple, the Lucuma, or natural marmalade tree, the gutta-percha tree (Isonandra), and the India mahwa, as well as the sapodilla, or sapota, after which the order is named.
Sappare
n.
(Min.) Kyanite.
Sapper
n.
• One who saps; specifically (Mil.), one who is employed in working at saps, building and repairing fortifications, and the like.
Sapphic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Sappho, the Grecian poetess; as, Sapphic odes; Sapphic verse.
(Pros.) Belonging to, or in the manner of, Sappho; — said of a certain kind of verse reputed to have been invented by Sappho, consisting of five feet, of which the first, fourth, and fifth are trochees, the second is a spondee, and the third a dactyl
n.
(Pros.) A Sapphic verse.
Sapphire
n.
(Min.) Native alumina or aluminium sesquioxide, Al2O3; corundum; esp., the blue transparent variety of corundum, highly prized as a gem.
• The color of the gem; bright blue.
(Zool.) Any humming bird of the genus Hylocharis, native of South America. The throat and breast are usually bright blue.
a.
• Of or resembling sapphire; sapphire; blue.
Sapphirine
n.
• Resembling sapphire; made of sapphire; having the color, or any quality of sapphire.
Sappho
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of brilliant South American humming birds of the genus Sappho, having very bright-colored and deeply forked tails; — called also firetail.
Sappiness
n.
• The quality of being sappy; juiciness.
Sappodilla
n.
(Bot.) See Sapodilla.
Sappy
a.
• Abounding with sap; full of sap; juisy; succulent.
• Hence, young, not firm; weak, feeble.
• Weak in intellect.
(Bot.) Abounding in sap; resembling, or consisting lagerly of, sapwood.
a.
• Musty; tainted.
Saprophagan
n.
(Zool.) One of a tribe of beetles which feed upon dacaying animal and vegetable substances; a carrion beetle.
Saprophagous
a.
(Zool.) Feeding on carrion.
Saprophyte
n.
(Bot.) Any plant growing on dacayed animal or vegetable matter, as most fungi and some flowering plants with no green color, as the Indian pipe.
Saprophytic
a.
• Feeding or growing upon decaying anomal or vegetable matter; pertaining to a saprophyte or the saprophytes.
Sapsago
n.
• A kind of Swiss cheese, of a greenish color, flavored with melilot.
Sapskull
n.
• A saphead.
Sapucaia
n.
(Bot.) A Brazilian tree. See Lecythis, and Monkey-pot.
Sapwood
n.
(Bot.) The alburnum, or part of the wood on any exogenous tree next to the bark, being that portion of the tree through which the sap flows most freely; — distinguished from Heartwood.
Saraband
n.
• A slow Spanish dance of Saracenic origin, to an air in triple time; also, the air itself.
Sarabate
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of certain vagrant or heretical Oriental monks in the early church.
Saracen
n.
• Anciently, an Arab; later, a Mussulman; in the Middle Ages, the common term among Christians in Europe for a Mohammedan hostile to the crusaders.
Sarasin
n.
(Arch.) See Sarrasin.
Saraswati
n.
(Hind. Myth.) The sakti or wife of Brahma; the Hindoo goddess of learning, music, and poetry.
Sarcasm
n.
• A keen, reproachful expression; a satirical remark uttered with some degree of scorn or contempt; a taunt; a gibe; a cutting jest.
Sarcasmous
a.
• Sarcastic.
Sarcastically
adv.
• In a sarcastic manner.
Sarcel
n.
• One of the outer pinions or feathers of the wing of a bird, esp. of a hawk.
Sarceled
a.
(her.) Cut through the middle.
Sarcelle
n.
(Zool.) The old squaw, or long-tailed duck.
Sarcenet
n.
• A species of fine thin silk fabric, used for linings, etc.
Sarcin
n.
• Same as Hypoxanthin.
Sarcina
n.
(Biol.) A genus of bacteria found in various organic fluids, especially in those those of the stomach, associated with certain diseases. The individual organisms undergo division along two perpendicular partitions, so that multiplication takes place in two directions, giving groups of four cubical cells. Also used adjectively; as, a sarcina micrococcus; a sarcina group.
Sarcle
v. t.
• To weed, or clear of weeds, with a hoe.
Sarco
• A combining form from Gr. , , flesh; as, sarcophagous, flesh-eating; sarcology.
Sarcobasis
n.
(Bot.) A fruit consisting of many dry indehiscent cells, which contain but few seeds and cohere about a common style, as in the mallows.
Sarcoblast
n.
(Zool.) A minute yellowish body present in the interior of certain rhizopods.
Sarcocarp
n.
(Bot.) the fleshy part of a stone fruit, situated between the skin, or epicarp, and the stone, or endocarp, as in a peach. See Illust. of Endocarp.
Sarcocele
n.
(Med.) Any solid tumor of the testicle.
Sarcodic
a.
(Biol.) Of or pertaining to sarcode.
Sarcodo
n.
(Biol.) A name applied by Dujardin in 1835 to the gelatinous material forming the bodies of the lowest animals; protoplasm.
Sarcoid
a.
(Biol.) Resembling flesh, or muscle; composed of sarcode.
Sarcolactic
a.
(Physiol. Chem.) relating to muscle and milk; as, sarcolactic acid. See Lactic acid, under Lactic.
Sarcolemma
n.
(Anat.) The very thin transparent and apparently homogenous sheath which incloses a striated muscular fiber; the myolemma.
Sarcoline
a.
(Min.) Flesh-colored.
Sarcology
n.
• That part of anatomy which treats of the soft parts. It includes myology, angiology, neurology, and splanchnology.
Sarcoma
n.
(Med.) A tumor of fleshy consistence; — formerly applied to many varieties of tumor, now restricted to a variety of malignant growth made up of cells resembling those of fetal development without any proper intercellular substance.
Sarcomatous
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to sarcoma; resembling sarcoma.
Sarcophaga
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of carnivorous and insectivorous marsupials including the dasyures and the opossums.
n.
(Zool.) A genus of Diptera, including the flesh flies.
Sarcophagan
n.
(Zool.) Any animal which eats flesh, especially any carnivorous marsupial.
(Zool.) Any fly of the genus Sarcophaga.
Sarcophagous
a.
(Zool.) Feeding on flesh; flesh-eating; carnivorous.
Sarcophagus
n.
• A species of limestone used among the Greeks for making coffins, which was so called because it consumed within a few weeks the flesh of bodies deposited in it. It is otherwise called lapis Assius, or Assian stone, and is said to have been found at Assos, a city of Lycia.
• A coffin or chest-shaped tomb of the kind of stone described above; hence, any stone coffin.
• A stone shaped like a sarcophagus and placed by a grave as a memorial.
Sarcophagy
n.
• The practice of eating flesh.
Sarcophile
n.
(Zool.) A flesh-eating animal, especially any one of the carnivorous marsupials.
Sarcoptid
n.
(Zool.) Any species of the genus Sarcoptes and related genera of mites, comprising the itch mites and mange mites.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the itch mites.
Sarcorhamphi
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of raptorial birds composing the vultures.
Sarcoseptum
n.
(Zool.) One of the mesenteries of an anthozoan.
Sarcosin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A crystalline nitrogenous substance, formed in the decomposition of creatin (one of the constituents of muscle tissue). Chemically, it is methyl glycocoll.
Sarcosis
n.
(Med.) Abnormal formation of flesh.
• Sarcoma.
Sarcotic
a.
(Med.) Producing or promoting the growth of flesh.
n.
• A sarcotic medicine.
Sarcous
a.
(Anat.) Fleshy; — applied to the minute stryctural elements, called sarcous elements, or sarcous disks, of which striated muscular fiber is composed.
Sarculation
n.
• A weeding, as with a hoe or a rake.
Sard
n.
(Min.) A variety of carnelian, of a rich reddish yellow or brownish red color. See the Note under Chalcedony.
Sardachate
n.
(Min.) A variety of agate containing sard.
Sardel
n.
• A precious stone. See Sardius.
Sardine
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several small species of herring which are commonly preserved in olive oil for food, especially the pilchard, or European sardine (Clupea pichardus). The California sardine (Clupea sagax) is similar. The American sardines of the Atlantic coast are mostly the young of the common herring and of the menhaden.
n.
• See Sardius.
Sardinian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the island, kingdom, or people of Sardinia.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Sardinia.
Sardius
n.
• A precious stone, probably a carnelian, one of which was set in Aaron's breastplate.
Sardoin
n.
(Min.) Sard; carnelian.
Sardonian
a.
• Sardonic.
Sardonic
a.
• Forced; unnatural; insincere; hence, derisive, mocking, malignant, or bitterly sarcastic; — applied only to a laugh, smile, or some facial semblance of gayety.
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a kind of linen made at Colchis.
Sardonyx
n.
(Min.) A variety of onyx consisting of sard and white chalcedony in alternate layers.
Saree
n.
• The principal garment of a Hindoo woman. It consists of a long piece of cloth, which is wrapped round the middle of the body, a portion being arranged to hang down in front, and the remainder passed across the bosom over the left shoulder.
Sargasso
n.
(Bot.) The gulf weed. See under Gulf.
Sargassum
n.
• A genus of algae including the gulf weed.
Sargo
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of sparoid fishes belonging to Sargus, Pomodasys, and related genera; — called also sar, and saragu.
Sargoptes
n.
(Zool.) A genus of parasitic mites including the itch mites.
Sari
n.
• Same as Saree.
Sarigue
n.
(Zool.) A small South American opossum (Didelphys opossum), having four white spots on the face.
Sark
n.
• A shirt.
v. t.
(Carp.) To cover with sarking, or thin boards.
Sarkin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) Same as Hypoxanthin.
Sarking
n.
(Carp.) Thin boards for shealting, as above the rafters, and under the shingles or slates, and for similar purposes.
Sarment
n.
(Bot.) A prostrate filiform stem or runner, as of the strawbwrry. See Runner.
Sarmentaceous
a.
(Bot.) Bearing sarments, or runners, as the strawberry.
Sarmentose
a.
(Bot.) Long and filiform, and almost naked, or having only leaves at the joints where it strikes root; as, a sarmentose stem.
• Bearing sarments; sarmentaceous.
Sarmentous
a.
(Bot.) Sarmentose.
Sarn
n.
• A pavement or stepping-stone.
Sarong
n.
• A sort of petticoat worn by both sexes in Java and the Malay Archipelago.
Saros
n.
(Astron) A Chaldean astronomical period or cycle, the length of which has been variously estimated from 3,600 years to 3,600 days, or a little short of 10 years.
Sarplar
n.
• A large bale or package of wool, containing eighty tods, or 2,240 pounds, in weight.
Sarplier
n.
• A coarse cloth made of hemp, and used for packing goods, etc.
Sarpo
n.
(Zool.) A large toadfish the Southern United States and the Gulf of Mexico (Batrachus tau, var. pardus).
Sarracenia
n.
(Bot.) A genus of American perrenial herbs growing in bogs; the American pitcher plant.
Sarsa
n.
• Sarsaparilla.
Sarsaparilla
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of several tropical American species of Smilax.
• The bitter mucilaginous roots of such plants, used in medicine and in sirups for soda, etc.
Sarsaparillin
n.
• See Parillin.
Sarse
n.
• A fine sieve; a searce.
v. t.
• To sift through a sarse.
Sarsen
n.
• One of the large sandstone blocks scattered over the English chalk downs; — called also sarsen stone, and Druid stone.
Sarsenet
n.
• See Sarcenet.
Sart
n.
• An assart, or clearing.
Sartorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a tailor or his work.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to thesartorius muscle.
Sartorius
n.
(Anat.) A muscle of the thigh, called the tailor's muscle, which arises from the hip bone and is inserted just below the knee. So named because its contraction was supposed to produce the position of the legs assumed by the tailor in sitting.
Sash
n.
• A scarf or band worn about the waist, over the shoulder, or otherwise; a belt; a girdle, — worn by women and children as an ornament; also worn as a badge of distinction by military officers, members of societies, etc.
v. t.
• To adorn with a sash or scarf.
n.
• The framing in which the panes of glass are set in a glazed window or door, including the narrow bars between the panes.
• In a sawmill, the rectangular frame in which the saw is strained and by which it is carried up and down with a reciprocating motion; — also called gate.
v. t.
• To furnish with a sash or sashes; as, to sash a door or a window.
Sashery
n.
• A collection of sashes; ornamentation by means of sashes.
Sashoon
n.
• A kind of pad worn on the leg under the boot.
Sasin
n.
(Zool.) The Indian antelope (Antilope bezoartica, or cervicapra), noted for its beauty and swiftness. It has long, spiral, divergent horns.
Sassafras
n.
(Bot.) An American tree of the Laurel family (Sassafras officinale); also, the bark of the roots, which has an aromatic smell and taste.
Sassanage
n.
• Stones left after sifting.
Sassarara
n.
• A word used to emphasize a statement.
Sasse
n.
• A sluice or lock, as in a river, to make it more navigable.
Sassenach
n.
• A Saxon; an Englishman; a Lowlander.
Sastra
n.
• Same as Shaster.
Sat
• imp. of Sit.
Satan
n.
• The grand adversary of man; The Devil, or Prince of darkness; the chief of the fallen angels; the archfiend.
Satanism
n.
• The evil and malicious disposition of Satan; a diabolical sprit.
Satanist
n.
• A very wicked-person.
Satanophany
n.
• An incarnation of Satan; a being possessed by a demon.
Satchel
n.
• A little sack or bag for carrying papers, books, or small articles of wearing apparel; a hand bag.
Sate
v. t.
• To satisfy the desire or appetite of; to satiate; to glut; to surfeit.
• imp. of Sit.
Sateen
n.
• A kind of dress goods made of cotton or woolen, with a glossy surface resembling satin.
Sateless
a.
• Insatiable.
Satellite
n.
• An attendant attached to a prince or other powerful person; hence, an obsequious dependent.
(Astron.) A secondary planet which revolves about another planet; as, the moon is a satellite of the earth. See Solar system, under Solar.
a.
(Anat.) Situated near; accompanying; as, the satellite veins, those which accompany the arteries.
Satellitions
a.
• Pertaining to, or consisting of, satellites.
Satiafactive
a.
• Satisfactory.
Satiate
a.
• Filled to satiety; glutted; sated; — followed by with or of.
v. t.
• To satisfy the appetite or desire of; tho feed to the full; to furnish enjoyment to, to the extent of desire; to sate; as, to satiate appetite or sense.
• To full beyond matural desire; to gratify to repletion or loathing; to surfeit; to glut.
• To saturate.
Satiation
n.
• Satiety.
Satiety
n.
• The state of being satiated or glutted; fullness of gratification, either of the appetite or of any sensual desire; fullness beyond desire; an excess of gratification which excites wearisomeness or loathing; repletion; satiation.
Satin
n.
• A silk cloth, of a thick, close texture, and overshot woof, which has a glossy surface.
Satinwood
n.
(Bot.) The hard, lemon-colored, fragrant wood of an East Indian tree (Chloroxylon Swietnia). It takes a lustrous finish, and is used in cabinetwork. The name is also given to the wood of a species of prickly ash (Xanthoxylum Caribaeum) growing in Florida and the West Indies.
Satinet
n.
• A thin kind of satin.
• A kind of cloth made of cotton warp and woolen filling, used chiefly for trousers
Satiny
a.
• Like or composed of satin; glossy; as, to have a satiny appearance; a satiny texture.
Sation
n.
• A sowing or planting.
Satire
n.
• A composition, generally poetical, holding up vice or folly to reprobation; a keen or severe exposure of what in public or private morals deserves rebuke; an invective poem; as, the Satires of Juvenal.
• Keeness and severity of remark; caustic exposure to reprobation; trenchant wit; sarcasm.
Satirist
n.
• One who satirizes; especially, one who writes satire.
Satirize
v. t.
• To make the object of satire; to attack with satire; to censure with keenness or severe sarcasm.
Satisfaction
n.
• The act of satisfying, or the state of being satisfied; gratification of desire; contentment in possession and enjoyment; repose of mind resulting from compliance with its desires or demands.
• Settlement of a claim, due, or demand; payment; indemnification; adequate compensation.
• That which satisfies or gratifiles; atonement.
Satisfactory
a.
• Giving or producing satisfaction; yielding content; especially, relieving the mind from doubt or uncertainty, and enabling it to rest with confidence; sufficient; as, a satisfactory account or explanation.
• Making amends, indemnification, or recompense; causing to cease from claims and to rest content; compensating; atoning; as, to make satisfactory compensation, or a satisfactory apology.
Satisfiable
a.
• That may be satisfied.
Satisfier
n.
• One who satisfies.
Satisfy
v. t.
• In general, to fill up the measure of a want of (a person or a thing); hence, to grafity fully the desire of; to make content; to supply to the full, or so far as to give contentment with what is wished for.
• To pay to the extent of chaims or deserts; to give what is due to; as, to satisfy a creditor.
• To answer or discharge, as a claim, debt, legal demand, or the like; to give compensation for; to pay off; to requitte; as, to satisfy a claim or an execution.
• To free from doubrt, suspense, or uncertainty; to give assurance to; as, to satisfy one's self by inquiry.
v. i.
• To give satisfaction; to afford gratification; to leave nothing to be desire.
• To make payment or atonement; to atone.
Satisfyingly
adv.
• So as to satisfy; satisfactorily.
Sative
a.
• Sown; propagated by seed.
Satle
v. t. & i.
• To settle.
Satrap
n.
• The governor of a province in ancient Persia; hence, a petty autocrat despot.
Satrapal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a satrap, or a satrapy.
Satrapess
n.
• A female satrap.
Satrapial
a.
• Satrapal.
Satrapy
n.
• The government or jurisdiction of a satrap; a principality.
Saturable
a.
• Capable of being saturated; admitting of saturation.
Saturant
a.
• Impregnating to the full; saturating.
n.
(Chem.) A substance used to neutralize or saturate the affinity of another substance.
(Med.) An antacid, as magnesia, used to correct acidity of the stomach.
Saturate
v. t.
• To cause to become completely penetrated, impregnated, or soaked; to fill fully; to sate.
(Chem.) To satisfy the affinity of; to cause to become inert by chemical combination with all that it can hold; as, to saturate phosphorus with chlorine.
p. a.
• Filled to repletion; saturated; soaked.
Saturated
a.
• Filled to repletion; holding by absorption, or in solution, all that is possible; as, saturated garments; a saturated solution of salt.
(Chem.) Having its affinity satisfied; combined with all it can hold; — said of certain atoms, radicals, or compounds; thus, methane is a saturated compound. Contrasted with unsaturated.
Saturation
n.
• The act of saturating, or the state of being saturating; complete penetration or impregnation.
(Chem.) The act, process, or result of saturating a substance, or of combining it to its fullest extent.
(Optics) Freedom from mixture or dilution with white; purity; — said of colors.
Saturator
n.
• One who, or that which, saturates.
Saturday
n.
• The seventh or last day of the week; the day following Friday and preceding Sunday.
Saturity
n.
• The state of being saturated; fullness of supply.
Saturn
n.
(Roman Myth.) One of the elder and principal deities, the son of Coelus and Terra (Heaven and Earth), anf the father of Jupiter. The corresponding Greek divinity was Kro`nos, later CHro`nos, Time.
(Astron.) One of the planets of the solar system, next in magnitude to Jupiter, but more remote from the sun. Its diameter is seventy thousand miles, its mean distance from the sun nearly eight hundred and eighty millions of miles, and its year, or periodical revolution round the sun, nearly twenty-nine years and a half. It is surrounded by a remarkable system of rings, and has eight satellites.
(Alchem.) The metal lead.
Saturnalia
n. pl.
(Rom. Antiq.) the festival of Saturn, celebrated in December, originally during one day, but afterward during seven days, as a period of unrestrained license and merriment for all classes, extending even to the slaves.
• Hence: A period or occasion of general licemse, in which the passions or vices have riotous indulgence.
Saturnalian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Saturnalia.
• Of unrestrained and intemperate jollity; riotously merry; dissolute.
Saturnian
a.
(Roman Myth.) Of or pertaining to Saturn, whose age or reign, from the mildness and wisdom of his government, is called the golden age.
• Hence: Resembling the golden age; distinguished for peacefulness, happiness, contentment.
(Astron.) Of or pertaining to the planet Saturn; as, the Saturnian year.
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of large handsome moths belonging to Saturnia and allied genera. The Luna moth, polyphemus, and promethea, are examples. They belong to the Silkworn family, and some are raised for their silk. See Polyphemus.
Saturnicentric
a.
(Astron.) Appearing as if seen from the center of the planet Saturn; relating or referred to Saturn as a center.
Saturnine
a.
• Born under, or influenced by, the planet Saturn.
• Heavy; grave; gloomy; dull; — the opposite of mercurial; as, a saturnine person or temper.
(Old Chem.) Of or pertaining to lead; characterized by, or resembling, lead, which was formerly called Saturn.
Saturnism
n.
(Med.) Plumbum.
Saturnist
n.
• A person of a dull, grave, gloomy temperament.
Satyr
n.
(Class. Myth.) A sylvan deity or demigod, represented as part man and part goat, and characterized by riotous merriment and lasciviousness.
(Zool.) Any one of many species of butterflies belonging to the family Nymphalidae. Their colors are commonly brown and gray, often with ocelli on the wings. Called also meadow browns.
(Zool.) The orangoutang.
Satyriasis
n.
• Immoderate venereal appetite in the male.
Satyrion
n.
(Bot.) Any one of several kinds of orchids.
Sauce
n.
• A composition of condiments and appetizing ingredients eaten with food as a relish; especially, a dressing for meat or fish or for puddings; as, mint sauce; sweet sauce, etc.
• Any garden vegetables eaten with meat.
• Stewed or preserved fruit eaten with other food as a relish; as, apple sauce, cranberry sauce
• Sauciness; impertinence.
v. t.
• To accompany with something intended to give a higher relish; to supply with appetizing condiments; to season; to flavor.
• To cause to relish anything, as if with a sauce; to tickle or gratify, as the palate; to please; to stimulate; hence, to cover, mingle, or dress, as if with sauce; to make an application to.
• To make poignant; to give zest, flavor or interest to; to set off; to vary and render attractive.
• To treat with bitter, pert, or tart language; to be impudent or sancy to.
n.
(Fine Art) A soft crayon for use in stump drawing or in shading with the stump.
Saucebox
n.
• A saucy, impudent person; especially, a pert child.
Saucepan
n.
• A small pan with a handle, in which sauce is prepared over a fire; a stewpan.
Saucer
n.
• A small pan or vessel in which sauce was set on a table.
• A small dish, commonly deeper than a plate, in which a cup is set at table.
• Something resembling a saucer in shape.
• A flat, shallow caisson for raising sunken ships
• A shallow socket for the pivot of a capstan.
Saucily
adv.
• In a saucy manner; impudently; with impertinent boldness.
Sauciness
n.
• The quality or state of being saucy; that which is saucy; impertinent boldness; contempt of superiors; impudence.
Saucy
a.
• Showing impertinent boldness or pertness; transgressing the rules of decorum; treating superiors with contempt; impudent; insolent; as, a saucy fellow.
• Expressive of, or characterized by, impudence; impertinent; as, a saucy eye; saucy looks.
Sauerkraut
n.
• Cabbage cut fine and allowed to ferment in a brine made of its own juice with salt, — a German dish.
Sauf
a.
• Safe.
conj. & prep.
• Save; except.
Saufly
adv.
• Safely.
Sauger
n.
(Zool.) An American fresh-water food fish (Stizostedion Canadense); — called also gray pike, blue pike, hornfish, land pike, sand pike, pickering, and pickerel.
Sauks
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) Same as Sacs.
Saul
n.
• Soul.
n.
• Same as Sal, the tree.
Saule
n.
• A hired mourner at a funeral.
Sault
n.
• A rapid in some rivers; as, the Sault Ste. Marie.
Saunders
n.
• See Sandress.
Saunter
v. i.
• To wander or walk about idly and in a leisurely or lazy manner; to lounge; to stroll; to loiter.
n.
• A sauntering, or a sauntering place.
Saunterer
n.
• One who saunters.
Saur
n.
• Soil; dirt; dirty water; urine from a cowhouse.
Saurel
n.
(Zool.) Any carangoid fish of the genus Trachurus, especially T. trachurus, or T. saurus, of Europe and America, and T. picturatus of California. Called also skipjack, and horse mackarel.
Sauria
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Reptilia formerly established to include the Lacertilia, Crocodilia, Dinosauria, and other groups. By some writers the name is restricted to the Lacertilia.
Saurian
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to, or of the nature of, the Sauria.
n.
• One of the Sauria.
Saurioid
a.
(Zool.) Same as Sauroid.
Saurobatrachia
n. pl.
(Zool.) The Urodela.
Saurognathous
a.
(Zool.) Having the bones of the palate arranged as in saurians, the vomer consisting of two lateral halves, as in the woodpeckers. (Pici).
Sauroid
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the saurians.
• Resembling a saurian superficially; as, a sauroid fish.
Sauroidichnite
n.
(Paleon.) The fossil track of a saurian.
Sauropoda
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct order of herbivorous dinosaurs having the feet of a saurian type, instead of birdlike, as they are in many dinosaurs. It includes the Largest Known land animals, belonging to Brontosaurus, Camarasaurus, and alied genera. See Illustration in Appendix.
Sauropsida
n. pl.
(Zool.) A comprehensive group of vertebrates, comprising the reptiles and birds.
Sauropterygia
n. pl.
(Paleon.) Same as Plesiosauria.
Saururae
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct order of birds having a long vertebrated tail with quills along each side of it. Archaeopteryx is the type. See Archaeopteryx, and Odontornithes.
Saury
n.
(Zool.) A slender marine fish (Scombresox saurus) of Europe and America. It has long, thin, beaklike jaws. Called also billfish, gowdnook, gawnook, skipper, skipjack, skopster, lizard fish, and Egypt herring.
Sausage
n.
• An article of food consisting of meat (esp. pork) minced and highly seasoned, and inclosed in a cylindrical case or skin usually made of the prepared intestine of some animal.
• A saucisson. See Saucisson.
Sauseflem
a.
• Having a red, pimpled face.
Saussurite
n.
(Min.) A tough, compact mineral, of a white, greenish, or grayish color. It is near zoisite in composition, and in part, at least, has been produced by the alteration of feldspar.
Saute
• p. p. of Sauter.
Sauter
v. t.
• To fry lightly and quickly, as meat, by turning ot tossing it over frequently in a hot pan greased with a little fat.
n.
• Psalter.
Sauterelle
n.
• An instrument used by masons and others to trace and form angles.
Sauterne
n.
• A white wine made in the district of sauterne, France.
Sautrie
n.
• Psaltery.
Sauvegarde
n.
(Zool.) The monitor.
Savable
a.
• capable of, or admitting of, being saved.
Savableness
n.
• Capability of being saved.
Savacioun
n.
• Salvation.
Savage
a.
• Of or pertaining to the forest; remote from human abodes and cultivation; in a state of nature; nature; wild; as, a savage wilderness.
• Wild; untamed; uncultivated; as, savage beasts.
• Uncivilized; untaught; unpolished; rude; as, savage life; savage manners.
• Characterized by cruelty; barbarous; fierce; ferocious; inhuman; brutal; as, a savage spirit.
n.
• A human being in his native state of rudeness; one who is untaught; uncivilized, or without cultivation of mind or manners.
• A man of extreme, unfeeling, brutal cruelty; a barbarian.
v. t.
• To make savage.
Savagely
adv.
• In a savage manner.
Savageness
n.
• The state or quality of being savage.
Savagery
n.
• The state of being savage; savageness; savagism.
• An act of cruelty; barbarity.
• Wild growth, as of plants.
Savagism
n.
• The state of being savage; the state of rude, uncivilized men, or of men in their native wildness and rudeness.
Savanilla
n.
(Zool.) The tarpum.
Savanna
n.
• A tract of level land covered with the vegetable growth usually found in a damp soil and warm climate, — as grass or reeds, — but destitute of trees.
Savant
n.
• A man of learning; one versed in literature or science; a person eminent for acquirements.
Save
n.
• The herb sage, or salvia.
v. t.
• To make safe; to procure the safety of; to preserve from injury, destruction, or evil of any kind; to rescue from impending danger; as, to save a house from the flames.
(Theol.) Specifically, to deliver from and its penalty; to rescue from a state of condemnation and spiritual death, and bring into a state of spiritual life.
• To keep from being spent or lost; to secure from waste or expenditure; to lay up; to reserve.
• To rescue from something undesirable or hurtful; to prevent from doing something; to spare.
• To hinder from doing, suffering, or happening; to obviate the necessity of; to prevent; to spare.
• To hold possession or use of; to escape loss of.
v. i.
• To avoid unnecessary expense or expenditure; to prevent waste; to be economical.
prep. or conj.
• Except; excepting; not including; leaving out; deducting; reserving; saving.
conj.
• Except; unless.
Saveable
a.
• See Savable.
Saveloy
n.
• A kind of dried sausage.
Savely
adv.
• Safely.
Savement
n.
• The act of saving.
Saver
n.
• One who saves.
Saving
a.
• 1. Preserving; rescuing.
• Avoiding unnecessary expense or waste; frugal; not lavish or wasteful; economical; as, a saving cook.
• Bringing back in returns or in receipts the sum expended; incurring no loss, though not gainful; as, a saving bargain; the ship has made a saving voyage.
• Making reservation or exception; as, a saving clause.
prep. or conj.
participle
• With the exception of; except; excepting; also, without disrespect to.
n.
• Something kept from being expended or lost; that which is saved or laid up; as, the savings of years of economy.
• Exception; reservation.
Savingly
adv.
• In a saving manner; with frugality or parsimony.
• So as to be finally saved from eternal death.
Savingness
n.
• The quality of being saving; carefulness not to expend money uselessly; frugality; parsimony.
• Tendency to promote salvation.
Savior
n.
• One who saves, preserves, or delivers from destruction or danger.
• Specifically: The (or our, your, etc.) Savior, he who brings salvation to men; Jesus Christ, the Redeemer.
Savioress
n.
• A female savior.
Savor
n.
• That property of a thing which affects the organs of taste or smell; taste and odor; flavor; relish; scent; as, the savor of an orange or a rose; an ill savor.
• Hence, specific flavor or quality; characteristic property; distinctive temper, tinge, taint, and the like.
• Sense of smell; power to scent, or trace by scent.
• Pleasure; delight; attractiveness.
v. i.
• To have a particular smell or taste; — with of.
• To partake of the quality or nature; to indicate the presence or influence; to smack; — with of.
• To use the sense of taste.
v. t.
• To perceive by the smell or the taste; hence, to perceive; to note.
• To have the flavor or quality of; to indicate the presence of.
• To taste or smell with pleasure; to delight in; to relish; to like; to favor.
Savorily
adv.
• In a savory manner.
Savoriness
n.
• The quality of being savory.
Savorless
a.
• Having no savor; destitute of smell or of taste; insipid.
Savorly
a.
• Savory.
adv.
• In a savory manner.
Savorous
a.
• Having a savor; savory.
Savorry
n.
(Bot.) An aromatic labiate plant (Satireia hortensis), much used in cooking; — also called summer savory.
Savory
a.
• Pleasing to the organs of taste or smell.
Savoy
n.
(Bot.) A variety of the common cabbage (Brassica oleracea major), having curled leaves, — much cultivated for winter use.
Savoyard
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Savoy.
Saw
• imp. of See.
n.
• Something said; speech; discourse.
• A saying; a proverb; a maxim.
• Dictate; command; decree.
n.
• An instrument for cutting or dividing substances, as wood, iron, etc., consisting of a thin blade, or plate, of steel, with a series of sharp teeth on the edge, which remove successive portions of the material by cutting and tearing.
v. t.
• To cut with a saw; to separate with a saw; as, to saw timber or marble.
• To form by cutting with a saw; as, to saw boards or planks, that is, to saw logs or timber into boards or planks; to saw shingles; to saw out a panel.
• Also used figuratively; as, to saw the air.
v. i.
• To use a saw; to practice sawing; as, a man saws well.
• To cut, as a saw; as, the saw or mill saws fast.
• To be cut with a saw; as, the timber saws smoothly.
Sawbelly
n.
• The alewife.
Sawbill
n.
• The merganser.
Sawbones
n.
• A nickname for a surgeon.
Sawbuck
n.
• A sawhorse.
Sawder
n.
• A corrupt spelling and pronunciation of solder.
Sawdust
n.
• Dust or small fragments of wood 9or of stone, etc.) made by the cutting of a saw.
Sawfish
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of elasmobranch fishes of the genus Pristis. They have a sharklike form, but are more nearly allied to the rays. The flattened and much elongated snout has a row of stout toothlike structures inserted along each edge, forming a sawlike organ with which it mutilates or kills its prey.
Sawfly
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the family Tenthredinidae. The female usually has an ovipositor containing a pair of sawlike organs with which she makes incisions in the leaves or stems of plants in which to lay the eggs. The larvae resemble those of Lepidoptera.
Sawhorse
n.
• A kind of rack, shaped like a double St. Andrew's cross, on which sticks of wood are laid for sawing by hand; — called also buck, and sawbuck.
Sawmill
n.
• A mill for sawing, especially one for sawing timber or lumber.
Sawneb
n.
• A merganser.
Sawtooth
n.
(Zool.) An arctic seal (Lobodon carcinophaga), having the molars serrated; — called also crabeating seal.
Sawtry
n.
• A psaltery.
Sawyer
n.
• One whose occupation is to saw timber into planks or boards, or to saw wood for fuel; a sawer.
• A tree which has fallen into a stream so that its branches project above the surface, rising and falling with a rocking or swaying motion in the current.
(Zool.) The bowfin.
Sax
n.
• A kind of chopping instrument for trimming the edges of roofing slates.
Saxatile
a.
• Of or pertaining to rocks; living among rocks; as, a saxatile plant.
Saxhorn
n.
(Mus.) A name given to a numerous family of brass wind instruments with valves, invented by Antoine Joseph Sax (known as Adolphe Sax), of Belgium and Paris, and much used in military bands and in orchestras.
Saxicava
n.
(Zool.) Any species of marine bivalve shells of the genus Saxicava. Some of the species are noted for their power of boring holes in limestone and similar rocks.
Saxicavid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the saxicavas.
n.
• A saxicava.
Saxicavous
a.
(Zool.) Boring, or hollowing out, rocks; — said of certain mollusks which live in holes which they burrow in rocks. See Illust. of Lithodomus.
Saxicoline
a.
(Zool.) Stone-inhabiting; pertaining to, or having the characteristics of, the stonechats.
Saxicolous
a.
(Bot.) Growing on rocks.
Saxifraga
n.
(Bot.) A genus of exogenous polypetalous plants, embracing about one hundred and eighty species. See Saxifrage.
Saxifragaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Saxifragaceae) of which saxifrage is the type. The order includes also the alum root, the hydrangeas, the mock orange, currants and gooseberries, and many other plants.
Saxifragant
a.
• Breaking or destroying stones; saxifragous.
n.
• That which breaks or destroys stones.
Saxifrage
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Saxifraga, mostly perennial herbs growing in crevices of rocks in mountainous regions.
Saxifragous
a.
• Dissolving stone, especially dissolving stone in the bladder.
Saxon
n.
• One of a nation or people who formerly dwelt in the nothern part of Germany, and who, with other Teutonic tribes, invaded and conquered England in the fifth and sixth centuries. (b) Also used in the sense of Anglo-Saxon. (c) A native or inhabitant of modern Saxony.
• The language of the Saxons; Anglo-Saxon.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Saxons, their country, or their language.
• Anglo-Saxon.
• Of or pertaining to Saxony or its inhabitants.
Saxonic
a.
• relating to the saxons or Anglo-Saxons.
Saxonism
n.
• An idiom of the Saxon or Anglo-Saxon language.
Saxonist
n.
• One versed in the Saxon language.
Saxonite
n.
(Min.) See Mountain soap, under Mountain.
Saxophone
n.
(Mus.) A wind instrument of brass, containing a reed, and partaking of the qualities both of a brass instrument and of a clarinet.
Say
imp.
• Saw.
n.
• Trial by sample; assay; sample; specimen; smack.
• Tried quality; temper; proof.
• Essay; trial; attempt.
v. t.
• To try; to assay.
n.
• A kind of silk or satin.
• A delicate kind of serge, or woolen cloth.
v. t.
• To utter or express in words; to tell; to speak; to declare; as, he said many wise things.
• To repeat; to rehearse; to recite; to pronounce; as, to say a lesson.
• To announce as a decision or opinion; to state positively; to assert; hence, to form an opinion upon; to be sure about; to be determined in mind as to.
• To mention or suggest as an estimate, hypothesis, or approximation; hence, to suppose; — in the imperative, followed sometimes by the subjunctive; as, he had, say fifty thousand dollars; the fox had run, say ten miles.
v. i.
• To speak; to express an opinion; to make answer; to reply.
n.
• A speech; something said; an expression of opinion; a current story; a maxim or proverb.
Sayer
n.
• One who says; an utterer.
Sayette
n.
• A mixed stuff, called also sagathy. See Sagathy.
Saying
n.
• That which is said; a declaration; a statement, especially a proverbial one; an aphorism; a proverb.
Sayman
n.
• One who assays.
Saymaster
n.
• A master of assay; one who tries or proves.
Saynd
• obs. p. p. of Senge, to singe.
Scab
n.
• An incrustation over a sore, wound, vesicle, or pustule, formed by the drying up of the discharge from the diseased part.
• The itch in man; also, the scurvy.
• The mange, esp. when it appears on sheep.
• A disease of potatoes producing pits in their surface, caused by a minute fungus (Tiburcinia Scabies).
(Founding) A slight iregular protuberance which defaces the surface of a casting, caused by the breaking away of a part of the mold.
• A mean, dirty, paltry fellow.
• A nickname for a workman who engages for lower wages than are fixed by the trades unions; also, for one who takes the place of a workman on a strike.
v. i.
• To become covered with a scab; as, the wound scabbed over.
Scabbard
n.
• The case in which the blade of a sword, dagger, etc., is kept; a sheath.
v. t.
• To put in a scabbard.
Scabbed
a.
• Abounding with scabs; diseased with scabs.
• Fig.: Mean; paltry; vile; worthless.
Scabbedness
n.
• Scabbiness.
Scabbily
adv.
• In a scabby manner.
Scabbiness
n.
• The quality or state of being scabby.
Scabble
v. t.
• See Scapple.
Scabby
a.
• Affected with scabs; full of scabs.
• Diseased with the scab, or mange; mangy.
Scabies
n.
(Med.) The itch.
Scabious
a.
• Consisting of scabs; rough; itchy; leprous; as, scabious eruptions.
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Scabiosa, several of the species of which are common in Europe. They resemble the Compositae, and have similar heads of flowers, but the anthers are not connected.
Scabling
n.
• A fragment or chip of stone.
Scabredity
n.
• Roughness; ruggedness.
Scabrous
a.
• Rough to the touch, like a file; having small raised dots, scales, or points; scabby; scurfy; scaly.
• Fig.: Harsh; unmusical.
Scabrousness
n.
• The quality of being scabrous.
Scabwort
n.
(Bot.) Elecampane.
Scad
n.
(Zool.) A small carangoid fish (Trachurus saurus) abundant on the European coast, and less common on the American. The name is applied also to several allied species.
• The goggler; — called also big-eyed scad. See Goggler.
• The friar skate.
• The cigar fish, or round robin.
Scaffold
n.
• A temporary structure of timber, boards, etc., for various purposes, as for supporting workmen and materials in building, for exhibiting a spectacle upon, for holding the spectators at a show, etc.
• Specifically, a stage or elevated platform for the execution of a criminal; as, to die on the scaffold.
(Metal.) An accumulation of adherent, partly fused material forming a shelf, or dome-shaped obstruction, above the tuyeres in a blast furnace.
v. t.
• To furnish or uphold with a scaffold.
Scaffoldage
n.
• A scaffold.
Scaffolding
n.
• A scaffold; a supporting framework; as, the scaffolding of the body.
• Materials for building scaffolds.
Scaglia
n.
• A reddish variety of limestone.
Scagliola
n.
• An imitation of any veined and ornamental stone, as marble, formed by a substratum of finely ground gypsum mixed with glue, the surface of which, while soft, is variegated with splinters of marble, spar, granite, etc., and subsequently colored and polished.
Scala
n.
(Surg.) A machine formerly employed for reducing dislocations of the humerus.
(Anat.) A term applied to any one of the three canals of the cochlea.
Scalable
a.
• Capable of being scaled.
Scalar
n.
(Math.) In the quaternion analysis, a quantity that has magnitude, but not direction; — distinguished from a vector, which has both magnitude and direction.
Scalaria
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine gastropods of the genus Scalaria, or family Scalaridae, having elongated spiral turreted shells, with rounded whorls, usually crossed by ribs or varices. The color is generally white or pale. Called also ladder shell, and wentletrap. See Ptenoglossa, and Wentletrap.
Scalariform
a.
• Resembling a ladder in form or appearance; having transverse bars or markings like the rounds of a ladder; as, the scalariform cells and scalariform pits in some plants.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to a scalaria.
Scalary
a.
• Resembling a ladder; formed with steps.
Scalawag
n.
• A scamp; a scapegrace.
Scald
v. t.
• To burn with hot liquid or steam; to pain or injure by contact with, or imersion in, any hot fluid; as, to scald the hand.
• To expose to a boiling or violent heat over a fire, or in hot water or other liquor; as, to scald milk or meat.
n.
• A burn, or injury to the skin or flesh, by some hot liquid, or by steam.
a.
• Affected with the scab; scaby.
• Scurry; paltry; as, scald rhymers.
n.
• Scurf on the head. See Scall.
n.
• One of the ancient Scandinavian poets and historiographers; a reciter and singer of heroic poems, etc., among the Norsemen; more rarely, a bard of any of the ancient Teutonic tribes.
Scalder
n.
• A Scandinavian poet; a scald.
Scaldfish
n.
(Zool.) A European flounder (Arnoglosus laterna, or Psetta arnoglossa); — called also megrin, and smooth sole.
Scaldic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the scalds of the Norsemen; as, scaldic poetry.
Scale
n.
• The dish of a balance; hence, the balance itself; an instrument or machine for weighing; as, to turn the scale; — chiefly used in the plural when applied to the whole instrument or apparatus for weighing. Also used figuratively.
(Astron.) The sign or constellation Libra.
v. t.
• To weigh or measure according to a scale; to measure; also, to grade or vary according to a scale or system.
n.
(Anat.) One of the small, thin, membranous, bony or horny pieces which form the covering of many fishes and reptiles, and some mammals, belonging to the dermal part of the skeleton, or dermoskeleton. See Cycloid, Ctenoid, and Ganoid.
• Hence, any layer or leaf of metal or other material, resembling in size and thinness the scale of a fish; as, a scale of iron, of bone, etc.
(Zool.) One of the small scalelike structures covering parts of some invertebrates, as those on the wings of Lepidoptera and on the body of Thysanura; the elytra of certain annelids. See Lepidoptera.
(Zool.) A scale insect. (See below.)
(Bot.) A small appendage like a rudimentary leaf, resembling the scales of a fish in form, and often in arrangement; as, the scale of a bud, of a pine cone, and the like. The name is also given to the chaff on the stems of ferns.
• The thin metallic side plate of the handle of a pocketknife. See Illust. of Pocketknife.
• An incrustation deposit on the inside of a vessel in which water is heated, as a steam boiler.
(Metal.) The thin oxide which forms on the surface of iron forgings. It consists esentially of the magnetic oxide, Fe3O4. Also, a similar coating upon other metals.
v. t.
• To strip or clear of scale or scales; as, to scale a fish; to scale the inside of a boiler.
• To take off in thin layers or scales, as tartar from the teeth; to pare off, as a surface.
• To scatter; to spread.
(Gun.) To clean, as the inside of a cannon, by the explosion of a small quantity of powder.
v. i.
• To separate and come off in thin layers or laminae; as, some sandstone scales by exposure.
• To separate; to scatter.
n.
• A ladder; a series of steps; a means of ascending.
• Hence, anything graduated, especially when employed as a measure or rule, or marked by lines at regular intervals.
• A mathematical instrument, consisting of a slip of wood, ivory, or metal, with one or more sets of spaces graduated and numbered on its surface, for measuring or laying off distances, etc., as in drawing, plotting, and the like. See Gunter's scale.
• A series of spaces marked by lines, and representing proportionately larger distances; as, a scale of miles, yards, feet, etc., for a map or plan.
• A basis for a numeral system; as, the decimal scale; the binary scale, etc.
(Mus.) The graduated series of all the tones, ascending or descending, from the keynote to its octave; — called also the gamut. It may be repeated through any number of octaves. See Chromatic scale, Diatonic scale, Major scale, and Minor scale, under Chromatic, Diatonic, Major, and Minor.
• Gradation; succession of ascending and descending steps and degrees; progressive series; scheme of comparative rank or order; as, a scale of being.
• Relative dimensions, without difference in proportion of parts; size or degree of the parts or components in any complex thing, compared with other like things; especially, the relative proportion of the linear dimensions of the parts of a drawing, map, model, etc., to the dimensions of the corresponding parts of the object that is represented; as, a map on a scale of an inch to a mile.
v. t.
• To climb by a ladder, or as if by a ladder; to ascend by steps or by climbing; to clamber up; as, to scale the wall of a fort.
v. i.
• To lead up by steps; to ascend.
Scaleback
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine annelids of the family Polynoidae, and allies, which have two rows of scales, or elytra, along the back. See Illust. under Chaetopoda.
Scalebeam
n.
• The lever or beam of a balance; the lever of a platform scale, to which the poise for weighing is applied.
• A weighing apparatus with a sliding weight, resembling a steelyard.
Scaleboard
n.
(Print.) A thin slip of wood used to justify a page.
• A thin veneer of leaf of wood used for covering the surface of articles of firniture, and the like.
Scaled
a.
• Covered with scales, or scalelike structures; — said of a fish, a reptile, a moth, etc.
• Without scales, or with the scales removed; as, scaled herring.
(Zool.) Having feathers which in form, color, or arrangement somewhat resemble scales; as, the scaled dove.
Scaleless
a.
• Destitute of scales.
Scalene
a.
(Geom.) Having the sides and angles unequal; — said of a triangle.
• Having the axis inclined to the base, as a cone.
(Anat.) Designating several triangular muscles called scalene muscles.
• Of or pertaining to the scalene muscles.
n.
(Geom.) A triangle having its sides and angles unequal.
Scalenohedral
a.
(Crystallog.) Of or pertaining to a scalenohedron.
Scalenohedron
n.
(Crystallog.) A pyramidal form under the rhombohedral system, inclosed by twelve faces, each a scalene triangle.
Scaler
n.
• One who, or that which, scales; specifically, a dentist's instrument for removing tartar from the teeth.
Scaliness
n.
• The state of being scaly; roughness.
Scaling
a.
• Adapted for removing scales, as from a fish; as, a scaling knife; adapted for removing scale, as from the interior of a steam boiler; as, a scaling hammer, bar, etc.
• Serving as an aid in clambering; as, a scaling ladder, used in assaulting a fortified place.
Scaliola
n.
• Same as Scagliola.
Scall
n.
• A scurf or scabby disease, especially of the scalp.
a.
• Scabby; scurfy.
Scalled
a.
• Scabby; scurfy; scall.
Scallion
n.
(Bot.) A kind of small onion (Allium Ascalonicum), native of Palestine; the eschalot, or shallot.
• Any onion which does not "bottom out," but remains with a thick stem like a leek.
Scallop
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine bivalve mollusks of the genus Pecten and allied genera of the family Pectinidae. The shell is usually radially ribbed, and the edge is therefore often undulated in a characteristic manner. The large adductor muscle of some the species is much used as food. One species (Vola Jacobaeus) occurs on the coast of Palestine, and its shell was formerly worn by pilgrims as a mark that they had been to the Holy Land. Called also fan shell. See Pecten, 2.
• One of series of segments of circles joined at their extremities, forming a border like the edge or surface of a scallop shell.
• One of the shells of a scallop; also, a dish resembling a scallop shell.
v. t.
• To mark or cut the edge or border of into segments of circles, like the edge or surface of a scallop shell. See Scallop, n., 2.
(Cookery) To bake in scallop shells or dishes; to prepare with crumbs of bread or cracker, and bake. See Scalloped oysters, below.
Scalloped
a.
• Furnished with a scallop; made or done with or in a scallop.
• Having the edge or border cut or marked with segments of circles. See Scallop, n., 2.
(Cookery) Baked in a scallop; cooked with crumbs.
Scalloper
n.
• One who fishes for scallops.
Scalloping
n.
• Fishing for scallops.
Scalp
n.
• A bed of oysters or mussels.
n.
• That part of the integument of the head which is usually covered with hair.
• A part of the skin of the head, with the hair attached, cut or torn off from an enemy by the Indian warriors of North America, as a token of victory.
• Fig.: The top; the summit.
v. t.
• To deprive of the scalp; to cut or tear the scalp from the head of.
(Surg.) To remove the skin of.
(Milling.) To brush the hairs of fuzz from, as wheat grains, in the process of high milling.
v. i.
• To make a small, quick profit by slight fluctuations of the market; — said of brokers who operate in this way on their own account.
Scalpel
n.
(Surg.) A small knife with a thin, keen blade, — used by surgeons, and in dissecting.
Scalper
n.
• One who, or that which, scalps.
(Surg.) Same as Scalping iron, under Scalping.
• A broker who, dealing on his own account, tries to get a small and quick profit from slight fluctuations of the market.
• A person who buys and sells the unused parts of railroad tickets.
Scalping
• a. & n. from Scalp.
Scalpriform
a.
(Anat.) Shaped like a chisel; as, the scalpriform incisors of rodents.
Scaly
a.
• Covered or abounding with scales; as, a scaly fish.
• Resembling scales, laminae, or layers.
• Mean; low; as, a scaly fellow.
(Bot.) Composed of scales lying over each other; as, a scaly bulb; covered with scales; as, a scaly stem.
Scamble
v. i.
• To move awkwardly; to be shuffling, irregular, or unsteady; to sprawl; to shamble.
• To move about pushing and jostling; to be rude and turbulent; to scramble.
v. t.
• To mangle.
Scambler
n.
• 1. One who scambles.
• A bold intruder upon the hospitality of others; a mealtime visitor.
Scambling
adv.
• In a scambling manner; with turbulence and noise; with bold intrusiveness.
Scamillus
n.
(Arch.) A sort of second plinth or block, below the bases of Ionic and Corinthian columns, generally without moldings, and of smaller size horizontally than the pedestal.
Scammoniate
a.
• Made from scammony; as, a scammoniate aperient.
Scammony
n.
(Bot.) A species of bindweed or Convolvulus (C. Scammonia).
• An inspissated sap obtained from the rot of the Convolvulus Scammonia, of a blackish gray color, a nauseous smell like that of old cheese, and a somewhat acrid taste. It is used in medicine as a cathartic.
Scamp
n.
• A rascal; a swindler; a rogue.
v. t.
• To perform in a hasty, neglectful, or imperfect manner; to do superficially.
Scampavia
n.
• A long, low war galley used by the Neapolitans and Sicilians in the early part of the nineteenth century.
Scamper
v. i.
• To run with speed; to run or move in a quick, hurried manner; to hasten away.
n.
• A scampering; a hasty flight.
Scamperer
n.
• One who scampers.
Scampish
a.
• Of or like a scamp; knavish; as, scampish conduct.
Scan
v. t.
• To mount by steps; to go through with step by step.
• Specifically (Pros.), to go through with, as a verse, marking and distinguishing the feet of which it is composed; to show, in reading, the metrical structure of; to recite metrically.
• To go over and examine point by point; to examine with care; to look closely at or into; to scrutinize.
Scandal
n.
• Offense caused or experienced; reproach or reprobation called forth by what is regarded as wrong, criminal, heinous, or flagrant: opprobrium or disgrace.
• Reproachful aspersion; opprobrious censure; defamatory talk, uttered heedlessly or maliciously.
(Equity) Anything alleged in pleading which is impertinent, and is reproachful to any person, or which derogates from the dignity of the court, or is contrary to good manners.
v. t.
• To treat opprobriously; to defame; to asperse; to traduce; to slander.
• To scandalize; to offend.
Scandalize
v. t.
• To offend the feelings of the conscience of (a person) by some action which is considered immoral or criminal; to bring shame, disgrace, or reproach upon.
• To reproach; to libel; to defame; to slander.
Scandalous
a.
• Giving offense to the conscience or moral feelings; exciting reprobation; calling out condemnation.
• Disgraceful to reputation; bringing shame or infamy; opprobrious; as, a scandalous crime or vice.
• Defamatory; libelous; as, a scandalous story.
Scandalously
adv.
• In a manner to give offense; shamefully.
• With a disposition to impute immorality or wrong.
Scandalousness
n.
• Quality of being scandalous.
Scandent
a.
• Climbing.
Scandia
n.
(Chem.) A chemical earth, the oxide of scandium.
Scandic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to scandium; derived from, or containing, scandium.
Scandinavian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Scandinavia, that is, Sweden, Norway, and Denmark.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Scandinavia.
Scandium
n.
(Chem.) A rare metallic element of the boron group, whose existence was predicated under the provisional name ekaboron by means of the periodic law, and subsequently discovered by spectrum analysis in certain rare Scandinavian minerals (euxenite and gadolinite). It has not yet been isolated. Symbol Sc. Atomic weight 44
Scansion
n.
(Pros.) The act of scanning; distinguishing the metrical feet of a verse by emphasis, pauses, or otherwise.
Scansores
n.
(Zool.) An artifical group of birds formerly regarded as an order. They are distributed among several orders by modern ornithologists.
Scansorial
a.
(Zool.) Capable of climbing; as, the woodpecker is a scansorial bird; adapted for climbing; as, the scansorial foot.
• Of or pertaining to the Scansores. See Illust. under Aves.
Scant
a.
• Not full, large, or plentiful; scarcely sufficient; less than is wanted for the purpose; scanty; meager; not enough; as, a scant allowance of provisions or water; a scant pattern of cloth for a garment.
• Sparing; parsimonious; chary.
v. t.
• To limit; to straiten; to treat illiberally; to stint; as, to scant one in provisions; to scant ourselves in the use of necessaries.
• To cut short; to make small, narrow, or scanty; to curtail.
v. i.
• To fail, of become less; to scantle; as, the wind scants.
adv.
• In a scant manner; with difficulty; scarcely; hardly.
n.
• Scantness; scarcity.
Scantily
adv.
• In a scanty manner; not fully; not plentifully; sparingly; parsimoniously.
Scantiness
n.
• Quality condition of being scanty.
Scantle
v. i.
• To be deficient; to fail.
v. t.
• To scant; to be niggard of; to divide into small pieces; to cut short or down.
Scantlet
n.
• A small pattern; a small quantity.
Scantling
a.
• Not plentiful; small; scanty.
n.
• A fragment; a bit; a little piece.
• A piece or quantity cut for a special purpose; a sample.
• A small quantity; a little bit; not much
• A piece of timber sawed or cut of a small size, as for studs, rails, etc.
• The dimensions of a piece of timber with regard to its breadth and thickness; hence, the measure or dimensions of anything.
• A rough draught; a rude sketch or outline.
• A frame for casks to lie upon; a trestle.
Scantly
adv.
• In a scant manner; not fully or sufficiently; narrowly; penuriously.
• Scarcely; hardly; barely.
Scantness
n.
• The quality or condition of being scant; narrowness; smallness; insufficiency; scantiness.
Scanty
a.
• Wanting amplitude or extent; narrow; small; not abundant.
• Somewhat less than is needed; insufficient; scant; as, a scanty supply of words; a scanty supply of bread.
• Sparing; niggardly; parsimonius.
Scape
n.
(Bot.) A peduncle rising from the ground or from a subterranean stem, as in the stemless violets, the bloodroot, and the like.
(Zool.) The long basal joint of the antennae of an insect.
(Arch.) The shaft of a column.
• The apophyge of a shaft.
v. t. & i.
• To escape.
n.
• An escape.
• Means of escape; evasion.
• A freak; a slip; a fault; an escapade.
• Loose act of vice or lewdness.
Scapegallows
n.
• One who has narrowly escaped the gallows for his crimes.
Scapegoat
n.
(Jewish Antiq.) A goat upon whose head were symbolically placed the sins of the people, after which he was suffered to escape into the wilderness.
• Hence, a person or thing that is made to bear blame for others.
Scapegrace
n.
• A graceless, unprincipled person; one who is wild and reckless.
Scapeless
a.
(Bot.) Destitute of a scape.
Scapement
n.
• Same as Escapement, 3.
Scaphander
n.
• The case, or impermeable apparel, in which a diver can work while under water.
Scaphism
n.
• An ancient mode of punishing criminals among the Persians, by confining the victim in a trough, with his head and limbs smeared with honey or the like, and exposed to the sun and to insects until he died.
Scaphite
n.
(Paleon.) Any fossil cephalopod shell of the genus Scaphites, belonging to the Ammonite family and having a chambered boat-shaped shell. Scaphites are found in the Cretaceous formation.
Scaphocephalic
a.
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or affected with, scaphocephaly.
Scaphocephaly
n.
(Anat.) A deformed condition of the skull, in which the vault is narrow, clongated, and more or less boat-shaped.
Scaphocerite
n.
(Zool.) A flattened plate or scale attached to the second joint of the antennae of many Crustacea.
Scaphognathite
n.
(Zool.) A thin leafike appendage (the exopodite) of the second maxilla of decapod crustaceans. It serves as a pumping organ to draw the water through the gill cavity.
Scaphoid
a.
(Anat.) Resembling a boat in form; boat-shaped.
n.
• The scaphoid bone.
Scapholunar
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the scaphoid and lunar bones of the carpus.
n.
• The scapholunar bone.
Scaphopda
n. pl.
(Zool.) A class of marine cephalate Mollusca having a tubular shell open at both ends, a pointed or spadelike foot for burrowing, and many long, slender, prehensile oral tentacles. It includes Dentalium, or the tooth shells, and other similar shells. Called also Prosopocephala, and Solenoconcha.
Scapiform
a.
(Bot.) Resembling scape, or flower stm.
Scaplite
n.
(Mon.) A grayish white mineral occuring in tetragonal crystals and in cleavable masses. It is esentially a silicate of aluminia and soda.
Scapple
v. t.
• To work roughly, or shape without finishing, as stone before leaving the quarry.
• To dress in any way short of fine tooling or rubbing, as stone.
Scapula
n.
(Anat.) The principal bone of the shoulder girdle in mammals; the shoulder blade.
(Zool.) One of the plates from which the arms of a crinoid arise.
Scapular
a.
• Of or pertaining to the scapula or the shoulder
n.
(Zool.) One of a special group of feathers which arise from each of the scapular regions and lie along the sides of the back.
Scapulary
a.
• Same as Scapular, a.
n.
(Zool.) Same as 2d and 3d Scapular.
Scapulet
n.
(Zool.) A secondary mouth fold developed at the base of each of the armlike lobes of the manubrium of many rhizostome medusae. See Illustration in Appendix.
Scapus
n.
• See 1st Scape.
Scar
n.
• A mark in the skin or flesh of an animal, made by a wound or ulcer, and remaining after the wound or ulcer is healed; a cicatrix; a mark left by a previous injury; a blemish; a disfigurement.
(Bot.) A mark left upon a stem or branch by the fall of a leaf, leaflet, or frond, or upon a seed by the separation of its support. See Illust. under Axillary.
v. t.
• To mark with a scar or scars.
v. i.
• To form a scar.
n.
• An isolated or protruding rock; a steep, rocky eminence; a bare place on the side of a mountain or steep bank of earth.
n.
(Zool.) A marine food fish, the scarus, or parrot fish.
Scarabaeus
n.
(Zool.) Same as Scarab.
Scaraboid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Scarabaeidae, an extensive group which includes the Egyptian scarab, the tumbleding, and many similar lamellicorn beetles.
n.
(Zool.) A scaraboid beetle.
Scaramouch
n.
• A personage in the old Italian comedy (derived from Spain) characterized by great boastfulness and poltroonery; hence, a person of like characteristics; a buffoon.
Scarce
a.
• Not plentiful or abundant; in small quantity in proportion to the demand; not easily to be procured; rare; uncommon.
• Scantily supplied (with); deficient (in); — with
• Sparing; frugal; parsimonious; stingy.
Scarcement
n.
(Arch. & Engin.) An offset where a wall or bank of earth, etc., retreats, leaving a shelf or footing.
Scard
n.
• A shard or fragment.
Scare
v. t.
• To frighten; to strike with sudden fear; to alarm.
n.
• Fright; esp., sudden fright produced by a trifling cause, or originating in mistake.
Scarecrow
n.
• Anything set up to frighten crows or other birds from cornfields; hence, anything terifying without danger.
• A person clad in rags and tatters.
(Zool.) The black tern.
Scarefire
n.
• An alarm of fire.
• A fire causing alarm.
Scarf
n.
• A cormorant.
n.
• An article of dress of a light and decorative character, worn loosely over the shoulders or about the neck or the waist; a light shawl or handkerchief for the neck; also, a cravat; a neckcloth.
v. t.
• To throw on loosely; to put on like a scarf.
• To dress with a scarf, or as with a scarf; to cover with a loose wrapping.
v. t.
• To form a scarf on the end or edge of, as for a joint in timber, metal rods, etc.
• To unite, as two pieces of timber or metal, by a scarf joint.
n.
• In a piece which is to be united to another by a scarf joint, the part of the end or edge that is tapered off, rabbeted, or notched so as to be thinner than the rest of the piece.
• A scarf joint.
Scarfskin
n.
(Anat.) See Epidermis.
Scarification
n.
• The act of scarifying.
Scarificator
n.
(Surg.) An instrument, principally used in cupping, containing several lancets moved simultaneously by a spring, for making slight incisions.
Scarifier
n.
• One who scarifies.
(Surg.) The instrument used for scarifying.
(Agric.) An implement for stripping and loosening the soil, without bringing up a fresh surface.
Scarify
v. t.
• To scratch or cut the skin of; esp. (Med.), to make small incisions in, by means of a lancet or scarificator, so as to draw blood from the smaller vessels without opening a large vein.
(Agric.) To stir the surface soil of, as a field.
Scarlatina
n.
(Med.) Scarlet fever.
Scarless
a.
• Free from scar.
Scarlet
n.
• A deep bright red tinged with orange or yellow, — of many tints and shades; a vivid or bright red color.
• Cloth of a scarlet color.
a.
• Of the color called scarlet; as, a scarlet cloth or thread.
v. t.
• To dye or tinge with scarlet.
Scarn
n.
• Dung.
Scaroid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Scaridae, a family of marine fishes including the parrot fishes.
Scarp
n.
(Her.) A band in the same position as the bend sinister, but only half as broad as the latter.
n.
(Fort.) The slope of the ditch nearest the parapet; the escarp.
• A steep descent or declivity.
v. t.
• To cut down perpendicularly, or nearly so; as, to scarp the face of a ditch or a rock.
Scarring
n.
• A scar; a mark.
Scarry
a.
• Bearing scars or marks of wounds.
a.
• Like a scar, or rocky eminence; containing scars.
Scarus
n.
(Zool.) A Mediterranean food fish (Sparisoma scarus) od excellent quality and highly valued by the Romans; — called also parrot fish.
Scary
n.
• Barren land having only a thin coat of grass.
a.
• Subject to sudden alarm.
• Causing fright; alarming.
Scasely
adv.
• Scarcely; hardly.
Scat
interj.
• Go away; begone; away; — chiefly used in driving off a cat.
n.
• A shower of rain.
Scatch
n.
• A kind of bit for the bridle of a horse; — called also scatchmouth.
Scatches
n.
• Stilts.
Scate
n.
• See Skate, for the foot.
Scatebrous
a.
• Abounding with springs.
Scath
n.
• Harm; damage; injury; hurt; waste; misfortune.
Scathful
a.
• Harmful; doing damage; pernicious.
Scathless
a.
• Unharmed.
Scathly
a.
• Injurious; scathful.
Scatter
v. t.
• To strew about; to sprinkle around; to throw down loosely; to deposit or place here and there, esp. in an open or sparse order.
• To cause to separate in different directions; to reduce from a close or compact to a loose or broken order; to dissipate; to disperse.
• Hence, to frustrate, disappoint, and overthrow; as, to scatter hopes, plans, or the like.
v. i.
• To be dispersed or dissipated; to disperse or separate; as, clouds scatter after a storm.
Scattered
a.
• Dispersed; dissipated; sprinkled, or loosely spread.
(Bot.) Irregular in position; having no regular order; as, scattered leaves.
Scattergood
n.
• One who wastes; a spendthrift.
Scattering
a.
• Going or falling in various directions; not united or agregated; divided among many; as, scattering votes.
n.
• Act of strewing about; something scattered.
Scatteringly
adv.
• In a scattering manner; dispersedly.
Scatterling
n.
• One who has no fixed habitation or residence; a vagabond.
Scaturient
a.
• Gushing forth; full to overflowing; effusive.
Scaturiginous
a.
• Abounding with springs.
Scaup
n.
• A bed or stratum of shellfish; scalp.
(Zool.) A scaup duck. See below.
Scauper
n.
• A tool with a semicircular edge, — used by engravers to clear away the spaces between the lines of an engraving.
Scaur
n.
• A precipitous bank or rock; a scar.
Scavage
n.
(O.Eng. Law) A toll duty formerly exacted of merchant strangers by mayors, sheriffs, etc., for goods shown or offered for sale within their precincts.
Scavenge
v. t.
• To cleanse, as streets, from filth.
Scavenger
n.
• A person whose employment is to clean the streets of a city, by scraping or sweeping, and carrying off the fifth. The name is also applied to any animal which devours refuse, carrion, or anything injurious to health.
Scazon
n.
(Lat. Pros.) A choliamb.
Scelerat
n.
• A villian; a criminal.
Scelestic
a.
• Evil; wicked; atrocious.
Scelet
n.
• A mummy; a skeleton.
Scena
n.
(Mus.) A scene in an opera.
• An accompanied dramatic recitative, interspersed with passages of melody, or followed by a full aria.
Scenario
n.
• A preliminary sketch of the plot, or main incidents, of an opera.
Scenary
n.
• Scenery.
Scene
n.
• The structure on which a spectacle or play is exhibited; the part of a theater in which the acting is done, with its adjuncts and decorations; the stage.
• The decorations and fittings of a stage, representing the place in which the action is supposed to go on; one of the slides, or other devices, used to give an appearance of reality to the action of a play; as, to paint scenes; to shift the scenes; to go behind the scenes.
• So much of a play as passes without change of locality or time, or important change of character; hence, a subdivision of an act; a separate portion of a play, subordinate to the act, but differently determined in different plays; as, an act of four scenes.
• The place, time, circumstance, etc., in which anything occurs, or in which the action of a story, play, or the like, is laid; surroundings amid which anything is set before the imagination; place of occurence, exhibition, or action.
• An assemblage of objects presented to the view at once; a series of actions and events exhibited in their connection; a spectacle; a show; an exhibition; a view.
• A landscape, or part of a landscape; scenery.
• An exhibition of passionate or strong feeling before others; often, an artifical or affected action, or course of action, done for effect; a theatrical display.
v. t.
• To exhibit as a scene; to make a scene of; to display.
Sceneful
a.
• Having much scenery.
Sceneman
n.
• The man who manages the movable scenes in a theater.
Scenery
n.
• Assemblage of scenes; the scenes of a play; the disposition and arrangement of the scenes in which the action of a play, poem, etc., is laid; representation of place of action or occurence.
• Sum of scenes or views; general aspect, as regards variety and beauty or the reverse, in a landscape; combination of natural views, as woods, hills, etc.
Sceneshifter
n.
• One who moves the scenes in a theater; a sceneman.
Scenograph
n.
• A perspective representation or general view of an object.
Scenography
n.
• The art or act of representing a body on a perspective plane; also, a representation or description of a body, in all its dimensions, as it appears to the eye.
Scent
v. t.
• To perceive by the olfactory organs; to smell; as, to scent game, as a hound does.
• To imbue or fill with odor; to perfume.
v. i.
• To have a smell.
• To hunt animals by means of the sense of smell.
n.
• That which, issuing from a body, affects the olfactory organs of animals; odor; smell; as, the scent of an orange, or of a rose; the scent of musk.
• Specifically, the odor left by an animal on the ground in passing over it; as, dogs find or lose the scent; hence, course of pursuit; track of discovery.
• The power of smelling; the sense of smell; as, a hound of nice scent; to divert the scent.
Scentful
a.
• Full of scent or odor; odorous.
• Of quick or keen smell.
Scentingly
adv.
• By scent.
Scentless
a.
• Having no scent.
Scepsis
n.
• Skepticism; skeptical philosophy.
Scepterellate
a.
(Zool.) Having a straight shaft with whorls of spines; — said of certain sponge spicules. See Illust. under Spicule.
Sceptral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a scepter; like a scepter.
Scern
v. t.
• To discern; to perceive.
Scerotal
a.
(Anat.) Sclerotic.
n.
• The optic capsule; the sclerotic coat of the eye.
Schade
n.
• Shade; shadow.
Schah
n.
• See Shah.
Schediasm
n.
• Cursory writing on a loose sheet.
Schedule
n.
• A written or printed scroll or sheet of paper; a document; especially, a formal list or inventory; a list or catalogue annexed to a larger document, as to a will, a lease, a statute, etc.
v. t.
• To form into, or place in, a schedule.
Scheelin
n.
(Chem.) Scheelium.
Scheelite
n.
(Min.) Calcium tungstate, a mineral of a white or pale yellowish color and of the tetragonal system of crystallization.
Scheelium
n.
(Chem.) The metal tungsten.
Scheik
n.
• See Sheik.
Schelly
n.
(Zool.) The powan.
Schema
n.
(Kantian Philos.) An outline or image universally applicable to a general conception, under which it is likely to be presented to the mind; as, five dots in a line are a schema of the number five; a preceding and succeeding event are a schema of cause and effect.
Schematic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a scheme or a schema.
Schematism
n.
(Astrol.) Combination of the aspects of heavenly bodies.
• Particular form or disposition of a thing; an exhibition in outline of any systematic arrangement.
Schematist
n.
• One given to forming schemes; a projector; a schemer.
Schematize
v. i.
• To form a scheme or schemes.
Scheme
n.
• A combination of things connected and adjusted by design; a system.
• A plan or theory something to be done; a design; a project; as, to form a scheme.
• Any lineal or mathematical diagram; an outline.
(Astrol.) A representation of the aspects of the celestial bodies for any moment o at a given event.
v. t.
• To make a scheme of; to plan; to design; to project; to plot.
v. i.
• To form a scheme or schemes.
Schemeful
a.
• Full of schemes or plans.
Schemer
n.
• One who forms schemes; a projector; esp., a plotter; an intriguer.
Scheming
a.
• Given to forming schemes; artful; intriguing.
Schemist
n.
• A schemer.
Schene
n.
(Antiq.) An Egyptian or Persian measure of length, varying from thirthy-two to sixty stadia.
Schenkbeer
n.
• A mild German beer.
Scherbet
n.
• See Sherbet.
Scherif
n.
• See Sherif.
Scherzando
adv.
(Mus.) In a playful or sportive manner.
Scherzo
n.
(Mus.) A playful, humorous movement, commonly in 3-4 measure, which often takes the place of the old minuet and trio in a sonata or a symphony.
Schesis
n.
• General state or disposition of the body or mind, or of one thing with regard to other things; habitude.
(Rhet.) A figure of speech whereby the mental habitude of an adversary or opponent is feigned for the purpose of arguing against him.
Schiedam
n.
• Holland gin made at Schiedam in the Netherlands.
Schilerization
n.
(Min.) The act or process of producing schiller in a mineral mass
Schiller
n.
(Min.) The peculiar bronzelike luster observed in certain minerals, as hypersthene, schiller spar, etc. It is due to the presence of minute inclusions in parallel position, and in sometimes of secondary origin.
Schilling
n.
• Any one of several small German and Dutch coins, worth from about one and a half cents to about five cents.
Schindylesis
n.
(Anat.) A form of articulation in which one bone is received into a groove or slit in another.
Schirrhus
n.
• See Scirrhus.
Schism
n.
• Division or separation; specifically (Eccl.), permanent division or separation in the Christian church; breach of unity among people of the same religious faith; the offense of seeking to produce division in a church without justifiable cause.
Schisma
n.
(Anc. Mus.) An interval equal to half a comma.
Schismatic
a.
• Of or pertaining to schism; implying schism; partaking of the nature of schism; tending to schism; as, schismatic opinions or proposals.
n.
• One who creates or takes part in schism; one who separates from an established church or religious communion on account of a difference of opinion.
Schismatical
a.
• Same as Schismatic.
Schismatize
v. i.
• To make part in schism; to make a breach of communion in the church.
Schismless
a.
• Free from schism.
Schist
n.
(Geol.) Any crystalline rock having a foliated structure (see Foliation) and hence admitting of ready division into slabs or slates. The common kinds are mica schist, and hornblendic schist, consisting chiefly of quartz with mica or hornblende and often feldspar.
Schistaceous
a.
• Of a slate color.
Schistic
a.
• Schistose.
Schistosity
n.
(Geol.) The quality or state of being schistose.
Schizocarp
n.
(Bot.) A dry fruit which splits at maturity into several closed one-seeded portions.
Schizocoele
n.
(Anat.) See Enterocoele.
Schizocoelous
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to, or of the nature of, a schizocoele.
Schizogenesis
n.
(Biol.) reproduction by fission.
Schizognath
n.
(Zool.) Any bird with a schizognathous palate.
Schizognathae
n. pl.
(Zool.) The schizognathous birds.
Schizognathism
n.
(Zool.) the condition of having a schizognathous palate.
Schizognathous
a.
(Zool.) Having the maxillo-palatine bones separate from each other and from the vomer, which is pointed in front, as in the gulls, snipes, grouse, and many other birds.
Schizomycetes
n. pl.
(Biol.) An order of Schizophyta, including the so-called fission fungi, or bacteria. See Schizophyta, in the Supplement.
Schizonemertea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of nemerteans comprising those having a deep slit along each side of the head. See Illust. in Appendix.
Schizopelmous
a.
(Zool.) Having the two flexor tendons of the toes entirely separate, and the flexor hallicus going to the first toe only.
Schizophyte
n.
(Biol.) One of a class of vegetable organisms, in the classification of Cohn, which includes all of the inferior forms that multiply by fission, whether they contain chlorophyll or not.
Schizopod
n.
(Zool.) one of the Schizopoda. Also used adjectively.
Schizopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of shrimplike Thoracostraca in which each of the thoracic legs has a long fringed upper branch (exopodite) for swimming.
Schlich
n.
(Metal.) The finer portion of a crushed ore, as of gold, lead, or tin, separated by the water in certain wet processes.
Schmelze
n.
• A kind of glass of a red or ruby color, made in Bohemia.
Schnapps
n.
• Holland gin.
Schneiderian
a.
(Anat.) Discovered or described by C. V. Schneider, a German anatomist of the seventeenth century.
Scholar
n.
• One who attends a school; one who learns of a teacher; one under the tuition of a preceptor; a pupil; a disciple; a learner; a student.
• One engaged in the pursuits of learning; a learned person; one versed in many branches, of knowledge; a person of high literary or scientific attainments; a savant.
• A man of books.
• In English universities, an undergraduate who belongs to the foundation of a college, and receives support in part from its revenues.
Scholarity
n.
• Scholarship.
Scholarlike
a.
• Scholarly.
Scholarly
a.
• Like a scholar, or learned person; showing the qualities of a scholar; as, a scholarly essay or critique.
adv.
• In a scholarly manner.
Scholarship
n.
• The character and qualities of a scholar; attainments in science or literature; erudition; learning.
• Literary education.
• Maintenance for a scholar; a foundation for the support of a student.
Scholastic
a.
• Pertaining to, or suiting, a scholar, a school, or schools; scholarlike; as, scholastic manners or pride; scholastic learning.
• Of or pertaining to the schoolmen and divines of the Middle Ages (see Schoolman); as, scholastic divinity or theology; scholastic philosophy.
• Hence, characterized by excessive subtilty, or needlessly minute subdivisions; pedantic; formal.
n.
• One who adheres to the method or subtilties of the schools.
(R.C.Ch.) See the Note under Jesuit.
Scholastical
a. & n.
• Scholastic.
Scholastically
adv.
• In a scholastic manner.
Scholasticism
n.
• The method or subtitles the schools of philosophy; scholastic formality; scholastic doctrines or philosophy.
Scholia
n. pl.
• See Scholium.
Scholiast
n.
• A maker of scholia; a commentator or annotator.
Scholiastic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a scholiast, or his pursuits.
Scholiaze
v. i.
• To write scholia.
Scholical
a.
• Scholastic.
Scholion
n.
• A scholium.
Scholium
n.
• Marginal anotation; an explanatory remark or comment; specifically, an explanatory comment on the text of a classic author by an early grammarian.
• A remark or observation subjoined to a demonstration or a train of reasoning.
Scholy
n.
• A scholium.
v. i. & t.
• To write scholia; to annotate.
School
n.
• A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish.
n.
• A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.
• A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.
• A session of an institution of instruction.
• One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning.
• The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honors are held.
• An assemblage of scholars; those who attend upon instruction in a school of any kind; a body of pupils.
• The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc.
• The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age; as, he was a gentleman of the old school.
• Figuratively, any means of knowledge or discipline; as, the school of experience.
v. t.
• To train in an institution of learning; to educate at a school; to teach.
• To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic disciplene; to train.
Schoolbook
n.
• A book used in schools for learning lessons.
Schoolboy
n.
• A boy belonging to, or attending, a school.
Schooldame
n.
• A schoolmistress.
Schoolery
n.
• Something taught; precepts; schooling
Schoolfellow
n.
• One bred at the same school; an associate in school.
Schoolgirl
n.
• A girl belonging to, or attending, a school.
Schoolhouse
n.
• A house appropriated for the use of a school or schools, or for instruction.
Schooling
n.
• Instruction in school; tuition; education in an institution of learning; act of teaching.
• Discipline; reproof; reprimand; as, he gave his son a good schooling.
• Compensation for instruction; price or reward paid to an instructor for teaching pupils.
a.
(Zool.) Collecting or running in schools or shoals.
Schoolma'am
n.
• A schoolmistress.
Schoolmaid
n.
• A schoolgirl.
Schoolman
n.
• One versed in the niceties of academical disputation or of school divinity.
Schoolmaster
n.
• The man who presides over and teaches a school; a male teacher of a school.
• One who, or that which, disciplines and directs.
Schoolmate
n.
• A pupil who attends the same school as another.
Schoolmistress
n.
• A woman who governs and teaches a school; a female school-teacher.
Schoolroom
n.
• A room in which pupils are taught.
Schoolship
n.
• A vessel employed as a nautical training school, in which naval apprentices receive their education at the expense of the state, and are trained for service as sailors. Also, a vessel used as a reform school to which boys are committed by the courts to be disciplined, and instructed as mariners.
Schoolward
adv.
• Toward school.
Schooner
n.
(Naut.) Originally, a small, sharp-built vessel, with two topsails on one or both masts and was called a topsail schooner. About 1840, longer vesels with three masts, fore-and-aft rigged, came into use, and since that time vesels with four masts and even with six masts, so rigged, are built. Schooners with more than two masts are designated three-masted schooners, four-masted schooners, etc. See Illustration in Appendix.
n.
• A large goblet or drinking glass, — used for lager beer or ale.
Schorl
n.
(Min.) Black tourmaline.
Schorlaceous
a.
• Partaking of the nature and character of schorl; resembling schorl.
Schorlous
a.
• Schorlaceous.
Schorly
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, schorl; as, schorly granite.
Schreibersite
n.
(Min.) A mineral occurring in steel-gray flexible folia. It contains iron, nickel, and phosphorus, and is found only in meteoric iron.
Schrode
n.
• See Scrod.
Schwanpan
n.
• Chinese abacus.
Schweitzerkase
n.
• Gruyere cheese.
Sciaenoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Sciaenidae, a family of marine fishes which includes the meagre, the squeteague, and the kingfish.
Sciagraph
n.
(Arch.) An old term for a vertical section of a building; — called also sciagraphy. See Vertical section, under Section.
(Phys.) A radiograph.
Sciagraphical
a.
• Pertaining to sciagraphy.
Sciagraphy
n.
• The art or science of projecting or delineating shadows as they fall in nature.
(Arch.) Same as Siagraph.
Sciamachy
n.
• See Sciomachy.
Sciatic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the hip; in the region of, or affecting, the hip; ischial; ischiatic; as, the sciatic nerve, sciatic pains.
n.
(Med.) Sciatica.
Sciatica
n.
(Med.) Neuralgia of the sciatic nerve, an affection characterized by paroxysmal attacks of pain in the buttock, back of the thing, or in the leg or foot, following the course of the branches of the sciatic nerve. The name is also popularly applied to various painful affections of the hip and the parts adjoininhg. See Ischiadic passion, under Ischiadic.
Sciatical
a.
(Anat.) Sciatic.
Sciaticly
adv.
• With, or by means of, sciatica.
Scibboleth
n.
• Shibboleth.
Science
n.
• Knowledge; lnowledge of principles and causes; ascertained truth of facts.
• Accumulated and established knowledge, which has been systematized and formulated with reference to the discovery of general truths or the operation of general laws; knowledge classified and made available in work, life, or the search for truth; comprehensive, profound, or philosophical knowledge.
• Especially, such knowledge when it relates to the physical world and its phenomena, the nature, constitution, and forces of matter, the qualities and function of living tissues, etc.; — called also natural science, and physical science.
• Any branch or departament of systematized knowledge considered as a distinct field of investigation or object of study; as, the science of astronomy, of chemistry, or of mind.
• Art, skill, or expertness, regarded as the result of knowledge of laws and principles.
v. t.
• To cause to become versed in science; to make skilled; to instruct.
Scient
a.
• Knowing; skillful.
Scienter
adv.
(Law) Knowingly; willfully.
Sciential
a.
• Pertaining to, or producing, science.
Scientific
a.
• Of or pertaining to science; used in science; as, scientific principles; scientific apparatus; scientific observations.
• Agreeing with, or depending on, the rules or principles of science; as, a scientific classification; a scientific arrangement of fossils.
• Having a knowledge of science, or of a science; evincing science or systematic knowledge; as, a scientific chemist; a scientific reasoner; a scientific argument.
Scientifical
a.
• Scientific.
Scientifically
adv.
• In a scientific manner; according to the rules or principles of science.
Scientist
n.
• One learned in science; a scientific investigator; one devoted to scientific study; a savant.
Scilicet
adv.
• To wit; namely; videlicet; — often abbreviated to sc., or ss.
Scillain
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside extracted from squill (Scilla) as a light porous substance.
Scillitin
n.
(Chem.) A bitter principle extracted from the bulbs of the squill (Scilla), and probably consisting of a complex mixture of several substances.
Scincoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Scincidae, or skinks.
n.
• A scincoidian.
Scincoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of lizards including the skinks. See Skink.
Scincoidian
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of lizards of the family Scincidae or tribe Scincoidea. The tongue is not extensile. The body and tail are covered with overlapping scales, and the toes are margined. See Illust. under Skink.
Sciniph
n.
• Some kind of stinging or biting insect, as a flea, a gnat, a sandly, or the like.
Scink
n.
(Zool.) A skink.
n.
• A slunk calf.
Scintilla
n.
• A spark; the least particle; an iota; a tittle.
Scintillant
a.
• Emitting sparks, or fine igneous particles; sparkling.
Scintillate
v. i.
• To emit sparks, or fine igneous particles.
• To sparkle, as the fixed stars.
Scintillation
n.
• The act of scintillating.
• A spark of flash emitted in scintillating.
Scintillous
a.
• Scintillant.
Scintillously
adv.
• In a scintillant manner.
Sciography
n.
• See Sciagraphy.
Sciolism
n.
• The knowledge of a sciolist; superficial knowledge.
Sciolist
n.
• One who knows many things superficially; a pretender to science; a smatterer.
Sciolistic
a.
• Of or pertaining to sciolism, or a sciolist; partaking of sciolism; resembling a sciolist.
Sciolous
a.
• Knowing superficially or imperfectly.
Sciomachy
n.
• A fighting with a shadow; a mock contest; an imaginary or futile combat.
Sciomancy
n.
• Divination by means of shadows.
Scion
n.
(Bot.) A shoot or sprout of a plant; a sucker.
• A piece of a slender branch or twig cut for grafting.
• Hence, a descendant; an heir; as, a scion of a royal stock.
Scioptic
a.
(Opt.) Of or pertaining to an optical arrangement for forming images in a darkened room, usually called scioptic ball.
Sciopticon
n.
• A kind of magic lantorn.
Scioptics
n.
• The art or process of exhibiting luminous images, especially those of external objects, in a darkened room, by arrangements of lenses or mirrors.
Scioptric
a.
(Opt.) Scioptic.
Sciot
a.
• Of or pertaining to the island Scio (Chio or Chios).
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Scio.
Sciotheric
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sundial.
Scious
a.
• Knowing; having knowledge.
Scirrhoid
a.
• Resembling scirrhus.
Scirrhosity
n.
(Med.) A morbid induration, as of a gland; stste of being scirrhous.
Scirrhous
a.
(Med.) Proceeding from scirrhus; of the nature of scirrhus; indurated; knotty; as, scirrhous affections; scirrhous disease.
Scirrhus
n.
(Med.) An indurated organ or part; especially, an indurated gland.
• A cancerous tumor which is hard, translucent, of a gray or bluish color, and emits a creaking sound when incised
Sciscitation
n.
• The act of inquiring; inquiry; demand.
Scise
v. i.
• To cut; to penetrate.
Scissel
n.
• The clippings of metals made in various mechanical operations.
• The slips or plates of metal out of which circular balnks have been cut for the purpose of coinage.
Scissible
a.
• Capable of being cut or divided by a sharp instrument.
Scissil
n.
• See Scissel.
Scissile
a.
• Capable of being cut smoothly; scissible.
Scission
n.
• The act of dividing with an instrument having a sharp edge.
Scissiparity
n.
(Biol.) Reproduction by fission.
Scissor
v. t.
• To cut with scissors or shears; to prepare with the aid of scissors.
Scissors
n. pl.
• A cutting instrument resembling shears, but smaller, consisting of two cutting blades with handles, movable on a pin in the center, by which they are held together. Often called a pair of scissors.
Scissorsbill
n.
(Zool.) See Skimmer.
Scissorstail
n.
(Zool.) A tyrant flycatcher (Milvulus forficatus) of the Southern United States and Mexico, which has a deeply forked tail. It is light gray above, white beneath, salmon on the flanks, and fiery red at the base of the crown feathers.
Scissure
n.
• A longitudinal opening in a body, made by cutting; a cleft; a fissure.
Scitamineous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to a natural order of plants (Scitamimeae), mostly tropical herbs, including the ginger, Indian shot, banana, and the plants producing turmeric and arrowroot.
Sciurine
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Squirrel family.
n.
• A rodent of the Squirrel family.
Sciuroid
a.
(Bot.) Resembling the tail of a squirrel; — generally said of branches which are close and dense, or of spikes of grass like barley.
Sciuromorpha
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of rodents containing the squirrels and allied animals, such as the gophers, woodchucks, beavers, and others.
Sciurus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of reodents comprising the common squirrels.
Scizorhinal
a.
(Anat.) Having the nasal bones separate.
(Zool.) Having the anterior nostrils prolonged backward in the form of a slit.
Sclaundre
n.
• Slander.
Sclavic
a.
• Same as Slavic.
Sclavism
n.
• Same as Slavism.
Sclavonian
a. & n.
• Same as Slavonian.
Sclavonic
a.
• Same as Slavonic.
Sclender
a.
• Slender.
Scleragogy
n.
• Severe discipline.
Scleregenous
a.
(Anat.) Making or secreting a hard substance; becoming hard.
Sclerema
n.
(Med.) Induration of the cellular tissue.
Sclerenchyma
n.
(Bot.) Vegetable tissue composed of short cells with thickened or hardened walls, as in nutshells and the gritty parts of a pear. See Sclerotic.
(Zool.) The hard calcareous deposit in the tissues of Anthozoa, constituing the stony corals.
Sclerenchymatous
a.
(Bot. & Zool.) Pertaining to, or composed of, sclerenchyma.
Sclerenchyme
n.
• Sclerenchyma.
Sclereskeleton
n.
(Anat.) That part of the skeleton which is developed in tendons, ligaments, and aponeuroses.
Scleriasis
n.
(Med.) A morbid induration of the edge of the eyelid.
• Induration of any part, including scleroderma.
Sclerite
n.
(Zool.) A hard chitinous or calcareous process or corpuscle, especially a spicule of the Alcyonaria.
Scleritis
n.
• See Sclerottis.
Sclerobase
n.
(Zool.) The calcareous or hornlike coral forming the central stem or axis of most compound alcyonarians; — called also foot secretion. See Illust. under Gorgoniacea, and Coenenchyma.
Scleroderm
n.
(Zool.) One of a tribe of plectognath fishes (Sclerodermi) having the skin covered with hard scales, or plates, as the cowfish and the trunkfish.
• One of the Sclerodermata
• Hardened, or bony, integument of various animals.
Scleroderma
n.
(Med.) A disease of adults, characterized by a diffuse rigidity and hardness of the skin.
Sclerodermata
n. pl.
(Zool.) The stony corals; the Madreporaria.
Sclerodermite
n.
(Zool.) The hard integument of Crustacea.
• Sclerenchyma.
Sclerogen
n.
(Bot.) The thickening matter of woody cells; lignin.
Scleroid
a.
(Bot.) Having a hard texture, as nutshells.
Scleroma
n.
(Med.) Induration of the tissues. See Sclerma, Scleroderma, and Sclerosis.
Sclerometer
n.
• An instrument for determining with accuracy the degree of hardness of a mineral.
Sclerosed
a.
• Affected with sclerosis.
Sclerosis
n.
(Med.) Induration; hardening; especially, that form of induration produced in an organ by increase of its interstitial connective tissue.
(Bot.) Hardening of the cell wall by lignification.
Sclerotic
a.
• Hard; firm; indurated; — applied especially in anatomy to the firm outer coat of the eyeball, which is often cartilaginous and sometimes bony.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the sclerotic coat of the eye; sclerotical.
(Med.) Affected with sclerosis; sclerosed.
n.
(Anat.) The sclerotic coat of the eye. See Illust. of Eye (d).
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained from ergot or the sclerotium of a fungus growing on rye.
Sclerotical
a.
(Anat.) Sclerotic.
Sclerotitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the sclerotic coat.
Sclerotium
n.
(Bot.) A hardened body formed by certain fungi, as by the Claviceps purpurea, which produced ergot.
(Zool.) The nature or resting stage of a plasmodium.
Sclerotome
n.
(Zool.) One of the bony, cartilaginous, or membranous partitoins which separate the myotomes.
Sclerous
a.
(Anat.) Hard; indurated; sclerotic.
Scoat
v. t.
• To prop; to scotch.
Scobby
n.
• The chaffinch.
Scobiform
a.
• Having the form of, or resembling, sawdust or raspings.
Scobs
n. sing. & pl.
• Raspings of ivory, hartshorn, metals, or other hard substance.
• The dross of metals.
Scoff
n.
• Derision; ridicule; mockery; derisive or mocking expression of scorn, contempt, or reproach.
• An object of scorn, mockery, or derision.
v. i.
• To show insolent ridicule or mockery; to manifest contempt by derisive acts or language; — often with at.
v. t.
• To treat or address with derision; to assail scornfully; to mock at.
Scoffer
n.
• One who scoffs.
Scoffery
n.
• The act of scoffing; scoffing conduct; mockery.
Scoffingly
adv.
• In a scoffing manner.
Scoke
n.
(Bot.) Poke (Phytolacca decandra).
Scolay
v. i.
• See Scoley.
Scold
v. i.
• To find fault or rail with rude clamor; to brawl; to utter harsh, rude, boisterous rebuke; to chide sharply or coarsely; — often with at; as, to scold at a servant.
v. t.
• To chide with rudeness and clamor; to rate; also, to rebuke or reprove with severity.
n.
• One who scolds, or makes a practice of scolding; esp., a rude, clamorous woman; a shrew.
• A scolding; a brawl.
Scolder
n.
• One who scolds.
(Zool.) The oyster catcher; — so called from its shrill cries.
• The old squaw.
Scolding
• a. & n. from Scold, v.
Scoldingly
adv.
• In a scolding manner.
Scole
n.
• School.
Scolecida
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Helminthes.
Scolecite
n.
(Min.) A zeolitic mineral occuring in delicate radiating groups of white crystals. It is a hydrous silicate of aluminia and lime. Called also lime mesotype.
Scolecomorpha
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Scolecida.
Scolex
n.
(Zool.) The embryo produced directly from the egg in a metagenetic series, especially the larva of a tapeworm or other parasitic worm. See Illust. of Echinococcus.
• One of the Scolecida.
Scoley
v. i.
• To go to school; to study.
Scoliosis
n.
(Med.) A lateral curvature of the spine.
Scolithus
n.
(Paleon.) A tubular structure found in Potsdam sandstone, and believed to be the fossil burrow of a marine worm.
Scollop
n. & v.
• See Scallop.
Scolopacine
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Scolopacidae, or Snipe family.
Scolopendra
n.
(Zool.) A genus of venomous myriapods including the centipeds. See Centiped.
• A sea fish.
Scolopendrine
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the Scolopendra.
Scolytid
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of small bark-boring beetles of the genus Scolytus and allied genera. Also used adjectively.
Scomber
n.
(Zool.) A genus of acanthopterygious fishes which includes the common mackerel.
Scomberoid
a. & n.
(Zool.) Same as Scombroid.
Scombriformes
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of fishes including the mackerels, tunnies, and allied fishes.
Scombroid
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the Mackerel family.
n.
• Any fish of the family Scombridae, of which the mackerel (Scomber) is the type.
Scomfish
v. t. & i.
• To suffocate or stifle; to smother.
Scomm
n.
• A bufoon.
• A flout; a jeer; a gibe; a taunt.
Scomtit
n. & v.
• Discomfit.
Sconce
n.
• A fortification, or work for defense; a fort.
• A hut for protection and shelter; a stall.
• A piece of armor for the head; headpiece; helmet.
• Fig.: The head; the skull; also, brains; sense; discretion.
• A poll tax; a mulct or fine.
• A protection for a light; a lantern or cased support for a candle; hence, a fixed hanging or projecting candlestick.
• Hence, the circular tube, with a brim, in a candlestick, into which the candle is inserted.
(Arch.) A squinch.
• A fragment of a floe of ice.
• A fixed seat or shelf.
v. t.
• To shut up in a sconce; to imprison; to insconce.
• To mulct; to fine.
Sconchoon
n.
(Arch.) A squinch.
Scone
n.
• A cake, thinner than a bannock, made of wheat or barley or oat meal.
Scoop
n.
• A large ladle; a vessel with a long handle, used for dipping liquids; a utensil for bailing boats.
• A deep shovel, or any similar implement for digging out and dipping or shoveling up anything; as, a flour scoop; the scoop of a dredging machine.
(Surg.) A spoon-shaped instrument, used in extracting certain substances or foreign bodies.
• A place hollowed out; a basinlike cavity; a hollow.
• A sweep; a stroke; a swoop.
• The act of scooping, or taking with a scoop or ladle; a motion with a scoop, as in dipping or shoveling.
v. t.
• To take out or up with, a scoop; to lade out.
• To empty by lading; as, to scoop a well dry.
• To make hollow, as a scoop or dish; to excavate; to dig out; to form by digging or excavation.
Scooper
n.
• One who, or that which scoops.
(Zool.) The avocet; — so called because it scoops up the mud to obtain food.
Scoot
v. i.
• To walk fast; to go quickly; to run hastily away.
Scoparin
n.
(Chem.) A yellow gelatinous or crystalline substance found in broom (Cytisus scoparius) accompanying sparteine.
Scopate
a.
(Zool.) Having the surface closely covered with hairs, like a brush.
Scope
n.
• That at which one aims; the thing or end to which the mind directs its view; that which is purposed to be reached or accomplished; hence, ultimate design, aim, or purpose; intention; drift; object.
• Room or opportunity for free outlook or aim; space for action; amplitude of opportunity; free course or vent; liberty; range of view; intent, or action.
• Extended area.
• Length; extent; sweep; as, scope of cable.
v. t.
Scopeline
a.
(Zool.) Scopeloid.
Scopeloid
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to fishes of the genus Scopelus, or family Scopelodae, which includes many small oceanic fishes, most of which are phosphorescent.
n.
(Zool.) Any fish of the family Scopelidae.
Scopiferous
a.
(Zool.) Bearing a tuft of brushlike hairs.
Scopiform
a.
• Having the form of a broom or besom.
Scopiped
n.
(Zool.) Same as Scopuliped.
Scoppet
v. t.
• To lade or dip out.
Scopster
n.
• The saury.
Scopula
n.
(Zool.) A peculiar brushlike organ found on the foot of spiders and used in the construction of the web.
• A special tuft of hairs on the leg of a bee.
Scopuliped
n.
(Zool.) Any species of bee which has on the hind legs a brush of hairs used for collecting pollen, as the hive bees and bumblebees.
Scopulous
a.
• Full of rocks; rocky.
Scorbute
n.
• Scurry.
Scorbutus
n.
(Med.) Scurvy.
Scorce
n.
• Barter. See Scorse.
Scorch
v. t.
• To burn superficially; to parch, or shrivel, the surface of, by heat; to subject to so much heat as changes color and texture without consuming; as, to scorch linen.
• To affect painfully with heat, or as with heat; to dry up with heat; to affect as by heat.
• To burn; to destroy by, or as by, fire.
v. i.
• To be burnt on the surface; to be parched; to be dried up.
• To burn or be burnt.
Scorching
a.
• Burning; parching or shriveling with heat.
Score
n.
• A notch or incision; especially, one that is made as a tally mark; hence, a mark, or line, made for the purpose of account.
• An account or reckoning; account of dues; bill; hence, indebtedness.
• Account; reason; motive; sake; behalf.
• The number twenty, as being marked off by a special score or tally; hence, in pl., a large number.
• A distance of twenty yards; — a term used in ancient archery and gunnery.
• A weight of twenty pounds.
• The number of points gained by the contestants, or either of them, in any game, as in cards or cricket.
• line drawn; a groove or furrow.
(Mus.) The original and entire draught, or its transcript, of a composition, with the parts for all the different instruments or voices written on staves one above another, so that they can be read at a glance; — so called from the bar, which, in its early use, was drawn through all the parts.
v. t.
• To mark with lines, scratches, or notches; to cut notches or furrows in; to notch; to scratch; to furrow; as, to score timber for hewing; to score the back with a lash.
• Especially, to mark with significant lines or notches, for indicating or keeping account of something; as, to score a tally.
• To mark or signify by lines or notches; to keep record or account; to set down; to record; to charge.
• To engrave, as upon a shield.
• To make a score of, as points, runs, etc., in a game.
(Mus.) To write down in proper order and arrangement; as, to score an overture for an orchestra. See Score, n., 9.
(Geol.) To mark with parallel lines or scratches; as, the rocks of New England and the Western States were scored in the drift epoch.
Scorer
n.
• One who, or that which, scores.
Scoria
n.
• The recrement of metals in fusion, or the slag rejected after the eduction of metallic ores; dross.
• Cellular slaggy lava; volcanic cinders.
Scoriac
a.
• Scoriaceous.
Scoriaceous
a.
• Of or pertaining to scoria; like scoria or the recrement of metals; partaking of the nature of scoria.
Scorie
n.
(Zool.) The young of any gull.
Scorification
n.
(Chem.) The act, process, or result of scorifying, or reducing to a slag; hence, the separation from earthy matter by means of a slag; as, the scorification of ores.
Scorifier
n.
(Chem.) One who, or that which, scorifies; specifically, a small flat bowl-shaped cup used in the first heating in assaying, to remove the earth and gangue, and to concentrate the gold and silver in a lead button.
Scoriform
a.
• In the form of scoria.
Scorify
v. t.
(Chem.) To reduce to scoria or slag; specifically, in assaying, to fuse so as to separate the gangue and earthy material, with borax, lead, soda, etc., thus leaving the gold and silver in a lead button; hence, to separate from, or by means of, a slag.
Scorious
a.
• Scoriaceous.
Scorn
n.
• Extreme and lofty contempt; haughty disregard; that disdain which aprings from the opinion of the utter meanness and unworthiness of an object.
• An act or expression of extreme contempt.
• An object of extreme disdain, contempt, or derision.
v. t.
• To hold in extreme contempt; to reject as unworthy of regard; to despise; to contemn; to disdain.
• To treat with extreme contempt; to make the object of insult; to mock; to scoff at; to deride.
v. i.
• To scoff; to act disdainfully.
Scorner
n.
• One who scorns; a despiser; a contemner; specifically, a scoffer at religion.
Scornful
a.
• Full of scorn or contempt; contemptuous; disdainful.
• Treated with scorn; exciting scorn.
Scorny
a.
• Deserving scorn; paltry.
Scorodite
n.
(Min.) A leek-green or brownish mineral occurring in orthorhombic crystals. It is a hydrous arseniate of iron.
Scorpaenoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the family Scorpaenidae, which includes the scorpene, the rosefish, the California rockfishes, and many other food fishes. [Written also scorpaenid.] See Illust. under Rockfish.
Scorpene
n.
(Zool.) A marine food fish of the genus Scorpaena, as the European hogfish (S. scrofa), and the California species (S. guttata).
Scorper
n.
• Same as Scauper.
Scorpio
n.
(Zool.) A scorpion.
(Astron.) The eighth sign of the zodiac, which the sun enters about the twenty-third day of October, marked thus [&scorpio;] in almanacs.
• A constellation of the zodiac containing the bright star Antares. It is drawn on the celestial globe in the figure of a scorpion.
Scorpiodea
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Scorpiones.
Scorpion
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of pulmonate arachnids of the order scorpiones, having a suctorial mouth, large claw-bearing palpi, and a caudal sting.
(Zool.) The pine or gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus).
(Zool.) the scorpene.
(Script.) A painful scourge.
(Astron.) A sign and constellation. See Scorpio.
(Antiq.) An ancient military engine for hurling stones and other missiles.
Scorpiones
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of arachnids comprising the scorpions.
Scorpionidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Scorpiones.
Scorpionwort
n.
(Bot.) A leguminous plant (Ornithopus scorpides) of Southern Europe, having curved pods.
Scorse
n.
• Barter; exchange; trade.
v. t.
• To barter or exchange.
• To chase.
v. i.
• To deal for the purchase of anything; to practice barter.
Scortatory
a.
• Pertaining to lewdness or fornication; lewd.
Scot
n.
• A name for a horse.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Scotland; a Scotsman, or Scotchman.
n.
• A portion of money assessed or paid; a tax or contribution; a mulct; a fine; a shot.
Scotch
a.
• Of or pertaining to Scotland, its language, or its inhabitants; Scottish.
n.
• The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland.
• Collectively, the people of Scotland.
v. t.
• To shoulder up; to prop or block with a wedge, chock, etc., as a wheel, to prevent its rolling or slipping.
n.
• A chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping; as, a scotch for a wheel or a log on inclined ground.
v. t.
• To cut superficially; to wound; to score.
n.
• A slight cut or incision; a score.
Scotch
v. t.
• To clothe or cover up.
Scotching
n.
(Masonry) Dressing stone with a pick or pointed instrument.
Scotchman
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Scotland; a Scot; a Scotsman.
(Naut.) A piece of wood or stiff hide placed over shrouds and other rigging to prevent chafe by the running gear.
Scoter
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of northern sea ducks of the genus Oidemia.
Scotia
n.
(Arch.) A concave molding used especially in classical architecture.
n.
• Scotland
Scotist
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of (Joannes) Duns Scotus, the Franciscan scholastic (d. 1308), who maintained certain doctrines in philosophy and theology, in opposition to the Thomists, or followers of Thomas Aquinas, the Dominican scholastic.
Scotograph
n.
• An instrument for writing in the dark, or without seeing.
Scotoma
n.
(Med.) Scotomy.
Scotomy
n.
• Dizziness with dimness of sight.
(Med.) Obscuration of the field of vision due to the appearance of a dark spot before the eye.
Scotoscope
n.
• An instrument that discloses objects in the dark or in a faint light.
Scots
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Scotch; Scotch; Scottish; as, Scots law; a pound Scots (1s. 8d.).
Scotsman
n.
• See Scotchman.
Scottering
n.
• The burning of a wad of pease straw at the end of harvest.
Scotticism
n.
• An idiom, or mode of expression, peculiar to Scotland or Scotchmen.
Scotticize
v. t.
• To cause to become like the Scotch; to make Scottish.
Scottish
a.
• Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of Scotland, their country, or their language; as, Scottish industry or economy; a Scottish chief; a Scottish dialect.
Scoundrel
n.
• A mean, worthless fellow; a rascal; a villain; a man without honor or virtue.
a.
• Low; base; mean; unprincipled.
Scoundreldom
n.
• The domain or sphere of scoundrels; scoundrels, collectively; the state, ideas, or practices of scoundrels.
Scoundrelism
n.
• The practices or conduct of a scoundrel; baseness; rascality.
Scour
v. t.
• To rub hard with something rough, as sand or Bristol brick, especially for the purpose of cleaning; to clean by friction; to make clean or bright; to cleanse from grease, dirt, etc., as articles of dress.
• To purge; as, to scour a horse.
• To remove by rubbing or cleansing; to sweep along or off; to carry away or remove, as by a current of water; — often with off or away.
• To pass swiftly over; to brush along; to traverse or search thoroughly; as, to scour the coast.
v. i.
• To clean anything by rubbing.
• To cleanse anything.
• To be purged freely; to have a diarrhoea.
• To run swiftly; to rove or range in pursuit or search of something; to scamper.
n.
• Diarrhoea or dysentery among cattle.
Scourage
n.
• Refuse water after scouring.
Scourer
n.
• One who, or that which, scours.
• A rover or footpad; a prowling robber.
Scourge
n.
• A lash; a strap or cord; especially, a lash used to inflict pain or punishment; an instrument of punishment or discipline; a whip.
• Hence, a means of inflicting punishment, vengeance, or suffering; an infliction of affliction; a punishment.
v. t.
• To whip severely; to lash.
• To punish with severity; to chastise; to afflict, as for sins or faults, and with the purpose of correction.
• To harass or afflict severely.
Scourger
n.
• One who scourges or punishes; one who afflicts severely.
Scourse
v. t.
• See Scorse.
Scouse
n.
(Naut.) A sailor's dish. Bread scouse contains no meat; lobscouse contains meat, etc. See Lobscouse.
Scout
n.
• A swift sailing boat.
n.
• A projecting rock.
v. t.
• To reject with contempt, as something absurd; to treat with ridicule; to flout; as, to scout an idea or an apology.
n.
• A person sent out to gain and bring in tidings; especially, one employed in war to gain information of the movements and condition of an enemy.
• A college student's or undergraduate's servant; — so called in Oxford, England; at Cambridge called a gyp; and at Dublin, a skip.
(Criket) A fielder in a game for practice.
• The act of scouting or reconnoitering.
v. t.
• To observe, watch, or look for, as a scout; to follow for the purpose of observation, as a scout.
• To pass over or through, as a scout; to reconnoiter; as, to scout a country.
v. i.
• To go on the business of scouting, or watching the motions of an enemy; to act as a scout.
Scovel
n.
• A mop for sweeping ovens; a malkin.
Scow
n.
(Naut.) A large flat-bottomed boat, having broad, square ends.
v. t.
• To transport in a scow.
Scowl
v. i.
• To wrinkle the brows, as in frowning or displeasure; to put on a frowning look; to look sour, sullen, severe, or angry.
• Hence, to look gloomy, dark, or threatening; to lower.
v. t.
• To look at or repel with a scowl or a frown.
• To express by a scowl; as, to scowl defiance.
n.
• The wrinkling of the brows or face in frowing; the expression of displeasure, sullennes, or discontent in the countenance; an angry frown.
• Hence, gloom; dark or threatening aspect.
Scowlingly
adv.
• In a scowling manner.
Scrabble
v. i.
• To scrape, paw, or scratch with the hands; to proceed by clawing with the hands and feet; to scramble; as, to scrabble up a cliff or a tree.
• To make irregular, crooked, or unmeaning marks; to scribble; to scrawl.
v. t.
• To mark with irregular lines or letters; to scribble; as, to scrabble paper.
n.
• The act of scrabbing; a moving upon the hands and knees; a scramble; also, a scribble.
Scraber
n.
(Zool.) The Manx shearwater.
• The black guillemot.
Scraffle
v. i.
• To scramble or struggle; to wrangle; also, to be industrious.
Scrag
n.
• Something thin, lean, or rough; a bony piece; especially, a bony neckpiece of meat; hence, humorously or in contempt, the neck.
• A rawboned person.
• A ragged, stunted tree or branch.
Scragged
a.
• Rough with irregular points, or a broken surface; scraggy; as, a scragged backbone.
• Lean and rough; scraggy.
Scraggedness
n.
• Quality or state of being scragged.
Scraggily
adv.
• in a scraggy manner.
Scragginess
n.
• The quality or state of being scraggy; scraggedness.
Scraggy
a.
• Rough with irregular points; scragged.
• Lean and rough; scragged.
Scragly
a.
• See Scraggy.
Scramble
v. i.
• To clamber with hands and knees; to scrabble; as, to scramble up a cliff; to scramble over the rocks.
• To struggle eagerly with others for something thrown upon the ground; to go down upon all fours to seize something; to catch rudely at what is desired.
v. t.
• To collect by scrambling; as, to scramble up wealth.
• To prepare (eggs) as a dish for the table, by stirring the yolks and whites together while cooking.
n.
• The act of scrambling, climbing on all fours, or clambering.
• The act of jostling and pushing for something desired; eager and unceremonious struggle for what is thrown or held out; as, a scramble for office.
Scrambler
n.
• One who scrambles; one who climbs on all fours.
• A greedy and unceremonious contestant.
Scrambling
a.
• Confused and irregular; awkward; scambling.
Scranch
v. t.
• To grind with the teeth, and with a crackling sound; to craunch.
Scranky
a.
• Thin; lean.
Scrannel
a.
• Slight; thin; lean; poor. Having
Scranny
a.
• Thin; lean; meager; scrawny; scrannel.
Scrap
n.
• Something scraped off; hence, a small piece; a bit; a fragment; a detached, incomplete portion.
• Specifically, a fragment of something written or printed; a brief excerpt; an unconnected extract.
• The crisp substance that remains after trying out animal fat; as, pork scraps.
• Same as Scrap iron, below.
Scrapbook
n.
• A blank book in which extracts cut from books and papers may be pasted and kept.
Scrape
v. t.
• To rub over the surface of (something) with a sharp or rough instrument; to rub over with something that roughens by removing portions of the surface; to grate harshly over; to abrade; to make even, or bring to a required condition or form, by moving the sharp edge of an instrument breadthwise over the surface with pressure, cutting away excesses and superfluous parts; to make smooth or clean; as, to scrape a bone with a knife; to scrape a metal plate to an even surface.
• To remove by rubbing or scraping (in the sense above).
• To collect by, or as by, a process of scraping; to gather in small portions by laborius effort; hence, to acquire avariciously and save penuriously; — often followed by together or up; as, to scrape money together.
• To express disapprobation of, as a play, or to silence, as a speaker, by drawing the feet back and forth upon the floor; — usually with down.
v. i.
• To rub over the surface of anything with something which roughens or removes it, or which smooths or cleans it; to rub harshly and noisily along.
• To occupy one's self with getting laboriously; as, he scraped and saved until he became rich.
• To play awkwardly and inharmoniously on a violin or like instrument.
• To draw back the right foot along the ground or floor when making a bow.
n.
• The act of scraping; also, the effect of scraping, as a scratch, or a harsh sound; as, a noisy scrape on the floor; a scrape of a pen.
• A drawing back of the right foot when bowing; also, a bow made with that accompaniment.
• A disagreable and embrassing predicament, as it were, a painful rubbing or scraping; a perplexity; a difficulty.
Scrapepenny
n.
• One who gathers and hoards money in trifling sums; a miser.
Scraper
n.
• An instrument with which anything is scraped.
• An instrument by which the soles of shoes are cleaned from mud and the like, by drawing them across it
• An instrument drawn by oxen or horses, used for scraping up earth in making or repairing roads, digging cellars, canals etc.
(Naut.) An instrument having two or three sharp sides or edges, for cleaning the planks, masts, or decks of a ship
(Lithography) In the printing press, a board, or blade, the edge of which is made to rub over the tympan sheet and thus produce the impression.
• One who scrapes.
• One who plays awkwardly on a violin
• One who acquires avariciously and saves penuriously.
Scraping
n.
• The act of scraping; the act or process of making even, or reducing to the proper form, by means of a scraper.
• Something scraped off; that which is separated from a substance, or is collected by scraping; as, the scraping of the street.
a.
• Resembling the act of, or the effect produced by, one who, or that which, scrapes; as, a scraping noise; a scraping miser.
Scrappily
adv.
• In a scrappy manner; in scraps.
Scrappy
a.
• Consisting of scraps; fragmentary; lacking unity or consistency; as, a scrappy lecture.
Scrat
v. t.
• To scratch.
v. i.
• To rake; to search.
n.
• An hermaphrodite.
Scratch
v. t.
• To rub and tear or mark the surface of with something sharp or ragged; to scrape, roughen, or wound slightly by drawing something pointed or rough across, as the claws, the nails, a pin, or the like.
• To write or draw hastily or awkwardly. Scratch out a pamphlet." Swift. 3. To cancel by drawing one or more lines through, as the name of a candidate upon a ballot, or of a horse in a list; hence, to erase; to efface; — often with out.
• To dig or excavate with the claws; as, some animals scratch holes, in which they burrow.
v. i.
• To use the claws or nails in tearing or in digging; to make scratches.
(Billiards) To score, not by skillful play but by some fortunate chance of the game.
n.
• A break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with anything pointed or rough; a slight wound, mark, furrow, or incision.
(Pugilistic Matches) A line across the prize ring; up to which boxers are brought when they join fight; hence, test, trial, or proof of courage; as, to bring to the scratch; to come up to the scratch.
(Far.) Minute, but tender and troublesome, excoriations, covered with scabs, upon the heels of horses which have been used where it is very wet or muddy.
• A kind of wig covering only a portion of the head.
(Billiards) A shot which scores by chance and not as intended by the player; a fluke.
a.
• Made, done, or happening by chance; arranged with little or no preparation; determined by circumstances; haphazard; as, a scratch team; a scratch crew for a boat race; a scratch shot in billiards.
Scratchback
n.
• A toy which imitates the sound of tearing cloth, — used by drawing it across the back of unsuspecting persons.
Scratchbrush
n.
• A stiff wire brush for cleaning iron castings and other metal.
Scratcher
n.
• One who, or that which, scratches; specifically (Zool.), any rasorial bird.
Scratching
adv.
• With the action of scratching.
Scratchweed
n.
(Bot.) Cleavers.
Scratchwork
n.
• See Scratch coat.
Scratchy
a.
• Characterized by scratches.
Scraw
n.
• A turf.
Scrawl
v. i.
• See Crawl.
v. t.
• To draw or mark awkwardly and irregularly; to write hastily and carelessly; to scratch; to scribble; as, to scrawl a letter.
v. i.
• To write unskillfully and inelegantly.
n.
• Unskillful or inelegant writing; that which is unskillfully or inelegantly written.
Scrawler
n.
• One who scrawls; a hasty, awkward writer.
Scrawny
a.
• Meager; thin; rawboned; bony; scranny.
Scray
n.
(Zool.) A tern; the sea swallow.
Screable
a.
• Capable of being spit out.
Screak
v. i.
• To utter suddenly a sharp, shrill sound; to screech; to creak, as a door or wheel.
n.
• A creaking; a screech; a shriek.
Scream
v. i.
• To cry out with a shrill voice; to utter a sudden, sharp outcry, or shrill, loud cry, as in fright or extreme pain; to shriek; to screech.
n.
• A sharp, shrill cry, uttered suddenly, as in terror or in pain; a shriek; a screech.
Screamer
n.
(Zool.) Any one of three species of South American birds constituting the family Anhimidae, and the suborder Palamedeae. They have two spines on each wing, and the head is either crested or horned. They are easily tamed, and then serve as guardians for other poultry. The crested screamers, or chajas, belong to the genus Chauna. The horned screamer, or kamichi, is Palamedea cornuta.
Screaming
a.
• Uttering screams; shrieking.
• Having the nature of a scream; like a scream; shrill; sharp.
Scree
n.
• A pebble; a stone; also, a heap of stones or rocky debris.
Screech
v. i.
• To utter a harsh, shrill cry; to make a sharp outcry, as in terror or acute pain; to scream; to shriek.
n.
• A harsh, shrill cry, as of one in acute pain or in fright; a shriek; a scream.
Screechers
n. pl.
(Zool.) The picarian birds, as distinguished from the singing birds.
Screechy
a.
• Like a screech; shrill and harsh.
Screed
n.
(Arch.) A strip of plaster of the thickness proposed for the coat, applied to the wall at intervals of four or five feet, as a guide.
• A wooden straightedge used to lay across the plaster screed, as a limit for the thickness of the coat.
• A fragment; a portion; a shred.
n.
• A breach or rent; a breaking forth into a loud, shrill sound; as, martial screeds.
• An harangue; a long tirade on any subject.
Screen
n.
• Anything that separates or cuts off inconvience, injury, or danger; that which shelters or conceals from view; a shield or protection; as, a fire screen.
(Arch.) A dwarf wall or partition carried up to a certain height for separation and protection, as in a church, to separate the aisle from the choir, or the like.
• A surface, as that afforded by a curtain, sheet, wall, etc., upon which an image, as a picture, is thrown by a magic lantern, solar microscope, etc.
• A long, coarse riddle or sieve, sometimes a revolving perforated cylinder, used to separate the coarser from the finer parts, as of coal, sand, gravel, and the like.
v. t.
• To provide with a shelter or means of concealment; to separate or cut off from inconvience, injury, or danger; to shelter; to protect; to protect by hiding; to conceal; as, fruits screened from cold winds by a forest or hill.
• To pass, as coal, gravel, ashes, etc., through a screen in order to separate the coarse from the fine, or the worthless from the valuable; to sift.
Screenings
n. pl.
• The refuse left after screening sand, coal, ashes, etc.
Screw
n.
• A cylinder, or a cylindrical perforation, having a continuous rib, called the thread, winding round it spirally at a constant inclination, so as to leave a continuous spiral groove, between one turn and the next, — used chiefly for producing, when revolved, motion or pressure in the direction of its axis, by the sliding of the threads of the cylinder in the grooves between the threads of the perforation adapted to it, the former being distinguished as the external, or male screw, or, more usually the screw; the latter as the internal, or female screw, or, more usually, the nut.
• Specifically, a kind of nail with a spiral thread and a head with a nick to receive the end of the screw-driver. Screws are much used to hold together pieces of wood or to fasten something; — called also wood screws, and screw nails. See also Screw bolt, below.
• Anything shaped or acting like a screw; esp., a form of wheel for propelling steam vessels. It is placed at the stern, and furnished with blades having helicoidal surfaces to act against the water in the manner of a screw. See Screw propeller, below.
• A steam vesel propelled by a screw instead of wheels; a screw steamer; a propeller.
• An extortioner; a sharp bargainer; a skinflint; a niggard.
• An instructor who examines with great or unnecessary severity; also, a searching or strict examination of a student by an instructor.
• A small packet of tobacco.
• An unsound or worn-out horse, useful as a hack, and commonly of good appearance.
(Math.) A straight line in space with which a definite linear magnitude termed the pitch is associated (cf. 5th Pitch, 10 (b)). It is used to express the displacement of a rigid body, which may always be made to consist of a rotation about an axis combined with a translation parallel to that axis.
(Zool.) An amphipod crustacean; as, the skeleton screw (Caprella). See Sand screw, under Sand.
v. t.
• To turn, as a screw; to apply a screw to; to press, fasten, or make firm, by means of a screw or screws; as, to screw a lock on a door; to screw a press.
• To force; to squeeze; to press, as by screws.
• Hence: To practice extortion upon; to oppress by unreasonable or extortionate exactions.
• To twist; to distort; as, to screw his visage.
• To examine rigidly, as a student; to subject to a severe examination.
v. i.
• To use violent mans in making exactions; to be oppressive or exacting.
• To turn one's self uneasily with a twisting motion; as, he screws about in his chair.
Screwer
n.
• One who, or that which, screws.
Screwing
• a. & n. from Screw, v. t.
Scribable
a.
• Capable of being written, or of being written upon.
Scribatious
a.
• Skillful in, or fond of, writing.
Scribbet
n.
• A painter's pencil.
Scribble
v. t.
(Woolen Manuf.) To card coarsely; to run through the scribling machine.
v. t.
• To write hastily or carelessly, without regard to correctness or elegance; as, to scribble a letter.
• To fill or cover with careless or worthless writing.
v. i.
• To write without care, elegance, or value; to scrawl.
n.
• Hasty or careless writing; a writing of little value; a scrawl; as, a hasty scribble.
Scribblement
n.
• A scribble.
Scribbler
n.
• One who scribles; a literary hack.
n.
• A scribbling machine.
Scribbling
n.
• The act or process of carding coarsely.
a.
• Writing hastily or poorly.
n.
• The act of writing hastily or idly.
Scribblingly
adv.
• In a scribbling manner.
Scribe
n.
• One who writes; a draughtsman; a writer for another; especially, an offical or public writer; an amanuensis or secretary; a notary; a copyist.
(Jewish Hist.) A writer and doctor of the law; one skilled in the law and traditions; one who read and explained the law to the people.
v. t.
• To write, engrave, or mark upon; to inscribe.
(Carp.) To cut (anything) in such a way as to fit closely to a somewhat irregular surface, as a baseboard to a floor which is out of level, a board to the curves of a molding, or the like; — so called because the workman marks, or scribe, with the compasses the line that he afterwards cuts.
• To score or mark with compasses or a scribing iron.
v. i.
• To make a mark.
Scriber
n.
• A sharp-pointed tool, used by joiners for drawing lines on stuff; a marking awl.
Scribism
n.
• The character and opinions of a Jewish scribe in the time of Christ.
Scrid
n.
• A screed; a shred; a fragment.
Scriggle
v. i.
• To wriggle.
Scrim
n.
• A kind of light cotton or linen fabric, often woven in openwork patterns, — used for curtains, etc,; — called also India scrim.
• Thin canvas glued on the inside of panels to prevent shrinking, checking, etc.
Scrimer
n.
• A fencing master.
Scrimmage
n.
• Formerly, a skirmish; now, a general row or confused fight or struggle.
(Football) The struggle in the rush lines after the ball is put in play.
Scrimp
v. t.
• To make too small or short; to limit or straiten; to put on short allowance; to scant; to contract; to shorten; as, to scrimp the pattern of a coat.
a.
• Short; scanty; curtailed.
n.
• A pinching miser; a niggard.
Scrimping
• a. & n. from Scrimp, v. t.
Scrimpingly
adv.
• In a scrimping manner.
Scrimpness
n.
• The state of being scrimp.
Scrimption
n.
• A small portion; a pittance; a little bit.
Scrimshaw
v. t.
• To ornament, as shells, ivory, etc., by engraving, and (usually) rubbing pigments into the incised lines.
n.
• A shell, a whale's tooth, or the like, that is scrimshawed.
Scrine
n.
• A chest, bookcase, or other place, where writings or curiosities are deposited; a shrine.
v. i.
• To cringe.
Scrip
n.
• A small bag; a wallet; a satchel.
n.
• A small writing, certificate, or schedule; a piece of paper containing a writing.
• A preliminary certificate of a subscription to the capital of a bank, railroad, or other company, or for a share of other joint property, or a loan, stating the amount of the subscription and the date of the payment of the installments; as, insurance scrip, consol scrip, etc. When all the installments are paid, the scrip is exchanged for a bond share certificate.
• Paper fractional currency.
Scrippage
n.
• The contents of a scrip, or wallet.
Script
n.
• A writing; a written document.
(Print.) Type made in imitation of handwriting.
(Law) An original instrument or document.
• Written characters; style of writing.
Scriptorium
n.
• In an abbey or monastery, the room set apart for writing or copying manuscripts; in general, a room devoted to writing.
Scriptory
a.
• Of or pertaining to writing; expressed in writing; used in writing; as, scriptory wills; a scriptory reed.
Scriptural
a.
• Contained in the Scriptures; according to the Scriptures, or sacred oracles; biblical; as, a scriptural doctrine.
Scripturalism
n.
• The quality or state of being scriptural; literal adherence to the Scriptures.
Scripturalist
n.
• One who adheres literally to the Scriptures.
Scripturally
adv.
• In a scriptural manner.
Scripturalness
n.
• Quality of being scriptural.
Scripture
n.
• Anything written; a writing; a document; an inscription.
• The books of the Old and the new Testament, or of either of them; the Bible; — used by way of eminence or distinction, and chiefly in the plural.
• A passage from the Bible;; a text.
Scripturian
n.
• A Scripturist.
Scripturist
n.
• One who is strongly attached to, or versed in, the Scriptures, or who endeavors to regulate his life by them.
Scrit
n.
• Writing; document; scroll.
Scritch
n.
• A screech.
Scrivener
n.
• A professional writer; one whose occupation is to draw contracts or prepare writings.
• One whose business is to place money at interest; a broker.
• A writing master.
Scrobicula
n.
(Zool.) One of the smooth areas surrounding the tubercles of a sea urchin.
Scrobicular
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to, or surrounding, scrobiculae; as, scrobicular tubercles.
Scrofula
n.
(Med.) A constitutional disease, generally hereditary, especially manifested by chronic enlargement and cheesy degeneration of the lymphatic glands, particularly those of the neck, and marked by a tendency to the development of chronic intractable inflammations of the skin, mucous membrane, bones, joints, and other parts, and by a diminution in the power of resistance to disease or injury and the capacity for recovery. Scrofula is now generally held to be tuberculous in character, and may develop into general or local tuberculosis (consumption).
Scrofulide
n.
(Med.) Any affection of the skin dependent on scrofula.
Scrofulous
a.
• Pertaining to scrofula, or partaking of its nature; as, scrofulous tumors; a scrofulous habit of body.
• Diseased or affected with scrofula.
Scrog
n.
• A stunted shrub, bush, or branch.
Scroggy
a.
• Abounding in scrog; also, twisted; stunted.
Scroll
n.
• A roll of paper or parchment; a writing formed into a roll; a schedule; a list.
(Arch.) An ornament formed of undulations giving off spirals or sprays, usually suggestive of plant form. Roman architectural ornament is largely of some scroll pattern.
• A mark or flourish added to a person's signature, intended to represent a seal, and in some States allowed as a substitute for a seal.
(Geom.) Same as Skew surface. See under Skew.
Scrolled
a.
• Formed like a scroll; contained in a scroll; adorned with scrolls; as, scrolled work.
Scrophularia
n.
(Bot.) A genus of coarse herbs having small flowers in panicled cymes; figwort.
Scrophulariaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to a very large natural order of gamopetalous plants (Scrophulariaceae, or Scrophularineae), usually having irregular didynamous flowers and a two-celled pod. The order includes the mullein, foxglove, snapdragon, figwort, painted cup, yellow rattle, and some exotic trees, as the Paulownia.
Scrotal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the scrotum; as, scrotal hernia.
Scrotiform
a.
• Purse-shaped; pouch-shaped.
Scrotocele
n.
(Med.) A rupture or hernia in the scrotum; scrotal hernia.
Scrotum
n.
(Anat.) The bag or pouch which contains the testicles; the cod.
Scrouge
v. t.
• To crowd; to squeeze.
Scrow
n.
• A scroll.
• A clipping from skins; a currier's cuttings.
Scroyle
n.
• A mean fellow; a wretch.
Scrub
v. t.
• To rub hard; to wash with rubbing; usually, to rub with a wet brush, or with something coarse or rough, for the purpose of cleaning or brightening; as, to scrub a floor, a doorplate.
v. i.
• To rub anything hard, especially with a wet brush; to scour; hence, to be diligent and penurious; as, to scrub hard for a living.
n.
• One who labors hard and lives meanly; a mean fellow.
• Something small and mean.
• A worn-out brush.
• A thicket or jungle, often specified by the name of the prevailing plant; as, oak scrub, palmetto scrub, etc.
(Stock Breeding) One of the commen live stock of a region of no particular breed or not of pure breed, esp. when inferior in size, etc.
a.
• Mean; dirty; contemptible; scrubby.
Scrubbed
a.
• Dwarfed or stunted; scrubby.
Scrubber
n.
• One who, or that which, scrubs; esp., a brush used in scrubbing.
(Gas Manuf.) A gas washer. See under Gas.
Scrubboard
n.
• A baseboard; a mopboard.
Scrubby
a.
• Of the nature of scrub; small and mean; stunted in growth; as, a scrubby cur.
Scrubstone
n.
• A species of calciferous sandstone.
Scruff
n.
• Scurf.
n.
• The nape of the neck; the loose outside skin, as of the back of the neck.
Scrummage
n.
• See Scrimmage.
Scrumptious
a.
• Nice; particular; fastidious; excellent; fine.
Scrunch
v. t. & v. i.
• To scranch; to crunch.
Scruple
n.
• A weight of twenty grains; the third part of a dram.
• Hence, a very small quantity; a particle.
• Hesitation as to action from the difficulty of determining what is right or expedient; unwillingness, doubt, or hesitation proceeding from motives of conscience.
v. i.
• To be reluctant or to hesitate, as regards an action, on account of considerations of conscience or expedience.
v. t.
• To regard with suspicion; to hesitate at; to question.
• To excite scruples in; to cause to scruple.
Scrupler
n.
• One who scruples.
Scrupulist
n.
• A scrupler.
Scrupulosity
n.
• The quality or state of being scruppulous; doubt; doubtfulness respecting decision or action; caution or tenderness from the far of doing wrong or ofending; nice regard to exactness and propierty; precision.
Scrupulous
a.
• Full ofscrupules; inclined to scruple; nicely doubtful; hesitating to determine or to act, from a fear of offending or of doing wrong.
• Careful; cautious; exact; nice; as, scrupulous abstinence from labor; scrupulous performance of duties.
• Given to making objections; captious.
• Liable to be doubted; doubtful; nice.
Scrutable
a.
• Discoverable by scrutiny, inquiry, or critical examination.
Scrutation
n.
• Search; scrutiny.
Scrutator
n.
• One who scrutinizes; a close examiner or inquirer.
Scrutineer
n.
• A scrutinizer; specifically, an examiner of votes, as at an election.
Scrutinize
v. t.
• To examine closely; to inspect or observe with critical attention; to regard narrowly; as, to scrutinize the measures of administration; to scrutinize the conduct or motives of individuals.
v. i.
• To make scrutiny.
Scrutinizer
n.
• One who scrutinizes.
Scrutinous
a.
• Closely examining, or inquiring; careful; sctrict.
Scrutiny
n.
• Close examination; minute inspection; critical observation.
(Anc. Church) An examination of catechumens, in the last week of Lent, who were to receive baptism on Easter Day.
(Canon Law) A ticket, or little paper billet, on which a vote is written.
(Parliamentary Practice) An examination by a committee of the votes given at an election, for the purpose of correcting the poll.
v. t.
• To scrutinize.
Scrutoire
n.
• A escritoire; a writing desk.
Scruze
v. t.
• To squeeze, compress, crush, or bruise.
Scry
v. t.
• To descry.
n.
• A flock of wild fowl.
n.
• A cry or shout.
Scud
v. i.
• To move swiftly; especially, to move as if driven forward by something.
(Naut.) To be driven swiftly, or to run, before a gale, with little or no sail spread.
v. t.
• To pass over quickly.
n.
• The act of scudding; a driving along; a rushing with precipitation.
• Loose, vapory clouds driven swiftly by the wind.
• A slight, sudden shower.
(Zool.) A small flight of larks, or other birds, less than a flock.
(Zool.) Any swimming amphipod crustacean.
Scuddle
v. i.
• To run hastily; to hurry; to scuttle.
Scudo
n.
(Com.) A silver coin, and money of account, used in Italy and Sicily, varying in value, in different parts, but worth about 4 shillings sterling, or about 96 cents; also, a gold coin worth about the same.
• A gold coin of Rome, worth 64 shillings 11 pence sterling, or about $ 15.70.
Scuff
n.
• The back part of the neck; the scruff.
v. i.
• To walk without lifting the feet; to proceed with a scraping or dragging movement; to shuffle.
Scuffle
v. i.
• To strive or struggle with a close grapple; to wrestle in a rough fashion.
• Hence, to strive or contend tumultuously; to struggle confusedly or at haphazard.
n.
• A rough, haphazard struggle, or trial of strength; a disorderly wrestling at close quarters.
• Hence, a confused contest; a tumultuous struggle for superiority; a fight.
• A child's pinafore or bib.
• A garden hoe.
Scuffler
n.
• One who scuffles.
• An agricultural implement resembling a scarifier, but usually lighter.
Scug
v. i.
• To hide.
n.
• A place of shelter; the declivity of a hill.
Scull
n.
(Anat.) The skull.
n.
• A shoal of fish.
n.
(Naut.) A boat; a cockboat. See Sculler.
• One of a pair of short oars worked by one person.
• A single oar used at the stern in propelling a boat.
(Zool.) The common skua gull.
v. t.
(Naut.) To impel (a boat) with a pair of sculls, or with a single scull or oar worked over the stern obliquely from side to side.
v. i.
• To impel a boat with a scull or sculls.
Sculler
n.
• A boat rowed by one man with two sculls, or short oars.
• One who sculls.
Scullery
n.
• A place where dishes, kettles, and culinary utensils, are cleaned and kept; also, a room attached to the kitchen, where the coarse work is done; a back kitchen.
• Hence, refuse; fifth; offal.
Scullion
n.
(Bot.) A scalion.
n.
• A servant who cleans pots and kettles, and does other menial services in the kitchen.
Scullionly
a.
• Like a scullion; base.
Sculp
v. t.
• To sculpture; to carve; to engrave.
Sculpin
n.
(Zool.) Any one of numerous species of marine cottoid fishes of the genus Cottus, or Acanthocottus, having a large head armed with sharp spines, and a broad mouth. They are generally mottled with yellow, brown, and black. Several species are found on the Atlantic coasts of Europe and America.
• A large cottoid market fish of California (Scorpaenichthys marmoratus); — called also bighead, cabezon, scorpion, salpa.
• The dragonet, or yellow sculpin, of Europe (Callionymus lura).
Sculptile
a.
• Formed by carving; graven; as, sculptile images.
Sculptor
n.
• One who sculptures; one whose occupation is to carve statues, or works of sculpture.
• Hence, an artist who designs works of sculpture, his first studies and his finished model being usually in a plastic material, from which model the marble is cut, or the bronze is cast.
Sculptress
n.
• A female sculptor.
Sculptural
a.
• Of or pertaining to sculpture.
Sculpture
n.
• The art of carving, cutting, or hewing wood, stone, metal, etc., into statues, ornaments, etc., or into figures, as of men, or other things; hence, the art of producing figures and groups, whether in plastic or hard materials.
• Carved work modeled of, or cut upon, wood, stone, metal, etc.
v. t.
• To form with the chisel on, in, or from, wood, stone, or metal; to carve; to engrave.
Sculpturesque
a.
• After the manner of sculpture; resembling, or relating to, sculpture.
Scum
n.
• The extraneous matter or impurities which rise to the surface of liquids in boiling or fermentation, or which form on the surface by other means; also, the scoria of metals in a molten state; dross.
• refuse; recrement; anything vile or worthless.
v. t.
• To take the scum from; to clear off the impure matter from the surface of; to skim.
• To sweep or range over the surface of.
v. i.
• To form a scum; to become covered with scum. Also used figuratively.
Scumber
v. i.
• To void excrement.
n.
• Dung.
Scumble
v. t.
(Fine Arts) To cover lighty, as a painting, or a drawing, with a thin wash of opaque color, or with color-crayon dust rubbed on with the stump, or to make any similar additions to the work, so as to produce a softened effect.
Scumbling
n.
(Fine Arts) A mode of obtaining a softened effect, in painting and drawing, by the application of a thin layer of opaque color to the surface of a painting, or part of the surface, which is too bright in color, or which requires harmonizing.
• In crayon drawing, the use of the stump.
• The color so laid on. Also used figuratively.
Scummer
v. i.
• To scumber.
n.
• Excrement; scumber.
n.
• An instrument for taking off scum; a skimmer.
Scumming
n.
• The act of taking off scum.
• That which is scummed off; skimmings; scum; — used chiefly in the plural.
Scummy
a.
• Covered with scum; of the nature of scum.
Scunner
v. t.
• To cause to loathe, or feel disgust at.
v. i.
• To have a feeling of loathing or disgust; hence, to have dislike, prejudice, or reluctance.
n.
• A feeling of disgust or loathing; a strong prejudice; abhorrence; as, to take a scunner against some one.
Scup
n.
• A swing.
n.
(Zool.) A marine sparoid food fish (Stenotomus chrysops, or S. argyrops), common on the Atlantic coast of the United States. It appears bright silvery when swimming in the daytime, but shows broad blackish transverse bands at night and when dead. Called also porgee, paugy, porgy, scuppaug.
Scuppaug
n.
(Zool.) See 2d Scup.
Scupper
n.
(Naut.) An opening cut through the waterway and bulwarks of a ship, so that water falling on deck may flow overboard; — called also scupper hole.
Scuppernong
n.
(Bot.) An American grape, a form of Vitis vulpina, found in the Southern Atlantic States, and often cultivated.
Scur
v. i.
• To move hastily; to scour.
Scurf
n.
• Thin dry scales or scabs upon the body; especially, thin scales exfoliated from the cuticle, particularly of the scalp; dandruff.
• Hence, the foul remains of anything adherent.
• Anything like flakes or scales adhering to a surface.
(Bot.) Minute membranous scales on the surface of some leaves, as in the goosefoot.
Scurff
n.
• The bull trout.
Scurfiness
n.
• Quality or state of being scurfy.
(Bot.) Scurf.
Scurfy
a.
• Having or producing scurf; covered with scurf; resembling scurf.
Scurrier
n.
• One who scurries.
Scurrile
a.
• Such as befits a buffoon or vulgar jester; grossly opprobrious or loudly jocose in language; scurrilous; as, scurrile taunts.
Scurrility
n.
• The quality or state of being scurrile or scurrilous; mean, vile, or obscene jocularity.
• That which is scurrile or scurrilous; gross or obscene language; low buffoonery; vulgar abuse.
Scurrilous
a.
• Using the low and indecent language of the meaner sort of people, or such as only the license of buffoons can warrant; as, a scurrilous fellow.
• Containing low indecency or abuse; mean; foul; vile; obscenely jocular; as, scurrilous language.
Scurrit
n.
(Zool.) the lesser tern (Sterna minuta).
Scurry
v. i.
• To hasten away or along; to move rapidly; to hurry; as, the rabbit scurried away.
n.
• Act of scurring; hurried movement.
Scurvily
adv.
• In a scurvy manner.
Scurviness
n.
• The quality or state of being scurvy; vileness; meanness.
Scurvy
a.
• Covered or affected with scurf or scabs; scabby; scurfy; specifically, diseased with the scurvy.
• Vile; mean; low; vulgar; contemptible.
n.
(Med.) A disease characterized by livid spots, especially about the thighs and legs, due to extravasation of blood, and by spongy gums, and bleeding from almost all the mucous membranes. It is accompanied by paleness, languor, depression, and general debility. It is occasioned by confinement, innutritious food, and hard labor, but especially by lack of fresh vegetable food, or confinement for a long time to a limited range of food, which is incapable of repairing the waste of the system. It was formerly prevalent among sailors and soldiers.
Scut
n.
• The tail of a hare, or of a deer, or other animal whose tail is short, sp. when carried erect; hence, sometimes, the animal itself.
Scuta
n. pl.
• See Scutum.
Scutage
n.
(Eng. Hist.) Shield money; commutation of service for a sum of money. See Escuage.
Scutal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a shield.
Scutate
a.
• Buckler-shaped; round or nearly round.
(Zool.) Protected or covered by bony or horny plates, or large scales.
Scutch
v. t.
• To beat or whip; to drub.
• To separate the woody fiber from (flax, hemp, etc.) by beating; to swingle.
• To loosen and dress the fiber of (cotton or silk) by beating; to free (fibrous substances) from dust by beating and blowing.
n.
• A wooden instrument used in scutching flax and hemp.
• The woody fiber of flax; the refuse of scutched flax.
Scutcheon
n.
• An escutcheon; an emblazoned shield.
• A small plate of metal, as the shield around a keyhole. See Escutcheon, 4.
Scutcheoned
a.
• Emblazoned on or as a shield.
Scutcher
n.
• One who scutches.
• An implement or machine for scutching hemp, flax, or cotton; etc.; a scutch; a scutching machine.
Scute
n.
• A small shield.
• An old French gold coin of the value of 3s. 4d. sterling, or about 80 cents.
(Zool.) A bony scale of a reptile or fish; a large horny scale on the leg of a bird, or on the belly of a snake.
Scutella
n. pl.
• See Scutellum.
n.
(Zool.) See Scutellum, n., 2.
Scutellation
n.
(Zool.) the entire covering, or mode of arrangement, of scales, as on the legs and feet of a bird.
Scutelliform
a.
• Scutellate.
(Bot.) Having the form of a scutellum.
Scutelliplantar
a.
(Zool.) Having broad scutella on the front, and small scales on the posterior side, of the tarsus; — said of certain birds.
Scutellum
n.
(Bot.) A rounded apothecium having an elevated rim formed of the proper thallus, the fructification of certain lichens.
(Zool.) The third of the four pieces forming the upper part of a thoracic segment of an insect. It follows the scutum, and is followed by the small postscutellum; a scutella. See Thorax.
• One of the transverse scales on the tarsi and toes of birds; a scutella.
Scutibranch
a.
(Zool.) Scutibranchiate.
n.
• One of the Scutibranchiata.
Scutibranchia
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Scutibranchiata.
Scutibranchian
n.
(Zool.) One of the Scutibranchiata.
Scutibranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of gastropod Mollusca having a heart with two auricles and one ventricle. The shell may be either spiral or shieldlike.
Scutibranchiate
a.
(Zool.) Having the gills protected by a shieldlike shell; of or pertaining to the Scutibranchiata.
n.
• One of the Scutibranchiata.
Scutiferous
a.
• Carrying a shield or buckler.
Scutiform
a.
• Shield-shaped; scutate.
Scutiger
n.
(Zool.) Any species of chilopod myriapods of the genus Scutigera. They sometimes enter buildings and prey upon insects.
Scutiped
a.
(Zool.) Having the anterior surface of the tarsus covered with scutella, or transverse scales, in the form of incomplete bands terminating at a groove on each side; — said of certain birds.
Scuttle
n.
• A broad, shallow basket.
• A wide-mouthed vessel for holding coal: a coal hod.
v. i.
• To run with affected precipitation; to hurry; to bustle; to scuddle.
n.
• A quick pace; a short run.
n.
• A small opening in an outside wall or covering, furnished with a lid.
(Naut.) A small opening or hatchway in the deck of a ship, large enough to admit a man, and with a lid for covering it, also, a like hole in the side or bottom of a ship
• An opening in the roof of a house, with a lid.
• The lid or door which covers or closes an opening in a roof, wall, or the like.
v. t.
• To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as of a ship), for any purpose.
• To sink by making holes through the bottom of; as, to scuttle a ship.
Scutum
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) An oblong shield made of boards or wickerwork covered with leather, with sometimes an iron rim; — carried chiefly by the heavy-armed infantry.
(O. Eng. Law) A penthouse or awning.
(Zool.) The second and largest of the four parts forming the upper surface of a thoracic segment of an insect. It is preceded by the prescutum and followed by the scutellum. See the Illust. under Thorax.
• One of the two lower valves of the operculum of a barnacle.
Scybala
n. pl.
(Med.) Hardened masses of feces.
Scye
n.
• Arm scye, a cutter's term for the armhole or part of the armhole of the waist of a garnment.
Scyle
v. t.
• To hide; to secrete; to conceal.
Scylla
n.
• A dangerous rock on the Italian coast opposite the whirpool Charybdis on the coast of Sicily, — both personified in classical literature as ravenous monsters. The passage between them was formerly considered perilous; hence, the saying "Between Scylla and Charybdis," signifying a great peril on either hand.
Scyllaea
n.
(Zool.) A genus of oceanic nudibranchiate mollusks having the small branched gills situated on the upper side of four fleshy lateral lobes, and on the median caudal crest.
Scyllarian
n.
(Zool.) One of a family (Scyllaridae) of macruran Crustacea, remarkable for the depressed form of the body, and the broad, flat antennae. Also used adjectively.
Scyllite
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance of a sweetish taste, resembling inosite and metameric with dextrose. It is extracted from the kidney of the dogfish (of the genus Scylium), the shark, and the skate.
Scymetar
n.
• See Scimiter.
Scypha
n.
(Bot.) See Scyphus, 2 (b).
Scyphiform
a.
(Bot.) Cup-shaped.
Scyphistoma
n.
(Zool.) The young attached larva of Discophora in the stage when it resembles a hydroid, or actinian.
Scyphobranchii
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of fishes including the blennioid and gobioid fishes, and other related families.
Scyphomeduse
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Acraspeda, or Discophora.
Scyphophori
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of fresh-water fishes inhabiting tropical Africa. They have rudimentary electrical organs on each side of the tail.
Scyphus
n.
(Antiq.) A kind of large drinking cup, — used by Greeks and Romans, esp. by poor folk.
(Bot.) The cup of a narcissus, or a similar appendage to the corolla in other flowers.
• A cup-shaped stem or podetium in lichens. Also called scypha. See Illust. of Cladonia pyxidata, under Lichen.
Scythe
n.
• An instrument for mowing grass, grain, or the like, by hand, composed of a long, curving blade, with a sharp edge, made fast to a long handle, called a snath, which is bent into a form convenient for use.
(Antiq.) A scythe-shaped blade attached to ancient war chariots.
v. t.
• To cut with a scythe; to cut off as with a scythe; to mow.
Scythed
a.
• Armed scythes, as a chariot.
Scytheman
n.
• One who uses a scythe; a mower.
Scythestone
n.
• A stone for sharpening scythes; a whetstone.
Scythewhet
n.
(Zool.) Wilson's thrush; — so called from its note.
Scythian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Scythia (a name given to the northern part of Asia, and Europe adjoining to Asia), or its language or inhabitants.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Scythia; specifically (Ethnol.), one of a Slavonic race which in early times occupied Eastern Europe.
• The language of the Scythians.
Scytodermata
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Holothurioidea.
Sdan
v. & n.
• Disdain.
Sdeign
v. t.
• To disdain.
Sea
n.
• One of the larger bodies of salt water, less than an ocean, found on the earth's surface; a body of salt water of second rank, generally forming part of, or connecting with, an ocean or a larger sea; as, the Mediterranean Sea; the Sea of Marmora; the North Sea; the Carribean Sea.
• An inland body of water, esp. if large or if salt or brackish; as, the Caspian Sea; the Sea of Aral; sometimes, a small fresh-water lake; as, the Sea of Galilee.
• The ocean; the whole body of the salt water which covers a large part of the globe.
• The swell of the ocean or other body of water in a high wind; motion of the water's surface; also, a single wave; a billow; as, there was a high sea after the storm; the vessel shipped a sea.
(Jewish Antiq.) A great brazen laver in the temple at Jerusalem; — so called from its size.
• Fig.: Anything resembling the sea in vastness; as, a sea of glory.
Seabeach
n.
• A beach lying along the sea.
Seabeard
n.
(Bot.) A green seaweed (Cladophora rupestris) growing in dense tufts.
Seaboard
n.
• The seashore; seacoast.
a.
• Bordering upon, or being near, the sea; seaside; seacoast; as, a seaboard town.
adv.
• Toward the sea.
Seaboat
• A boat or vessel adapted to the open sea; hence, a vessel considered with reference to her power of resisting a storm, or maintaining herself in a heavy sea; as, a good sea boat.
(Zool.) A chitin.
Seabord
n. & a.
• See Seaboard.
Seabound
a.
• Bounded by the sea.
Seacoast
n.
• The shore or border of the land adjacent to the sea or ocean. Also used adjectively.
Seafarer
n.
• One who follows the sea as a business; a mariner; a sailor.
Seafaring
a.
• Following the business of a mariner; as, a seafaring man.
Seagirt
a.
• Surrounded by the water of the sea or ocean; as, a seagirt isle.
Seagoing
a.
• Going upon the sea; especially, sailing upon the deep sea; — used in distinction from coasting or river, as applied to vessels.
Seah
n.
• A Jewish dry measure containing one third of an an ephah.
Seak
n.
• Soap prepared for use in milling cloth.
Seal
n.
(Zool.) Any aquatic carnivorous mammal of the families Phocidae and Otariidae.
n.
• An engraved or inscribed stamp, used for marking an impression in wax or other soft substance, to be attached to a document, or otherwise used by way of authentication or security.
• Wax, wafer, or other tenacious substance, set to an instrument, and impressed or stamped with a seal; as, to give a deed under hand and seal.
• That which seals or fastens; esp., the wax or wafer placed on a letter or other closed paper, etc., to fasten it.
• That which confirms, ratifies, or makes stable; that which authenticates; that which secures; assurance. "under the seal of silence."
• An arrangement for preventing the entrance or return of gas or air into a pipe, by which the open end of the pipe dips beneath the surface of water or other liquid, or a deep bend or sag in the pipe is filled with the liquid; a draintrap.
v. t.
• To set or affix a seal to; hence, to authenticate; to confirm; to ratify; to establish; as, to seal a deed.
• To mark with a stamp, as an evidence of standard exactness, legal size, or merchantable quality; as, to seal weights and measures; to seal silverware.
• To fasten with a seal; to attach together with a wafer, wax, or other substance causing adhesion; as, to seal a letter.
• Hence, to shut close; to keep close; to make fast; to keep secure or secret.
• To fix, as a piece of iron in a wall, with cement, plaster, or the like.
• To close by means of a seal; as, to seal a drainpipe with water. See 2d Seal, 5.
• Among the Mormons, to confirm or set apart as a second or additional wife.
v. i.
• To affix one's seal, or a seal.
Sealer
n.
• One who seals; especially, an officer whose duty it is to seal writs or instruments, to stamp weights and measures, or the like.
n.
• A mariner or a vessel engaged in the business of capturing seals.
Seam
n.
• Grease; tallow; lard.
n.
• The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth or leather.
• Hence, a line of junction; a joint; a suture, as on a ship, a floor, or other structure; the line of union, or joint, of two boards, planks, metal plates, etc.
(geol. & Mining) A thin layer or stratum; a narrow vein between two thicker strata; as, a seam of coal.
• A line or depression left by a cut or wound; a scar; a cicatrix.
v. t.
• To form a seam upon or of; to join by sewing together; to unite.
• To mark with something resembling a seam; to line; to scar.
• To make the appearance of a seam in, as in knitting a stocking; hence, to knit with a certain stitch, like that in such knitting.
v. i.
• To become ridgy; to crack open.
n.
• A denomination of weight or measure.
• The quantity of eight bushels of grain.
• The quantity of 120 pounds of glass
Seaman
n.
• A merman; the male of the mermaid.
n.
• One whose occupation is to assist in the management of ships at sea; a mariner; a sailor; — applied both to officers and common mariners, but especially to the latter. Opposed to landman, or landsman.
Seamanlike
a.
• Having or showing the skill of a practical seaman.
Seamanship
n.
• The skill of a good seaman; the art, or skill in the art, of working a ship.
Seamark
n.
• Any elevated object on land which serves as a guide to mariners; a beacon; a landmark visible from the sea, as a hill, a tree, a steeple, or the like.
Seamed
a.
(Falconry) Out of condition; not in good condition; — said of a hawk.
Seaming
n.
• The act or process of forming a seam or joint.
(Fishing) The cord or rope at the margin of a seine, to which the meshes of the net are attached.
Seamless
a.
• Without a seam.
Seamster
n.
• One who sews well, or whose occupation is to sew.
Seamstress
n.
• A woman whose occupation is sewing; a needlewoman.
Seamstressy
n.
• The business of a seamstress.
Seamy
a.
• Having a seam; containing seams, or showing them.
Sean
n.
• A seine. See Seine.
Seance
n.
• A session, as of some public body; especially, a meeting of spiritualists to receive spirit communication, so called.
Seannachie
n.
• A bard among the Highlanders of Scotland, who preserved and repeated the traditions of the tribes; also, a genealogist.
Seapiece
n.
• A picture representing a scene at sea; a marine picture.
Seapyot
(Zool.) See 1st Sea pie.
Seaquail
(Zool.) The turnstone.
Seaquake
n.
• A quaking of the sea.
Sear
v. t.
• To wither; to dry up.
• To burn (the surface of) to dryness and hardness; to cauterize; to expose to a degree of heat such as changes the color or the hardness and texture of the surface; to scorch; to make callous; as, to sear the skin or flesh. Also used figuratively.
n.
• The catch in a gunlock by which the hammer is held cocked or half cocked.
Searce
n.
• A fine sieve.
v. t.
• To sift; to bolt.
Searcer
n.
• One who sifts or bolts.
• A searce, or sieve.
Search
v. t.
• To look over or through, for the purpose of finding something; to examine; to explore; as, to search the city.
• To inquire after; to look for; to seek.
• To examine or explore by feeling with an instrument; to probe; as, to search a wound.
• To examine; to try; to put to the test.
v. i.
• To seek; to look for something; to make inquiry, exploration, or examination; to hunt.
n.
• The act of seeking or looking for something; quest; inquiry; pursuit for finding something; examination.
Searchable
a.
• Capable of being searched.
Searchableness
n.
• Quality of being searchable.
Searcher
n.
• One who, or that which, searhes or examines; a seeker; an inquirer; an examiner; a trier.
• Formerly, an officer in London appointed to examine the bodies of the dead, and report the cause of death.
• An officer of the customs whose business it is to search ships, merchandise, luggage, etc.
• An inspector of leather
(Gun.) An instrument for examining the bore of a cannon, to detect cavities.
• An implement for sampling butter; a butter trier
(Med.) An instrument for feeling after calculi in the bladder, etc.
Searching
a.
• Exploring thoroughly; scrutinizing; penetrating; trying; as, a searching discourse; a searching eye.
Searchless
a.
• Impossible to be searched; inscrutable; impenetrable.
Searcloth
n.
• Cerecloth.
v. t.
• To cover, as a sore, with cerecloth.
Seared
a.
• Scorched; cauterized; hence, figuratively, insensible; not susceptible to moral influences.
Searedness
n.
• The state of being seared or callous; insensibility.
Seascape
n.
• A picture representing a scene at sea.
Seashell
n.
(Zool.) The shell of any marine mollusk.
Seashore
n.
• The coast of the sea; the land that lies adjacent to the sea or ocean.
(Law) All the ground between the ordinary highwater and low-water marks.
Seasick
a.
• Affected with seasickness.
Seasickness
n.
• The peculiar sickness, characterized by nausea and prostration, which is caused by the pitching or rolling of a vessel.
Seaside
n.
• The land bordering on, or adjacent to, the sea; the seashore. Also used adjectively.
Season
n.
• One of the divisions of the year, marked by alternations in the length of day and night, or by distinct conditions of temperature, moisture, etc., caused mainly by the relative position of the earth with respect to the sun. In the north temperate zone, four seasons, namely, spring, summer, autumn, and winter, are generally recognized. Some parts of the world have three seasons, — the dry, the rainy, and the cold; other parts have but two, — the dry and the rainy.
• Hence, a period of time, especially as regards its fitness for anything contemplated or done; a suitable or convenient time; proper conjuncture; as, the season for planting; the season for rest.
• A period of time not very long; a while; a time.
• That which gives relish; seasoning.
v. t.
• To render suitable or appropriate; to prepare; to fit.
• To fit for any use by time or habit; to habituate; to accustom; to inure; to ripen; to mature; as, to season one to a climate.
• Hence, to prepare by drying or hardening, or removal of natural juices; as, to season timber.
• To fit for taste; to render palatable; to give zest or relish to; to spice; as, to season food.
• Hence, to fit for enjoyment; to render agrecable.
• To qualify by admixture; to moderate; to temper.
• To imbue; to tinge or taint.
• To copulate with; to impregnate.
v. i.
• To become mature; to grow fit for use; to become adapted to a climate.
• To become dry and hard, by the escape of the natural juices, or by being penetrated with other substance; as, timber seasons in the sun.
• To give token; to savor.
Seasonable
a.
• Occurring in good time, in due season, or in proper time for the purpose; suitable to the season; opportune; timely; as, a seasonable supply of rain.
Seasonage
n.
• A seasoning.
Seasonal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the seasons.
Seasoner
n.
• One who, or that which, seasons, or gives a relish; a seasoning.
Seasoning
n.
• The act or process by which anything is seasoned.
• That which is added to any species of food, to give it a higher relish, as salt, spices, etc.; a condiment.
• Hence, something added to enhance enjoyment or relieve dullness; as, wit is the seasoning of conversation.
Seasonless
a.
• Without succession of the seasons.
Seat
n.
• The place or thing upon which one sits; hence; anything made to be sat in or upon, as a chair, bench, stool, saddle, or the like.
• The place occupied by anything, or where any person or thing is situated, resides, or abides; a site; an abode, a station; a post; a situation.
• That part of a thing on which a person sits; as, the seat of a chair or saddle; the seat of a pair of pantaloons.
• A sitting; a right to sit; regular or appropriate place of sitting; as, a seat in a church; a seat for the season in the opera house.
• Posture, or way of sitting, on horseback.
(Mach.) A part or surface on which another part or surface rests; as, a valve seat.
v. t.
• To place on a seat; to cause to sit down; as, to seat one's self.
• To cause to occupy a post, site, situation, or the like; to station; to establish; to fix; to settle.
• To assign a seat to, or the seats of; to give a sitting to; as, to seat a church, or persons in a church.
• To fix; to set firm.
• To settle; to plant with inhabitants; as to seat a country.
• To put a seat or bottom in; as, to seat a chair.
v. i.
• To rest; to lie down.
Seating
n.
• The act of providong with a seat or seats; as, the seating of an audience.
• The act of making seats; also, the material for making seats; as, cane seating.
Seatless
a.
• Having no seat.
Seave
n.
• A rush.
Seavy
a.
• Overgrown with rushes.
Seawand
(Bot.) See Sea girdles.
Seaward
a.
• Directed or situated toward the sea.
adv.
• Toward the sea.
Seaware
n.
(Bot.) Seaweed; esp., coarse seaweed. See Ware, and Sea girdles.
Seaweed
n.
• Popularly, any plant or plants growing in the sea.
(Bot.) Any marine plant of the class Algae, as kelp, dulse, Fucus, Ulva, etc.
Seawife
n.
(Zool.) A European wrasse (Labrus vetula).
Seaworthiness
n.
• The state or quality of being seaworthy, or able to resist the ordinary violence of wind and weather.
Seaworthy
a.
• Fit for a voyage; worthy of being trusted to transport a cargo with safety; as, a seaworthy ship.
Sebaceous
a.
(Physiol.) Pertaining to, or secreting, fat; composed of fat; having the appearance of fat; as, the sebaceous secretions of some plants, or the sebaceous humor of animals.
Sebacic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to fat; derived from, or resembling, fat; specifically, designating an acid (formerly called also sebic, and pyroleic, acid), obtained by the distillation or saponification of certain oils (as castor oil) as a white crystalline substance.
Sebat
n.
• The eleventh month of the ancient Hebrew year, approximately corresponding with February.
Sebate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of sebacic acid.
Sebesten
n.
(Bot.) The mucilaginous drupaceous fruit of two East Indian trees (Cordia Myxa, and C. latifolia), sometimes used medicinally in pectoral diseases.
Sebic
a.
• See Sebacic.
Sebiferous
a.
(Bot.) Producing vegetable tallow.
(Physiol.) Producing fat; sebaceous; as, the sebiferous, or sebaceous, glands.
Sebiparous
a.
(Physiol.) Same as Sebiferous.
Seborrhea
n.
(Med.) A morbidly increased discharge of sebaceous matter upon the skin; stearrhea.
Secale
n.
(Bot.) A genus of cereal grasses including rye.
Secancy
n.
• A cutting; an intersection; as, the point of secancy of one line by another.
Secant
a.
• Cutting; divivding into two parts; as, a secant line.
n.
(Geom.) A line that cuts another; especially, a straight line cutting a curve in two or more points.
(Trig.) A right line drawn from the center of a circle through one end of a circular arc, and terminated by a tangent drawn from the other end; the number expressing the ratio line of this line to the radius of the circle. See Trigonometrical function, under Function.
Secco
a.
• Dry.
Secede
v. i.
• To withdraw from fellowship, communion, or association; to separate one's self by a solemn act; to draw off; to retire; especially, to withdraw from a political or religious body.
Seceder
n.
• One who secedes.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of a numerous body of Presbyterians in Scotland who seceded from the communion of the Established Church, about the year 1733, and formed the Secession Church, so called.
Secern
v. t.
• To separate; to distinguish.
(Physiol.) To secrete; as, mucus secerned in the nose.
Secernent
a.
(Physiol.) Secreting; secretory.
n.
• That which promotes secretion.
(Anat.) A vessel in, or by means of, which the process of secretion takes place; a secreting vessel.
Secernment
n.
(Physiol.) The act or process of secreting.
Secess
n.
• Retirement; retreat; secession.
Secession
n.
• The act of seceding; separation from fellowship or association with others, as in a religious or political organization; withdrawal.
(U.S. Hist.) The withdrawal of a State from the national Union.
Secessionism
n.
• The doctrine or policy of secession; the tenets of secession; the tenets of secessionists.
Secessionist
n.
• One who upholds secession.
(U.S. Hist.) One who holds to the belief that a State has the right to separate from the Union at its will.
Seche
v. t. & i.
• To seek.
Sechium
n.
(Bot.) The edible fruit of a West Indian plant (Sechium edule) of the Gourd family. It is soft, pear-shaped, and about four inches long, and contains a single large seed. The root of the plant resembles a yam, and is used for food.
Seck
a.
• Barren; unprofitable. See Rent seck, under Rent.
Seckel
n.
(Bot.) A small reddish brown sweet and juicy pear. It originated on a farm near Philadelphia, afterwards owned by a Mr. Seckel.
Secle
n.
• A century.
Seclude
v. t.
• To shut up apart from others; to withdraw into, or place in, solitude; to separate from society or intercourse with others.
• To shut or keep out; to exclude.
Seclusion
n.
• The act of secluding, or the state of being secluded; separation from society or connection; a withdrawing; privacy; as, to live in seclusion.
Seclusive
a.
• Tending to seclude; keeping in seclusion; secluding; sequestering.
Second
a.
• Immediately following the first; next to the first in order of place or time; hence, occuring again; another; other.
• Next to the first in value, power, excellence, dignity, or rank; secondary; subordinate; inferior.
• Being of the same kind as another that has preceded; another, like a protype; as, a second Cato; a second Troy; a second deluge.
n.
• One who, or that which, follows, or comes after; one next and inferior in place, time, rank, importance, excellence, or power.
• One who follows or attends another for his support and aid; a backer; an assistant; specifically, one who acts as another's aid in a duel.
• Aid; assistance; help.
• An article of merchandise of a grade inferior to the best; esp., a coarse or inferior kind of flour.
• The sixtieth part of a minute of time or of a minute of space, that is, the second regular subdivision of the degree; as, sound moves about 1,140 English feet in a second; five minutes and ten seconds north of this place.
• In the duodecimal system of mensuration, the twelfth part of an inch or prime; a line. See Inch, and Prime, n., 8.
(Mus.) The interval between any tone and the tone which is represented on the degree of the staff next above it.
• The second part in a concerted piece; — often popularly applied to the alto.
v. t.
• To follow in the next place; to succeed; to alternate.
• To follow or attend for the purpose of assisting; to support; to back; to act as the second of; to assist; to forward; to encourage.
• Specifically, to support, as a motion or proposal, by adding one's voice to that of the mover or proposer.
Secondarily
adv.
• In a secondary manner or degree.
• Secondly; in the second place.
Secondariness
n.
• The state of being secondary.
Secondary
a.
• Suceeding next in order to the first; of second place, origin, rank, rank, etc.; not primary; subordinate; not of the first order or rate.
• Acting by deputation or delegated authority; as, the work of secondary hands.
(Chem.) Possessing some quality, or having been subject to some operation (as substitution), in the second degree; as, a secondary salt, a secondary amine, etc. Cf. primary.
(Min.) Subsequent in origin; — said of minerals produced by alteertion or deposition subsequent to the formation of the original rocks mass; also of characters of minerals (as secondary cleavage, etc.) developed by pressure or other causes.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the second joint of the wing of a bird.
(Med.) Dependent or consequent upon another disease; as, Bright's disease is often secondary to scarlet fever. (b) Occuring in the second stage of a disease; as, the secondary symptoms of syphilis.
n.
• One who occupies a subordinate, inferior, or auxiliary place; a delegate deputy; one who is second or next to the chief officer; as, the secondary, or undersheriff of the city of London.
(Astron.) A secondary circle.
• A satellite.
(Zool.) A secondary quill.
Seconder
n.
• One who seconds or supports what another attempts, affirms, moves, or proposes; as, the seconder of an enterprise or of a motion.
Secondhand
a.
• Not original or primary; received from another.
• Not new; already or previously or used by another; as, a secondhand book, garment.
Secondly
adv.
• In the second place.
Secondo
n.
(Mus.) The second part in a concerted piece.
Secre
a.
• Secret; secretive; faithful to a secret.
n.
• A secret.
Secrecy
n.
• The state or quality of being hidden; as, his movements were detected in spite of their secrecy.
• That which is concealed; a secret.
• Seclusion; privacy; retirement.
• The quality of being secretive; fidelity to a secret; forbearance of disclosure or discovery.
Secrely
adv.
• Secretly.
Secreness
n.
• Secrecy; privacy.
Secret
a.
• Hidden; concealed; as, secret treasure; secret plans; a secret vow.
• Withdraw from general intercourse or notice; in retirement or secrecy; secluded.
• Faithful to a secret; not inclined to divulge or betray confidence; secretive.
• Separate; distinct.
n.
• Something studiously concealed; a thing kept from general knowledge; what is not revealed, or not to be revealed.
• A thing not discovered; what is unknown or unexplained; a mystery.
• The parts which modesty and propriety require to be concealed; the genital organs.
v. t.
• To keep secret.
Secretage
n.
• A process in which mercury, or some of its salts, is employed to impart the property of felting to certain kinds of furs.
Secretarial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a secretary; befitting a secretary.
Secretary
n.
• One who keeps, or is intrusted with, secrets.
• A person employed to write orders, letters, dispatches, public or private papers, records, and the like; an official scribe, amanuensis, or writer; one who attends to correspondence, and transacts other business, for an association, a public body, or an individual.
• An officer of state whose business is to superintend and manage the affairs of a particular department of government, and who is usually a member of the cabinet or advisory council of the chief executive; as, the secretary of state, who conducts the correspondence and attends to the relations of a government with foreign courts; the secretary of the treasury, who manages the department of finance; the secretary of war, etc.
• A piece of furniture, with conveniences for writing and for the arrangement of papers; an escritoire.
(Zool.) The secretary bird.
Secretaryship
n.
• The office, or the term of office, of a secretary.
Secrete
v. t.
• To deposit in a place of hiding; to hide; to conceal; as, to secrete stolen goods; to secrete one's self.
(Physiol.) To separate from the blood and elaborate by the process of secretion; to elaborate and emit as a secretion. See Secretion.
Secretion
n.
• The act of secreting or concealing; as, the secretion of dutiable goods.
(Physiol.) The act of secreting; the process by which material is separated from the blood through the agency of the cells of the various glands and elaborated by the cells into new substances so as to form the various secretions, as the saliva, bile, and other digestive fluids. The process varies in the different glands, and hence are formed the various secretions.
(Physiol.) Any substance or fluid secreted, or elaborated and emitted, as the gastric juice.
Secretist
n.
• A dealer in secrets.
Secretitious
a.
• Parted by animal secretion; as, secretitious humors.
Secretive
a.
• Tending to secrete, or to keep secret or private; as, a secretive disposition.
Secretiveness
n.
• The quality of being secretive; disposition or tendency to conceal.
(Phren.) The faculty or propensity which impels to reserve, secrecy, or concealment.
Secretly
adv.
• In a secret manner.
Secretness
n.
• The state or quality of being secret, hid, or concealed.
• Secretiveness; concealment.
Secretory
a.
(Physiol.) Secreting; performing, or connected with, the office secretion; secernent; as, secretory vessels, nerves.
n.
• A secretory vessel; a secernent.
Sect
n.
• A cutting; a scion.
n.
• Those following a particular leader or authority, or attached to a certain opinion; a company or set having a common belief or allegiance distinct from others; in religion, the believers in a particular creed, or upholders of a particular practice; especially, in modern times, a party dissenting from an established church; a denomination; in philosophy, the disciples of a particular master; a school; in society and the state, an order, rank, class, or party.
Sectant
n.
• One of the portions of space bounded by the three coordinate planes. Specif. (Crystallog.), one of the parts of a crystal into which it is divided by the axial planes.
Sectarian
n.
• Pertaining to a sect, or to sects; peculiar to a sect; bigotedly attached to the tenets and interests of a denomination; as, sectarian principles or prejudices.
n.
• One of a sect; a member or adherent of a special school, denomination, or religious or philosophical party; one of a party in religion which has separated itself from established church, or which holds tenets different from those of the prevailing denomination in a state.
Sectarianism
n.
• The quality or character of a sectarian; devotion to the interests of a party; excess of partisan or denominational zeal; adherence to a separate church organization.
Sectarianize
v. t.
• To imbue with sectarian feelings; to subject to the control of a sect.
Sectarism
n.
• Sectarianism.
Sectarist
n.
• A sectary.
Sectary
n.
• A sectarian; a member or adherent of a sect; a follower or disciple of some particular teacher in philosophy or religion; one who separates from an established church; a dissenter.
Sectator
n.
• A follower; a disciple; an adherent to a sect.
Sectile
a.
• Capable of being cut; specifically (Min.), capable of being severed by the knife with a smooth cut; — said of minerals.
Sectility
n.
• The state or quality of being sectile.
Section
n.
• The act of cutting, or separation by cutting; as, the section of bodies.
• A part separated from something; a division; a portion; a slice.
• A distinct part or portion of a book or writing; a subdivision of a chapter; the division of a law or other writing; a paragraph; an article; hence, the character §, often used to denote such a division
• A distinct part of a country or people, community, class, or the like; a part of a territory separated by geographical lines, or of a people considered as distinct
• One of the portions, of one square mile each, into which the public lands of the United States are divided; one thirty-sixth part of a township. These sections are subdivided into quarter sections for sale under the homestead and preemption laws.
(Geom.) The figure made up of all the points common to a superficies and a solid which meet, or to two superficies which meet, or to two lines which meet. In the first case the section is a superficies, in the second a line, and in the third a point.
(Nat. Hist.) A division of a genus; a group of species separated by some distinction from others of the same genus; — often indicated by the sign §.
(Mus.) A part of a musical period, composed of one or more phrases. See Phrase.
• The description or representation of anything as it would appear if cut through by any intersecting plane; depiction of what is beyond a plane passing through, or supposed to pass through, an object, as a building, a machine, a succession of strata; profile.
Sectional
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sections or distinct part of larger body or territory; local.
• Consisting of sections, or capable of being divided into sections; as, a sectional steam boiler.
Sectionalism
n.
• A disproportionate regard for the interests peculiar to a section of the country; local patriotism, as distinguished from national.
Sectionality
n.
• The state or quality of being sectional; sectionalism.
Sectionalize
v. t.
• To divide according to gepgraphical sections or local interests.
Sectionally
adv.
• In a sectional manner.
Sectionize
v. t.
• To form into sections.
Sectism
n.
• Devotion to a sect.
Sectist
n.
• One devoted to a sect; a soetary.
Sectiuncle
n.
• A little or petty sect.
Sector
n.
(Geom.) A part of a circle comprehended between two radii and the included arc.
• A mathematical instrument, consisting of two rulers connected at one end by a joint, each arm marked with several scales, as of equal parts, chords, sines, tangents, etc., one scale of each kind on each arm, and all on lines radiating from the common center of motion. The sector is used for plotting, etc., to any scale.
• An astronomical instrument, the limb of which embraces a small portion only of a circle, used for measuring differences of declination too great for the compass of a micrometer. When it is used for measuring zenith distances of stars, it is called a zenith sector.
Sectoral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a sector; as, a sectoral circle.
Sectorial
a.
(Anat.) Adapted for cutting.
n.
• A sectorial, or carnassial, tooth.
Secular
a.
• Coming or observed once in an age or a century.
• Pertaining to an age, or the progress of ages, or to a long period of time; accomplished in a long progress of time; as, secular inequality; the secular refrigeration of the globe.
• Of or pertaining to this present world, or to things not spiritual or holy; relating to temporal as distinguished from eternal interests; not immediately or primarily respecting the soul, but the body; worldly.
(Eccl.) Not regular; not bound by monastic vows or rules; not confined to a monastery, or subject to the rules of a religious community; as, a secular priest.
• Belonging to the laity; lay; not clerical.
n.
(Eccl.) A secular ecclesiastic, or one not bound by monastic rules.
(Eccl.) A church official whose functions are confined to the vocal department of the choir.
• A layman, as distinguished from a clergyman.
Secularism
n.
• The state or quality of being secular; a secular spirit; secularity.
• The tenets or principles of the secularists.
Secularist
n.
• One who theoretically rejects every form of religious faith, and every kind of religious worship, and accepts only the facts and influences which are derived from the present life; also, one who believes that education and other matters of civil policy should be managed without the introduction of a religious element.
Secularity
n.
• Supreme attention to the things of the present life; worldliness.
Secularization
n.
• The act of rendering secular, or the state of being rendered secular; conversion from regular or monastic to secular; conversion from religious to lay or secular possession and uses; as, the secularization of church property.
Secularize
v. t.
• To convert from regular or monastic into secular; as, to secularize a priest or a monk.
• To convert from spiritual or common use; as, to secularize a church, or church property.
• To make worldly or unspiritual.
Secularly
adv.
• In a secular or worldly manner.
Secularness
n.
• The quality or state of being secular; worldliness; worldly-minded-ness.
Secund
a.
(Bot.) Arranged on one side only, as flowers or leaves on a stalk.
Secundate
v. t.
• To make prosperous.
Secundation
n.
• Prosperity.
Secundine
n.
(Bot.) The second coat, or integument, of an ovule, lying within the primine.
• The afterbirth, or placenta and membranes; — generally used in the plural.
Securable
a.
• That may be secured.
Secure
a.
• Free from fear, care, or anxiety; easy in mind; not feeling suspicion or distrust; confident.
• Overconfident; incautious; careless; — in a bad sense.
• Confident in opinion; not entertaining, or not having reason to entertain, doubt; certain; sure; — commonly with of; as, secure of a welcome.
• Net exposed to danger; safe; — applied to persons and things, and followed by against or from.
v. t.
• To make safe; to relieve from apprehensions of, or exposure to, danger; to guard; to protect.
• To put beyond hazard of losing or of not receiving; to make certain; to assure; to insure; — frequently with against or from, rarely with of; as, to secure a creditor against loss; to secure a debt by a mortgage.
• To make fast; to close or confine effectually; to render incapable of getting loose or escaping; as, to secure a prisoner; to secure a door, or the hatches of a ship.
• To get possession of; to make one's self secure of; to acquire certainly; as, to secure an estate.
Securely
adv.
• In a secure manner; without fear or apprehension; without danger; safely.
Securement
n.
• The act of securing; protection.
Secureness
n.
• The condition or quality of being secure; exemption from fear; want of vigilance; security.
Securer
n.
• One who, or that which, secures.
Securifera
n. pl.
(Zool.) The Serrifera.
Securiform
a.
(Nat. Hist.) Having the form of an ax hatchet.
Securipalp
n.
(Zool.) One of a family of beetles having the maxillary palpi terminating in a hatchet-shaped joint.
Security
n.
• The condition or quality of being secure; secureness.
• Freedom from apprehension, anxiety, or care; confidence of power of safety; hence, assurance; certainty.
• Hence, carelessness; negligence; heedlessness
• Freedom from risk; safety
• That which secures or makes safe; protection; guard; defense.
• Something given, deposited, or pledged, to make certain the fulfillment of an obligation, the performance of a contract, the payment of a debt, or the like; surety; pledge.
• One who becomes surety for another, or engages himself for the performance of another's obligation
• An evidence of debt or of property, as a bond, a certificate of stock, etc.; as, government securities.
Sedan
n.
• A portable chair or covered vehicle for carrying a single person, — usually borne on poles by two men. Called also sedan chair.
Sedate
a.
• Undisturbed by passion or caprice; calm; tranquil; serene; not passionate or giddy; composed; staid; as, a sedate soul, mind, or temper.
Sedation
n.
• The act of calming, or the state of being calm.
Sedative
a.
• Tending to calm, moderate, or tranquilize; specifically (Med.), allaying irritability and irritation; assuaging pain.
n.
(Med.) A remedy which allays irritability and irritation, and irritative activity or pain.
Sedent
a.
• Sitting; inactive; quiet.
Sedentarily
adv.
• In a sedentary manner.
Sedentariness
n.
• Quality of being sedentary.
Sedentary
a.
• Accustomed to sit much or long; as, a sedentary man.
• Characterized by, or requiring, much sitting; as, a sedentary employment; a sedentary life.
• Inactive; motionless; sluggish; hence, calm; tranquil.
• Caused by long sitting.
(Zool.) Remaining in one place, especially when firmly attached to some object; as, the oyster is a sedentary mollusk; the barnacles are sedentary crustaceans.
Sederunt
n.
• A sitting, as of a court or other body.
Sedge
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the genus Carex, perennial, endogenous herbs, often growing in dense tufts in marshy places. They have triangular jointless stems, a spiked inflorescence, and long grasslike leaves which are usually rough on the margins and midrib. There are several hundred species.
(Zool.) A flock of herons.
Sedged
a.
• Made or composed of sedge.
Sedgy
a.
• Overgrown with sedge.
Sedilia
n. pl.
(Arch.) Seats in the chancel of a church near the altar for the officiating clergy during intervals of service.
Sediment
n.
• The matter which subsides to the bottom, frrom water or any other liquid; settlings; lees; dregs.
(Geol.) The material of which sedimentary rocks are formed.
Sedimental
a.
• Sedimentary.
Sedimentary
a.
• Of or pertaining to sediment; formed by sediment; containing matter that has subsided.
Sedimentation
n.
• The act of depositing a sediment; specifically (Geol.), the deposition of the material of which sedimentary rocks are formed.
Sedition
n.
• The raising of commotion in a state, not amounting to insurrection; conduct tending to treason, but without an overt act; excitement of discontent against the government, or of resistance to lawful authority.
• Dissension; division; schism.
Seditionary
n.
• An inciter or promoter of sedition.
Seditious
a.
• Of or pertaining to sedition; partaking of the nature of, or tending to excite, sedition; as, seditious behavior; seditious strife; seditious words.
• Disposed to arouse, or take part in, violent opposition to lawful authority; turbulent; factious; guilty of sedition; as, seditious citizens.
Sedlitz
a.
• Same as Seidlitz.
Seduce
v. t.
• To draw aside from the path of rectitude and duty in any manner; to entice to evil; to lead astray; to tempt and lead to iniquity; to corrupt.
• Specifically, to induce to surrender chastity; to debauch by means of solicitation.
Seducement
n.
• The act of seducing.
• The means employed to seduce, as flattery, promises, deception, etc.; arts of enticing or corrupting.
Seducer
n.
• One who, or that which, seduces; specifically, one who prevails over the chastity of a woman by enticements and persuasions.
Seducible
a.
• Capable of being seduced; corruptible.
Seducing
a.
• Seductive.
Seduction
n.
• The act of seducing; enticement to wrong doing; specifically, the offense of inducing a woman to consent to unlawful sexual intercourse, by enticements which overcome her scruples; the wrong or crime of persuading a woman to surrender her chastity.
• That which seduces, or is adapted to seduce; means of leading astray; as, the seductions of wealth.
Seductive
a.
• Tending to lead astray; apt to mislead by flattering appearances; tempting; alluring; as, a seductive offer.
Seductively
adv.
• In a seductive manner.
Seductress
n.
• A woman who seduces.
Sedulity
n.
• The quality or state of being sedulous; diligent and assiduous application; constant attention; unremitting industry; sedulousness.
Sedulous
a.
• Diligent in application or pursuit; constant, steady, and persevering in business, or in endeavors to effect an object; steadily industrious; assiduous; as, the sedulous bee.
Sedum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants, mostly perennial, having succulent leaves and cymose flowers; orpine; stonecrop.
See
n.
• A seat; a site; a place where sovereign power is exercised.
• Specifically: (a) The seat of episcopal power; a diocese; the jurisdiction of a bishop; as, the see of New York. (b) The seat of an archibishop; a province or jurisdiction of an archibishop; as, an archiepiscopal see. (c) The seat, place, or office of the pope, or Roman pontiff; as, the papal see. (d) The pope or his court at Rome; as, to appeal to the see of Rome.
v. t.
• To perceive by the eye; to have knowledge of the existence and apparent qualities of by the organs of sight; to behold; to descry; to view.
• To perceive by mental vision; to form an idea or conception of; to note with the mind; to observe; to discern; to distinguish; to understand; to comprehend; to ascertain.
• To follow with the eyes, or as with the eyes; to watch; to regard attentivelly; to look after.
• To have an interview with; especially, to make a call upon; to visit; as, to go to see a friend.
• To fall in with; to have intercourse or communication with; hence, to have knowledge or experience of; as, to see military service.
• To accompany in person; to escort; to wait upon; as, to see one home; to see one aboard the cars.
v. i.
• To have the power of sight, or of perceiving by the proper organs; to possess or employ the sense of vision; as, he sees distinctly.
• Figuratively: To have intellectual apprehension; to perceive; to know; to understand; to discern; — often followed by a preposition, as through, or into.
• To be attentive; to take care; to give heed; — generally with to; as, to see to the house.
Seed
n.
(Bot.) A ripened ovule, consisting of an embryo with one or more integuments, or coverings; as, an apple seed; a currant seed. By germination it produces a new plant.
• Any small seedlike fruit, though it may consist of a pericarp, or even a calyx, as well as the seed proper; as, parsnip seed; thistle seed.
(Physiol.) The generative fluid of the male; semen; sperm; — not used in the plural.
• That from which anything springs; first principle; original; source; as, the seeds of virtue or vice.
• The principle of production.
• Progeny; offspring; children; descendants; as, the seed of Abraham; the seed of David.
• Race; generation; birth.
v. t.
• To sprinkle with seed; to plant seeds in; to sow; as, to seed a field.
• To cover thinly with something scattered; to ornament with seedlike decorations.
Seedbox
n.
(Bot.) A capsule.
• A plant (Ludwigia alternifolia) which has somewhat cubical or box-shaped capsules.
Seedcake
n.
• A sweet cake or cooky containing aromatic seeds, as caraway.
Seedcod
n.
• A seedlip.
Seeder
n.
• One who, or that which, sows or plants seed.
Seediness
n.
• The quality or state of being seedy, shabby, or worn out; a state of wretchedness or exhaustion.
Seedless
a.
• Without seed or seeds.
Seedling
n.
(Bot.) A plant reared from the seed, as distinguished from one propagated by layers, buds, or the like.
Seedman
See
• Seedsman.
Seedness
n.
• Seedtime.
Seedsman
n.
• A sower; one who sows or scatters seed.
• A person who deals in seeds.
Seedtime
n.
• The season proper for sowing.
Seedy
a.
• Abounding with seeds; bearing seeds; having run to seeds.
• Having a peculiar flavor supposed to be derived from the weeds growing among the vines; — said of certain kinds of FRench brandy.
• Old and worn out; exhausted; spiritless; also, poor and miserable looking; shabily clothed; shabby looking; as, he looked seedy coat.
Seeing
conj.
• (but originally a present participle). In view of the fact (that); considering; taking into account (that); insmuch as; since; because; — followed by a dependent clause; as, he did well, seeing that he was so young.
Seek
a.
• Sick.
v. t.
• To go in search of; to look for; to search for; to try to find.
• To inquire for; to ask for; to solicit; to bessech.
• To try to acquire or gain; to strive after; to aim at; as, to seek wealth or fame; to seek one's life.
• To try to reach or come to; to go to; to resort to.
v. i.
• To make search or inquiry: to endeavor to make discovery.
Seeker
n.
• One who seeks; that which is used in seeking or searching.
(Eccl.) One of a small heterogeneous sect of the 17th century, in Great Britain, who professed to be seeking the true church, ministry, and sacraments.
Seel
v. t.
(Falconry) To close the eyes of (a hawk or other bird) by drawing through the lids threads which were fastened over the head.
• Hence, to shut or close, as the eyes; to blind.
v. i.
• To incline to one side; to lean; to roll, as a ship at sea.
n.
• Good fortune; favorable opportunity; prosperity. "So have I seel".
• Time; season; as, hay seel.
Seelily
adv.
• In a silly manner.
Seely
a.
• See Silly.
Seem
v. i.
• To appear, or to appear to be; to have a show or semblance; to present an appearance; to look; to strike one's apprehension or fancy as being; to be taken as.
v. t.
• To befit; to beseem.
Seemer
n.
• One who seems; one who carries or assumes an appearance or semblance.
Seeming
a.
• Having a semblance, whether with or without reality; apparent; specious; befitting; as, seeming friendship; seeming truth.
n.
• Appearance; show; semblance; fair appearance; speciousness.
• Apprehension; judgment.
Seemingly
adv.
• In appearance; in show; in semblance; apparently; ostensibly.
Seemingness
n.
• Semblance; fair appearance; plausibility.
Seemless
a.
• Unseemly.
Seemlily
adv.
• In a seemly manner.
Seemliness
n.
• The quality or state of being seemly: comeliness; propriety.
Seemly
a.
• Suited to the object, occasion, purpose, or character; suitable; fit; becoming; comely; decorous.
adv.
• In a decent or suitable manner; becomingly.
Seemlyhed
n.
• Comely or decent appearance.
Seen
p. p.
• of See.
a.
• Versed; skilled; accomplished.
Seer
a.
• Sore; painful.
n.
• One who sees.
n.
• A person who foresees events; a prophet.
Seeress
n.
• A female seer; a prophetess.
Seerfish
n.
(Zool.) A scombroid food fish of Maderia (Cybium Commersonii).
Seerhand
n.
• A kind of muslin of a texture between nainsook and mull.
Seership
n.
• The office or quality of a seer.
Seersucker
n.
• A light fabric, originally made in the East Indies, of silk and linen, usually having alternating stripes, and a slightly craped or puckered surface; also, a cotton fabric of similar appearance.
Seerwood
n.
• Dry wood.
Seesaw
n.
• A play among children in which they are seated upon the opposite ends of a plank which is balanced in the middle, and move alternately up and down.
• A plank or board adjusted for this play.
• A vibratory or reciprocating motion.
(Whist.) Same as Crossruff.
v. i.
• To move with a reciprocating motion; to move backward and forward, or upward and downward.
v. t.
• To cause to move backward and forward in seesaw fashion.
a.
• Moving up and down, or to and fro; having a reciprocating motion.
Seet
imp.
• Sate; sat.
Seeth
• imp. of Seethe.
Seethe
v. t.
• To decoct or prepare for food in hot liquid; to boil; as, to seethe flesh.
v. i.
• To be a state of ebullition or violent commotion; to be hot; to boil.
Seether
n.
• A pot for boiling things; a boiler.
Seg
n.
(Bot.) Sedge.
• The gladen, and other species of Iris.
n.
• A castrated bull.
Segar
n.
• See Cigar.
Seggar
n.
• A case or holder made of fire clay, in which fine pottery is inclosed while baking in the kin.
Segge
n.(Zool.The hedge sparrow.
Segment
n.
• One of the parts into which any body naturally separates or is divided; a part divided or cut off; a section; a portion; as, a segment of an orange; a segment of a compound or divided leaf.
(Geom.) A part cut off from a figure by a line or plane; especially, that part of a circle contained between a chord and an arc of that circle, or so much of the circle as is cut off by the chord; as, the segment acb in the Illustration.
(Mach.) A piece in the form of the sector of a circle, or part of a ring; as, the segment of a sectional fly wheel or flywheel rim.
• A segment gear.
(Biol.) One of the cells or division formed by segmentation, as in egg cleavage or in fissiparous cell formation.
• One of the divisions, rings, or joints into which many animal bodies are divided; a somite; a metamere; a somatome.
v. i.
(Biol.) To divide or separate into parts in growth; to undergo segmentation, or cleavage, as in the segmentation of the ovum.
Segmental
a.
• Relating to, or being, a segment.
(Anat. & Zool.) Of or pertaining to the segments of animals; as, a segmental duct; segmental papillae.
• Of or pertaining to the segmental organs.
Segmentation
n.
• The act or process of dividing into segments; specifically (Biol.), a self-division into segments as a result of growth; cell cleavage; cell multiplication; endogenous cell formation.
Segmented
a.
• Divided into segments or joints; articulated.
Segno
n.
(Mus.) A sign. See Al segno, and Dal segno.
Sego
n.
(Bot.) A liliaceous plant (Calochortus Nuttallii) of Western North America, and its edible bulb; — so called by the Ute Indians and the Mormons.
Segregate
a.
• Separate; select.
(Bot.) Separated from others of the same kind.
v. t.
• To separate from others; to set apart.
v. i.
(Geol.) To separate from a mass, and collect together about centers or along lines of fracture, as in the process of crystallization or solidification.
Segregation
n.
• The act of segregating, or the state of being segregated; separation from others; a parting.
(Geol.) Separation from a mass, and gathering about centers or into cavities at hand through cohesive attraction or the crystallizing process.
Seguestration
n.
(Civil & Com. Law) The act of separating, or setting aside, a thing in controversy from the possession of both the parties that contend for it, to be delivered to the one adjudged entitled to it. It may be voluntary or involuntary.
(Chancery) A prerogative process empowering certain commissioners to take and hold a defendant's property and receive the rents and profits thereof, until he clears himself of a contempt or performs a decree of the court.
(Eccl. Law) A kind of execution for a rent, as in the case of a beneficed clerk, of the profits of a benefice, till he shall have satisfied some debt established by decree; the gathering up of the fruits of a benefice during a vacancy, for the use of the next incumbent; the disposing of the goods, by the ordinary, of one who is dead, whose estate no man will meddle with.
(Intrnat. Law) The seizure of the property of an individual for the use of the state; particularly applied to the seizure, by a belligerent power, of debts due from its subjects to the enemy.
• The state of being separated or set aside; separation; retirement; seclusion from society.
• Disunion; disjunction.
Seiches
n. pl.
(Geol.) Local oscillations in level observed in the case of some lakes, as Lake Geneva.
Seid
n.
• A descendant of Mohammed through his daughter Fatima and nephew Ali.
Seidlitz
a.
• Of or pertaining to Seidlitz, a village in Bohemia.
Seigh
• obs. imp. sing. of See. Saw.
Seigneurial
a.
• Of or pertaining to the lord of a manor; manorial.
• Vested with large powers; independent.
Seignior
n.
• A lord; the lord of a manor.
• A title of honor or of address in the South of Europe, corresponding to Sir or Mr. in English.
Seigniorage
n.
• Something claimed or taken by virtue of sovereign prerogative; specifically, a charge or toll deducted from bullion brought to a mint to be coined; the difference between the cost of a mass of bullion and the value as money of the pieces coined from it.
• A share of the receipts of a business taken in payment for the use of a right, as a copyright or a patent.
Seignioral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a seignior; seigneurial.
Seignioralty
n.
• The territory or authority of a seignior, or lord.
Seigniorial
a.
• Same as Seigneurial.
Seigniorize
v. t.
• To lord it over.
Seigniory
n.
• The power or authority of a lord; dominion.
• The territory over which a lord holds jurisdiction; a manor.
Seine
n.
(Fishing.) A large net, one edge of which is provided with sinkers, and the other with floats. It hangs vertically in the water, and when its ends are brought together or drawn ashore incloses the fish.
Seiner
n.
• One who fishes with a seine.
Seining
n.
• Fishing with a seine.
Seint
n.
• A girdle.
n.
• A saint.
Seintuary
n.
• Sanctuary.
Seirfish
n.
(Zool.) Same as Seerfish.
Seirospore
n.
(Bot.) One of several spores arranged in a chain as in certain algae of the genus Callithamnion.
Seise
v. t.
• See Seize.
Seisin
n.
• See Seizin.
Seismograph
n.
(Physics) An apparatus for registering the shocks and undulatory motions of earthquakes.
Seismographic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a seismograph; indicated by a seismograph.
Seismography
n.
• A writing about, or a description of, earthquakes.
• The art of registering the shocks and undulatory movements of earthquakes.
Seismological
a.
• Of or pertaining to seismology.
Seismology
n.
• The science of earthquakes.
Seismometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the direction, duration, and force of earthquakes and like concussions.
Seismometric
a.
• Of or pertaining to seismometry, or seismometer; as, seismometric instruments; seismometric measurements.
Seismometry
n.
• The mensuration of such phenomena of earthquakes as can be expressed in numbers, or by their relation to the coordinates of space.
Seismoscope
n.
(Physics) A seismometer.
Seity
n.
• Something peculiar to one's self.
Seizable
a.
• That may be seized.
Seize
v. t.
• To fall or rush upon suddenly and lay hold of; to gripe or grasp suddenly; to reach and grasp.
• To take possession of by force.
• To invade suddenly; to take sudden hold of; to come upon suddenly; as, a fever seizes a patient.
(law) To take possession of by virtue of a warrant or other legal authority; as, the sheriff seized the debtor's goods.
• To fasten; to fix.
• To grap with the mind; to comprehend fully and distinctly; as, to seize an idea.
(Naut.) To bind or fasten together with a lashing of small stuff, as yarn or marline; as, to seize ropes.
Seizer
n.
• One who, or that which, seizes.
Seizin
n.
(Law) Possession; possession of an estate of froehold. It may be either in deed or in law; the former when there is actual possession, the latter when there is a right to such possession by construction of law. In some of the United States seizin means merely ownership.
• The act of taking possession.
• The thing possessed; property.
Seizing
n.
• The act of taking or grasping suddenly.
(Naut.) The operation of fastening together or lashing.
• The cord or lashing used for such fastening.
Seizor
n.
(Law) One who seizes, or takes possession.
Seizure
n.
• The act of seizing, or the state of being seized; sudden and violent grasp or gripe; a taking into possession; as, the seizure of a thief, a property, a throne, etc.
• Retention within one's grasp or power; hold; possession; ownership.
• That which is seized, or taken possession of; a thing laid hold of, or possessed.
Sejein
v. t.
• To separate.
Sejunction
n.
• The act of disjoining, or the state of being disjoined.
Sejungible
a.
• Capable of being disjoined.
Seke
a.
• Sick.
v. t. & i.
• To seek.
Sekes
n.
(Arch.) A place in a pagan temple in which the images of the deities were inclosed.
Selachian
n.
(Zool.) One of the Selachii. See Illustration in Appendix.
Selachii
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of elasmobranchs including the sharks and rays; the Plagiostomi. Called also Selacha, Selache, and Selachoidei.
Selachoidei
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Selachii.
Selachostomi
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of ganoid fishes which includes the paddlefish, in which the mouth is armed with small teeth.
Selaginella
n.
(Bot.) A genus of cryptogamous plants resembling Lycopodia, but producing two kinds of spores; also, any plant of this genus. Many species are cultivated in conservatories.
Selah
n.
(Script.) A word of doubtful meaning, occuring frequently in the Psalms; by some, supposed to signify silence or a pause in the musical performance of the song.
Selcouth
n.
• Rarely known; unusual; strange.
Seld
a.
• Rare; uncommon; unusual.
adv.
• Rarely; seldom.
Seldem
adv.
• Rarely; not often; not frequently.
Selden
adv.
• Seldom.
Seldom
a.
• Rare; infrequent.
Seldomness
n.
• Rareness.
Seldseen
a.
• Seldom seen.
Seldshewn
a.
• Rarely shown or exhibited.
Select
a.
• Taken from a number by preferance; picked out as more valuable or exellent than others; of special value or exellence; nicely chosen; selected; choice.
v. t.
• To choose and take from a number; to take by preference from among others; to pick out; to cull; as, to select the best authors for perusal.
Selectedly
adv.
• With care and selection.
Selection
n.
• The act of selecting, or the state of being selected; choice, by preference.
• That which is selected; a collection of things chosen; as, a choice selection of books.
Selective
a.
• Selecting; tending to select.
Selectman
n.
• One of a board of town officers chosen annually in the New England States to transact the general public business of the town, and have a kind of executive authority. The number is usually from three to seven in each town.
Selectness
n.
• The quality or state of being select.
Selector
n.
• One who selects.
Selenate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of selenic acid; — formerly called also seleniate.
Selenecentric
a.
(Astron.) As seen or estimated from the center of the moon; with the moon central.
Selenhydric
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, hydrogen selenide, H2Se, regarded as an acid analogous to sulphydric acid.
Selenic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to selenium; derived from, or containing, selenium; specifically, designating those compounds in which the element has a higher valence as contrasted with selenious compounds.
Selenide
n.
(Chem.) A binary compound of selenium, or a compound regarded as binary; as, ethyl selenide.
Seleniferous
a.
• Containing, or impregnated with, selenium; as, seleniferous pyrites.
Selenious
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or containing, selenium; specifically, designating those compounds in which the element has a lower valence as contrasted with selenic compounds.
Selenite
n.
(Chem.) A salt of selenious acid.
n.
(Min.) A variety of gypsum, occuring in transparent crystals or crystalline masses.
Selenium
n.
(Chem.) A nonmetallic element of the sulphur group, and analogous to sulphur in its compounds. It is found in small quantities with sulphur and some sulphur ores, and obtained in the free state as a dark reddish powder or crystalline mass, or as a dark metallic-looking substance. It exhibits under the action of light a remarkable variation in electric conductivity, and is used in certain electric apparatus. Symbol Se. Atomic weight 78.9.
Seleniuret
n.
(CHem.) A selenide.
Seleniureted
a.
(Chem.) Combined with selenium as in a selenide; as, seleniureted hydrogen.
Selenograph
• , n. A picture or delineation of the moon's surface, or of any part of it.
Selenographer
n.
• One skilled in selenography.
Selenographist
n.
• A selenographer.
Selenography
n.
• The science that treats of the physical features of the moon; — corresponding to physical geography in respect to the earth.
Selenology
n.
• That branch of astronomy which treats of the moon.
Selenonium
n.
(Chem.) A hypothetical radical of selenium, analogous to sulphonium.
Self0complacent
a.
• Satisfied with one's own character, capacity, and doings; self-satisfied.
Self
a.
• Same; particular; very; identical.
n.
• The individual as the object of his own reflective consciousness; the man viewed by his own cognition as the subject of all his mental phenomena, the agent in his own activities, the subject of his own feelings, and the possessor of capacities and character; a person as a distinct individual; a being regarded as having personality.
• Hence, personal interest, or love of private interest; selfishness; as, self is his whole aim.
• Personification; embodiment.
Selfhood
n.
• Existence as a separate self, or independent person; conscious personality; individuality.
Selfish
a.
• Caring supremely or unduly for one's self; regarding one's own comfort, advantage, etc., in disregard, or at the expense, of those of others.
(Ethics) Believing or teaching that the chief motives of human action are derived from love of self.
Selfishly
adv.
• In a selfish manner; with regard to private interest only or chiefly.
Selfishness
n.
• The quality or state of being selfish; exclusive regard to one's own interest or happiness; that supreme self-love or self-preference which leads a person to direct his purposes to the advancement of his own interest, power, or happiness, without regarding those of others.
Selfism
n.
• Concentration of one's interests on one's self; self-love; selfishness.
Selfist
n.
• A selfish person.
Selfless
a.
• Having no regard to self; unselfish.
Selflessness
n.
• Quality or state of being selfless.
Selfness
n.
• Selfishness.
Selfsame
a.
• Precisely the same; the very same; identical.
Selion
n.
• A short piece of land in arable ridges and furrows, of uncertain quantity; also, a ridge of land lying between two furrows.
Seljuckian
n.
• A member of the family of Seljuk; an adherent of that family, or subject of its government; (pl.) the dynasty of Turkish sultans sprung from Seljuk.
Seljukian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Seljuk, a Tartar chief who embraced Mohammedanism, and began the subjection of Western Asia to that faith and rule; of or pertaining to the dynasty founded by him, or the empire maintained by his descendants from the 10th to the 13th century.
Sell
n.
• Self.
n.
• A sill.
n.
• A cell; a house.
n.
• A saddle for a horse.
• A throne or lofty seat.
v. t.
• To transfer to another for an equivalent; to give up for a valuable consideration; to dispose of in return for something, especially for money.
• To make a matter of bargain and sale of; to accept a price or reward for, as for a breach of duty, trust, or the like; to betray.
• To impose upon; to trick; to deceive; to make a fool of; to cheat.
v. i.
• To practice selling commodities.
• To be sold; as, corn sells at a good price.
n.
• An imposition; a cheat; a hoax.
Seller
n.
• One who sells.
Selvagee
n.
(Naut.) A skein or hank of rope yarns wound round with yarns or marline, — used for stoppers, straps, etc.
Selve
a.
• Self; same.
Selves
n.
• pl. of Self.
Sely
a.
• Silly.
Semaeostomata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Discophora having large free mouth lobes. It includes Aurelia, and Pelagia. Called also Semeostoma. See Illustr. under Discophora, and Medusa.
Semaphore
n.
• A signal telegraph; an apparatus for giving signals by the disposition of lanterns, flags, oscillating arms, etc.
Semaphorically
adv.
• By means a semaphore.
Semaphorist
n.
• One who manages or operates a semaphore.
Sematology
n.
• The doctrine of signs as the expression of thought or reasoning; the science of indicating thought by signs.
Sematrope
n.
• An instrument for signaling by reflecting the rays of the sun in different directions.
Semblable
a.
• Like; similar; resembling.
n.
• Likeness; representation.
Semblably
adv.
• In like manner.
Semblance
n.
• Seeming; appearance; show; figure; form.
• Likeness; resemblance, actual or apparent; similitude; as, the semblance of worth; semblance of virtue.
Semblant
a.
• Like; resembling.
• Seeming, rather than real; apparent.
n.
• Show; appearance; figure; semblance.
• The face.
Semblative
a.
• Resembling.
Semble
v. i.
• To imitate; to make a representation or likeness.
(Law) It seems; — chiefly used impersonally in reports and judgments to express an opinion in reference to the law on some point not necessary to be decided, and not intended to be definitely settled in the cause.
a.
• Like; resembling.
Sembling
n.
(Zool.) The practice of attracting the males of Lepidoptera or other insects by exposing the female confined in a cage.
Seme
a.
(Her.) Sprinkled or sown; — said of field, or a charge, when strewed or covered with small charges.
Semele
n.
(Gr. Myth.) A daughter of Cadmus, and by Zeus mother of Bacchus.
Semen
n.
(Bot.) The seed of plants.
(Physiol.) The seed or fecundating fluid of male animals; sperm. It is a white or whitish viscid fluid secreted by the testes, characterized by the presence of spermatozoids to which it owes its generative power.
Semeniferous
a.
(Biol.) Seminiferous.
Semester
n.
• A period of six months; especially, a term in a college or uneversity which divides the year into two terms.
Semiacid
a.
• Slightly acid; subacid.
Semiacidified
a.
• Half acidified.
Semiadherent
a.
• Adherent part way.
Semiamplexicaul
a.
(Bot.) Partially amplexicaul; embracing the stem half round, as a leaf.
Semiangle
n.
(Geom.) The half of a given, or measuring, angle.
Semiannually
adv.
• Every half year.
Semiannular
a.
• Having the figure of a half circle; forming a semicircle.
Semiaxis
n.
(Geom.) One half of the axis of an llipse or other figure.
Semibarbarian
a.
• Half barbarous; partially civilized.
n.
• One partly civilized.
Semibarbaric
a.
• Half barbarous or uncivilized; as, semibarbaric display.
Semibarbarism
n.
• The quality or state of being half barbarous or uncivilized.
Semibarbarous
a.
• Half barbarous.
Semibreve
n.
(Mus.) A note of half the time or duration of the breve; — now usually called a whole note. It is the longest note in general use.
Semibrief
n.
(Mus.) A semibreve.
Semibull
n.
(R.C.Ch.) A bull issued by a pope in the period between his election and coronation.
Semicalcareous
a.
• Half or partially calcareous; as, a semicalcareous plant.
Semicalcined
a.
• Half calcined; as, semicalcined iron.
Semicastrate
v. t.
• To deprive of one testicle.
Semicentennial
a.
• Of or pertaining to half of a century, or a period of fifty years; as, a semicentennial commemoration.
n.
• A fiftieth anniversary.
Semichaotic
a.
• Partially chaotic.
Semichorus
n.
(Mus.) A half chorus; a passage to be sung by a selected portion of the voices, as the female voices only, in contrast with the full choir.
Semicircle
n.
• The half of a circle; the part of a circle bounded by its diameter and half of its circumference.
• A semicircumference.
• A body in the form of half of a circle, or half of a circumference.
• An instrument for measuring angles.
Semicircled
a.
• Semicircular.
Semicircular
a.
• Having the form of half of a circle.
Semicirque
n.
• A semicircular hollow or opening among trees or hills.
Semicolon
n.
• The punctuation mark [;] indicating a separation between parts or members of a sentence more distinct than that marked by a comma.
Semicolumn
n.
• A half column; a column bisected longitudinally, or along its axis.
Semicolumnar
a.
• Like a semicolumn; flat on one side and round on the other; imperfectly columnar.
Semicompact
a.
• Half compact; imperfectly indurated.
Semiconscious
a.
• Half conscious; imperfectly conscious.
Semicope
n.
• A short cope, or an inferier kind of cope.
Semicrystalline
a.
(Min.) Half crystalline; — said of certain cruptive rocks composed partly of crystalline, partly of amorphous matter.
Semicubical
a.
(Math.) Of or pertaining to the square root of the cube of a quantity.
Semideistical
a.
• Half deisticsl; bordering on deism.
Semidemiquaver
n.
(Mus.) A demisemiquaver; a thirty-second note.
Semidetached
a.
• Half detached; partly distinct or separate.
Semidiameter
n.
(Math.) Half of a diameter; a right line, or the length of a right line, drawn from the center of a circle, a sphere, or other curved figure, to its circumference or periphery; a radius.
Semidiapason
n.
(Mus.) An imperfect octave.
Semidiapente
n.
(Mus.) An imperfect or diminished fifth.
Semidiaphaneity
n.
• Half or imperfect transparency; translucency.
Semidiaphanous
a.
• Half or imperfectly transparent; translucent.
Semidiatessaron
n.
(Mus.) An imperfect or diminished fourth.
Semiditone
n.
(Gr. Mus.) A lesser third, having its terms as 6 to 5; a hemiditone.
Semidiurnal
a.
• Pertaining to, or accomplished in, half a day, or twelve hours; occurring twice every day.
• Pertaining to, or traversed in, six hours, or in half the time between the rising and setting of a heavenly body; as, a semidiurnal arc.
Semidome
n.
(Arch.) A roof or ceiling covering a semicircular room or recess, or one of nearly that shape, as the apse of a church, a niche, or the like. It is approximately the quarter of a hollow sphere.
Semidouble
n.
(Eccl.) An office or feast celebrated with less solemnity than the double ones. See Double, n., 8.
a.
(Bot.) Having the outermost stamens converted into petals, while the inner ones remain perfect; — said of a flower.
Semifable
n.
• That which is part fable and part truth; a mixture of truth and fable.
Semiflexed
a.
• Half bent.
Semifloret
n.
(Bot.) See Semifloscule.
Semifloscular
a.
• Semiflosculous.
Semifloscule
n.
(Bot.) A floscule, or florest, with its corolla prolonged into a strap-shaped petal; — called also semifloret.
Semiflosculous
a.
(Bot.) Having all the florets ligulate, as in the dandelion.
Semifluid
a.
• Imperfectly fluid.
n.
• A semifluid substance.
Semiform
n.
• A half form; an imperfect form.
Semiformed
a.
• Half formed; imperfectly formed; as, semiformed crystals.
Semiglutin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A peptonelike body, insoluble in alcohol, formed by boiling collagen or gelatin for a long time in water. Hemicollin, a like body, is also formed at the same time, and differs from semiglutin by being partly soluble in alcohol.
Semihistorical
a.
• Half or party historical.
Semihoral
a.
• Half-hourly.
Semiiannual
a.
• Half-yearly.
Semiimute
a.
• Having the faculty of speech but imperfectly developed or partially lost.
Semiindurated
a.
• Imperfectly indurated or hardened.
Semilapidified
a.
• Imperfectly changed into stone.
Semilens
n.
(Opt.) The half of a lens divided along a plane passing through its axis.
Semilenticular
a.
• Half lenticular or convex; imperfectly resembling a lens.
Semiligneous
a.
• Half or partially ligneous, as a stem partly woody and partly herbaceous.
Semiliquid
a.
• Half liquid; semifluid.
Semiliquidity
n.
• The quality or state of being semiliquid; partial liquidity.
Semilogical
a.
• Half logical; partly logical; said of fallacies.
Semilor
n.
• A yellowish alloy of copper and zinc. See Simplor.
Semilunar
a.
• Shaped like a half moon.
n.
(Anat.) The semilunar bone.
Semilunary
a.
• Semilunar.
Semilunate
a.
• Semilunar.
Semilune
n.
(Geom.) The half of a lune.
Semimetal
n.
(Chem.) An element possessing metallic properties in an inferior degree and not malleable, as arsenic, antimony, bismuth, molybdenum, uranium, etc.
Semimetallic
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to a semimetal; possessing metallic properties in an inferior degree; resembling metal.
Semimonthly
a.
• Coming or made twice in a month; as, semimonthly magazine; a semimonthly payment.
n.
• Something done or made every half month; esp., a semimonthly periodical.
adv.
• In a semimonthly manner; at intervals of half a month.
Semimute
n.
• A semimute person.
Seminal
a.
• Pertaining to, containing, or consisting of, seed or semen; as, the seminal fluid.
• Contained in seed; holding the relation of seed, source, or first principle; holding the first place in a series of developed results or consequents; germinal; radical; primary; original; as, seminal principles of generation; seminal virtue.
n.
• A seed.
Seminality
n.
• The quality or state of being seminal.
Seminary
n.
• A piece of ground where seed is sown for producing plants for transplantation; a nursery; a seed plat.
• Hence, the place or original stock whence anything is brought or produced.
• A place of education, as a scool of a high grade, an academy, college, or university.
• Seminal state.
• Fig.: A seed bed; a source.
• A Roman Catholic priest educated in a foreign seminary; a seminarist.
a.
• Belonging to seed; seminal.
Seminate
v. t.
• To sow; to spread; to propagate.
Semination
n.
• The act of sowing or spreading.
(Bot.) Natural dispersion of seeds.
Semined
a.
• Thickly covered or sown, as with seeds.
Seminiferous
a.
(Biol.) Seed-bearing; producing seed; pertaining to, or connected with, the formation of semen; as, seminiferous cells or vesicles.
Seminification
n.
• Propagation from seed.
Seminist
n.
(Biol.) A believer in the old theory that the newly created being is formed by the admixture of the seed of the male with the supposed seed of the female.
Seminoles
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians who formerly occupied Florida, where some of them still remain. They belonged to the Creek Confideration.
Seminose
n.
(Chem.) A carbohydrate of the glucose group found in the thickened endosperm of certain seeds, and extracted as yellow sirup having a sweetish-bitter taste.
Seminude
a.
• Partially nude; half naked.
Seminymph
n.
(Zool.) The pupa of insects which undergo only a slight change in passing to the imago state.
Semioccasionally
adv.
• Once in a while; on rare occasions.
Semiofficial
a.
• Half official; having some official authority or importance; as, a semiofficial statement.
Semiopacous
a.
• Semiopaque.
Semiopal
n.
(Min.) A variety of opal not possessing opalescence.
Semiopaque
a.
• Half opaque; only half transparent.
Semiorbicular
a.
• Having the shape of a half orb or sphere.
Semiotic
a.
• Same as Semeiotic.
Semiotics
n.
• Same as Semeiotics.
Semious
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Sim; monkeylike.
Semioval
a.
• Half oval.
Semiovate
a.
• Half ovate.
Semioxygenated
a.
• Combined with oxygen only in part.
Semipagan
a.
• Half pagan.
Semiparabola
n.
(Geom.) One branch of a parabola, being terminated at the principal vertex of the curve.
Semiped
n.
(Pros.) A half foot in poetry.
Semipedal
a.
(Pres.) Containing a half foot.
Semipellucid
a.
• Half clear, or imperfectly transparent; as, a semipellucid gem.
Semipellucidity
n.
• The qualiti or state of being imperfectly transparent.
Semipenniform
a.
(Anat.) Half or partially penniform; as, a semipenniform muscle.
Semiperspicuous
a.
• Half transparent; imperfectly clear; semipellucid.
Semiphlogisticated
a.
(Old Chem.) Partially impregnated with phlogiston.
Semiplume
n.
(Zool.) A feather which has a plumelike web, with the shaft of an ordinary feather.
Semiprecious
a.
• Somewhat precious; as, semiprecious stones or metals.
Semiproof
n.
• Half proof; evidence from the testimony of a single witness.
Semiquaver
n.
(Mus.) A note of half the duration of the quaver; — now usually called a sixsteenth note.
Semiquintile
n.
(Astrol.) An aspect of the planets when distant from each other half of the quintile, or thirty-six degrees.
Semirecondite
a.
(Zool.) Half hidden or half covered; said of the head of an insect when half covered by the shield of the thorax.
Semiring
n.
(Anat.) One of the incomplete rings of the upper part of the bronchial tubes of most birds. The semerings form an essential part of the syrinx, or musical organ, of singing birds.
Semisavage
a.
• Half savage.
n.
• One who is half savage.
Semisextile
n.
(Astrol.) An aspect of the planets when they are distant from each other the twelfth part of a circle, or thirty degrees.
Semisolid
a.
• Partially solid.
Semisoun
n.
• A half sound; a low tone.
Semispheroidal
a.
• Formed like a half spheroid.
Semisteel
n.
• Puddled steel
Semita
n.
(Zool.) A fasciole of a spatangoid sea urchin.
Semitangent
n.
(Geom.) The tangent of half an arc.
Semite
n.
• One belonging to the Semitic race. Also used adjectively.
Semiterete
a.
(Nat. Hist.) Half terete.
Semitertian
a.
(Med.) Having the characteristics of both a tertian and a quotidian intermittent.
n.
• An intermittent combining the characteristics of a tertian and a quotidian.
Semitic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Shem or his descendants; belonging to that division of the Caucasian race which includes the Arabs, Jews, and related races.
Semitism
n.
• A Semitic idiom; a word of Semitic origin.
Semitone
n.
(Mus.) Half a tone; — the name commonly applied to the smaller intervals of the diatonic scale.
Semitonic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a semitone; consisting of a semitone, or of semitones.
Semitransept
n.
(Arch.) The half of a transept; as, the north semitransept of a church.
Semitranslucent
a.
• Slightly clear; transmitting light in a slight degree.
Semitransparency
n.
• Imperfect or partial transparency.
Semitransparent
a.
• Half or imperfectly transparent.
Semiverticillate
a.
• Partially verticillate.
Semivif
a.
• Only half alive.
Semivitreous
a.
• Partially vitreous.
Semivitrification
n.
• The quality or state of being semivitrified.
• A substance imperfectly vitrified.
Semivitrified
a.
• Half or imperfectly vitrified; partially converted into glass.
Semivocal
a.
(Phon.) Of or pertaining to a semivowel; half cocal; imperfectly sounding.
Semivowel
n.
(Phon.) A sound intermediate between a vowel and a consonant, or partaking of the nature of both, as in the English w and y.
• The sign or letter representing such a sound.
Semiweekly
a.
• Coming, or made, or done, once every half week; as, a semiweekly newspaper; a semiweekly trip.
n.
• That which comes or happens once every half week, esp. a semiweekly periodical.
adv.
• At intervals of half a week each.
Semolella
n.
• See Semolina.
Semolina
n.
• The fine, hard parts of wheat, rounded by the attrition of the millstones, — used in cookery.
Semolino
n.
• Same as Semolina.
Semopermanent
n.
• Half or partly permanent.
Semoule
n.
• Same as Semolina.
Sempervirent
a.
• Always fresh; evergreen.
Sempervive
n.
(Bot.) The houseleek.
Sempervivum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of fleshy-leaved plants, of which the houseleek (Sempervivum tectorum) is the commonest species.
Sempiternal
a.
• Of neverending duration; everlasting; endless; having beginning, but no end.
• Without beginning or end; eternal.
Sempiterne
a.
• Sempiternal.
Sempiternity
n.
• Future duration without end; the relation or state of being sempiternal.
Sempre
adv.
(Mus.) Always; throughout; as, sempre piano, always soft.
Sempster
n.
• A seamster.
Sempstress
n.
• A seamstress.
Sempstressy
n.
• Seamstressy.
Semster
n.
• A seamster.
Semuncia
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A Roman coin equivalent to one twenty-fourth part of a Roman pound.
Sen
n.
• A Japanese coin, worth about one half of a cent.
adv., prep., & conj.
• Since.
Senary
a.
• Of six; belonging to six; containing six.
Senate
n.
• An assembly or council having the highest deliberative and legislative functions.
(Anc. Rom.) A body of elders appointed or elected from among the nobles of the nation, and having supreme legislative authority.
• The upper and less numerous branch of a legislature in various countries, as in France, in the United States, in most of the separate States of the United States, and in some Swiss cantons
• In general, a legislative body; a state council; the legislative department of government
• The governing body of the Universities of Cambridge and London.
• In some American colleges, a council of elected students, presided over by the president of the college, to which are referred cases of discipline and matters of general concern affecting the students.
Senator
n.
• A member of a senate.
(O.Eng.Law) A member of the king's council; a king's councilor.
Senatorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a senator, or a senate; becoming to a senator, or a senate; as, senatorial duties; senatorial dignity.
• Entitled to elect a senator, or by senators; as, the senatorial districts of a State.
Senatorially
adv.
• In a senatorial manner.
Senatorian
a.
• Senatorial.
Senatorious
a.
• Senatorial.
Senatorship
n.
• The office or dignity of a senator.
Senatusconsult
n.
• A decree of the Roman senate.
Send
v. t.
• To cause to go in any manner; to dispatch; to commission or direct to go; as, to send a messenger.
• To give motion to; to cause to be borne or carried; to procure the going, transmission, or delivery of; as, to send a message.
• To emit; to impel; to cast; to throw; to hurl; as, to send a ball, an arrow, or the like.
• To cause to be or to happen; to bestow; to inflict; to grant; — sometimes followed by a dependent proposition.
v. i.
• To dispatch an agent or messenger to convey a message, or to do an errand.
(Naut.) To pitch; as, the ship sends forward so violently as to endanger her masts.
n.
(Naut.) The impulse of a wave by which a vessel is carried bodily.
Sendal
n.
• A light thin stuff of silk.
Sender
n.
• One who sends.
Senecas
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians who formerly inhabited a part of Western New York. This tribe was the most numerous and most warlike of the Five Nations.
Senecio
n.
(Bot.) A very large genus of composite plants including the groundsel and the golden ragwort.
Senectitude
n.
• Old age.
Senega
n.
(Med.) Seneca root.
Senegal
n.
• Gum senegal. See under Gum.
Senegin
n.
(Med. Chem.) A substance extracted from the rootstock of the Polygala Senega (Seneca root), and probably identical with polygalic acid.
Senescence
n.
• The state of growing old; decay by time.
Senescent
a.
• Growing old; decaying with the lapse of time.
Seneschal
n.
• An officer in the houses of princes and dignitaries, in the Middle Ages, who had the superintendence of feasts and domestic ceremonies; a steward. Sometimes the seneschal had the dispensing of justice, and was given high military commands.
Seneschalship
n.
• The office, dignity, or jurisdiction of a seneschal.
Senge
v. t.
• To singe.
Sengreen
n.
(Bot.) The houseleek.
Senile
a.
• Of or pertaining to old age; proceeding from, or characteristic of, old age; affected with the infirmities of old age; as, senile weakness.
Senility
n.
• The quality or state of being senile; old age.
Senior
a.
• More advanced than another in age; prior in age; elder; hence, more advanced in dignity, rank, or office; superior; as, senior member; senior counsel.
• Belonging to the final year of the regular course in American colleges, or in professional schools.
n.
• A person who is older than another; one more advanced in life.
• One older in office, or whose entrance upon office was anterior to that of another; one prior in grade.
• An aged person; an older.
• One in the fourth or final year of his collegiate course at an American college; — originally called senior sophister; also, one in the last year of the course at a professional schools or at a seminary.
Seniority
n.
• The quality or state of being senior.
Seniorize
v. i.
• To exercise authority; to rule; to lord it.
Seniory
n.
• Seniority.
Senna
n.
(Med.) The leaves of several leguminous plants of the genus Cassia. (C. acutifolia. C. angustifolia, etc.). They constitute a valuable but nauseous cathartic medicine.
(Bot.) The plants themselves, native to the East, but now cultivated largely in the south of Europe and in the West Indies.
Sennachy
n.
• See Seannachie.
Sennet
n.
• A signal call on a trumpet or cornet for entrance or exit on the stage.
n.
(Zool.) The barracuda.
Sennight
n.
• The space of seven nights and days; a week.
Sennit
n.
(Naut.) A braided cord or fabric formed by plaiting together rope yarns or other small stuff.
• Plaited straw or palm leaves for making hats.
Senocular
a.
• Having six eyes.
Senonian
a.
(Geol.) In european geology, a name given to the middle division of the Upper Cretaceous formation.
Senor
n.
• A Spanish title of courtesy corresponding to the English Mr. or Sir; also, a gentleman.
Senora
n.
• A Spanish title of courtesy given to a lady; Mrs.; Madam; also, a lady.
Senorita
n.
• A Spanish title of courtesy given to a young lady; Miss; also, a young lady.
Sens
adv.
• Since.
Sensate
v. t.
• To feel or apprehend more or less distinctly through a sense, or the senses; as, to sensate light, or an odor.
Sensation
n.
(Physiol.) An impression, or the consciousness of an impression, made upon the central nervous organ, through the medium of a sensory or afferent nerve or one of the organs of sense; a feeling, or state of consciousness, whether agreeable or disagreeable, produced either by an external object (stimulus), or by some change in the internal state of the body.
• A purely spiritual or psychical affection; agreeable or disagreeable feelings occasioned by objects that are not corporeal or material.
• A state of excited interest or feeling, or that which causes it.
Sensational
a.
• Of or pertaining to sensation; as, sensational nerves.
• Of or pertaining to sensationalism, or the doctrine that sensation is the sole origin of knowledge.
• Suited or intended to excite temporarily great interest or emotion; melodramatic; emotional; as, sensational plays or novels; sensational preaching; sensational journalism; a sensational report.
Sensationalism
n.
(Metaph.) The doctrine held by Condillac, and by some ascribed to Locke, that our ideas originate solely in sensation, and consist of sensations transformed; sensualism; — opposed to intuitionalism, and rationalism.
• The practice or methods of sensational writing or speaking; as, the sensationalism of a novel.
Sensationalist
n.
(Metaph.) An advocate of, or believer in, philosophical sensationalism.
• One who practices sensational writing or speaking.
Sense
n.
(Physiol.) A faculty, possessed by animals, of perceiving external objects by means of impressions made upon certain organs (sensory or sense organs) of the body, or of perceiving changes in the condition of the body; as, the senses of sight, smell, hearing, taste, and touch. See Muscular sense, under Muscular, and Temperature sense, under Temperature.
• Perception by the sensory organs of the body; sensation; sensibility; feeling.
• Perception through the intellect; apprehension; recognition; understanding; discernment; appreciation.
• Sound perception and reasoning; correct judgment; good mental capacity; understanding; also, that which is sound, true, or reasonable; rational meaning.
• That which is felt or is held as a sentiment, view, or opinion; judgment; notion; opinion.
• Meaning; import; signification; as, the true sense of words or phrases; the sense of a remark.
• Moral perception or appreciation.
(Geom.) One of two opposite directions in which a line, surface, or volume, may be supposed to be described by the motion of a point, line, or surface.
v. t.
• To perceive by the senses; to recognize.
Senseful
a.
• Full of sense, meaning, or reason; reasonable; judicious.
Senseless
a.
• Destitute of, deficient in, or contrary to, sense; without sensibility or feeling; unconscious; stupid; foolish; unwise; unreasonable.
Sensery
n.
(Physiol.) Same as Sensorium.
Sensibility
n.
(Physiol.) The quality or state of being sensible, or capable of sensation; capacity to feel or perceive.
• The capacity of emotion or feeling, as distinguished from the intellect and the will; peculiar susceptibility of impression, pleasurable or painful; delicacy of feeling; quick emotion or sympathy; as, sensibility to pleasure or pain; sensibility to shame or praise; exquisite sensibility; — often used in the plural.
• Experience of sensation; actual feeling.
• That quality of an instrument which makes it indicate very slight changes of condition; delicacy; as, the sensibility of a balance, or of a thermometer.
Sensible
a.
• Capable of being perceived by the senses; apprehensible through the bodily organs; hence, also, perceptible to the mind; making an impression upon the sense, reason, or understanding; heat; sensible resistance.
• Having the capacity of receiving impressions from external objects; capable of perceiving by the instrumentality of the proper organs; liable to be affected physsically or mentally; impressible.
• Hence: Liable to impression from without; easily affected; having nice perception or acute feeling; sensitive; also, readily moved or affected by natural agents; delicate; as, a sensible thermometer.
• Perceiving or having perception, either by the senses or the mind; cognizant; perceiving so clearly as to be convinced; satisfied; persuaded.
• Having moral perception; capable of being affected by moral good or evil.
• Possessing or containing sense or reason; giftedwith, or characterized by, good or common sense; intelligent; wise.
n.
• Sensation; sensibility.
• That which impresses itself on the sense; anything perceptible.
• That which has sensibility; a sensitive being.
Sensibleness
n.
• The quality or state of being sensible; sensibility; appreciation; capacity of perception; susceptibility.
• Intelligence; reasonableness; good sense.
Sensibly
adv.
• In a sensible manner; so as to be perceptible to the senses or to the mind; appreciably; with perception; susceptibly; sensitively.
• With intelligence or good sense; judiciously.
Sensifacient
a.
• Converting into sensation.
Sensiferous
a.
• Exciting sensation; conveying sensation.
Sensific
a.
• Exciting sensation.
Sensificatory
a.
• Susceptible of, or converting into, sensation; as, the sensificatory part of a nervous system.
Sensigenous
a.
• Causing or exciting sensation.
Sensism
n.
• Same as Sensualism, 2 & 3.
Sensist
n.
• One who, in philosophy, holds to sensism.
Sensitive
a.
• Having sense of feeling; possessing or exhibiting the capacity of receiving impressions from external objects; as, a sensitive soul.
• Having quick and acute sensibility, either to the action of external objects, or to impressions upon the mind and feelings; highly susceptible; easily and acutely affected.
(Mech.) Having a capacity of being easily affected or moved; as, a sensitive thermometer; sensitive scales.
(Chem. & Photog.) Readily affected or changed by certain appropriate agents; as, silver chloride or bromide, when in contact with certain organic substances, is extremely sensitive to actinic rays.
• Serving to affect the sense; sensible.
• Of or pertaining to sensation; depending on sensation; as, sensitive motions; sensitive muscular motions excited by irritation.
Sensitivity
n.
• The quality or state of being sensitive; — used chiefly in science and the arts; as, the sensitivity of iodized silver.
Sensitize
v. t.
(Photog.) To render sensitive, or susceptible of being easily acted on by the actinic rays of the sun; as, sensitized paper or plate.
Sensitizer
n.
(Photog.) An agent that sensitizes.
Sensitory
n.
• See Sensory.
Sensive
a.
• Having sense or sensibility; sensitive.
Sensor
a.
• Sensory; as, the sensor nerves.
Sensorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to the sensorium; as, sensorial faculties, motions, powers.
Sensorium
n.
(Physiol.) The seat of sensation; the nervous center or centers to which impressions from the external world must be conveyed before they can be perceived; the place where external impressions are localized, and transformed into sensations, prior to being reflected to other parts of the organism; hence, the whole nervous system, when animated, so far as it is susceptible of common or special sensations.
Sensory
a.
(Physiol.) Of or pertaining to the sensorium or sensation; as, sensory impulses; — especially applied to those nerves and nerve fibers which convey to a nerve center impulses resulting in sensation; also sometimes loosely employed in the sense of afferent, to indicate nerve fibers which convey impressions of any kind to a nerve center.
Sensual
a.
• Pertaining to, consisting in, or affecting, the sense, or bodily organs of perception; relating to, or concerning, the body, in distinction from the spirit.
• Hence, not spiritual or intellectual; carnal; fleshly; pertaining to, or consisting in, the gratification of the senses, or the indulgence of appetites; wordly.
• Devoted to the pleasures of sense and appetite; luxurious; voluptuous; lewd; libidinous.
• Pertaining or peculiar to the philosophical doctrine of sensualism.
Sensualism
n.
• The condition or character of one who is sensual; subjection to sensual feelings and appetite; sensuality.
(Philos.) The doctrine that all our ideas, or the operations of the understanding, not only originate in sensation, but are transformed sensations, copies or relics of sensations; sensationalism; sensism.
(Ethics) The regarding of the gratification of the senses as the highest good.
Sensualist
n.
• One who is sensual; one given to the indulgence of the appetites or senses as the means of happiness.
• One who holds to the doctrine of sensualism.
Sensualistic
a.
• Sensual.
• Adopting or teaching the doctrines of sensualism.
Sensuality
n.
• The quality or state of being sensual; devotedness to the gratification of the bodily appetites; free indulgence in carnal or sensual pleasures; luxuriousness; voluptuousness; lewdness.
Sensualization
n.
• The act of sensualizing, or the state of being sensualized.
Sensualize
v. t.
• To make sensual; to subject to the love of sensual pleasure; to debase by carnal gratifications; to carnalize; as, sensualized by pleasure.
Sensually
adv.
• In a sensual manner.
Sensualness
n.
• Sensuality; fleshliness.
Sensuism
n.
• Sensualism.
Sensuosity
n.
• The quality or state of being sensuous; sensuousness.
Sensuous
a.
• Of or pertaining to the senses, or sensible objects; addressing the senses; suggesting pictures or images of sense.
• Highly susceptible to influence through the senses.
Sent
v. & n.
• See Scent, v. & n.
• obs. 3d pers. sing. pres. of Send, for sendeth.
• imp. & p. p. of Send.
Sentence
n.
• Sense; meaning; significance.
• An opinion; a decision; a determination; a judgment, especially one of an unfavorable nature.
• A philosophical or theological opinion; a dogma; as, Summary of the Sentences; Book of the Sentences
(Law) In civil and admiralty law, the judgment of a court pronounced in a cause; in criminal and ecclesiastical courts, a judgment passed on a criminal by a court or judge; condemnation pronounced by a judgical tribunal; doom. In common law, the term is exclusively used to denote the judgment in criminal cases.
• A short saying, usually containing moral instruction; a maxim; an axiom; a saw.
(Gram.) A combination of words which is complete as expressing a thought, and in writing is marked at the close by a period, or full point. See Proposition, 4.
v. t.
• To pass or pronounce judgment upon; to doom; to condemn to punishment; to prescribe the punishment of.
• To decree or announce as a sentence.
• To utter sentenciously.
Sentencer
n.
• One who pronounced a sentence or condemnation.
sentential
a.
• Comprising sentences; as, a sentential translation.
• Of or pertaining to a sentence, or full period; as, a sentential pause.
Sententially
adv.
• In a sentential manner.
Sententiarist
n.
• A sententiary.
Sententiary
n.
• One who read lectures, or commented, on the Sentences of Peter Lombard, Bishop of Paris (1159-1160), a school divine.
Sententiosity
n.
• The quality or state of being sententious.
Sententious
a.
• Abounding with sentences, axioms, and maxims; full of meaning; terse and energetic in expression; pithy; as, a sententious style or discourse; sententious truth.
• Comprising or representing sentences; sentential.
Sentery
n.
• A sentry.
Senteur
n.
• Scent.
Sentient
a.
• Having a faculty, or faculties, of sensation and perception. Specif. (Physiol.), especially sensitive; as, the sentient extremities of nerves, which terminate in the various organs or tissues.
n.
• One who has the faculty of perception; a sentient being.
Sentiently
adv.
• In a sentient or perceptive way.
Sentiment
n.
• A thought prompted by passion or feeling; a state of mind in view of some subject; feeling toward or respecting some person or thing; disposition prompting to action or expression.
• Hence, generally, a decision of the mind formed by deliberation or reasoning; thought; opinion; notion; judgment; as, to express one's sentiments on a subject.
• A sentence, or passage, considered as the expression of a thought; a maxim; a saying; a toast.
• Sensibility; feeling; tender susceptibility.
Sentimental
a.
• Having, expressing, or containing a sentiment or sentiments; abounding with moral reflections; containing a moral reflection; didactic.
• Inclined to sentiment; having an excess of sentiment or sensibility; indulging the sensibilities for their own sake; artificially or affectedly tender; — often in a reproachful sense.
• Addressed or pleasing to the emotions only, usually to the weaker and the unregulated emotions.
Sentimentalism
n.
• The quality of being sentimental; the character or behavior of a sentimentalist; sentimentality.
Sentimentalist
n.
• One who has, or affects, sentiment or fine feeling.
Sentimentality
n.
• The quality or state of being sentimental.
Sentimentalize
v. t.
• To regard in a sentimental manner; as, to sentimentalize a subject.
v. i.
• To think or act in a sentimental manner, or like a sentimentalist; to affect exquisite sensibility.
Sentimentally
adv.
• In a sentimental manner.
Sentine
n.
• A place for dregs and dirt; a sink; a sewer.
Sentinel
n.
• One who watches or guards; specifically (Mil.), a soldier set to guard an army, camp, or other place, from surprise, to observe the approach of danger, and give notice of it; a sentry.
• Watch; guard.
(Zool.) A marine crab (Podophthalmus vigil) native of the Indian Ocean, remarkable for the great length of its eyestalks; — called also sentinel crab.
v. t.
• To watch over like a sentinel.
• To furnish with a sentinel; to place under the guard of a sentinel or sentinels.
Sentisection
n.
• Painful vivisection; — opposed to callisection.
Sentry
n.
(Mil.) A soldier placed on guard; a sentinel.
• Guard; watch, as by a sentinel.
Senza
prep.
(Mus.) Without; as, senza stromenti, without instruments.
Sepal
n.
(Bot.) A leaf or division of the calyx.
Sepaled
a.
(Bot.) Having one or more sepals.
Sepaline
a.
(Bot.) Relating to, or having the nature of, sepals.
Sepalody
n.
(Bot.) The metamorphosis of other floral organs into sepals or sepaloid bodies.
Sepaloid
a.
(Bot.) Like a sepal, or a division of a calyx.
Sepalous
a.
(Bot.) Having, or relating to, sepals; — used mostly in composition. See under Sepal.
Separability
n.
• Quality of being separable or divisible; divisibility; separableness.
Separable
a.
• Capable of being separated, disjoined, disunited, or divided; as, the separable parts of plants; qualities not separable from the substance in which they exist.
Separate
v. t.
• To disunite; to divide; to disconnect; to sever; to part in any manner.
• To come between; to keep apart by occupying the space between; to lie between; as, the Mediterranean Sea separates Europe and Africa.
• To set apart; to select from among others, as for a special use or service.
v. i.
• To part; to become disunited; to be disconnected; to withdraw from one another; as, the family separated.
p. a.
• Divided from another or others; disjoined; disconnected; separated; — said of things once connected.
• Unconnected; not united or associated; distinct; — said of things that have not been connected.
• Disunited from the body; disembodied; as, a separate spirit; the separate state of souls.
Separatical
a.
• Of or pertaining to separatism in religion; schismatical.
Separating
a.
• Designed or employed to separate.
Separation
n.
• The act of separating, or the state of being separated, or separate.
• Chemical analysis
• Divorce
(Steam Boilers) The operation of removing water from steam.
Separatism
n.
• The character or act of a separatist; disposition to withdraw from a church; the practice of so withdrawing.
Separatist
n.
• One who withdraws or separates himself; especially, one who withdraws from a church to which he has belonged; a seceder from an established church; a dissenter; a nonconformist; a schismatic; a sectary.
Separatistic
a.
• Of or pertaining to separatists; characterizing separatists; schismatical.
Separative
a.
• Causing, or being to cause, separation.
Separator
n.
• One who, or that which, separates.
(Steam Boilers) A device for depriving steam of particles of water mixed with it
(Mining) An apparatus for sorting pulverized ores into grades, or separating them from gangue
(Weaving) An instrument used for spreading apart the threads of the warp in the loom, etc.
Separatory
a.
• Separative.
n.
(Chem.) An apparatus used in separating, as a separating funnel.
(Surg.) A surgical instrument for separating the pericranium from the cranium.
Separatrix
n.
(Arith.) The decimal point; the dot placed at the left of a decimal fraction, to separate it from the whole number which it follows. The term is sometimes also applied to other marks of separation.
Sepawn
n.
• See Supawn.
Sepelible
a.
• Admitting of burial.
Sepelition
n.
• Burial.
Sephen
n.
(Zool.) A large sting ray of the genus Trygon, especially T. sephen of the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. The skin is an article of commerce.
Sepia
n.
(Zool.) The common European cuttlefish.
• A genus comprising the common cuttlefish and numerous similar species. See Illustr. under Cuttlefish.
• A pigment prepared from the ink, or black secretion, of the sepia, or cuttlefish. Treated with caustic potash, it has a rich brown color; and this mixed with a red forms Roman sepia. Cf. India ink, under India.
a.
• Of a dark brown color, with a little red in its composition; also, made of, or done in, sepia.
Sepic
a.
• Of or pertaining to sepia; done in sepia; as, a sepic drawing.
Sepidaceous
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the cuttlefishes of the genus Sepia.
Sepiment
n.
• Something that separates; a hedge; a fence.
Sepiolite
n.
(Min.) Meerschaum. See Meerschaum.
Sepiostare
n.
(Zool.) The bone or shell of cuttlefish. See Illust. under Cuttlefish.
Sepon
n.
• See Supawn
Sepose
v. t.
• To set apart.
Seposit
v. t.
• To set aside; to give up.
Seposition
n.
• The act of setting aside, or of giving up.
Sepoy
n.
• A native of India employed as a soldier in the service of a European power, esp. of Great Britain; an Oriental soldier disciplined in the European manner.
Seppuku
n.
• Same as Hara-kiri.
Sepsin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A soluble poison (ptomaine) present in putrid blood. It is also formed in the putrefaction of proteid matter in general.
Sepsis
n.
(Med.) The poisoning of the system by the introduction of putrescent material into the blood.
Sept
n.
• A clan, tribe, or family, proceeding from a common progenitor; — used especially of the ancient clans in Ireland.
Septaemia
n.
(Med.) Septicaemia.
Septal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a septum or septa, as of a coral or a shell.
Septane
n.
(Chem.) See Heptane.
Septangle
n.
(Geom.) A figure which has seven angles; a heptagon.
Septangular
a.
• Heptagonal.
Septarium
n.
(Geol.) A flattened concretionary nodule, usually of limestone, intersected within by cracks which are often filled with calcite, barite, or other minerals.
Septate
a.
• Divided by partition or partitions; having septa; as, a septate pod or shell.
September
n.
• The ninth month of the year, containing thurty days.
Septemberer
n.
• A Setembrist.
Septembrist
n.
• An agent in the massacres in Paris, committed in patriotic frenzy, on the 22d of September, 1792.
Septemfluous
a.
• Flowing sevenfold; divided into seven streams or currents.
Septempartite
a.
• Divided nearly to the base into seven parts; as, a septempartite leaf.
Septemtrioun
n.
• Septentrion.
Septemvir
n.
(Rom. Hist.) One of a board of seven men associated in some office.
Septemvirate
n.
• The office of septemvir; a government by septimvirs.
Septenary
a.
• Consisting of, or relating to, seven; as, a septenary number.
• Lasting seven years; continuing seven years.
n.
• The number seven.
Septenate
a.
(Bot.) Having parts in sevens; heptamerous.
Septennate
n.
• A period of seven years; as, the septennate during which the President of the French Republic holds office.
Septennial
a.
• Lasting or continuing seven years; as, septennial parliaments.
• Happening or returning once in every seven years; as, septennial elections in England.
Septennially
adv.
• Once in seven years.
Septentrial
a.
• Septentrional.
Septentrio
n.
(Astron.) The constellation Ursa Major.
Septentrion
n.
• The north or northern regions.
Septentrionality
n.
• Northerliness.
Septentrionally
adv.
• Northerly.
Septentrionate
v. i.
• To tend or point toward the north; to north.
Septfoil
n.
(Bot.) A European herb, the tormentil. See Tormentil.
(Arch.) An ornamental foliation having seven lobes. Cf. Cinquefoil, Quarterfoil, and Trefoil.
(Eccl.Art.) A typical figure, consisting of seven equal segments of a circle, used to denote the gifts of the Holy Chost, the seven sacraments as recognized by the Roman Catholic Church, etc.
Septic
a.
(Math.) Of the seventh degree or order.
n.
(Alg.) A quantic of the seventh degree.
n.
• A substance that promotes putrefaction.
Septicaemia
n.
(Med.) A poisoned condition of the blood produced by the absorption into it of septic or putrescent material; blood poisoning. It is marked by chills, fever, prostration, and inflammation of the different serous membranes and of the lungs, kidneys, and other organs.
Septically
adv.
• In a septic manner; in a manner tending to promote putrefaction.
Septicidal
a.
(Bot.) Dividing the partitions; — said of a method of dehiscence in which a pod splits through the partitions and is divided into its component carpels.
Septicity
n.
• Tendency to putrefaction; septic quality.
Septifarious
a.
(Bot.) Turned in seven different ways.
Septiferous
a.
(Bot.) Bearing a partition; — said of the valves of a capsule.
a.
• Conveying putrid poison; as, the virulence of septiferous matter.
Septifluous
a.
• Flowing in seven streams; septemfluous.
Septifolious
a.
(Bot.) Having seven leaves.
Septiform
a.
• Having the form of a septum.
Septifragal
a.
(Bot.) Breaking from the partitions; — said of a method of dehiscence in which the valves of a pod break away from the partitions, and these remain attached to the common axis.
Septilateral
a.
• Having seven sides; as, a septilateral figure.
Septillion
n.
• According to the French method of numeration (which is followed also in the United States), the number expressed by a unit with twenty-four ciphers annexed. According to the English method, the number expressed by a unit with forty-two ciphers annexed. See Numeration.
Septimole
n.
(Mus.) A group of seven notes to be played in the time of four or six.
Septinsular
a.
• Consisting of seven islands; as, the septinsular republic of the Ionian Isles.
Septisyllable
n.
• A word of seven syllables.
Septoic
a.
(Chem.) See Heptoic.
Septomaxillary
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the nasal septum and the maxilla; situated in the region of these parts.
n.
• A small bone between the nasal septum and the maxilla in many reptiles and amphibians.
Septuagenarian
n.
• A person who is seventy years of age; a septuagenary.
Septuagenary
a.
• Consisting of seventy; also, seventy years old.
n.
• A septuagenarian.
Septuagesima
n.
(Eccl.) The third Sunday before Lent; — so called because it is about seventy days before Easter.
Septuagesimal
a.
• Consisting of seventy days, years, etc.; reckoned by seventies.
Septuagint
n.
• A Greek version of the Old Testament; — so called because it was believed to be the work of seventy (or rather of seventy-two) translators.
Septuary
n.
• Something composed of seven; a week.
Septulate
a.
(Bot.) Having imperfect or spurious septa.
Septulum
n.
(Anat.) A little septum; a division between small cavities or parts.
Septum
n.
• A wall separating two cavities; a partition; as, the nasal septum.
(Bot.) A partition that separates the cells of a fruit.
(Zool.) One of the radial calcareous plates of a coral.
• One of the transverse partitions dividing the shell of a mollusk, or of a rhizopod, into several chambers. See Illust. under Nautilus.
• One of the transverse partitions dividing the body cavity of an annelid.
Septuor
n.
(Mus.) A septet.
Septuple
a.
• Seven times as much; multiplied by seven; sevenfold.
v. t.
• To multiply by seven; to make sevenfold.
Sepulchral
a.
• Of or pertaining to burial, to the grave, or to monuments erected to the memory of the dead; as, a sepulchral stone; a sepulchral inscription.
• Unnaturally low and grave; hollow in tone; — said of sound, especially of the voice.
Sepulture
n.
• The act of depositing the dead body of a human being in the grave; burial; interment.
• A sepulcher; a grave; a place of burial.

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