Dictionary Of The English Language "Pre"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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Prescient
a.
• Having knowledge of coming events; foreseeing; conscious beforehand.
Preaccusation
n.
• Previous accusation.
Preace
v. & n.
• Press.
Preach
v. i.
• To proclaim or publish tidings; specifically, to proclaim the gospel; to discourse publicly on a religious subject, or from a text of Scripture; to deliver a sermon.
• To give serious advice on morals or religion; to discourse in the manner of a preacher.
v. t.
• To proclaim by public discourse; to utter in a sermon or a formal religious harangue.
• To inculcate in public discourse; to urge with earnestness by public teaching.
• To deliver or pronounce; as, to preach a sermon.
• To teach or instruct by preaching; to inform by preaching.
• To advise or recommend earnestly.
n.
• A religious discourse.
Preacher
n.
• One who preaches; one who discourses publicly on religious subjects.
• One who inculcates anything with earnestness.
Preachership
n.
• The office of a preacher.
Preachify
v. i.
• To discourse in the manner of a preacher.
Preaching
n.
• The act of delivering a religious discourse; the art of sermonizing; also, a sermon; a public religious discourse; serious, earnest advice.
Preachman
n.
• A preacher; — so called in contempt.
Preachment
n.
• A religious harangue; a sermon; — used derogatively.
Preacquaint
v. t.
• To acquaint previously or beforehand.
Preacquaintance
n.
• Previous acquaintance or knowledge.
Preact
v. t.
• To act beforehand; to perform previously.
Preaction
n.
• Previous action.
Preadamic
a.
• Prior to Adam.
Preadamite
n.
• An inhabitant of the earth before Adam.
• One who holds that men existed before Adam.
Preadamitic
a.
• Existing or occurring before Adam; preadamic; as, preadamitic periods.
Preadjustment
n.
• Previous adjustment.
Preadministration
n.
• Previous administration.
Preadmonish
v. t.
• To admonish previously.
Preadmonition
n.
• Previous warning or admonition; forewarning.
Preadvertise
v. t.
• To advertise beforehand; to preannounce publicly.
Preamble
n.
• A introductory portion; an introduction or preface, as to a book, document, etc.; specifically, the introductory part of a statute, which states the reasons and intent of the law.
v. t. & i.
• To make a preamble to; to preface; to serve as a preamble.
Preambulary
a.
• Of or pertaining to a preamble; introductory; contained or provided for in a preamble.
Preambulate
v. i.
• To walk before.
Preambulation
n.
• A walking or going before; precedence.
• A preamble.
Preambulatory
a.
• Preceding; going before; introductory.
Preambulous
a.
• See Perambulatory.
Preannounce
v. t.
• To announce beforehand.
Preantenultimate
a.
• Being or indicating the fourth syllable from the end of a word, or that before the antepenult.
Preaortic
a.
(Anat.) In front, or on the ventral side, of the aorta.
Preappoint
v. t.
• To appoint previously, or beforehand.
Preappointment
n.
• Previous appointment.
Preapprehension
n.
• An apprehension or opinion formed before examination or knowledge.
Prearm
v. t.
• To forearm.
Prearrange
v. t.
• To arrange beforehand.
Prease
v. t. & i.
• To press; to crowd.
n.
• A press; a crowd.
Preassurance
n.
• Previous assurance.
Preataxic
a.
(Med.) Occurring before the symptom ataxia has developed; — applied to the early symptoms of locomotor ataxia.
Preaudience
n.
(Eng. Law) Precedence of rank at the bar among lawyers.
Preaxial
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of any transverse axis in the body of an animal; anterior; cephalic; esp., in front, or on the anterior, or cephalic (that is, radial or tibial) side of the axis of a limb.
Prebendal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a prebend; holding a prebend; as, a prebendal priest or stall.
Prebendary
n.
• A clergyman attached to a collegiate or cathedral church who enjoys a prebend in consideration of his officiating at stated times in the church. See Note under Benefice, n., 3.
• A prebendaryship.
Prebendaryship
n.
• The office of a prebendary.
Prebendate
v. t.
• To invest with the office of prebendary; to present to a prebend.
Prebendship
n.
• A prebendaryship.
Prebronchial
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the bronchus; — applied especially to an air sac on either side of the esophagus of birds.
Precalculate
v. t.
• To calculate or determine beforehand; to prearrange.
Precant
n.
• One who prays.
Precarious
a.
• Depending on the will or pleasure of another; held by courtesy; liable to be changed or lost at the pleasure of another; as, precarious privileges.
• Held by a doubtful tenure; depending on unknown causes or events; exposed to constant risk; not to be depended on for certainty or stability; uncertain; as, a precarious state of health; precarious fortunes.
Precation
n.
• The act of praying; supplication; entreaty.
Precaution
n.
• Previous caution or care; caution previously employed to prevent mischief or secure good; as, his life was saved by precaution.
• A measure taken beforehand to ward off evil or secure good or success; a precautionary act; as, to take precautions against accident.
v. t.
• To warn or caution beforehand.
• To take precaution against.
Precautional
a.
• Precautionary.
Precautionary
a.
• Of or pertaining to precaution, or precautions; as, precautionary signals.
Precautious
a.
• Taking or using precaution; precautionary.
Precedaneous
a.
• Preceding; antecedent; previous.
Precede
v. t.
• To go before in order of time; to occur first with relation to anything.
• To go before in place, rank, or importance.
• To cause to be preceded; to preface; to introduce; — used with by or with before the instrumental object.
Precedent
a.
• Going before; anterior; preceding; antecedent; as, precedent services.
n.
• Something done or said that may serve as an example to authorize a subsequent act of the same kind; an authoritative example.
• A preceding circumstance or condition; an antecedent; hence, a prognostic; a token; a sign.
• A rough draught of a writing which precedes a finished copy.
(Law) A judicial decision which serves as a rule for future determinations in similar or analogous cases; an authority to be followed in courts of justice; forms of proceeding to be followed in similar cases.
Precedented
a.
• Having a precedent; authorized or sanctioned by an example of a like kind.
Precedential
a.
• Of the nature of a precedent; having force as an example for imitation; as, precedential transactions.
Precedently
adv.
• Beforehand; antecedently.
Preceding
a.
• Going before; — opposed to following.
(Astron.) In the direction toward which stars appear to move. See Following, 2.
Precel
v. t. & i.
• To surpass; to excel; to exceed.
Precellent
a.
• Excellent; surpassing.
Precent
n.
• Any commandment, instruction, or order intended as an authoritative rule of action; esp., a command respecting moral conduct; an injunction; a rule.
(Law) A command in writing; a species of writ or process.
Precentor
n.
• A leader of a choir; a directing singer.
• The leader of the choir in a cathedral; — called also the chanter or master of the choir.
• The leader of the congregational singing in Scottish and other churches.
Precentorship
n.
• The office of a precentor.
Precept
v. t.
• To teach by precepts.
Preceptial
a.
• Preceptive.
Preception
n.
• A precept.
Preceptive
a.
• Containing or giving precepts; of the nature of precepts; didactic; as, the preceptive parts of the Scriptures.
Preceptor
n.
• One who gives commands, or makes rules; specifically, the master or principal of a school; a teacher; an instructor.
• The head of a preceptory among the Knights Templars.
Preceptorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a preceptor.
Preceptory
a.
• Preceptive.
n.
• A religious house of the Knights Templars, subordinate to the temple or principal house of the order in London. See Commandery, n., 2.
Preceptress
n.
• A woman who is the principal of a school; a female teacher.
Precession
n.
• The act of going before, or forward.
Precessional
a.
• Of or pertaining to pression; as, the precessional movement of the equinoxes.
Precessor
n.
• A predecessor.
Precinct
n.
• The limit or exterior line encompassing a place; a boundary; a confine; limit of jurisdiction or authority; — often in the plural; as, the precincts of a state.
• A district within certain boundaries; a minor territorial or jurisdictional division; as, an election precinct; a school precinct.
• A parish or prescribed territory attached to a church, and taxed for its support.
Preciosity
n.
• Preciousness; something precious.
Precious
a.
• Of great price; costly; as, a precious stone.
• Of great value or worth; very valuable; highly esteemed; dear; beloved; as, precious recollections.
• Particular; fastidious; overnice.
Preciously
adv.
• In a precious manner; expensively; extremely; dearly. Also used ironically.
Preciousness
n.
• The quality or state of being precious; costliness; dearness.
Precipe
n.
(Law) See Praecipe, and Precept.
Precipice
n.
• A sudden or headlong fall.
• A headlong steep; a very steep, perpendicular, or overhanging place; an abrupt declivity; a cliff.
Precipient
a.
• Commanding; directing.
Precipitability
n.
• The quality or state of being precipitable.
Precipitable
a.
• Capable of being precipitated, or cast to the bottom, as a substance in solution. See Precipitate, n. (Chem.)
Precipitant
a.
• Falling or rushing headlong; rushing swiftly, violently, or recklessly; moving precipitately.
• Unexpectedly or foolishly brought on or hastened; rashly hurried; hasty; sudden; reckless.
n.
(Chem.) Any force or reagent which causes the formation of a precipitate.
Precipitantly
adv.
• With rash or foolish haste; in headlong manner.
Precipitantness
n.
• The quality or state of being precipitant; precipitation.
Precipitate
a.
• Overhasty; rash; as, the king was too precipitate in declaring war.
• Lacking due deliberation or care; hurried; said or done before the time; as, a precipitate measure.
• Falling, flowing, or rushing, with steep descent; headlong.
• Ending quickly in death; brief and fatal; as, a precipitate case of disease.
n.
(Chem.) An insoluble substance separated from a solution in a concrete state by the action of some reagent added to the solution, or of some force, such as heat or cold. The precipitate may fall to the bottom (whence the name), may be diffused through the solution, or may float at or near the surface.
v. t.
• To throw headlong; to cast down from a precipice or height.
• To urge or press on with eager haste or violence; to cause to happen, or come to a crisis, suddenly or too soon; as, precipitate a journey, or a conflict.
(Chem.) To separate from a solution, or other medium, in the form of a precipitate; as, water precipitates camphor when in solution with alcohol.
v. i.
• To dash or fall headlong.
• To hasten without preparation.
(Chem.) To separate from a solution as a precipitate. See Precipitate, n.
Precipitately
adv.
• In a precipitate manner; headlong; hastily; rashly.
Precipitation
n.
• The act of precipitating, or the state of being precipitated, or thrown headlong.
• A falling, flowing, or rushing downward with violence and rapidity.
• Great hurry; rash, tumultuous haste; impetuosity.
(Chem.) The act or process from a solution.
Precipitator
n.
• One who precipitates, or urges on with vehemence or rashness.
Precipitious
a.
• Precipitous.
Precipitous
a.
• Steep, like a precipice; as, a precipitous cliff or mountain.
• Headlong; as, precipitous fall.
• Hasty; rash; quick; sudden; precipitate; as, precipitous attempts. Sir T. Browne. "Marian's low, precipitous
Precise
a.
• Having determinate limitations; exactly or sharply defined or stated; definite; exact; nice; not vague or equivocal; as, precise rules of morality.
• Strictly adhering or conforming to rule; very nice or exact; punctilious in conduct or ceremony; formal; ceremonious.
Precisian
n.
• One who limits, or restrains.
• An overprecise person; one rigidly or ceremoniously exact in the observance of rules; a formalist; — formerly applied to the English Puritans.
Precisianism
n.
• The quality or state of being a precisian; the practice of a precisian.
Precisianist
n.
• A precisian.
Precision
n.
• The quality or state of being precise; exact limitation; exactness; accuracy; strict conformity to a rule or a standard; definiteness.
Precisive
a.
• Cutting off; (Logic) exactly limiting by cutting off all that is not absolutely relative to the purpose; as, precisive censure; precisive abstraction.
Preclude
v. t.
• To put a barrier before; hence, to shut out; to hinder; to stop; to impede.
• To shut out by anticipative action; to prevent or hinder by necessary consequence or implication; to deter action of, access to, employment of, etc.; to render ineffectual; to obviate by anticipation.
Preclusion
n.
• The act of precluding, or the state of being precluded; a shutting out.
Preclusive
a.
• Shutting out; precluding, or tending to preclude; hindering.
Precoce
a.
• Precocious.
Precoces
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Praecoces.
Precocious
a.
• Ripe or mature before the proper or natural time; early or prematurely ripe or developed; as, precocious trees.
• Developed more than is natural or usual at a given age; exceeding what is to be expected of one's years; too forward; — used especially of mental forwardness; as, a precocious child; precocious talents.
Precociously
adv.
• In a precocious manner.
Precoetanean
n.
• One contemporary with, but older than, another.
Precogita/tion
n.
• Previous cogitation.
Precogitate
v. t.
• To cogitate beforehand.
Precognition
n.
• Previous cognition.
(Scots Law) A preliminary examination of a criminal case with reference to a prosecution.
Precognizable
a.
• Cognizable beforehand.
Precognosce
v. t.
(Scots Law) To examine beforehand, as witnesses or evidence.
Precollection
n.
• A collection previously made.
Precompose
v. t.
• To compose beforehand.
Preconceit
n.
• An opinion or notion formed beforehand; a preconception.
Preconceive
v. t.
• To conceive, or form an opinion of, beforehand; to form a previous notion or idea of.
Preconception
n.
• The act of preconceiving; conception or opinion previously formed.
Preconcert
v. t.
• To concert or arrange beforehand; to settle by previous agreement.
n.
• Something concerted or arranged beforehand; a previous agreement.
Preconcerted
a.
• Previously arranged; agreed upon beforehand.
Preconcertion
n.
• The act of preconcerting; preconcert.
Precondemn
v. t.
• To condemn beforehand.
Precondition
n.
• A previous or antecedent condition; a preliminary condition.
Preconform
v. t. & i.
• To conform by way anticipation.
Preconformity
n.
• Anticipative or antecedent conformity.
Preconizate
v. t.
• To proclaim; to publish; also, to summon; to call.
Preconization
n.
• A publishing by proclamation; a public proclamation.
(Eccl.) A formal approbation by the pope of a person nominated to an ecclesiastical dignity.
Preconize
v. t.
(Eccl.) To approve by preconization.
Preconquer
v. t.
• To conquer in anticipation.
Preconscious
a.
• Of or pertaining to a state before consciousness.
Preconsent
n.
• A previous consent.
Preconsign
v. t.
• To consign beforehand; to make a previous consignment of.
Preconsolidated
a.
• Consolidated beforehand.
Preconstitute
v. t.
• To constitute or establish beforehand.
Precontract
v. t.
• To contract, engage, or stipulate previously.
v. i.
• To make a previous contract or agreement.
n.
• A contract preceding another
(Law) a contract of marriage which, according to the ancient law, rendered void a subsequent marriage solemnized in violation of it.
Precontrive
v. t. & i.
• To contrive or plan beforehand.
Precoracoid
n.
(Anat.) The anterior part of the coracoid (often closely united with the clavicle) in the shoulder girdle of many reptiles and amphibians.
Precordial
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the heart; of or pertaining to the praecordia.
Precrural
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the leg or thigh; as, the precrural glands of the horse.
Precurrer
n.
• A precursor.
Precurse
n.
• A forerunning.
Precursive
a.
• Preceding; introductory; precursory.
Precursor
n.
• One who, or that which, precedes an event, and indicates its approach; a forerunner; a harbinger.
Precursorship
n.
• The position or condition of a precursor.
Precursory
a.
• Preceding as a precursor or harbinger; indicating something to follow; as, precursory symptoms of a fever.
n.
• An introduction.
Predacean
n.
(Zool.) A carnivorous animal.
Predaceous
a.
• Living by prey; predatory.
Predal
a.
• Of or pertaining to prey; plundering; predatory.
Predate
v. t.
• To date anticipation; to affix to (a document) an earlier than the actual date; to antedate; as, a predated deed or letter.
Predation
n.
• The act of pillaging.
Predatorily
adv.
• In a predatory manner.
Predatory
a.
• Characterized by plundering; practicing rapine; plundering; pillaging; as, a predatory excursion; a predatory party.
• Hungry; ravenous; as, predatory spirits.
(Zool.) Living by preying upon other animals; carnivorous.
Prede
v. i.
• To prey; to plunder.
n.
• Prey; plunder; booty.
Predecay
n.
• Premature decay.
Predecease
v. t.
• To die sooner than.
n.
• The death of one person or thing before another.
Predecessive
a.
• Going before; preceding.
Predecessor
n.
• One who precedes; one who has preceded another in any state, position, office, etc.; one whom another follows or comes after, in any office or position.
Predeclare
v. t.
• To declare or announce beforehand; to preannounce.
Prededication
n.
• A dedication made previously or beforehand.
Predefine
v. t.
• To define beforehand.
Predeliberation
n.
• Previous deliberation.
Predelineation
n.
• Previous delineation.
Predella
n.
• The step, or raised secondary part, of an altar; a superaltar; hence, in Italian painting, a band or frieze of several pictures running along the front of a superaltar, or forming a border or frame at the foot of an altarpiece.
Predesign
v. t.
• To design or purpose beforehand; to predetermine.
Predesignate
a.
(Logic) A term used by Sir William Hamilton to define propositions having their quantity indicated by a verbal sign; as, all, none, etc.; — contrasted with preindesignate, defining propositions of which the quantity is not so indicated.
Predestinarian
a.
• Of or pertaining to predestination; as, the predestinarian controversy.
n.
• One who believes in or supports the doctrine of predestination.
Predestinarianism
n.
• The system or doctrine of the predestinarians.
Predestinary
a.
• Predestinarian.
Predestinate
a.
• Predestinated; foreordained; fated.
v. t.
• To predetermine or foreordain; to appoint or ordain beforehand by an unchangeable purpose or decree; to preelect.
Predestination
n.
• The act of predestinating.
(Theol.) The purpose of Good from eternity respecting all events; especially, the preordination of men to everlasting happiness or misery. See Calvinism.
Predestinative
a.
• Determining beforehand; predestinating.
Predestinator
n.
• One who predestinates, or foreordains.
• One who holds to the doctrine of predestination; a predestinarian.
Predestine
v. t.
• To decree beforehand; to foreordain; to predestinate.
Predestiny
n.
• Predestination.
Predeterminable
a.
• Capable of being determined beforehand.
Predeterminate
a.
• Determined beforehand; as, the predeterminate counsel of God.
Predetermination
n.
• The act of previous determination; a purpose formed beforehand; as, the predetermination of God's will.
Predetermine
v. t.
• To determine (something) beforehand.
• To doom by previous decree; to foredoom.
v. i.
• To determine beforehand.
Predial
a.
• Consisting of land or farms; landed; as, predial estate; that is, real estate.
• Attached to land or farms; as, predial slaves.
• Issuing or derived from land; as, predial tithes.
Prediastolic
a.
(Physiol.) Preceding the diastole of the heart; as, a prediastolic friction sound.
Predicability
n.
• The quality or state of being predicable, or affirmable of something, or attributed to something.
Predicable
a.
• Capable of being predicated or affirmed of something; affirmable; attributable.
n.
• Anything affirmable of another; especially, a general attribute or notion as affirmable of, or applicable to, many individuals.
(Logic) One of the five most general relations of attributes involved in logical arrangements, namely, genus, species, difference, property, and accident.
Predicament
n.
• A class or kind described by any definite marks; hence, condition; particular situation or state; especially, an unfortunate or trying position or condition.
(Logic) See Category.
Predicamental
a.
• Of or pertaining to a predicament.
Predicant
a.
• Predicating; affirming; declaring; proclaiming; hence; preaching.
n.
• One who predicates, affirms, or proclaims; specifically, a preaching friar; a Dominican.
Predicate
v. t.
• To assert to belong to something; to affirm (one thing of another); as, to predicate whiteness of snow.
• To found; to base.
v. i.
• To affirm something of another thing; to make an affirmation.
n.
(Logic) That which is affirmed or denied of the subject. In these propositions, "Paper is white," "Ink is not white," whiteness is the predicate affirmed of paper and denied of ink.
(Gram.) The word or words in a proposition which express what is affirmed of the subject.
a.
• Predicated.
Predication
n.
• The act of predicating, or of affirming one thing of another; affirmation; assertion.
• Preaching.
Predicative
a.
• Expressing affirmation or predication; affirming; predicating, as, a predicative term.
Predicatory
a.
• Affirmative; positive.
Predicrotic
a.
(Physiol.) A term applied to the pulse wave sometimes seen in a pulse curve or sphygmogram, between the apex of the curve and the dicrotic wave.
Predict
v. t.
• To tell or declare beforehand; to foretell; to prophesy; to presage; as, to predict misfortune; to predict the return of a comet.
n.
• A prediction.
Predictable
a.
• That may be predicted.
Prediction
n.
• The act of foretelling; also, that which is foretold; prophecy.
Predictional
a.
• Prophetic; prognostic.
Predictive
a.
• Foretelling; prophetic; foreboding.
Predictor
n.
• One who predicts; a foreteller.
Predictory
a.
• Predictive.
Predigest
v. t.
(Med.) To subject (food) to predigestion or artificial digestion.
Predigestion
n.
• Digestion too soon performed; hasty digestion.
(Med.) Artificial digestion of food for use in illness or impaired digestion.
Predilect
v. t.
• To elect or choose beforehand.
Predilection
n.
• A previous liking; a prepossession of mind in favor of something; predisposition to choose or like; partiality.
Prediscover
v. t.
• To discover beforehand.
Prediscovery
n.
• A previous discovery.
Predisponency
n.
• The state of being predisposed; predisposition.
Predisponent
a.
• Disposing beforehand; predisposing.
n.
• That which predisposes.
Predispose
v. t.
• To dispose or incline beforehand; to give a predisposition or bias to; as, to predispose the mind to friendship.
• To make fit or susceptible beforehand; to give a tendency to; as, debility predisposes the body to disease.
Predisposition
n.
• The act of predisposing, or the state of being predisposed; previous inclination, tendency, or propensity; predilection; — applied to the mind; as, a predisposition to anger.
• Previous fitness or adaptation to any change, impression, or purpose; susceptibility; — applied to material things; as, the predisposition of the body to disease.
Predominance
n.
• The quality or state of being predominant; superiority; ascendency; prevalence; predomination.
(Astrol.) The superior influence of a planet.
Predominancy
n.
• Predominance.
Predominant
a.
• Having the ascendency over others; superior in strength, influence, or authority; prevailing; as, a predominant color; predominant excellence.
Predominantly
adv.
• In a predominant manner.
Predominate
v. i.
• To be superior in number, strength, influence, or authority; to have controlling power or influence; to prevail; to rule; to have the mastery; as, love predominated in her heart.
v. t.
• To rule over; to overpower.
Predomination
n.
• The act or state of predominating; ascendency; predominance.
Predoom
v. t.
• To foredoom.
Predorsal
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the back; immediately in front, or on the ventral side the dorsal part of the vertebral column.
Predy
a.
• Cleared and ready for engagement, as a ship.
Preedy
adv.
• With ease.
Preef
n.
• Proof.
Preelect
v. t.
• To elect beforehand.
Preelection
n.
• Election beforehand.
Preeminence
n.
• The quality or state of being preeminent; superiority in prominence or in excellence; distinction above others in quality, rank, etc.; rarely, in a bad sense, superiority or notoriety in evil; as, preeminence in honor.
Preeminent
a.
• Eminent above others; prominent among those who are eminent; superior in excellence; surpassing, or taking precedence of, others; rarely, surpassing others in evil, or in bad qualities; as, preeminent in guilt.
Preeminently
adv.
• In a preeminent degree.
Preemploy
v. t.
• To employ beforehand.
Preempt
v. t. & i.
• To settle upon (public land) with a right of preemption, as under the laws of the United States; to take by preemption.
Preemption
n.
• The act or right of purchasing before others.
• The privilege or prerogative formerly enjoyed by the king of buying provisions for his household in preference to others.
• The right of an actual settler upon public lands (particularly those of the United States) to purchase a certain portion at a fixed price in preference to all other applicants.
Preemptioner
n.
• One who holds a prior to purchase certain public land.
Preemptive
a.
• Of or pertaining to preemption; having power to preempt; preempting.
Preemptory
a.
• Pertaining to preemption.
Preemtor
n.
• One who preempts; esp., one who preempts public land.
Preen
n.
• A forked tool used by clothiers in dressing cloth.
v. t.
• To dress with, or as with, a preen; to trim or dress with the beak, as the feathers; — said of birds.
• To trim up, as trees.
Preend
n.
• A payment or stipend; esp., the stipend or maintenance granted to a prebendary out of the estate of a cathedral or collegiate, church with which he is connected. See Note under Benefice.
• A prebendary.
Preengage
v. t.
• To engage by previous contract; to bind or attach previously; to preoccupy.
Preengagement
n.
• Prior engagement, obligation, or attachment, as by contract, promise, or affection.
Preerect
v. t.
• To erect beforehand.
Prees
n.
• Press; throng.
Preestablish
v. t.
• To establish beforehand.
Preestablishment
n.
• Settlement beforehand.
Preeternity
n.
• Infinite previous duration.
Preexamination
n.
• Previous examination.
Preexamine
v. t.
• To examine beforehand.
Preexist
v. i.
• To exist previously; to exist before something else.
Preexistence
n.
• Existence in a former state, or previous to something else.
• Existence of the soul before its union with the body; — a doctrine held by certain philosophers.
Preexistency
n.
• Preexistence.
Preexistent
a.
• Existing previously; preceding existence; as, a preexistent state.
Preexistentism
n.
(Philos.) The theory of a preexistence of souls before their association with human bodies.
Preexistimation
n.
• Previous esteem or estimation.
Preexpectation
n.
• Previous expectation.
Preface
n.
• Something spoken as introductory to a discourse, or written as introductory to a book or essay; a proem; an introduction, or series of preliminary remarks.
(R. C. Ch.) The prelude or introduction to the canon of the Mass.
v. t.
• To introduce by a preface; to give a preface to; as, to preface a book discourse.
v. i.
• To make a preface.
Prefacer
n.
• The writer of a preface.
Prefatorial
a.
• Prefatory.
Prefatorily
adv.
• In a prefatory manner; by way of preface.
Prefatory
a.
• Pertaining to, or of the nature of, a preface; introductory to a book, essay, or discourse; as, prefatory remarks.
Prefect
n.
• A Roman officer who controlled or superintended a particular command, charge, department, etc.; as, the prefect of the aqueducts; the prefect of a camp, of a fleet, of the city guard, of provisions; the pretorian prefect, who was commander of the troops guarding the emperor's person.
• A superintendent of a department who has control of its police establishment, together with extensive powers of municipal regulation.
• In the Greek and Roman Catholic churches, a title of certain dignitaries below the rank of bishop.
Prefectorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a prefect.
Prefectship
n.
• The office or jurisdiction of a prefect.
Prefecture
n.
• The office, position, or jurisdiction of a prefect; also, his official residence.
Prefecundation
n.
(Physiol.) A term collectively applied to the changes or conditions preceding fecundation, especially to the changes which the ovum undergoes before fecundation.
Prefecundatory
a.
• Of or pertaining to prefecundation.
Prefer
v. t.
• To carry or bring (something) forward, or before one; hence, to bring for consideration, acceptance, judgment, etc.; to offer; to present; to proffer; to address; — said especially of a request, prayer, petition, claim, charge, etc.
• To go before, or be before, in estimation; to outrank; to surpass.
• To cause to go before; hence, to advance before others, as to an office or dignity; to raise; to exalt; to promote; as, to prefer an officer to the rank of general.
• To set above or before something else in estimation, favor, or liking; to regard or honor before another; to hold in greater favor; to choose rather; — often followed by to, before, or above.
Preferability
n.
• The quality or state of being preferable; preferableness.
Preferable
a.
• Worthy to be preferred or chosen before something else; more desirable; as, a preferable scheme.
Preferableness
n.
• The quality or state of being preferable.
Preferably
adv.
• In preference; by choice.
Preference
n.
• The act of Preferring, or the state of being preferred; the setting of one thing before another; precedence; higher estimation; predilection; choice; also, the power or opportunity of choosing; as, to give him his preference.
• That which is preferred; the object of choice or superior favor; as, which is your preference?
Preferential
a.
• Giving, indicating, or having a preference or precedence; as, a preferential claim; preferential shares.
Preferment
n.
• The act of choosing, or the state of being chosen; preference.
• The act of preferring, or advancing in dignity or office; the state of being advanced; promotion.
• A position or office of honor or profit; as, the preferments of the church.
Preferrer
n.
• One who prefers.
Prefidence
n.
• The quality or state of being prefident.
Prefident
a.
• Trusting beforehand; hence, overconfident.
Prefigurate
v. t.
• To prefigure.
Prefiguration
n.
• The act of prefiguring, or the state of being prefigured.
Prefigurative
a.
• Showing by prefiguration.
Prefigure
v. t.
• To show, suggest, or announce, by antecedent types and similitudes; to foreshadow.
Prefigurement
n.
• The act of prefiguring; prefiguration; also, that which is prefigured.
Prefine
v. t.
• To limit beforehand.
Prefinite
a.
• Prearranged.
Prefinition
n.
• Previous limitation.
Prefix
v. t.
• To put or fix before, or at the beginning of, another thing; as, to prefix a syllable to a word, or a condition to an agreement.
• To set or appoint beforehand; to settle or establish antecedently.
n.
• That which is prefixed; esp., one or more letters or syllables combined or united with the beginning of a word to modify its signification; as, pre- in prefix, con- in conjure.
Prefixion
n.
• The act of prefixing.
Prefloration
n.
(Bot.) Astivation.
Prefoliation
n.
(Bot.) Vernation.
Preform
v. t.
• To form beforehand, or for special ends.
Preformation
n.
(Biol.) An old theory of the preexistence of germs. Cf. Embo&icir;tement.
Preformative
n.
• A formative letter at the beginning of a word.
Prefrontal
a.
(Anat. & Zool.) Situated in front of the frontal bone, or the frontal region of the skull; ectethmoid, as a certain bone in the nasal capsule of many animals, and certain scales of reptiles and fishes.
n.
• A prefrontal bone or scale.
Prefulgency
n.
• Superior brightness or effulgency.
Pregage
v. t.
• To preengage.
Preglacial
a.
(Geol.) Prior to the glacial or drift period.
Pregnable
a
• Capable of being entered, taken, or captured; expugnable; as, a pregnable fort.
Pregnance
n.
• Pregnancy.
Pregnancy
n.
• The condition of being pregnant; the state of being with young.
• Figuratively: The quality of being heavy with important contents, issue, significance, etc.; unusual consequence or capacity; fertility.
Pregnant
a.
• Being with young, as a female; having conceived; great with young; breeding; teeming; gravid; preparing to bring forth.
• Heavy with important contents, significance, or issue; full of consequence or results; weighty; as, pregnant replies.
• Full of promise; abounding in ability, resources, etc.; as, a pregnant youth.
n.
• A pregnant woman.
a.
• Affording entrance; receptive; yielding; willing; open; prompt.
Pregnantly
adv.
• In a pregnant manner; fruitfully; significantly.
adv.
• Unresistingly; openly; hence, clearly; evidently.
Pregravate
v. t.
• To bear down; to depress.
Pregravitate
v. i.
• To descend by gravity; to sink.
Pregustant
a.
• Tasting beforehand; having a foretaste.
Pregustation
n.
• The act of tasting beforehand; foretaste.
Prehallux
n.
(Anat.) An extra first toe, or rudiment of a toe, on the preaxial side of the hallux.
Prehend
v. t.
• To lay hold of; to seize.
Prehensile
a.
• Adapted to seize or grasp; seizing; grasping; as, the prehensile tail of a monkey.
Prehension
n.
• The act of taking hold, seizing, or grasping, as with the hand or other member.
Prehensory
a.
• Adapted to seize or grasp; prehensile.
Prehistoric
a.
• Of or pertaining to a period before written history begins; as, the prehistoric ages; prehistoric man.
Prehnite
n.
(Min.) A pale green mineral occurring in crystalline aggregates having a botryoidal or mammillary structure, and rarely in distinct crystals. It is a hydrous silicate of alumina and lime.
Prehnitic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a tetrabasic acid of benzene obtained as a white crystalline substance; — probably so called from the resemblance of the wartlike crystals to the mammillae on the surface of prehnite.
Preindesignate
a.
(Logic.) Having no sign expressive of quantity; indefinite. See Predesignate.
Preindispose
v. t.
• To render indisposed beforehand.
Preinstruct
v. t.
• To instruct previously or beforehand.
Preintimation
n.
• Previous intimation; a suggestion beforehand.
Prejudge
v. t.
• To judge before hearing, or before full and sufficient examination; to decide or sentence by anticipation; to condemn beforehand.
Prejudgment
n.
• The act of prejudging; decision before sufficient examination.
Prejudicacy
n.
• Prejudice; prepossession.
Prejudical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the determination of some matter not previously decided; as, a prejudical inquiry or action at law.
Prejudicant
a.
• Influenced by prejudice; biased.
Prejudicate
a.
• Formed before due examination.
• Biased by opinions formed prematurely; prejudiced.
v. t.
• To determine beforehand, especially to disadvantage; to prejudge.
v. i.
• To prejudge.
Prejudicately
adv.
• With prejudice.
Prejudication
n.
• The act of prejudicating, or of judging without due examination of facts and evidence; prejudgment.
(Rom. Law) A preliminary inquiry and determination about something which belongs to a matter in dispute.
• A previous treatment and decision of a point; a precedent.
Prejudicative
a.
• Forming a judgment without due examination; prejudging.
Prejudice
n.
• Foresight.
• An opinion or judgment formed without due examination; prejudgment; a leaning toward one side of a question from other considerations than those belonging to it; an unreasonable predilection for, or objection against, anything; especially, an opinion or leaning adverse to anything, without just grounds, or before sufficient knowledge.
(Law) A bias on the part of judge, juror, or witness which interferes with fairness of judgment.
• Mischief; hurt; damage; injury; detriment.
v. t.
• To cause to have prejudice; to prepossess with opinions formed without due knowledge or examination; to bias the mind of, by hasty and incorrect notions; to give an unreasonable bent to, as to one side or the other of a cause; as, to prejudice a critic or a juryman.
• To obstruct or injure by prejudices, or by previous bias of the mind; hence, generally, to hurt; to damage; to injure; to impair; as, to prejudice a good cause.
Prejudicial
a.
• Biased, possessed, or blinded by prejudices; as, to look with a prejudicial eye.
• Tending to obstruct or impair; hurtful; injurious; disadvantageous; detrimental.
Preknowledge
n.
• Prior knowledge.
Prelacy
n.
• The office or dignity of a prelate; church government by prelates.
• The order of prelates, taken collectively; the body of ecclesiastical dignitaries.
Prelal
a.
• Of or pertaining to printing; typographical.
Prelate
n.
• A clergyman of a superior order, as an archbishop or a bishop, having authority over the lower clergy; a dignitary of the church.
v. i.
• To act as a prelate.
Prelateity
n.
• Prelacy.
Prelateship
n.
• The office of a prelate.
Prelatess
n.
• A woman who is a prelate; the wife of a prelate.
Prelatial
a.
• Prelatical.
Prelatically
adv.
• In a prelatical manner; with reference to prelates.
Prelation
n.
• The setting of one above another; preference.
Prelatism
n.
• Prelacy; episcopacy.
Prelatist
n.
• One who supports of advocates prelacy, or the government of the church by prelates; hence, a high-churchman.
Prelatize
v. t.
• To bring under the influence of prelacy.
v. i.
• To uphold or encourage prelacy; to exercise prelatical functions.
Prelatry
n.
• Prelaty; prelacy.
Prelaty
n.
• Prelacy.
Prelect
v. t.
• To read publicly, as a lecture or discourse.
v. i.
• To discourse publicly; to lecture.
Prelection
n.
• A lecture or discourse read in public or to a select company.
Prelector
n.
• A reader of lectures or discourses; a lecturer.
Prelibation
n.
• A. tasting beforehand, or by anticipation; a foretaste; as, a prelibation of heavenly bliss.
• A pouring out, or libation, before tasting.
Preliminarily
adv.
• In a preliminary manner.
Preliminary
a.
• Introductory; previous; preceding the main discourse or business; prefatory; as, preliminary observations to a discourse or book; preliminary articles to a treaty; preliminary measures; preliminary examinations.
n.
• That which precedes the main discourse, work, design, or business; something introductory or preparatory; as, the preliminaries to a negotiation or duel; to take one's preliminaries the year before entering college.
Prelimit
v. t.
• To limit previously.
Prelook
v. i.
• To look forward.
Prelude
n.
• An introductory performance, preceding and preparing for the principal matter; a preliminary part, movement, strain, etc.; especially (Mus.), a strain introducing the theme or chief subject; a movement introductory to a fugue, yet independent; — with recent composers often synonymous with overture.
v. i.
• To play an introduction or prelude; to give a prefatory performance; to serve as prelude.
v. t.
• To introduce with a previous performance; to play or perform a prelude to; as, to prelude a concert with a lively air.
• To serve as prelude to; to precede as introductory.
Preluder
n.
• One who, or that which, preludes; one who plays a prelude.
Preludial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a prelude; of the nature of a prelude; introductory.
Preludious
a.
• Preludial.
Prelumbar
a.
(Anat.) Situated immediately in front of the loins;- applied to the dorsal part of the abdomen.
Prelusive
a.
• Of the nature of a prelude; introductory; indicating that something of a like kind is to follow.
Prelusorily
adv.
• In a prelusory way.
Prelusory
a.
• Introductory; prelusive.
Premature
a.
• Mature or ripe before the proper time; as, the premature fruits of a hotbed.
• Happening, arriving, existing, or performed before the proper or usual time; adopted too soon; too early; untimely; as, a premature fall of snow; a premature birth; a premature opinion; premature decay.
• Arriving or received without due authentication or evidence; as, a premature report.
Prematurity
n.
• The quality or state of being premature; early, or untimely, ripeness; as, the prematurity of genius.
Premaxilla
n.
(Anat.) A bone on either side of the middle line between the nose and mouth, forming the anterior part of each half of the upper jawbone; the intermaxilla. In man the premaxillae become united and form the incisor part of the maxillary bone.
Premaxillary
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the maxillary bones; pertaining to the premaxillae; intermaxillary.
n.
• A premaxilla.
Premediate
v. t.
• To advocate.
Premeditate
v. t.
• To think on, and revolve in the mind, beforehand; to contrive and design previously; as, to premeditate robbery.
v. i.
• To think, consider, deliberate, or revolve in the mind, beforehand.
a.
• Premeditated; deliberate.
Premeditately
adv.
• With premeditation.
Premeditation
n.
• The act of meditating or contriving beforehand; previous deliberation; forethought.
Premerit
v. t.
• To merit or deserve beforehand.
Premices
n. pl.
• First fruits.
Premier
a.
• First; chief; principal; as, the premier place; premier minister.
• Most ancient; — said of the peer bearing the oldest title of his degree.
n.
• The first minister of state; the prime minister.
Premiership
n.
• The office of the premier.
Premillennial
a
• , Previous to the millennium.
Premious
a.
• Rich in gifts.
Premise
n.
• A proposition antecedently supposed or proved; something previously stated or assumed as the basis of further argument; a condition; a supposition.
(Logic) Either of the first two propositions of a syllogism, from which the conclusion is drawn.
(Law) Matters previously stated or set forth; esp., that part in the beginning of a deed, the office of which is to express the grantor and grantee, and the land or thing granted or conveyed, and all that precedes the habendum; the thing demised or granted.
• A piece of real estate; a building and its adjuncts; as, to lease premises; to trespass on another's premises.
v. t.
• To send before the time, or beforehand; hence, to cause to be before something else; to employ previously.
• To set forth beforehand, or as introductory to the main subject; to offer previously, as something to explain or aid in understanding what follows; especially, to lay down premises or first propositions, on which rest the subsequent reasonings.
v. i.
• To make a premise; to set forth something as a premise.
Premiss
n.
• Premise.
Premit
v. t.
• To premise.
Premium
n.
• A reward or recompense; a prize to be won by being before another, or others, in a competition; reward or prize to be adjudged; a bounty; as, a premium for good behavior or scholarship, for discoveries, etc.
• Something offered or given for the loan of money; bonus; — sometimes synonymous with interest, but generally signifying a sum in addition to the capital.
• A sum of money paid to underwriters for insurance, or for undertaking to indemnify for losses of any kind.
• A sum in advance of, or in addition to, the nominal or par value of anything; as, gold was at a premium; he sold his stock at a premium.
Premolar
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the molar teeth.
n.
• An anterior molar tooth which has replaced a deciduous molar. See Tooth.
Premonish
v. t.
• To forewarn; to admonish beforehand.
Premonishment
n.
• Previous warning or admonition; forewarning.
Premonition
n.
• Previous warning, notice, or information; forewarning; as, a premonition of danger.
Premonitor
n.
• One who, or that which, gives premonition.
Premonitory
a.
• Giving previous warning or notice; as, premonitory symptoms of disease. —
Premonstrant
n.
• A Premonstratensian.
Premonstrate
v. t.
• To show beforehand; to foreshow.
Premonstratensian
n.
(R. C. Ch.) One of a religious order of regular canons founded by St. Norbert at Premontre, in France, in 1119. The members of the order are called also White Canons, Norbertines, and Premonstrants.
Premonstration
n.
• A showing beforehand; foreshowing.
Premonstrator
n.
• One who, or that which, premonstrates.
Premorse
a.
• Terminated abruptly, or as it bitten off.
Premosaic
a.
• Relating to the time before Moses; as, premosaic history.
Premotion
n.
• Previous motion or excitement to action.
Premunire
n.
(Law) See Praemunire.
Premunite
v. t.
• To fortify beforehand; to guard against objection.
Premunition
n.
• The act of fortifying or guarding against objections.
Premunitory
a.
• Of or pertaining to a premunire; as, a premunitory process.
Prenasal
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the nose, or in front of the nasal chambers.
Prenatal
a.
• Being or happening before birth.
Prender
n.
(Law) The power or right of taking a thing before it is offered.
Prenomen
n.
• See Praenomen.
Prenominal
a.
• Serving as a prefix in a compound name.
Prenominate
a.
• Forenamed; named beforehand.
v. t.
• To forename; to name beforehand; to tell by name beforehand.
Prenomination
n.
• The act of prenominating; privilege of being named first.
Prenostic
n.
• A prognostic; an omen.
Prenote
v. t.
• To note or designate beforehand.
Prenotion
n.
• A notice or notion which precedes something else in time; previous notion or thought; foreknowledge.
Prensation
n.
• The act of seizing with violence.
Prentice
n.
• An apprentice.
Prenticehood
n.
• Apprenticehood
Prenticeship
n.
• Apprenticeship.
Prenunciation
n.
• The act of announcing or proclaiming beforehand.
Prenuncious
a.
• Announcing beforehand; presaging.
Preoblongata
n.
(Anat.) The anterior part of the medulla oblongata.
Preobtain
v. t.
• To obtain beforehand.
Preoccupancy
n.
• The act or right of taking possession before another; as, the preoccupancy of wild land.
Preoccupate
v. t.
• To anticipate; to take before.
• To prepossess; to prejudice.
Preoccupation
n.
• The act of preoccupying, or taking possession of beforehand; the state of being preoccupied; prepossession.
• Anticipation of objections.
Preoccupy
v. t.
• To take possession of before another; as, to preoccupy a country not before held.
• To prepossess; to engage, occupy, or engross the attention of, beforehand; hence, to prejudice.
Preocular
a.
(Zool.) Placed just in front of the eyes, as the antennae of certain insects.
n.
• One of the scales just in front of the eye of a reptile or fish.
Preominate
v. t.
• To ominate beforehand; to portend.
Preopercular
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the operculum; pertaining to the preoperculum.
n.
• The preoperculum.
Preoperculum
n
(Anat.) The anterior opercular bone in fishes.
Preopinion
n.
• Opinion previously formed; prepossession; prejudice.
Preoption
n.
• Right of first choice.
Preoral
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of, or anterior to, the mouth; as, preoral bands.
Preorbital
• a. (Anat.) Situated in front or the orbit.
Preordain
v. t.
• To ordain or appoint beforehand: to predetermine: to foreordain.
Preorder
v. t.
• To order to arrange beforehand; to foreordain.
Preordinance
n.
• Antecedent decree or determination.
Preordinate
a.
• Preordained.
Preordination
n.
• The act of foreordaining: previous determination.
Preparable
a.
• Capable of being prepared.
Preparation
n.
• The act of preparing or fitting beforehand for a particular purpose, use, service, or condition; previous arrangement or adaptation; a making ready; as, the preparation of land for a crop of wheat; the preparation of troops for a campaign.
• The state of being prepared or made ready; preparedness; readiness; fitness; as, a nation in good preparation for war.
• That which makes ready, prepares the way, or introduces; a preparatory act or measure.
• That which is prepared, made, or compounded by a certain process or for a particular purpose; a combination. Specifically: (a) Any medicinal substance fitted for use. (b) Anything treated for preservation or examination as a specimen. (c) Something prepared for use in cookery.
• An army or fleet.
(Mus.) The holding over of a note from one chord into the next chord, where it forms a temporary discord, until resolved in the chord that follows; the anticipation of a discordant note in the preceding concord, so that the ear is prepared for the shock. See Suspension.
• Accomplishment; qualification.
Preparative
a.
• Tending to prepare or make ready; having the power of preparing, qualifying, or fitting; preparatory.
n.
• That which has the power of preparing, or previously fitting for a purpose; that which prepares.
• That which is done in the way of preparation.
Preparatively
adv.
• By way of preparation.
Preparator
n.
• One who prepares beforehand, as subjects for dissection, specimens for preservation in collections, etc.
Preparatory
a.
• Preparing the way for anything by previous measures of adaptation; antecedent and adapted to what follows; introductory; preparative; as, a preparatory school; a preparatory condition.
Prepare
v. t.
• To fit, adapt, or qualify for a particular purpose or condition; to make ready; to put into a state for use or application; as, to prepare ground for seed; to prepare a lesson.
• To procure as suitable or necessary; to get ready; to provide; as, to prepare ammunition and provisions for troops; to prepare ships for defence; to prepare an entertainment.
v. i.
• To make all things ready; to put things in order; as, to prepare for a hostile invasion.
• To make one's self ready; to get ready; to take the necessary previous measures; as, to prepare for death.
n.
• Preparation.
Prepared
a.
• Made fit or suitable; adapted; ready; as, prepared food; prepared questions.
Preparer
n.
• One who, or that which, prepares, fits, or makes ready.
Prepay
v. t.
• To pay in advance, or beforehand; as, to prepay postage.
Prepayment
n.
• Payment in advance.
Prepenial
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of, or anterior to, the penis.
Prepense
v. t.
• To weigh or consider beforehand; to premeditate.
v. i.
• To deliberate beforehand.
a.
• Devised, contrived, or planned beforehand; preconceived; premeditated; aforethought; — usually placed after the word it qualifies; as, malice prepense.
Prepensely
adv.
• In a premeditated manner.
Prepollent
a.
• Having superior influence or power; prevailing; predominant.
n.
(Anat.) An extra first digit, or rudiment of a digit, on the preaxial side of the pollex.
Preponder
v. t.
• To preponderate
Preponderant
a.
• Preponderating; outweighing; overbalancing; — used literally and figuratively; as, a preponderant weight; of preponderant importance.
Preponderate
v. t.
• To outweigh; to overpower by weight; to exceed in weight; to overbalance.
• To overpower by stronger or moral power.
• To cause to prefer; to incline; to decide.
v. i.
• To exceed in weight; hence, to incline or descend, as the scale of a balance; figuratively, to exceed in influence, power, etc.; hence; to incline to one side; as, the affirmative side preponderated.
Preponderatingly
adv.
• In a preponderating manner; preponderantly.
Preponderation
n.
• The act or state of preponderating; preponderance; as, a preponderation of reasons.
Prepose
v. t.
• To place or set before; to prefix.
Preposition
n.
(Gram.) A word employed to connect a noun or a pronoun, in an adjectival or adverbial sense, with some other word; a particle used with a noun or pronoun (in English always in the objective case) to make a phrase limiting some other word; — so called because usually placed before the word with which it is phrased; as, a bridge of iron; he comes from town; it is good for food; he escaped by running.
• A proposition; an exposition; a discourse.
Prepositional
a.
• Of or pertaining to a preposition; of the nature of a preposition.
Prepositive
a.
(Gram.) Put before; prefixed; as, a prepositive particle.
n.
• A prepositive word.
Prepositor
n.
• A scholar appointed to inspect other scholars; a monitor.
Prepositure
n.
• The office or dignity of a provost; a provostship.
Prepossess
v. t.
• To preoccupy, as ground or land; to take previous possession of.
• To preoccupy, as the mind or heart, so as to preclude other things; hence, to bias or prejudice; to give a previous inclination to, for or against anything; esp., to induce a favorable opinion beforehand, or at the outset.
Prepossessing
a.
• Tending to invite favor; attracting confidence, favor, esteem, or love; attractive; as, a prepossessing manner.
Prepossession
n.
• Preoccupation; prior possession.
• Preoccupation of the mind by an opinion, or impression, already formed; preconceived opinion; previous impression; bias; — generally, but not always, used in a favorable sense; as, the prepossessions of childhood.
Prepossessor
n.
• One who possesses, or occupies, previously.
Preposterous
a.
• Having that first which ought to be last; inverted in order.
• Contrary to nature or reason; not adapted to the end; utterly and glaringly foolish; unreasonably absurd; perverted.
Prepostor
n.
• See Prepositor.
Prepotency
n.
• The quality or condition of being prepotent; predominance.
(Biol.) The capacity, on the part of one of the parents, as compared with the other, to transmit more than his or her own share of characteristics to their offspring.
Prepotent
a.
• Very powerful; superior in force, influence, or authority; predominant.
(Biol.) Characterized by prepotency.
Preprovide
v. t.
• To provide beforehand.
Prepubic
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of, or anterior to, the pubis; pertaining to the prepubis.
Prepubis
n.
(Anat.) A bone or cartilage, of some animals, situated in the middle line in front of the pubic bones.
Prepuce
n.
(Anat.) The foreskin.
Preputial
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the prepuce.
Preraphaelite
a.
• Of or pertaining to the style called preraphaelitism; as, a preraphaelite figure; a preraphaelite landscape.
n.
• One who favors or practices art as it was before Raphael; one who favors or advocates preraphaelitism.
Preregnant
n.
• One who reigns before another; a sovereign predecessor.
Preremote
a.
• More remote in previous time or prior order.
Prerequire
v. t.
• To require beforehand.
Prerequisite
a.
• Previously required; necessary as a preliminary to any proposed effect or end; as, prerequisite conditions of success.
n.
• Something previously required, or necessary to an end or effect proposed.
Preresolve
v. t. & i.
• To resolve beforehand; to predetermine.
Prerogative
n.
• An exclusive or peculiar privilege; prior and indefeasible right; fundamental and essential possession; — used generally of an official and hereditary right which may be asserted without question, and for the exercise of which there is no responsibility or accountability as to the fact and the manner of its exercise.
• Precedence; preeminence; first rank.
Prerogatived
a.
• Endowed with a prerogative, or exclusive privilege.
Prerogatively
adv.
• By prerogative.
Presage
n.
• Something which foreshows or portends a future event; a prognostic; an omen; an augury.
• Power to look the future, or the exercise of that power; foreknowledge; presentiment.
v. t.
• To have a presentiment of; to feel beforehand; to foreknow.
• To foretell; to predict; to foreshow; to indicate.
v. i.
• To form or utter a prediction; — sometimes used with of.
Presageful
a.
• Full of presages; ominous.
Presagement
n.
• The act or art of presaging; a foreboding.
• That which is presaged, or foretold.
Presager
n.
• One who, or that which, presages; a foreteller; a foreboder.
Presagious
a.
• Foreboding; ominous.
Presbyope
n.
(Med.) One who has presbyopia; a farsighted person.
Presbyopia
(Med.) A defect of vision consequent upon advancing age. It is due to rigidity of the crystalline lens, which produce difficulty of accommodation and recession of the near point of vision, so that objects very near the eyes can not be seen distinctly without the use of convex glasses. Called also presbytia.
Presbyopic
a.
• Affected by presbyopia; also, remedying presbyopia; farsighted.
Presbyopy
n.
• See Presbyopia.
Presbyte
n.
• Same as Presbyope.
Presbyter
n.
• An elder in the early Christian church. See 2d Citation under Bishop, n., 1.
(Ch. of Eng. & Prot. Epis. Ch.) One ordained to the second order in the ministry; — called also priest.
(Presbyterian Ch.) A member of a presbytery whether lay or clerical.
• A Presbyterian.
Presbyteral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a presbyter or presbytery; presbyterial.
Presbyterate
n.
• A presbytery; also, presbytership.
Presbyteress
n.
• A female presbyter.
Presbyterial
a.
• Presbyterian.
Presbyterian
a.
• Of or pertaining to a presbyter, or to ecclesiastical government by presbyters; relating to those who uphold church government by presbyters; also, to the doctrine, discipline, and worship of a communion so governed.
n.
• One who maintains the validity of ordination and government by presbyters; a member of the Presbyterian church.
Presbyterianism
n.
• That form of church government which invests presbyters with all spiritual power, and admits no prelates over them; also, the faith and polity of the Presbyterian churches, taken collectively.
Presbyterium
n.
(Arch.) Same as Presbytery, 4.
Presbytership
n.
• The office or station of a presbyter; presbyterate.
Presbytery
n.
• A body of elders in the early Christian church.
(Presbyterian Ch.) A judicatory consisting of all the ministers within a certain district, and one layman, who is a ruling elder, from each parish or church, commissioned to represent the church in conjunction with the pastor. This body has a general jurisdiction over the churches under its care, and next below the provincial synod in authority.
• The Presbyterian religion of polity.
(Arch.) That part of the church reserved for the officiating priest.
• The residence of a priest or clergyman.
Presbytia
n.
(Med.) Presbyopia.
Presbytic
a.
(Med.) Same as Presbyopic.
Presbytism
n.
• Presbyopia.
Prescapular
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the prescapula; supraspinous.
Prescience
n.
• Knowledge of events before they take place; foresight.
Presciendent
a.
• Foreknowing; having foreknowledge; as, prescious of ills.
Presciently
adv.
• With presciense or foresight.
Prescind
v. t.
• To cut off; to abstract.
(Metaph.) To consider by a separate act of attention or analysis.
Prescribe
v. t.
• To lay down authoritatively as a guide, direction, or rule of action; to impose as a peremptory order; to dictate; to appoint; to direct.
(Med.) To direct, as a remedy to be used by a patient; as, the doctor prescribed quinine.
v. i.
• To give directions; to dictate.
• To influence by long use
(Med.) To write or to give medical directions; to indicate remedies; as, to prescribe for a patient in a fever.
(Law) To claim by prescription; to claim a title to a thing on the ground of immemorial use and enjoyment, that is, by a custom having the force of law.
Prescriber
n.
• One who prescribes.
Prescript
a.
• Directed; prescribed.
n.
• Direction; precept; model prescribed.
• A medical prescription.
Prescriptibility
n
• , The quality or state of being prescriptible.
Prescriptible
a.
• Depending on, or derived from, prescription; proper to be prescribed.
Prescription
n.
• The act of prescribing, directing, or dictating; direction; precept; also, that which is prescribed.
(Med.) A direction of a remedy or of remedies for a disease, and the manner of using them; a medical recipe; also, a prescribed remedy.
(Law) A prescribing for title; the claim of title to a thing by virtue immemorial use and enjoyment; the right or title acquired by possession had during the time and in the manner fixed by law.
Prescriptive
a.
(Law) Consisting in, or acquired by, immemorial or long-continued use and enjoyment; as, a prescriptive right of title; pleading the continuance and authority of long custom.
Prescriptively
adv.
• By prescription.
Prescutum
n.
(Zool.) The first of the four pieces composing the dorsal part, or tergum, of a thoracic segment of an insect. It is usually small and inconspicuous.
Preseance
n.
• Priority of place in sitting.
Preselect
v. t.
• To select beforehand.
Presence
n.
• The state of being present, or of being within sight or call, or at hand; — opposed to absence.
• The place in which one is present; the part of space within one's ken, call, influence, etc.; neighborhood without the intervention of anything that forbids intercourse.
• Specifically, neighborhood to the person of one of superior of exalted rank; also, presence chamber.
• The whole of the personal qualities of an individual; person; personality; especially, the person of a superior, as a sovereign.
• An assembly, especially of person of rank or nobility; noble company.
• Port, mien; air; personal appearence.
Presensation
n.
• Previous sensation, notion, or idea.
Presension
n.
• Previous perception.
Present
a.
• Being at hand, within reach or call, within certain contemplated limits; — opposed to absent.
• Now existing, or in process; begun but not ended; now in view, or under consideration; being at this time; not past or future; as, the present session of Congress; the present state of affairs; the present instance.
• Not delayed; immediate; instant; coincident.
• Ready; quick in emergency; as a present wit.
• Favorably attentive; propitious.
n.
• Present time; the time being; time in progress now, or at the moment contemplated; as, at this present.
(Law) Present letters or instrument, as a deed of conveyance, a lease, letter of attorney, or other writing; as in the phrase, " Know all men by these presents," that is, by the writing itself, " per has literas praesentes; " — in this sense, rarely used in the singular.
(Gram.) A present tense, or the form of the verb denoting the present tense.
v. t.
• To bring or introduce into the presence of some one, especially of a superior; to introduce formally; to offer for acquaintance; as, to present an envoy to the king; (with the reciprocal pronoun) to come into the presence of a superior.
• To exhibit or offer to view or notice; to lay before one's perception or cognizance; to set forth; to present a fine appearance.
• To pass over, esp. in a ceremonious manner; to give in charge or possession; to deliver; to make over.
• To make a gift of; to bestow; to give, generally in a formal or ceremonious manner; to grant; to confer.
• Hence: To endow; to bestow a gift upon; to favor, as with a donation; also, to court by gifts.
• To present; to personate.
• To nominate to an ecclesiastical benefice; to offer to the bishop or ordinary as a candidate for institution.
• To nominate for support at a public school or other institution
• To lay before a public body, or an official, for consideration, as before a legislature, a court of judicature, a corporation, etc.; as, to present a memorial, petition, remonstrance, or indictment.
• To lay before a court as an object of inquiry; to give notice officially of, as a crime of offence; to find or represent judicially; as, a grand jury present certain offenses or nuisances, or whatever they think to be public injuries
• To bring an indictment against
• To aim, point, or direct, as a weapon; as, to present a pistol or the point of a sword to the breast of another
v. i.
(Med.) To appear at the mouth of the uterus so as to be perceptible to the finger in vaginal examination; — said of a part of an infant during labor.
n.
• Anything presented or given; a gift; a donative; as, a Christmas present.
n.
(Mil.) The position of a soldier in presenting arms; as, to stand at present.
Presentable
a.
• Capable or admitting of being presented; suitable to be exhibited, represented, or offered; fit to be brought forward or set forth; hence, fitted to be introduced to another, or to go into society; as, ideas that are presentable in simple language; she is not presentable in such a gown.
• Admitting of the presentation of a clergiman; as, a church presentable.
Presentaneous
a.
• Ready; quick; immediate in effect; as, presentaneous poison.
Presentation
n.
• The act of presenting, or the state of being presented; a setting forth; an offering; bestowal.
• exhibition; representation; display; appearance; semblance; show.
• That which is presented or given; a present; a gift, as, the picture was a presentation.
(Eccl.) The act of offering a clergyman to the bishop or ordinary for institution in a benefice; the right of presenting a clergyman.
(Med.) The particular position of the child during labor relatively to the passage though which it is to be brought forth; — specifically designated by the part which first appears at the mouth of the uterus; as, a breech presentation.
Presentative
a.
(Eccl.) Having the right of presentation, or offering a clergyman to the bishop for institution; as, advowsons are presentative, collative, or donative.
• Admitting the presentation of a clergyman; as, a presentative parsonage.
(Metaph.) Capable of being directly known by, or presented to, the mind; intuitive; directly apprehensible, as objects; capable of apprehending, as faculties.
Presentee
n.
• One to whom something is presented; also, one who is presented; specifically (Eccl.), one presented to benefice.
Presenter
n.
• One who presents.
Presential
a.
• Implying actual presence; present, immediate.
Presentiality
n.
• State of being actually present.
Presentiate
v. t.
• To make present.
Presentient
a.
• Feeling or perceiving beforehand.
Presentific
a.
• Making present.
Presentifical
a.
• Presentific.
Presentiment
n.
• Previous sentiment, conception, or opinion; previous apprehension; especially, an antecedent impression or conviction of something unpleasant, distressing, or calamitous, about to happen; anticipation of evil; foreboding.
Presentimental
a.
• Of nature of a presentiment; foreboding.
Presention
n.
• See Presension.
Presentive
a.
(Philol.) Bringing a conception or notion directly before the mind; presenting an object to the memory of imagination; — distinguished from symbolic.
Presently
adv.
• At present; at this time; now.
• At once; without delay; forthwith; also, less definitely, soon; shortly; before long; after a little while; by and by.
• With actual presence; actually .
Presentment
n.
• The act of presenting, or the state of being presented; presentation.
• Setting forth to view; delineation; appearance; representation; exhibition.
(Law) The notice taken by a grand jury of any offence from their own knowledge or observation, without any bill of indictment laid before them, as, the presentment of a nuisance, a libel, or the like; also, an inquisition of office and indictment by a grand jury; an official accusation presented to a tribunal by the grand jury in an indictment, or the act of offering an indictment; also, the indictment itself.
• The official notice (formerly required to be given in court) of the surrender of a copyhold estate.
Presentness
n.
• The quality or state of being present; presence.
Presentoir
n.
• An ornamental tray, dish, or the like, used as a salver.
Preservable
a.
• Capable of being preserved; admitting of preservation.
Preservation
n.
• The act or process of preserving, or keeping safe; the state of being preserved, or kept from injury, destruction, or decay; security; safety; as, preservation of life, fruit, game, etc.; a picture in good preservation.
Preservative
a.
• Having the power or quality of preserving; tending to preserve, or to keep from injury, decay, etc.
n.
• That which preserves, or has the power of preserving; a presevative agent.
Preservatory
a.
• Preservative.
n.
• A preservative.
• A room, or apparatus, in which perishable things, as fruit, vegetables, etc., can be preserved without decay.
Preserve
v. t.
• To keep or save from injury or destruction; to guard or defend from evil, harm, danger, etc.; to protect.
• To save from decay by the use of some preservative substance, as sugar, salt, etc.; to season and prepare for remaining in a good state, as fruits, meat, etc.; as, to preserve peaches or grapes.
• To maintain throughout; to keep intact; as, to preserve appearances; to preserve silence.
v. i.
• To make preserves.
• To protect game for purposes of sport.
n.
• That which is preserved; fruit, etc., seasoned and kept by suitable preparation; esp., fruit cooked with sugar; — commonly in the plural.
• A place in which game, fish, etc., are preserved for purposes of sport, or for food.
Preserver
n.
• One who, or that which, preserves, saves, or defends, from destruction, injury, or decay; esp., one who saves the life or character of another.
• One who makes preserves of fruit.
Preshow
v. t.
• To foreshow.
Presidary
n.
• A guard.
Preside
v. i.
• To be set, or to sit, in the place of authority; to occupy the place of president, chairman, moderator, director, etc.; to direct, control, and regulate, as chief officer; as, to preside at a public meeting; to preside over the senate.
• To exercise superintendence; to watch over.
Presidence
n.
• See Presidency.
Presidency
n.
• The function or condition of one who presides; superintendence; control and care.
• The office of president; as, Washington was elected to the presidency.
• The term during which a president holds his office; as, during the presidency of Madison.
• One of the three great divisions of British India, the Bengal, Madras, and Bombay Presidencies, each of which had a council of which its governor was president.
President
n.
• Precedent.
a.
• Occupying the first rank or chief place; having the highest authority; presiding.
n.
• One who is elected or appointed to preside; a presiding officer, as of a legislative body.
• The chief officer of a corporation, company, institution, society, or the like
• The chief executive officer of the government in certain republics; as, the president of the United States.
• A protector; a guardian; a presiding genius
Presidential
a.
• Presiding or watching over.
• Of or pertaining to a president; as, the presidential chair; a presidential election.
Presidentship
n.
• The office and dignity of president; presidency.
Presider
n.
• One who presides.
Presiding
• a. & n. from Preside.
Presidio
n.
• A place of defense; a fortress; a garrison; a fortress; a garrison or guardhouse.
Presignification
n.
• The act of signifying or showing beforehand.
Presignify
v. t.
• To intimate or signify beforehand; to presage.
Presphenoid
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the sphenoid bone; of or pertaining to the anterior part of the sphenoid bone (i. e., the presphenoid bone).
n.
(Anat.) The presphenoid bone.
Presphenoidal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the presphenoid bone; presphenoid.
Prespinal
a.
(Anat.) Prevertebral.
Press
n.
(Zool.) An East Indian insectivore (Tupaia ferruginea). It is arboreal in its habits, and has a bushy tail. The fur is soft, and varies from rusty red to maroon and to brownish black.
v. t.
• To force into service, particularly into naval service; to impress.
n.
• A commission to force men into public service, particularly into the navy.
v. t.
• To urge, or act upon, with force, as weight; to act upon by pushing or thrusting, in distinction from pulling; to crowd or compel by a gradual and continued exertion; to bear upon; to squeeze; to compress; as, we press the ground with the feet when we walk; we press the couch on which we repose; we press substances with the hands, fingers, or arms; we are pressed in a crowd.
• To squeeze, in order to extract the juice or contents of; to squeeze out, or express, from something.
• To squeeze in or with suitable instruments or apparatus, in order to compact, make dense, or smooth; as, to press cotton bales, paper, etc.; to smooth by ironing; as, to press clothes.
• To embrace closely; to hug.
• To oppress; to bear hard upon.
• To straiten; to distress; as, to be pressed with want or hunger.
• To exercise very powerful or irresistible influence upon or over; to constrain; to force; to compel.
• To try to force (something upon some one); to urge or inculcate with earnestness or importunity; to enforce; as, to press divine truth on an audience.
• To drive with violence; to hurry; to urge on; to ply hard; as, to press a horse in a race.
v. i.
• To exert pressure; to bear heavily; to push, crowd, or urge with steady force.
• To move on with urging and crowding; to make one's way with violence or effort; to bear onward forcibly; to crowd; to throng; to encroach.
• To urge with vehemence or importunity; to exert a strong or compelling influence; as, an argument presses upon the judgment.
n.
• An apparatus or machine by which any substance or body is pressed, squeezed, stamped, or shaped, or by which an impression of a body is taken; sometimes, the place or building containing a press or presses.
• Specifically, a printing press.
• The art or business of printing and publishing; hence, printed publications, taken collectively, more especially newspapers or the persons employed in writing for them; as, a free press is a blessing, a licentious press is a curse.
• An upright case or closet for the safe keeping of articles; as, a clothes press.
• The act of pressing or thronging forward.
• Urgent demands of business or affairs; urgency; as, a press of engagements.
• A multitude of individuals crowded together; crowd of single things; a throng.
Pressback
v. t.
• To pack, or prepare for packing, by means of a press.
Presscapula
n.
(Anat.) The part of the scapula in front of, or above, the spine, or mesoscapula.
Presser
n.
• One who, or that which, presses.
Pressgang
n.
• See Press gang, under Press.
Pressing
a.
• Urgent; exacting; importunate; as, a pressing necessity.
Pression
n.
• The act of pressing; pressure.
(Cartesian Philos.) An endeavor to move.
Pressiroster
n.
(Zool.) One of a tribe of wading birds (Pressirostres) including those which have a compressed beak, as the plovers.
Pressirostral
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the pressirosters.
Pressitant
a.
• Gravitating; heavy.
Pressive
a.
• Pressing; urgent; also, oppressive; as, pressive taxation.
Pressly
adv.
• Closely; concisely.
Pressman
n.
• One who manages, or attends to, a press, esp. a printing press.
• One who presses clothes; as, a tailor's pressman.
n.
• One of a press gang, who aids in forcing men into the naval service; also, one forced into the service.
Pressor
a.
(Physiol.) Causing, or giving rise to, pressure or to an increase of pressure; as, pressor nerve fibers, stimulation of which excites the vasomotor center, thus causing a stronger contraction of the arteries and consequently an increase of the arterial blood pressure; — opposed to depressor.
Presstriction
n.
• Obstruction, dimness, or defect of sight.
Pressurage
n.
• Pressure.
• The juice of the grape extracted by the press; also, a fee paid for the use of a wine press.
Pressure
n.
• The act of pressing, or the condition of being pressed; compression; a squeezing; a crushing; as, a pressure of the hand.
• A contrasting force or impulse of any kind; as, the pressure of poverty; the pressure of taxes; the pressure of motives on the mind; the pressure of civilization.
• Affliction; distress; grievance.
• Urgency; as, the pressure of business.
• Impression; stamp; character impressed.
(Mech.) The action of a force against some obstacle or opposing force; a force in the nature of a thrust, distributed over a surface, often estimated with reference to the upon a unit's area.
Presswork
n.
• The art of printing from the surface of type, plates, or engravings in relief, by means of a press; the work so done.
Prest
• imp. & p. p. of Press.
a.
• Ready; prompt; prepared.
• Neat; tidy; proper.
n.
• Ready money; a loan of money.
(Law) A duty in money formerly paid by the sheriff on his account in the exchequer, or for money left or remaining in his hands.
v. t.
• To give as a loan; to lend.
Prestable
a.
• Payable.
Prestation
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A payment of money; a toll or duty; also, the rendering of a service.
Prester
n.
• A meteor or exhalation formerly supposed to be thrown from the clouds with such violence that by collision it is set on fire.
• One of the veins of the neck when swollen with anger or other excitement.
n.
• A priest or presbyter; as, Prester John.
Presternum
n.
(Anat.) The anterior segment of the sternum; the manubrium.
Prestidigital
a.
• Nimble-fingered; having fingers fit for prestidigitation, or juggling.
Prestidigitation
n.
• Legerdemain; sleight of hand; juggling.
Prestidigitator
n.
• One skilled in legerdemain or sleight of hand; a juggler.
Prestige
n.
• Delusion; illusion; trick.
• Weight or influence derived from past success; expectation of future achievements founded on those already accomplished; force or charm derived from acknowledged character or reputation.
Prestigiation
n.
• Legerdemain; prestidigitation.
Prestigiator
n.
• A juggler; prestidigitator.
Prestigiatory
a.
• Consisting of impostures; juggling.
Prestigious
a.
• Practicing tricks; juggling.
Prestimony
n.
(Canon Law) A fund for the support of a priest, without the title of a benefice. The patron in the collator.
Prestissimo
adv.
(Mus.) Very quickly; with great rapidity.
Presto
adv.
• Quickly; immediately; in haste; suddenly.
(Mus.) Quickly; rapidly; — a direction for a quick, lively movement or performance; quicker than allegro, or any rate of time except prestissimo.
Presultor
n.
• A leader in the dance.
Presumable
a.
• Such as may be presumed or supposed to be true; that seems entitled to belief without direct evidence.
Presumably
adv.
• In a presumable manner; by, or according to, presumption.
Presume
v. t.
• To assume or take beforehand; esp., to do or undertake without leave or authority previously obtained.
• To take or suppose to be true, or entitled to belief, without examination or proof, or on the strength of probability; to take for granted; to infer; to suppose.
v. i.
• To suppose or assume something to be, or to be true, on grounds deemed valid, though not amounting to proof; to believe by anticipation; to infer; as, we may presume too far.
• To venture, go, or act, by an assumption of leave or authority not granted; to go beyond what is warranted by the circumstances of the case; to venture beyond license; to take liberties; — often with on or upon before the ground of confidence.
Presumedly
adv.
• By presumption.
Presumer
n.
• One who presumes; also, an arrogant person.
Presumingly
adv.
• Confidently; arrogantly.
Presumption
n.
• The act of presuming, or believing upon probable evidence; the act of assuming or taking for granted; belief upon incomplete proof.
• Ground for presuming; evidence probable, but not conclusive; strong probability; reasonable supposition; as, the presumption is that an event has taken place.
• That which is presumed or assumed; that which is supposed or believed to be real or true, on evidence that is probable but not conclusive.
• The act of venturing beyond due beyond due bounds; an overstepping of the bounds of reverence, respect, or courtesy; forward, overconfident, or arrogant opinion or conduct; presumptuousness; arrogance; effrontery.
Presumptive
a.
• Based on presumption or probability; grounded on probable evidence; probable; as, presumptive proof.
• Presumptuous; arrogant.
Presumptively
adv.
• By presumption, or supposition grounded or probability; presumably.
Presumptuous
a.
• Full of presumption; presuming; overconfident or venturesome; audacious; rash; taking liberties unduly; arrogant; insolent; as, a presumptuous commander; presumptuous conduct.
• Founded on presumption; as, a presumptuous idea.
• Done with hold design, rash confidence, or in violation of known duty; willful.
Presumptuously
adv.
• In a presumptuous manner; arrogantly.
Presumptuousness
n.
• The quality or state of being presumptuous.
Presupposal
n.
• Presupposition.
Presuppose
v. t.
• To suppose beforehand; to imply as antecedent; to take for granted; to assume; as, creation presupposes a creator.
Presupposition
n.
• The act of presupposing; an antecedent implication; presumption.
• That which is presupposed; a previous supposition or surmise.
Presurmise
n.
• A surmise previously formed.
Presystolic
a.
(Physiol.) Preceding the systole or contraction of the heart; as, the presystolic friction sound.
Pretemporal
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the temporal bone.
Pretend
v. t.
• To lay a claim to; to allege a title to; to claim.
• To hold before, or put forward, as a cloak or disguise for something else; to exhibit as a veil for something hidden.
• To hold out, or represent, falsely; to put forward, or offer, as true or real (something untrue or unreal); to show hypocritically, or for the purpose of deceiving; to simulate; to feign; as, to pretend friendship.
• To intend; to design; to plot; to attempt.
• To hold before one; to extend.
v. i.
• To put in, or make, a claim, truly or falsely; to allege a title; to lay claim to, or strive after, something; — usually with to.
• To hold out the appearance of being, possessing, or performing; to profess; to make believe; to feign; to sham; as, to pretend to be asleep.
Pretendant
n.
• A pretender; a claimant.
Pretended
a.
• Making a false appearance; unreal; false; as, pretended friend.
Pretendence
n.
• The act of pretending; pretense.
Pretender
n.
• One who lays claim, or asserts a title (to something); a claimant.
• The pretender (Eng. Hist.), the son or the grandson of James II., the heir of the royal family of Stuart, who laid claim to the throne of Great Britain, from which the house was excluded by law.
• One who pretends, simulates, or feigns.
Pretendership
n.
• The character, right, or claim of a pretender.
Pretendingly
adv.
• As by right or title; arrogantly; presumptuously.
Pretensed
a.
• Pretended; feigned.
Pretenseful
a.
• Abounding in pretenses.
Pretenseless
a.
• Not having or making pretenses.
Pretension
n.
• The act of pretending, or laying claim; the act of asserting right or title.
• A claim made, whether true or false; a right alleged or assumed; a holding out the appearance of possessing a certain character; as, pretensions to scholarship.
Pretentative
a.
• Fitted for trial beforehand; experimental.
Pretentious
a.
• Full of pretension; disposed to lay claim to more than is one's; presuming; assuming.
Preterhuman
a.
• More than human.
Preterient
a.
• Passed through; antecedent; previous; as, preterient states.
Preterimperfect
a. & n.
(Gram.) Old name of the tense also called imperfect.
Preterist
n.
• One whose chief interest is in the past; one who regards the past with most pleasure or favor.
(Theol.) One who believes the prophecies of the Apocalypse to have been already fulfilled.
Preterit
a.
(Gram.) Past; — applied to a tense which expresses an action or state as past.
• Belonging wholly to the past; passed by.
n.
(Gram.) The preterit; also, a word in the preterit tense.
Preterite
a. & n.
• Same as Preterit.
Preteriteness
n.
• Same as Preteritness.
Preterition
n.
• The act of passing, or going past; the state of being past.
(Rhet.) A figure by which, in pretending to pass over anything, a summary mention of it is made; as, "I will not say, he is valiant, he is learned, he is just." Called also paraleipsis.
(Law) The omission by a testator of some one of his heirs who is entitled to a portion.
Preteritive
a.
(Gram.) Used only or chiefly in the preterit or past tenses, as certain verbs.
Preteritness
n.
• The quality or state of being past.
Preterlapsed
a.
• Past; as, preterlapsed ages.
Preterlegal
a.
• Exceeding the limits of law.
Pretermission
n.
• The act of passing by or omitting; omission.
(Rhet.) See Preterition.
Pretermit
v. t.
• To pass by; to omit; to disregard.
Preternatural
a.
• Beyond of different from what is natural, or according to the regular course of things, but not clearly supernatural or miraculous; strange; inexplicable; extraordinary; uncommon; irregular; abnormal; as, a preternatural appearance; a preternatural stillness; a preternatural presentation (in childbirth) or labor.
Preternaturalism
n.
• The state of being preternatural; a preternatural condition.
Preternaturality
n.
• Preternaturalness.
Preternaturally
adv.
• In a preternatural manner or degree.
Preternaturalness
n.
• The quality or state of being preternatural.
Preterperfect
a. & n.
(Gram.) Old name of the tense also called preterit.
Preterpluperfect
a. & n.
(Gram.) Old name of the tense also called pluperfect.
Pretertiary
a.
(Geol.) Earlier than Tertiary.
Pretervection
n.
• The act of carrying past or beyond.
Pretex
v. t.
• To frame; to devise; to disguise or excuse; hence, to pretend; to declare falsely.
Pretext
n.
• Ostensible reason or motive assigned or assumed as a color or cover for the real reason or motive; pretense; disguise.
Pretexture
n.
• A pretext.
Pretibial
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the tibia.
Pretor
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A civil officer or magistrate among the ancient Romans.
• Hence, a mayor or magistrate.
Pretorial
a.
• Pretorian.
Pretorian
a.
• Of or pertaining to a pretor or magistrate; judicial; exercised by, or belonging to, a pretor; as, pretorian power or authority.
n.
• A soldier of the pretorian guard.
Pretorium
n.
• The general's tent in a Roman camp; hence, a council of war, because held in the general's tent.
• The official residence of a governor of a province; hence, a place; a splendid country seat.
Pretorship
n.
• The office or dignity of a pretor.
Pretorture
v. t.
• To torture beforehand.
Prettily
adv.
• In a pretty manner.
Prettiness
n.
• The quality or state of being pretty; — used sometimes in a disparaging sense.
Pretty
a.
• Pleasing by delicacy or grace; attracting, but not striking or impressing; of a pleasing and attractive form a color; having slight or diminutive beauty; neat or elegant without elevation or grandeur; pleasingly, but not grandly, conceived or expressed; as, a pretty face; a pretty flower; a pretty poem.
• Moderately large; considerable; as, he had saved a pretty fortune.
• Affectedly nice; foppish; — used in an ill sense.
• Mean; despicable; contemptible; — used ironically; as, a pretty trick; a pretty fellow.
• Stout; strong and brave; intrepid; valiant.
adv.
• In some degree; moderately; considerably; rather; almost; — less emphatic than very; as, I am pretty sure of the fact; pretty cold weather.
Prettyish
a.
• Somewhat pretty.
Prettyism
n.
• Affectation of a pretty style, manner, etc.
Pretypify
v. t.
• To prefigure; to exhibit previously in a type.
Pretzel
n.
• A kind of German biscuit or cake in the form of a twisted ring, salted on the outside.
Prevail
v. i.
• To overcome; to gain the victory or superiority; to gain the advantage; to have the upper hand, or the mastery; to succeed; — sometimes with over or against.
• To be in force; to have effect, power, or influence; to be predominant; to have currency or prevalence; to obtain; as, the practice prevails this day.
• To persuade or induce; — with on, upon, or with; as, I prevailedon him to wait.
Prevailing
a.
• Having superior force or influence; efficacious; persuasive.
• Predominant; prevalent; most general; as, the prevailing disease of a climate; a prevailing opinion.
Prevailingly
adv.
• So as to prevail.
Prevailment
n.
• Prevalence; superior influence; efficacy.
Prevalence
n.
• The quality or condition of being prevalent; superior strength, force, or influence; general existence, reception, or practice; wide extension; as, the prevalence of virtue, of a fashion, or of a disease; the prevalence of a rumor.
Prevalency
n.
• See Prevalence.
Prevalent
a.
• Gaining advantage or superiority; having superior force, influence, or efficacy; prevailing; predominant; successful; victorious.
• Most generally received or current; most widely adopted or practiced; also, generally or extensively existing; widespread; prevailing; as, a prevalent observance; prevalent disease.
Prevalently
adv.
• In a prevalent manner.
Prevaricate
v. i.
• To shift or turn from one side to the other, from the direct course, or from truth; to speak with equivocation; to shuffle; to quibble; as, he prevaricates in his statement.
(Civil Law) To collude, as where an informer colludes with the defendant, and makes a sham prosecution.
(Eng. Law) To undertake a thing falsely and deceitfully, with the purpose of defeating or destroying it.
v. t.
• To evade by a quibble; to transgress; to pervert.
Prevarication
n.
• The act of prevaricating, shuffling, or quibbling, to evade the truth or the disclosure of truth; a deviation from the truth and fair dealing.
• A secret abuse in the exercise of a public office.
(Law)(Roman Law) The collusion of an informer with the defendant, for the purpose of making a sham prosecution.
(Common Law) A false or deceitful seeming to undertake a thing for the purpose of defeating or destroying it.
Prevaricator
n.
• One who prevaricates.
(Roman Law) A sham dealer; one who colludes with a defendant in a sham prosecution.
• One who betrays or abuses a trust.
Preve
v. i. & i.
• To prove.
n.
• Proof.
Prevenance
n.
(Metaph.) A going before; anticipation in sequence or order.
Prevenancy
n.
• The act of anticipating another's wishes, desires, etc., in the way of favor or courtesy; hence, civility; obligingness.
Prevene
v. t. & i.
• To come before; to anticipate; hence, to hinder; to prevent.
Prevenience
n.
• The act of going before; anticipation.
Prevenient
a.
• Going before; preceding; hence, preventive.
Prevent
v. t.
• To go before; to precede; hence, to go before as a guide; to direct.
• To be beforehand with; to anticipate.
• To intercept; to hinder; to frustrate; to stop; to thwart.
v. i.
• To come before the usual time.
Preventability
n.
• The quality or state of being preventable.
Preventable
a.
• Capable of being prevented or hindered; as, preventable diseases.
Preventative
n.
• That which prevents; — incorrectly used instead of preventive.
Preventer
n.
• One who goes before; one who forestalls or anticipates another.
• One who prevents or obstructs; a hinderer; that which hinders; as, a preventer of evils or of disease.
(Naut.) An auxiliary rope to strengthen a mast.
Preventingly
adv.
• So as to prevent or hinder.
Prevention
n.
• The act of going, or state of being, before.
• Anticipation; esp., anticipation of needs or wishes; hence, precaution; forethought.
• The act of preventing or hindering; obstruction of action, access, or approach; thwarting.
• Prejudice; prepossession.
Preventional
a.
• Tending to prevent.
Preventive
a.
• Going before; preceding.
• Tending to defeat or hinder; obviating; preventing the access of; as, a medicine preventive of disease.
n.
• That which prevents, hinders, or obstructs; that which intercepts access; in medicine, something to prevent disease; a prophylactic.
Preventively
adv.
• In a preventive manner.
Prevertebral
a.
(Anat.) Situated immediately in front, or on the ventral side, of the vertebral column; prespinal.
Previous
a.
• Going before in time; being or happening before something else; antecedent; prior; as, previous arrangements; a previous illness.
Previously
adv.
• Beforehand; antecedently; as, a plan previously formed.
Previousness
n.
• The quality or state of being previous; priority or antecedence in time.
Previse
v. t.
• To foresee.
• To inform beforehand; to warn.
Prevision
n.
• Foresight; foreknowledge; prescience.
Prevoyant
a.
• Foreseeing; prescient.
Prewarn
v. t. & i.
• To warn beforehand; to forewarn.
Prey
n.
• Anything, as goods, etc., taken or got by violence; anything taken by force from an enemy in war; spoil; booty; plunder.
• That which is or may be seized by animals or birds to be devoured; hence, a person given up as a victim.
• The act of devouring other creatures; ravage.
v. i.
• To take booty; to gather spoil; to ravage; to take food by violence.
Preyer
n.
• One who, or that which, preys; a plunderer; a waster; a devourer.
Preyful
a.
• Disposed to take prey.
• Rich in prey.
Prezygapophysis
n.
(Anat.) An anterior zygapophysis.
Prial
n.
• A corruption of pair royal. See under Pair, n.
Prian
n.
(Mining) A fine, white, somewhat friable clay; also, the ore contained in a mixture of clay and pebbles.
Priapean
n.
(Lat. Pros.) A species of hexameter verse so constructed as to be divisible into two portions of three feet each, having generally a trochee in the first and the fourth foot, and an amphimacer in the third; — applied also to a regular hexameter verse when so constructed as to be divisible into two portions of three feet each.
Priapism
n.
(Med.) More or less permanent erection and rigidity of the penis, with or without sexual desire.
Priapulacea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of Gephyraea, having a cylindrical body with a terminal anal opening, and usually with one or two caudal gills.
Pricasour
n.
• A hard rider.
Price
n.
• The sum or amount of money at which a thing is valued, or the value which a seller sets on his goods in market; that for which something is bought or sold, or offered for sale; equivalent in money or other means of exchange; current value or rate paid or demanded in market or in barter; cost.
• Value; estimation; excellence; worth.
• Reward; recompense; as, the price of industry.
v. t.
• To pay the price of.
• To set a price on; to value. See Prize.
• To ask the price of; as, to price eggs.
Priced
a.
• Rated in price; valued; as, high-priced goods; low-priced labor.
Priceite
n.
(Min.) A hydrous borate of lime, from Oregon.
Priceless
a.
• Too valuable to admit of being appraised; of inestimable worth; invaluable.
• Of no value; worthless.
Prick
n.
• That which pricks, penetrates, or punctures; a sharp and slender thing; a pointed instrument; a goad; a spur, etc.; a point; a skewer.
• The act of pricking, or the sensation of being pricked; a sharp, stinging pain; figuratively, remorse.
• A mark made by a pointed instrument; a puncture; a point.
• A point or mark on the dial, noting the hour
• The point on a target at which an archer aims; the mark; the pin
• A mark denoting degree; degree; pitch
• A mathematical point; — regularly used in old English translations of Euclid
• The footprint of a hare.
(Naut.) A small roll; as, a prick of spun yarn; a prick of tobacco.
v. t.
• To pierce slightly with a sharp-pointed instrument or substance; to make a puncture in, or to make by puncturing; to drive a fine point into; as, to prick one with a pin, needle, etc.; to prick a card; to prick holes in paper.
• To fix by the point; to attach or hang by puncturing; as, to prick a knife into a board.
• To mark or denote by a puncture; to designate by pricking; to choose; to mark; — sometimes with off.
• To mark the outline of by puncturing; to trace or form by pricking; to mark by punctured dots; as, to prick a pattern for embroidery; to prick the notes of a musical composition.
• To ride or guide with spurs; to spur; to goad; to incite; to urge on; — sometimes with on, or off.
• To affect with sharp pain; to sting, as with remorse.
• To make sharp; to erect into a point; to raise, as something pointed; — said especially of the ears of an animal, as a horse or dog; and usually followed by up; — hence, to prick up the ears, to listen sharply; to have the attention and interest strongly engaged.
• To render acid or pungent.
• To dress; to prink; — usually with up.
(Naut) To run a middle seam through, as the cloth of a sail.
• To trace on a chart, as a ship's course.
(Far.) To drive a nail into (a horse's foot), so as to cause lameness.
• To nick.
v. i.
• To be punctured; to suffer or feel a sharp pain, as by puncture; as, a sore finger pricks.
• To spur onward; to ride on horseback.
• To become sharp or acid; to turn sour, as wine.
• To aim at a point or mark.
Pricker
n.
• One who, or that which, pricks; a pointed instrument; a sharp point; a prickle.
• One who spurs forward; a light horseman.
• A priming wire; a priming needle, — used in blasting and gunnery.
(Naut.) A small marline spike having generally a wooden handle, — used in sailmaking.
Pricket
n.
(Zool.) A buck in his second year. See Note under 3d Buck.
Pricking
n.
• The act of piercing or puncturing with a sharp point.
(Far.) The driving of a nail into a horse's foot so as to produce lameness.
• Same as Nicking.
• A sensation of being pricked.
• The mark or trace left by a hare's foot; a prick; also, the act of tracing a hare by its footmarks.
• Dressing one's self for show; prinking.
Prickle
n.
• A little prick; a small, sharp point; a fine, sharp process or projection, as from the skin of an animal, the bark of a plant, etc.; a spine.
• A kind of willow basket; — a term still used in some branches of trade.
• A sieve of filberts, — about fifty pounds.
v. t.
• To prick slightly, as with prickles, or fine, sharp points.
Prickliness
n.
• The quality of being prickly, or of having many prickles.
Prickling
a.
• Prickly.
Pricklouse
n.
• A tailor; — so called in contempt.
Prickly
a.
• Full of sharp points or prickles; armed or covered with prickles; as, a prickly shrub.
Prickmadam
n.
(Bot.) A name given to several species of stonecrop, used as ingredients of vermifuge medicines. See Stonecrop.
Prickpunch
n.
• A pointed steel punch, to prick a mark on metal.
Prickshaft
n.
• An arrow.
Pricksong
n.
• Music written, or noted, with dots or points; — so called from the points or dots with which it is noted down.
Prickwood
n.
(Bot.) A shrub (Euonymus Europaeus); — so named from the use of its wood for goads, skewers, and shoe pegs. Called also spindle tree.
Pricky
a.
• Stiff and sharp; prickly.
Pride
n.
(Zool.) A small European lamprey (Petromyzon branchialis); — called also prid, and sandpiper.
n.
• The quality or state of being proud; inordinate self-esteem; an unreasonable conceit of one's own superiority in talents, beauty, wealth, rank, etc., which manifests itself in lofty airs, distance, reserve, and often in contempt of others.
• A sense of one's own worth, and abhorrence of what is beneath or unworthy of one; lofty self-respect; noble self-esteem; elevation of character; dignified bearing; proud delight; — in a good sense.
• Proud or disdainful behavior or treatment; insolence or arrogance of demeanor; haughty bearing and conduct; insolent exultation; disdain.
• That of which one is proud; that which excites boasting or self-gratulation; the occasion or ground of self-esteem, or of arrogant and presumptuous confidence, as beauty, ornament, noble character, children, etc.
• Show; ostentation; glory.
• Highest pitch; elevation reached; loftiness; prime; glory; as, to be in the pride of one's life.
• Consciousness of power; fullness of animal spirits; mettle; wantonness; hence, lust; sexual desire; esp., an excitement of sexual appetite in a female beast.
v. t.
• To indulge in pride, or self-esteem; to rate highly; to plume; — used reflexively.
v. i.
• To be proud; to glory.
Prideful
a.
• Full of pride; haughty.
Prideless
a.
• Without pride.
Pridian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the day before, or yesterday.
Pridingly
adv.
• Proudly.
Prie
n.
(Bot.) The plant privet.
v. i.
• To pry.
Pried
• imp. & p. p. of Pry.
Priedieu
n.
• A kneeling desk for prayers.
Prief
n.
• Proof.
Prier
n.
• One who pries; one who inquires narrowly and searches, or is inquisitive.
Priest
n.
(Christian Church) A presbyter elder; a minister
(R. C. Ch. & Gr. Ch.) One who is authorized to consecrate the host and to say Mass; but especially, one of the lowest order possessing this power
(Ch. of Eng. & Prot. Epis. Ch.) A presbyter; one who belongs to the intermediate order between bishop and deacon. He is authorized to perform all ministerial services except those of ordination and confirmation.
• One who officiates at the altar, or performs the rites of sacrifice; one who acts as a mediator between men and the divinity or the gods in any form of religion; as, Buddhist priests.
v. t.
• To ordain as priest.
Priestcap
n.
(Fort.) A form of redan, so named from its shape; — called also swallowtail.
Priestcraft
n.
• Priestly policy; the policy of a priesthood; esp., in an ill sense, fraud or imposition in religious concerns; management by priests to gain wealth and power by working upon the religious motives or credulity of others.
Priestery
n.
• Priests, collectively; the priesthood; — so called in contempt.
Priestess
n.
• A woman who officiated in sacred rites among pagans.
Priesthood
n.
• The office or character of a priest; the priestly function.
• Priests, taken collectively; the order of men set apart for sacred offices; the order of priests.
Priesting
n.
• The office of a priest.
Priestism
n.
• The influence, doctrines, principles, etc., of priests or the priesthood.
Priestless
a.
• Without a priest.
Priestlike
a.
• Priestly.
Priestliness
n.
• The quality or state of being priestly.
Priestly
a.
• Of or pertaining to a priest or the priesthood; sacerdotal; befitting or becoming a priest; as, the priestly office; a priestly farewell.
Prieve
v. t.
• To prove.
Prig
v. i.
• To haggle about the price of a commodity; to bargain hard.
v. t.
• To cheapen.
• To filch or steal; as, to prig a handkerchief.
n.
• A pert, conceited, pragmatical fellow.
• A thief; a filcher.
Priggery
n.
• Priggism.
Priggish
a.
• Like a prig; conceited; pragmatical.
Priggism
n.
• The quality or state of being priggish; the manners of a prig.
• Roguery; thievery.
Prighte
• imp. of Prick.
Prill
n.
(Zool.) The brill.
v. i.
• To flow.
n.
• A stream.
n.
(Mining) A nugget of virgin metal.
• Ore selected for excellence.
• The button of metal from an assay.
Prillion
n.
• Tin extracted from the slag.
Prim
n.
(Bot) The privet.
a.
• Formal; precise; affectedly neat or nice; as, prim regularity; a prim person.
v. t.
• To deck with great nicety; to arrange with affected preciseness; to prink.
v. i.
• To dress or act smartly.
Primacy
n.
• The state or condition of being prime or first, as in time, place, rank, etc., hence, excellency; supremacy.
• The office, rank, or character of a primate; the chief ecclesiastical station or dignity in a national church; the office or dignity of an archbishop; as, the primacy of England.
Primage
n.
(Com.) A charge in addition to the freight; originally, a gratuity to the captain for his particular care of the goods (sometimes called hat money), but now belonging to the owners or freighters of the vessel, unless by special agreement the whole or part is assigned to the captain.
Primal
a.
• First; primary; original; chief.
Primality
n.
• The quality or state of being primal.
Primarily
adv.
• In a primary manner; in the first place; in the first place; in the first intention; originally.
Primariness
n.
• The quality or state of being primary, or first in time, in act, or in intention.
Primary
a.
• First in order of time or development or in intention; primitive; fundamental; original.
• First in order, as being preparatory to something higher; as, primary assemblies; primary schools.
• First in dignity or importance; chief; principal; as, primary planets; a matter of primary importance.
(Geol.) Earliest formed; fundamental.
(Chem.) Illustrating, possessing, or characterized by, some quality or property in the first degree; having undergone the first stage of substitution or replacement.
n.
• That which stands first in order, rank, or importance; a chief matter.
• A primary meeting; a caucus.
(Zool.) One of the large feathers on the distal joint of a bird's wing. See Plumage, and Illust. of Bird.
(Astron.) A primary planet; the brighter component of a double star. See under Planet.
Primate
n.
• The chief ecclesiastic in a national church; one who presides over other bishops in a province; an archbishop.
(Zool.) One of the Primates.
Primates
n. pl.
(Zool.) The highest order of mammals. It includes man, together with the apes and monkeys. Cf. Pitheci.
Primateship
n.
• The office, dignity, or position of a primate; primacy.
Primatial
a.
• Primatical.
Primatical
a.
• Of or pertaining to a primate.
Prime
a.
• First in order of time; original; primeval; primitive; primary.
• First in rank, degree, dignity, authority, or importance; as, prime minister.
• First in excellence; of highest quality; as, prime wheat; a prime quality of cloth.
• Early; blooming; being in the first stage.
• Lecherous; lustful; lewd.
• Marked or distinguished by a mark (') called a prime mark.
n.
• The first part; the earliest stage; the beginning or opening, as of the day, the year, etc.; hence, the dawn; the spring.
• The spring of life; youth; hence, full health, strength, or beauty; perfection.
• That which is first in quantity; the most excellent portion; the best part.
• The morning; specifically (R. C. Ch.), the first canonical hour, succeeding to lauds.
(Fencing) The first of the chief guards.
(Chem.) Any number expressing the combining weight or equivalent of any particular element; — so called because these numbers were respectively reduced to their lowest relative terms on the fixed standard of hydrogen as 1.
(Arith.) A prime number. See under Prime, a.
• An inch, as composed of twelve seconds in the duodecimal system; — denoted by [']. See 2d Inch, n., 1.
v. t.
• To apply priming to, as a musket or a cannon; to apply a primer to, as a metallic cartridge.
• To lay the first color, coating, or preparation upon (a surface), as in painting; as, to prime a canvas, a wall.
• To prepare; to make ready; to instruct beforehand; to post; to coach; as, to prime a witness; the boys are primed for mischief.
• To trim or prune, as trees.
(Math.) To mark with a prime mark.
v. i.
• To be renewed, or as at first.
• To serve as priming for the charge of a gun.
• To work so that foaming occurs from too violent ebullition, which causes water to become mixed with, and be carried along with, the steam that is formed; — said of a steam boiler.
Primely
adv.
• At first; primarily.
• In a prime manner; excellently.
Primeness
n.
• The quality or state of being first.
• The quality or state of being prime, or excellent.
Primer
n.
• One who, or that which, primes; specifically, an instrument or device for priming; esp., a cap, tube, or water containing percussion powder or other capable for igniting a charge of gunpowder.
a.
• First; original; primary.
n.
• Originally, a small prayer book for church service, containing the little office of the Virgin Mary; also, a work of elementary religious instruction.
• A small elementary book for teaching children to read; a reading or spelling book for a beginner.
(Print.) A kind of type, of which there are two species; one, called long primer, intermediate in size between bourgeois and small pica [see Long primer]; the other, called great primer, larger than pica.
Primero
n.
• A game at cards, now unknown.
Primerole
n.
(Bot.) See Primrose.
Primeval
a.
• Belonging to the first ages; pristine; original; primitive; primary; as, the primeval innocence of man.
Primevally
adv.
• In a primeval manner; in or from the earliest times; originally.
Primevous
a.
• Primeval.
Primigenial
a.
• First born, or first of all; original; primary. See Primogenial.
Primine
n.
(Bot.) The outermost of the two integuments of an ovule.
Priming
n.
• The powder or other combustible used to communicate fire to a charge of gunpowder, as in a firearm.
(Paint.) The first coating of color, size, or the like, laid on canvas, or on a building, or other surface.
(Steam Eng.) The carrying over of water, with the steam, from the boiler, as into the cylinder.
Primipara
n.
(Med.) A woman who bears a child for the first time.
Primiparous
a.
• Belonging to a first birth; bearing young for the first time.
Primipilar
a.
• Of or pertaining to the captain of the vanguard of a Roman army.
Primitia
n.
(Eng. Law) The first fruit; the first year's whole profit of an ecclesiastical preferment.
Primitial
a.
• Being of the first production; primitive; original.
Primitive
a.
• Of or pertaining to the beginning or origin, or to early times; original; primordial; primeval; first; as, primitive innocence; the primitive church.
• Of or pertaining to a former time; old-fashioned; characterized by simplicity; as, a primitive style of dress.
• Original; primary; radical; not derived; as, primitive verb in grammar.
n.
• An original or primary word; a word not derived from another; — opposed to derivative.
Primitively
adv.
• Originally; at first.
• Primarily; not derivatively.
• According to the original rule or ancient practice; in the ancient style.
Primitiveness
n.
• The quality or state of being primitive; conformity to primitive style or practice.
Primity
n.
• Quality of being first; primitiveness.
Primly
adv.
• In a prim or precise manner.
Primness
n.
• The quality or state of being prim; affected formality or niceness; preciseness; stiffness.
Primo
a.
(Mus.) First; chief.
Primogenial
a.
• First born, made, or generated; original; primary; elemental; as, primogenial light.
Primogenitive
a.
• Of or pertaining to primogeniture.
n.
• Primogeniture.
Primogenitor
n.
• The first ancestor; a forefather.
Primogeniture
n.
• The state of being the firstborn of the same parents; seniority by birth among children of the same family.
(Eng. Law) The exclusive right of inheritance which belongs to the eldest son. Thus in England the right of inheriting the estate of the father belongs to the eldest son, and in the royal family the eldest son of the sovereign is entitled to the throne by primogeniture. In exceptional cases, among the female children, the crown descends by right of primogeniture to the eldest daughter only and her issue.
Primogenitureship
n.
• The state or privileges of the firstborn.
Primordial
a.
• First in order; primary; original; of earliest origin; as, primordial condition.
(Geol.) Of or pertaining to the lowest beds of the Silurian age, corresponding to the Acadian and Potsdam periods in American geology. It is called also Cambrian, and by many geologists is separated from the Silurian.
(Biol.) Originally or earliest formed in the growth of an individual or organ; as, a primordial leaf; a primordial cell.
n.
• A first principle or element.
Primordialism
n.
• Devotion to, or persistence in, conditions of the primordial state.
Primordially
adv.
• At the beginning; under the first order of things; originally.
Primordian
n.
(Bot.) A name given to several kinds of plums; as, red primordian, amber primordian, etc.
Primordiate
a.
• Primordial.
Primp
v. i. & t.
• To be formal or affected in dress or manners; — often with up.
Primrose
n.
(Bot.) An early flowering plant of the genus Primula (P. vulgaris) closely allied to the cowslip. There are several varieties, as the white-, the red-, the yellow-flowered, etc. Formerly called also primerole, primerolles.
• Any plant of the genus Primula.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the primrose; of the color of a primrose; — hence, flowery; gay.
Primula
n.
(Bot.) The genus of plants including the primrose (Primula vera).
Primulaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to an order of herbaceous plants (Primulaceae), of which the primrose is the type, and the pimpernel, the cyclamen, and the water violet are other examples.
Primus
n.
• One of the bishops of the Episcopal Church of Scotland, who presides at the meetings of the bishops, and has certain privileges but no metropolitan authority.
Primy
a.
• Being in its prime.
Prince
n.
• The one of highest rank; one holding the highest place and authority; a sovereign; a monarch; — originally applied to either sex, but now rarely applied to a female.
• The son of a king or emperor, or the issue of a royal family; as, princes of the blood.
• A title belonging to persons of high rank, differing in different countries. In England it belongs to dukes, marquises, and earls, but is given to members of the royal family only. In Italy a prince is inferior to a duke as a member of a particular order of nobility; in Spain he is always one of the royal family.
• The chief of any body of men; one at the head of a class or profession; one who is preeminent; as, a merchant prince; a prince of players.
v. i.
• To play the prince.
Princedom
n.
• The jurisdiction, sovereignty, rank, or estate of a prince.
Princehood
n.
• Princeliness.
Princekin
n.
• A petty prince; a princeling.
Princeless
a.
• Without a prince.
Princelet
n.
• A petty prince.
Princelike
a.
• Princely.
Princeliness
n.
• The quality of being princely; the state, manner, or dignity of a prince.
Princeling
n.
• A petty prince; a young prince.
Princely
a.
• Of or relating to a prince; regal; royal; of highest rank or authority; as, princely birth, character, fortune, etc.
• Suitable for, or becoming to, a prince; grand; august; munificent; magnificent; as, princely virtues; a princely fortune.
adv.
• In a princely manner.
Princess
n.
• A female prince; a woman having sovereign power, or the rank of a prince.
• The daughter of a sovereign; a female member of a royal family.
• The consort of a prince; as, the princess of Wales.
Princesse
a.
• A term applied to a lady's long, close-fitting dress made with waist and skirt in one.
Princesslike
a.
• Like a princess.
Princewood
n.
(Bot.) The wood of two small tropical American trees (Hamelia ventricosa, and Cordia gerascanthoides). It is brownish, veined with lighter color.
Princified
a.
• Imitative of a prince.
Principal
a.
• Highest in rank, authority, character, importance, or degree; most considerable or important; chief; main; as, the principal officers of a Government; the principal men of a state; the principal productions of a country; the principal arguments in a case.
• Of or pertaining to a prince; princely.
n.
• A leader, chief, or head; one who takes the lead; one who acts independently, or who has controlling authority or influence; as, the principal of a faction, a school, a firm, etc.; — distinguished from a subordinate, abettor, auxiliary, or assistant.
(Law) The chief actor in a crime, or an abettor who is present at it, — as distinguished from an accessory.
• A chief obligor, promisor, or debtor, — as distinguished from a surety.
• One who employs another to act for him, — as distinguished from an agent.
• A thing of chief or prime importance; something fundamental or especially conspicuous.
(Com.) A capital sum of money, placed out at interest, due as a debt or used as a fund; — so called in distinction from interest or profit.
(Arch. & Engin.) The construction which gives shape and strength to a roof, — generally a truss of timber or iron, but there are roofs with stone principals. Also, loosely, the most important member of a piece of framing.
(Mus.) In English organs the chief open metallic stop, an octave above the open diapason. On the manual it is four feet long, on the pedal eight feet. In Germany this term corresponds to the English open diapason.
(O. Eng. Law) A heirloom; a mortuary.
• The first two long feathers of a hawk's wing.
• One of turrets or pinnacles of waxwork and tapers with which the posts and center of a funeral hearse were formerly crowned.
• A principal or essential point or rule; a principle.
Principality
n.
• Sovereignty; supreme power; hence, superiority; predominance; high, or the highest, station.
• A prince; one invested with sovereignty.
• The territory or jurisdiction of a prince; or the country which gives title to a prince; as, the principality of Wales.
Principally
adv.
• In a principal manner; primarily; above all; chiefly; mainly.
Principalness
n.
• The quality of being principal.
Principate
n.
• Principality; supreme rule.
Principia
n. pl.
• First principles; fundamental beginnings; elements; as. Newton's Principia.
Principial
a.
• Elementary.
Principiant
a.
• Relating to principles or beginnings.
Principiate
v. t.
• To begin; to initiate.
Principiation
n.
• Analysis into primary or elemental parts.
Principle
n.
• Beginning; commencement.
• A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.
• An original faculty or endowment.
• A fundamental truth; a comprehensive law or doctrine, from which others are derived, or on which others are founded; a general truth; an elementary proposition; a maxim; an axiom; a postulate.
• A settled rule of action; a governing law of conduct; an opinion or belief which exercises a directing influence on the life and behavior; a rule (usually, a right rule) of conduct consistently directing one's actions; as, a person of no principle.
(Chem.) Any original inherent constituent which characterizes a substance, or gives it its essential properties, and which can usually be separated by analysis; — applied especially to drugs, plant extracts, etc.
v. t.
• To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet, or rule of conduct, good or ill.
Prink
v. i.
• To dress or adjust one's self for show; to prank.
v. t.
• To prank or dress up; to deck fantastically.
Prinker
n.
• One who prinks.
Prinpriddle
n.
(Zool.) The longtailed titmouse.
Print
v. t.
• To fix or impress, as a stamp, mark, character, idea, etc., into or upon something.
• To stamp something in or upon; to make an impression or mark upon by pressure, or as by pressure.
• To strike off an impression or impressions of, from type, or from stereotype, electrotype, or engraved plates, or the like; in a wider sense, to do the typesetting, presswork, etc., of (a book or other publication); as, to print books, newspapers, pictures; to print an edition of a book.
• To stamp or impress with colored figures or patterns; as, to print calico.
(Photog.) To take (a copy, a positive picture, etc.), from a negative, a transparent drawing, or the like, by the action of light upon a sensitized surface.
v. i.
• To use or practice the art of typography; to take impressions of letters, figures, or electrotypes, engraved plates, or the like.
• To publish a book or an article.
n.
• A mark made by impression; a line, character, figure, or indentation, made by the pressure of one thing on another; as, the print of teeth or nails in flesh; the print of the foot in sand or snow.
• A stamp or die for molding or impressing an ornamental design upon an object; as, a butter print.
• That which receives an impression, as from a stamp or mold; as, a print of butter.
• Printed letters; the impression taken from type, as to excellence, form, size, etc.; as, small print; large print; this line is in print.
• That which is produced by printing.
• An impression taken from anything, as from an engraved plate
• A printed publication, more especially a newspaper or other periodical
• A printed cloth; a fabric figured by stamping, especially calico or cotton cloth
• A photographic copy, or positive picture, on prepared paper, as from a negative, or from a drawing on transparent paper.
(Founding) A core print. See under Core.
Printer
n.
• One who prints; especially, one who prints books, newspapers, engravings, etc., a compositor; a typesetter; a pressman.
Printery
n.
• A place where cloth is printed; print works; also, a printing office.
Printing
n.
• The act, art, or practice of impressing letters, characters, or figures on paper, cloth, or other material; the business of a printer, including typesetting and presswork, with their adjuncts; typography; also, the act of producing photographic prints.
Printless
a.
• Making no imprint.
a.
• Making no imprint.
Printshop
n.
• A shop where prints are sold.
Prior
a.
• Preceding in the order of time; former; antecedent; anterior; previous; as, a prior discovery; prior obligation; — used elliptically in cases like the following: he lived alone [in the time] prior to his marriage.
n.
(Eccl.) The superior of a priory, and next below an abbot in dignity.
Priorate
n.
• The dignity, office, or government, of a prior.
Prioress
n.
• A lady superior of a priory of nuns, and next in dignity to an abbess.
Priority
n.
• The quality or state of being prior or antecedent in time, or of preceding something else; as, priority of application.
• Precedence; superior rank.
Priorly
adv.
• Previously.
Priorship
n.
• The state or office of prior; priorate.
Priory
n.
• A religious house presided over by a prior or prioress; — sometimes an offshoot of, an subordinate to, an abbey, and called also cell, and obedience. See Cell, 2.
Pris
n.
• See Price, and 1st Prize.
Prisage
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A right belonging to the crown of England, of taking two tuns of wine from every ship importing twenty tuns or more, — one before and one behind the mast. By charter of Edward I. butlerage was substituted for this.
• The share of merchandise taken as lawful prize at sea which belongs to the king or admiral.
Priscillianist
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Priscillian, bishop of Avila in Spain, in the fourth century, who mixed various elements of Gnosticism and Manicheism with Christianity.
Prise
n.
• An enterprise.
n. & v.
• See Prize, n., 5. Also Prize, v. t.
Priser
n.
• See 1st Prizer.
Prism
n.
(Geom.) A solid whose bases or ends are any similar, equal, and parallel plane figures, and whose sides are parallelograms.
(Opt.) A transparent body, with usually three rectangular plane faces or sides, and two equal and parallel triangular ends or bases; — used in experiments on refraction, dispersion, etc.
(Crystallog.) A form the planes of which are parallel to the vertical axis. See Form, n., 13.
Prismatically
adv.
• In the form on manner of a prism; by means of a prism.
Prismatoidal
a.
• Having a prismlike form.
Prismoid
n.
• A body that approaches to the form of a prism.
Prismoidal
a.
• Having the form of a prismoid; as, prismoidal solids.
Prismy
a.
• Pertaining to a prism.
Prison
n.
• A place where persons are confined, or restrained of personal liberty; hence, a place or state o confinement, restraint, or safe custody.
• Specifically, a building for the safe custody or confinement of criminals and others committed by lawful authority.
v. t.
• To imprison; to shut up in, or as in, a prison; to confine; to restrain from liberty.
• To bind (together); to enchain.
Prisoner
n.
• One who is confined in a prison.
• A person under arrest, or in custody, whether in prison or not; a person held in involuntary restraint; a captive; as, a prisoner at the bar of a court.
Prisonment
n.
• Imprisonment.
Pristinate
a.
• Pristine; primitive.
Pristine
a.
• Belonging to the earliest period or state; original; primitive; primeval; as, the pristine state of innocence; the pristine manners of a people; pristine vigor.
Pritch
n.
• A sharp-pointed instrument; also, an eelspear.
• Pique; offense.
Pritchel
n.
• A tool employed by blacksmiths for punching or enlarging the nail holes in a horseshoe.
Prithee
interj.
• A corruption of pray thee; as, I prithee; generally used without I.
Privacy
n.
• The state of being in retirement from the company or observation of others; seclusion.
• A place of seclusion from company or observation; retreat; solitude; retirement.
• Concealment of what is said or done.
• A private matter; a secret.
• See Privity, 2.
Privado
n.
• A private friend; a confidential friend; a confidant.
Private
a.
• Belonging to, or concerning, an individual person, company, or interest; peculiar to one's self; unconnected with others; personal; one's own; not public; not general; separate; as, a man's private opinion; private property; a private purse; private expenses or interests; a private secretary.
• Sequestered from company or observation; appropriated to an individual; secret; secluded; lonely; solitary; as, a private room or apartment; private prayer.
• Not invested with, or engaged in, public office or employment; as, a private citizen; private life.
• Not publicly known; not open; secret; as, a private negotiation; a private understanding.
• Having secret or private knowledge; privy.
n.
• A secret message; a personal unofficial communication.
• Personal interest; particular business.
• Privacy; retirement.
• One not invested with a public office.
(Mil.) A common soldier; a soldier below the grade of a noncommissioned officer.
• The private parts; the genitals.
Privateer
n.
• An armed private vessel which bears the commission of the sovereign power to cruise against the enemy. See Letters of marque, under Marque.
• The commander of a privateer.
v. i.
• To cruise in a privateer.
Privateering
n.
• Cruising in a privateer.
Privateersman
n.
• An officer or seaman of a privateer.
Privately
adv.
• In a private manner; not openly; without the presence of others.
• In a manner affecting an individual; personally not officially; as, he is not privately benefited.
Privateness
n.
• Seclusion from company or society; retirement; privacy; secrecy.
• The state of one not invested with public office.
Privation
n.
• The act of depriving, or taking away; hence, the depriving of rank or office; degradation in rank; deprivation.
• The state of being deprived or destitute of something, especially of something required or desired; destitution; need; as, to undergo severe privations.
• The condition of being absent; absence; negation.
Privative
a.
• Causing privation; depriving.
• Consisting in the absence of something; not positive; negative.
(Gram.) Implying privation or negation; giving a negative force to a word; as, alpha privative; privative particles; — applied to such prefixes and suffixes as a- (Gr. ), un-, non-, -less.
n.
• That of which the essence is the absence of something.
(Logic) A term indicating the absence of any quality which might be naturally or rationally expected; — called also privative term.
(Gram.) A privative prefix or suffix. See Privative, a., 3.
Privatively
adv.
• In a privative manner; by the absence of something; negatively.
Privativeness
n.
• The state of being privative.
Privet
n.
(Bot.) An ornamental European shrub (Ligustrum vulgare), much used in hedges; — called also prim.
Privilege
n.
• A peculiar benefit, advantage, or favor; a right or immunity not enjoyed by others or by all; special enjoyment of a good, or exemption from an evil or burden; a prerogative; advantage; franchise.
(Stockbroker's Cant) See Call, Put, Spread, etc.
v. t.
• To grant some particular right or exemption to; to invest with a peculiar right or immunity; to authorize; as, to privilege representatives from arrest.
• To bring or put into a condition of privilege or exemption from evil or danger; to exempt; to deliver.
Privileged
a.
• Invested with a privilege; enjoying a peculiar right, advantage, or immunity.
Privily
adv.
• In a privy manner; privately; secretly.
Privity
n.
• Privacy; secrecy; confidence.
• Private knowledge; joint knowledge with another of a private concern; cognizance implying consent or concurrence.
• A private matter or business; a secret.
• The genitals; the privates.
(Law) A connection, or bond of union, between parties, as to some particular transaction; mutual or successive relationship to the same rights of property.
Privy
a.
• Of or pertaining to some person exclusively; assigned to private uses; not public; private; as, the privy purse.
• Secret; clandestine.
• Appropriated to retirement; private; not open to the public.
• Admitted to knowledge of a secret transaction; secretly cognizant; privately knowing.
n.
(Law) A partaker; a person having an interest in any action or thing; one who has an interest in an estate created by another; a person having an interest derived from a contract or conveyance to which he is not himself a party. The term, in its proper sense, is distinguished from party.
• A necessary house or place; a backhouse.
Prizable
a.
• Valuable.
Prize
n.
• That which is taken from another; something captured; a thing seized by force, stratagem, or superior power.
(Law) Anything captured by a belligerent using the rights of war; esp., property captured at sea in virtue of the rights of war, as a vessel.
• An honor or reward striven for in a competitive contest; anything offered to be competed for, or as an inducement to, or reward of, effort.
• That which may be won by chance, as in a lottery
• Anything worth striving for; a valuable possession held or in prospect.
• A contest for a reward; competition.
• A lever; a pry; also, the hold of a lever.
v. t.
• To move with a lever; to force up or open; to pry.
v. t.
• To set or estimate the value of; to appraise; to price; to rate.
• To value highly; to estimate to be of great worth; to esteem.
n.
• Estimation; valuation.
Prizeman
n.
• The winner of a prize.
Prizer
n.
• One who estimates or sets the value of a thing; an appraiser.
n.
• One who contends for a prize; a prize fighter; a challenger.
Prizing
n.
• The application of a lever to move any weighty body, as a cask, anchor, cannon, car, etc. See Prize, n., 5.
Pro
prep.
• A Latin preposition signifying for, before, forth.
adv.
• For, on, or in behalf of, the affirmative side; — in contrast with con.
Proa
n.
(Naut.) A sailing canoe of the Ladrone Islands and Malay Archipelago, having its lee side flat and its weather side like that of an ordinary boat. The ends are alike. The canoe is long and narrow, and is kept from overturning by a cigar-shaped log attached to a frame extending several feet to windward. It has been called the flying proa, and is the swiftest sailing craft known.
Proach
v. i.
• See Approach.
Proatlas
n.
(Anat.) A vertebral rudiment in front of the atlas in some reptiles.
Probabiliorism
n.
• The doctrine of the probabiliorists.
Probabiliorist
n.
(Casuistry) One who holds, in opposition to the probabilists, that a man is bound to do that which is most probably right.
Probabilism
n.
• The doctrine of the probabilists.
Probabilist
n.
• One who maintains that certainty is impossible, and that probability alone is to govern our faith and actions.
(Casuistry) One who maintains that a man may do that which has a probability of being right, or which is inculcated by teachers of authority, although other opinions may seem to him still more probable.
Probability
n.
• The quality or state of being probable; appearance of reality or truth; reasonable ground of presumption; likelihood.
• That which is or appears probable; anything that has the appearance of reality or truth.
(Math.) Likelihood of the occurrence of any event in the doctrine of chances, or the ratio of the number of favorable chances to the whole number of chances, favorable and unfavorable. See 1st Chance, n., 5.
Probable
a.
• Capable of being proved.
• Having more evidence for than against; supported by evidence which inclines the mind to believe, but leaves some room for doubt; likely.
• Rendering probable; supporting, or giving ground for, belief, but not demonstrating; as, probable evidence; probable presumption.
Probably
adv.
• In a probable manner; in likelihood.
Probacy
n.
• Proof; trial.
Probal
a.
• Approved; probable.
Probality
n.
• Probability.
Probang
n.
• A slender elastic rod, as of whalebone, with a sponge on the end, for removing obstructions from the esophagus, etc.
Probate
n.
• Proof.
(Law) Official proof; especially, the proof before a competent officer or tribunal that an instrument offered, purporting to be the last will and testament of a person deceased, is indeed his lawful act; the copy of a will proved, under the seal of the Court of Probate, delivered to the executors with a certificate of its having been proved
• The right or jurisdiction of proving wills
a.
• Of or belonging to a probate, or court of probate; as, a probate record.
v. t.
• To obtain the official approval of, as of an instrument purporting to be the last will and testament; as, the executor has probated the will.
Probation
n.
• The act of proving; also, that which proves anything; proof.
• Any proceeding designed to ascertain truth, to determine character, qualification, etc.; examination; trial; as, to engage a person on probation. Hence, specifically: (a) The novitiate which a person must pass in a convent, to probe his or her virtue and ability to bear the severities of the rule. (b) The trial of a ministerial candidate's qualifications prior to his ordination, or to his settlement as a pastor. (c) Moral trial; the state of man in the present life, in which he has the opportunity of proving his character, and becoming qualified for a happier state.
Probational
a.
• Probationary.
Probationary
a.
• Of or pertaining to probation; serving for trial.
Probationer
n.
• One who is undergoing probation; one who is on trial; a novice.
• A student in divinity, who, having received certificates of good morals and qualifications from his university, is admitted to several trials by a presbytery, and, on acquitting himself well, is licensed to preach.
Probationership
n.
• The state of being a probationer; novitiate.
Probationship
n.
• A state of probation.
Probative
a.
• Serving for trial or proof; probationary; as, probative judgments; probative evidence.
Probator
n.
• An examiner; an approver.
(O. Eng. Law) One who, when indicted for crime, confessed it, and accused others, his accomplices, in order to obtain pardon; a state's evidence.
Probatory
a.
• Serving for trial; probationary.
• Pertaining to, or serving for, proof.
Probe
v. t.
• To examine, as a wound, an ulcer, or some cavity of the body, with a probe.
• Fig.: to search to the bottom; to scrutinize or examine thoroughly.
n.
(Surg.) An instrument for examining the depth or other circumstances of a wound, ulcer, or cavity, or the direction of a sinus, of for exploring for bullets, for stones in the bladder, etc.
Probeagle
n.
(Zool.) See Porbeagle.
Probity
n.
• Tried virtue or integrity; approved moral excellence; honesty; rectitude; uprightness.
Problem
n.
• A question proposed for solution; a matter stated for examination or proof; hence, a matter difficult of solution or settlement; a doubtful case; a question involving doubt.
(Math.) Anything which is required to be done; as, in geometry, to bisect a line, to draw a perpendicular; or, in algebra, to find an unknown quantity.
Problematist
n.
• One who proposes problems.
Problematize
v. t.
• To propose problems.
Proboscidate
a.
(Zool.) Having a proboscis; proboscidial.
Proboscidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of large mammal including the elephants and mastodons.
Proboscidean
a.
(Zool.) Proboscidian.
Proboscidial
a.
(Zool.) Proboscidate.
Proboscidian
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the Proboscidea.
n.
• One of the Proboscidea.
Proboscidifera
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive division of pectinibranchiate gastropods, including those that have a long retractile proboscis, with the mouth at the end, as the cones, whelks, tritons, and cowries. See Illust. of Gastropoda, and of Winkle.
(Zool.) A subdivision of the taenioglossate gastropods, including the fig-shells (Pyrula), the helmet shells (Cassis), the tritons, and allied genera.
Proboscidiform
a.
• Having the form or uses of a proboscis; as, a proboscidiform mouth.
Proboscis
n.
(Zool.) A hollow organ or tube attached to the head, or connected with the mouth, of various animals, and generally used in taking food or drink; a snout; a trunk.
(Zool.) By extension, applied to various tubelike mouth organs of the lower animals that can be everted or protruded.
• The nose.
Procacious
a.
• Pert; petulant; forward; saucy.
Procacity
n.
• Forwardness; pertness; petulance.
Procambium
n.
(Bot.) The young tissue of a fibrovascular bundle before its component cells have begun to be differentiated.
Procatarctic
a.
(Med.) Beginning; predisposing; exciting; initial.
Procatarxis
n.
(Med.) The kindling of a disease into action; also, the procatarctic cause.
Procedendo
n.
(Law) A writ by which a cause which has been removed on insufficient grounds from an inferior to a superior court by certiorari, or otherwise, is sent down again to the same court, to be proceeded in there.
• In English practice, a writ issuing out of chancery in cases where the judges of subordinate courts delay giving judgment, commanding them to proceed to judgment.
• A writ by which the commission of the justice of the peace is revived, after having been suspended.
Procedure
n.
• The act or manner of proceeding or moving forward; progress; process; operation; conduct
• A step taken; an act performed; a proceeding; the steps taken in an action or other legal proceeding.
• That which results; issue; product.
Proceed
v. i.
• To move, pass, or go forward or onward; to advance; to continue or renew motion begun; as, to proceed on a journey.
• To pass from one point, topic, or stage, to another; as, to proceed with a story or argument.
• To issue or come forth as from a source or origin; to come from; as, light proceeds from the sun.
• To go on in an orderly or regulated manner; to begin and carry on a series of acts or measures; to act by method; to prosecute a design.
• To be transacted; to take place; to occur.
• To have application or effect; to operate.
(Law) To begin and carry on a legal process.
n.
• See Proceeds.
Proceeder
n.
• One who proceeds.
Proceeding
n.
• The act of one who proceeds, or who prosecutes a design or transaction; progress or movement from one thing to another; a measure or step taken in a course of business; a transaction; as, an illegal proceeding; a cautious or a violent proceeding.
(Law) The course of procedure in the prosecution of an action at law.
Proceeds
n. pl.
• That which comes forth or results; effect; yield; issue; product; sum accruing from a sale, etc.
Proceleusmatic
a.
• Inciting; animating; encouraging.
(Pros.) Consisting of four short syllables; composed of feet of four short syllables each.
n.
(Pros.) A foot consisting of four short syllables.
Procellarian
n.
(Zool.) One of a family of oceanic birds (Procellaridae) including the petrels, fulmars, and shearwaters. They are often seen in great abundance in stormy weather.
Procellous
a.
• Stormy.
Procephalic
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to, or forming, the front of the head.
Proception
n.
• Preoccupation.
Procere
a.
• Of high stature; tall.
Procerebrum
n.
(Anat.) The prosencephalon.
Proceres
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of large birds; the Ratitae; — called also Proceri.
Procerite
n.
(Zool.) The segment next to the flagellum of the antennae of Crustacea.
Procerity
n.
• Height of stature; tallness.
Process
n.
• The act of proceeding; continued forward movement; procedure; progress; advance.
• A series of actions, motions, or occurrences; progressive act or transaction; continuous operation; normal or actual course or procedure; regular proceeding; as, the process of vegetation or decomposition; a chemical process; processes of nature.
• A statement of events; a narrative.
(Anat. & Zool.) Any marked prominence or projecting part, especially of a bone; anapophysis.
(Law) The whole course of proceedings in a cause real or personal, civil or criminal, from the beginning to the end of the suit; strictly, the means used for bringing the defendant into court to answer to the action; — a generic term for writs of the class called judicial.
Procession
n.
• The act of proceeding, moving on, advancing, or issuing; regular, orderly, or ceremonious progress; continuous course.
• That which is moving onward in an orderly, stately, or solemn manner; a train of persons advancing in order; a ceremonious train; a retinue; as, a procession of mourners; the Lord Mayor's procession.
(Eccl.) An orderly and ceremonial progress of persons, either from the sacristy to the choir, or from the choir around the church, within or without.
(Eccl.) An old term for litanies which were said in procession and not kneeling.
v. t.
(Law) To ascertain, mark, and establish the boundary lines of, as lands.
v. i.
• To march in procession.
v. i.
• To honor with a procession.
Processional
a.
• Of or pertaining to a procession; consisting in a procession.
n.
(R. C. Ch.) A service book relating to ecclesiastical processions.
• A hymn, or other selection, sung during a church procession; as, the processional was the 202d hymn.
Processionalist
n.
• One who goes or marches in a procession.
Processionary
a.
• Pertaining to a procession; consisting in processions; as, processionary service.
Processioner
n.
• One who takes part in a procession.
• A manual of processions; a processional.
• An officer appointed to procession lands.
Processioning
n.
• A proceeding prescribed by statute for ascertaining and fixing the boundaries of land. See 2d Procession.
Processive
a.
• Proceeding; advancing.
Prochein
a.
• Next; nearest.
Prochordal
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the notochord; — applied especially to parts of the cartilaginous rudiments in the base of the skull.
Prochronism
n.
• The dating of an event before the time it happened; an antedating; — opposed to metachronism.
Prochronize
v. t.
• To antedate.
Prociduous
a.
• Falling from its proper place.
Procinct
n.
• A state of complete readiness for action.
Proclaim
v. t.
• To make known by public announcement; to give wide publicity to; to publish abroad; to promulgate; to declare; as, to proclaim war or peace.
• To outlaw by public proclamation.
Proclaimer
n.
• One who proclaims.
Proclamation
n.
• The act of proclaiming; official or general notice; publication.
• That which is proclaimed, publicly announced, or officially declared; a published ordinance; as, the proclamation of a king; a Thanksgiving proclamation.
Proclitic
a.
(Gr. Gram.) Leaning forward; — said of certain monosyllabic words which are so closely attached to the following word as not to have a separate accent.
Proclive
a.
• Having a tendency by nature; prone; proclivous.
Proclivity
n.
• Inclination; propensity; proneness; tendency.
• Readiness; facility; aptitude.
Proclivous
a.
• Inclined; tending by nature.
(Zool.) Having the incisor teeth directed forward.
Procoele
n.
(Anat.) A lateral cavity of the prosencephalon; a lateral ventricle of the brain.
Procoelia
n.
(Anat.) Same as Procoele.
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Crocodilia, including the true crocodiles and alligators, in which the dorsal vertebrae are concave in front.
Procoelian
a.
(Anat & Zool.) Concave in front; as, procoelian vertebrae, which have the anterior end of the centra concave and the posterior convex.
n.
(Zool.) A reptile having procoelian vertebrae; one of the Procoelia.
Procoelous
a.
• Same as Procoelian.
Proconsul
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) An officer who discharged the duties of a consul without being himself consul; a governor of, or a military commander in, a province. He was usually one who had previously been consul.
Proconsulate
n.
• The office jurisdiction of a proconsul, or the term of his office.
Proconsulship
n.
• Proconsulate.
Procrastinate
v. t.
• To put off till to-morrow, or from day to day; to defer; to postpone; to delay; as, to procrastinate repentance.
v. i.
• To delay; to be dilatory.
Procrastination
n.
• The act or habit of procrastinating, or putting off to a future time; delay; dilatoriness.
Procrastinator
n.
• One who procrastinates, or defers the performance of anything.
Procrastinatory
a.
• Of or pertaining to procrastination; dilatory.
Procrastine
v. t.
• To procrastinate.
Procreant
a.
• Generating; producing; productive; fruitful; assisting in procreation.
n.
• One who, or that which, procreates.
Procreate
v. t.
• To generate and produce; to beget; to engender.
Procreation
n.
• The act of begetting; generation and production of young.
Procreative
a.
• Having the power to beget; generative.
Procreativeness
n.
• The power of generating.
Procreator
n.
• One who begets; a father or sire; a generator.
Procris
n.
(Zool.) Any species of small moths of the genus Procris. The larvae of some species injure the grapevine by feeding in groups upon the leaves.
Procrustean
a.
• Of or pertaining to Procrustes, or the mode of torture practiced by him; producing conformity by violent means; as, the Procrustean treatment; a Procrustean limit. See Procrustes.
Procrusteanize
v. t.
• To stretch or contract according to some rule or standard.
Procrustes
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A celebrated legendary highwayman of Attica, who tied his victims upon an iron bed, and, as the case required, either stretched or cut of their legs to adapt them to its length; — whence the metaphorical phrase, the bed of Procrustes.
Procrustesian
a.
• See Procrustean.
Proctitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the rectum.
Proctocele
n.
(Med.) Inversion and prolapse of the mucous coat of the rectum, from relaxation of the sphincter, with more or less swelling; prolapsus ani.
Proctodaeum
n.
(Anat.) See Mesenteron.
Proctor
n.
• One who is employed to manage to affairs of another.
• A person appointed to collect alms for those who could not go out to beg for themselves, as lepers, the bedridden, etc.; hence a beggar.
(Eng. Law) An officer employed in admiralty and ecclesiastical causes. He answers to an attorney at common law, or to a solicitor in equity.
(Ch. of Eng.) A representative of the clergy in convocation
• An officer in a university or college whose duty it is to enforce obedience to the laws of the institution.
v. t.
• To act as a proctor toward; to manage as an attorney or agent.
Proctorage
n.
• Management by a proctor, or as by a proctor; hence, control; superintendence; — in contempt.
Proctorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a proctor, esp. an academic proctor; magisterial.
Proctorical
a.
• Proctorial.
Proctorship
n.
• The office or dignity of a proctor; also, the term of his office.
Proctotomy
n.
(Surg.) An incision into the rectum, as for the division of a stricture.
Proctucha
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Turbellaria including those that have an intestine terminating posteriorly.
• The Nemertina.
Procumbent
a.
• Lying down, or on the face; prone.
(Bot.) Lying on the ground, but without putting forth roots; trailing; prostrate; as, a procumbent stem.
Procurable
a.
• Capable of being procured; obtainable.
Procuracy
n.
• The office or act of a proctor or procurator; management for another.
• Authority to act for another; a proxy.
Procuration
n.
• The act of procuring; procurement.
• The management of another's affairs.
• The instrument by which a person is empowered to transact the affairs of another; a proxy.
(Ch. of Eng.) A sum of money paid formerly to the bishop or archdeacon, now to the ecclesiastical commissioners, by an incumbent, as a commutation for entertainment at the time of visitation; — called also proxy.
Procurator
n.
(Law) One who manages another's affairs, either generally or in a special matter; an agent; a proctor.
(Rom. Antiq.) A governor of a province under the emperors; also, one who had charge of the imperial revenues in a province; as, the procurator of Judea.
Procuratorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a procurator, or proctor; made by a proctor.
Procuratorship
n.
• The office or term of a procurator.
Procuratory
a.
• Tending to, or authorizing, procuration.
Procure
v. t.
• To bring into possession; to cause to accrue to, or to come into possession of; to acquire or provide for one's self or for another; to gain; to get; to obtain by any means, as by purchase or loan.
• To contrive; to bring about; to effect; to cause.
• To solicit; to entreat.
• To cause to come; to bring; to attract.
• To obtain for illicit intercourse or prostitution.
v. i.
• To pimp.
• To manage business for another in court.
Procurement
n.
• The act of procuring or obtaining; obtainment; attainment.
• Efficient contrivance; management; agency.
Procurer
n.
• One who procures, or obtains; one who, or that which, brings on, or causes to be done, esp. by corrupt means.
• One who procures the gratification of lust for another; a pimp; a pander.
Procuress
n.
• A female procurer, or pander.
Procyon
n.
(Astron.) a star of the first magnitude in the constellation Canis Minor, or the Little Dog.
(Zool.) A genus of mammals including the raccoon.
Prod
n.
• A pointed instrument for pricking or puncturing, as a goad, an awl, a skewer, etc.
• A prick or stab which a pointed instrument.
• A light kind of crossbow; — in the sense, often spelled prodd.
v. t.
• To thrust some pointed instrument into; to prick with something sharp; as, to prod a soldier with a bayonet; to prod oxen; hence, to goad, to incite, to worry; as, to prod a student.
Prodd
n.
• A crossbow. See Prod, 3.
Prodigal
a.
• Given to extravagant expenditure; expending money or other things without necessity; recklessly or viciously profuse; lavish; wasteful; not frugal or economical; as, a prodigal man; the prodigal son; prodigal giving; prodigal expenses.
n.
• One who expends money extravagantly, viciously, or without necessity; one that is profuse or lavish in any expenditure; a waster; a spendthrift.
Prodigality
n.
• Extravagance in expenditure, particularly of money; excessive liberality; profusion; waste; — opposed to frugality, economy, and parsimony.
Prodigalize
v. i.
• To act as a prodigal; to spend liberally.
v. t.
• To expend lavishly.
Prodigally
adv.
• In a prodigal manner; with profusion of expense; extravagantly; wasteful; profusely; lavishly; as, an estate prodigally dissipated.
Prodigate
v. t.
• To squander.
Prodigence
n.
• Waste; profusion; prodigality.
Prodigious
a.
• Of the nature of a prodigy; marvelous; wonderful; portentous.
• Extraordinary in bulk, extent, quantity, or degree; very great; vast; huge; immense; as, a prodigious mountain; a prodigious creature; a prodigious blunder.
Prodigiously
adv.
• Enormously; wonderfully; astonishingly; as, prodigiously great.
• Very much; extremely; as, he was prodigiously pleased.
Prodigiousness
n.
• The quality or state of being prodigious; the state of having qualities that excite wonder or astonishment; enormousness; vastness.
Prodigy
n.
• Something extraordinary, or out of the usual course of nature, from which omens are drawn; a portent; as, eclipses and meteors were anciently deemed prodigies.
• Anything so extraordinary as to excite wonder or astonishment; a marvel; as, a prodigy of learning.
• A production out of ordinary course of nature; an abnormal development; a monster.
Prodition
n.
• Disclosure; treachery; treason.
Proditorious
a.
• Treacherous; perfidious; traitorous.
• Apt to make unexpected revelations.
Proditory
a.
• Treacherous.
Prodromal
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to prodromes; as, the prodromal stage of a disease.
Prodrome
n.
• A forerunner; a precursor.
Prodromous
a.
• Precursory.
Prodromus
n.
• A prodrome.
• A preliminary course or publication; — used esp. in the titles of elementary works.
Produce
v. t.
• To bring forward; to lead forth; to offer to view or notice; to exhibit; to show; as, to produce a witness or evidence in court.
• To bring forth, as young, or as a natural product or growth; to give birth to; to bear; to generate; to propagate; to yield; to furnish; as, the earth produces grass; trees produce fruit; the clouds produce rain.
• To cause to be or to happen; to originate, as an effect or result; to bring about; as, disease produces pain; vice produces misery.
• To give being or form to; to manufacture; to make; as, a manufacturer produces excellent wares.
• To yield or furnish; to gain; as, money at interest produces an income; capital produces profit.
• To draw out; to extend; to lengthen; to prolong; as, to produce a man's life to threescore.
(Geom.) To extend; — applied to a line, surface, or solid; as, to produce a side of a triangle.
v. i.
• To yield or furnish appropriate offspring, crops, effects, consequences, or results.
n.
• That which is produced, brought forth, or yielded; product; yield; proceeds; result of labor, especially of agricultural labors; hence, specifically, agricultural products.
Producement
n.
• Production.
Producent
n.
• One who produces, or offers to notice.
Producer
n.
• One who produces, brings forth, or generates.
• One who grows agricultural products, or manufactures crude materials into articles of use.
(Iron & Steel Manuf.) A furnace for producing combustible gas which is used for fuel.
Producibility
n.
• The quality or state of being producible.
Producible
a.
• Capable of being produced, brought forward, brought forth, generated, made, or extended.
Product
n.
• Anything that is produced, whether as the result of generation, growth, labor, or thought, or by the operation of involuntary causes; as, the products of the season, or of the farm; the products of manufactures; the products of the brain.
(Math.) The number or sum obtained by adding one number or quantity to itself as many times as there are units in another number; the number resulting from the multiplication of two or more numbers; as, the product of the multiplication of 7 by 5 is 35. In general, the result of any kind of multiplication. See the Note under Multiplication.
v. t.
• To produce; to bring forward.
• To lengthen out; to extend.
• To produce; to make.
Productibility
n.
• The state of being productible; producibility.
Productible
a.
• Capable of being produced; producible.
Productile
a.
• Capable of being extended or prolonged; extensible; ductile.
Production
n.
• The act or process or producing, bringing forth, or exhibiting to view; as, the production of commodities, of a witness.
• That which is produced, yielded, or made, whether naturally, or by the application of intelligence and labor; as, the productions of the earth; the productions of handicraft; the productions of intellect or genius.
• The act of lengthening out or prolonging.
Productive
a.
• Having the quality or power of producing; yielding or furnishing results; as, productive soil; productive enterprises; productive labor, that which increases the number or amount of products.
• Bringing into being; causing to exist; producing; originative; as, an age productive of great men; a spirit productive of heroic achievements.
• Producing, or able to produce, in large measure; fertile; profitable.
Productivity
n.
• The quality or state of being productive; productiveness.
Productress
n.
• A female producer.
Productus
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct genus of brachiopods, very characteristic of the Carboniferous rocks.
Proeguminal
a.
(Med.) Serving to predispose; predisposing; as, a proeguminal cause of disease.
Proem
n.
• Preface; introduction; preliminary observations; prelude.
v. t.
• To preface.
Proembryo
n.
(Bot.) The series of cells formed in the ovule of a flowering plant after fertilization, but before the formation of the embryo.
• The primary growth from the spore in certain cryptogamous plants; as, the proembryo, or protonema, of mosses.
Proemial
a.
• Introductory; prefatory; preliminary.
Proemptosis
n.
(Chron.) The addition of a day to the lunar calendar. See Metemptosis.
Proface
interj.
• Much good may it do you! — a familiar salutation or welcome.
Profanate
v. t.
• To profane.
Profanation
n.
• The act of violating sacred things, or of treating them with contempt or irreverence; irreverent or too familiar treatment or use of what is sacred; desecration; as, the profanation of the Sabbath; the profanation of a sanctuary; the profanation of the name of God.
• The act of treating with abuse or disrespect, or with undue publicity, or lack of delicacy.
Profane
a.
• Not sacred or holy; not possessing peculiar sanctity; unconsecrated; hence, relating to matters other than sacred; secular; — opposed to sacred, religious, or inspired; as, a profane place.
• Unclean; impure; polluted; unholy.
• Treating sacred things with contempt, disrespect, irreverence, or undue familiarity; irreverent; impious. Hence, specifically; Irreverent in language; taking the name of God in vain; given to swearing; blasphemous; as, a profane person, word, oath, or tongue.
v. t.
• To violate, as anything sacred; to treat with abuse, irreverence, obloquy, or contempt; to desecrate; to pollute; as, to profane the name of God; to profane the Scriptures, or the ordinance of God.
• To put to a wrong or unworthy use; to make a base employment of; to debase; to abuse; to defile.
Profanely
adv.
• In a profane manner.
Profaneness
n.
• The quality or state of being profane; especially, the use of profane language.
Profaner
n.
• One who treats sacred things with irreverence, or defiles what is holy; one who uses profane language.
Profanity
n.
• The quality or state of being profane; profaneness; irreverence; esp., the use of profane language; blasphemy.
• That which is profane; profane language or acts.
Profection
n.
• A setting out; a going forward; advance; progression.
Profectitious
a.
• Proceeding from, as from a parent; derived, as from an ancestor.
Profert
n.
(Law) The exhibition or production of a record or paper in open court, or an allegation that it is in court.
Profess
v. t.
• To make open declaration of, as of one's knowledge, belief, action, etc.; to avow or acknowledge; to confess publicly; to own or admit freely.
• To set up a claim to; to make presence to; hence, to put on or present an appearance of.
• To present to knowledge of, to proclaim one's self versed in; to make one's self a teacher or practitioner of, to set up as an authority respecting; to declare (one's self to be such); as, he professes surgery; to profess one's self a physician.
v. i.
• To take a profession upon one's self by a public declaration; to confess.
• To declare friendship.
Professedly
adv.
• By profession.
Profession
n.
• The act of professing or claiming; open declaration; public avowal or acknowledgment; as, professions of friendship; a profession of faith.
• That which one professed; a declaration; an avowal; a claim; as, his professions are insincere.
• That of which one professed knowledge; the occupation, if not mechanical, agricultural, or the like, to which one devotes one's self; the business which one professes to understand, and to follow for subsistence; calling; vocation; employment; as, the profession of arms; the profession of a clergyman, lawyer, or physician; the profession of lecturer on chemistry.
• The collective body of persons engaged in a calling; as, the profession distrust him.
(Eccl. Law.) The act of entering, or becoming a member of, a religious order.
Professional
a.
• Of or pertaining to a profession, or calling; conforming to the rules or standards of a profession; following a profession; as, professional knowledge; professional conduct.
• Engaged in by professionals; as, a professional race; — opposed to amateur.
n.
• A person who prosecutes anything professionally, or for a livelihood, and not in the character of an amateur; a professional worker.
Professionalism
n.
• The following of a profession, sport, etc., as an occupation; — opposed to amateurism.
Professionalist
n.
• professional person.
Professionally
adv.
• In a professional manner or capacity; by profession or calling; in the exercise of one's profession; one employed professionally.
Professor
n.
• One who professed, or makes open declaration of, his sentiments or opinions; especially, one who makes a public avowal of his belief in the Scriptures and his faith in Christ, and thus unites himself to the visible church.
• One who professed, or publicly teaches, any science or branch of learning; especially, an officer in a university, college, or other seminary, whose business it is to read lectures, or instruct students, in a particular branch of learning; as a professor of theology, of botany, of mathematics, or of political economy.
Professorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a professor; as, the professional chair; professional interest.
Professorialism
n.
• The character, manners, or habits of a professor.
Professoriat
n.
• See Professoriate.
Professoriate
n.
• The body of professors, or the professorial staff, in a university or college.
• A professorship.
Professorship
n.
• The office or position of a professor, or public teacher.
Professory
a.
• Of or pertaining to a professor; professorial.
Proffer
v. t.
• To offer for acceptance; to propose to give; to make a tender of; as, to proffer a gift; to proffer services; to proffer friendship.
• To essay or attempt of one's own accord; to undertake, or propose to undertake.
n.
• An offer made; something proposed for acceptance by another; a tender; as, proffers of peace or friendship.
• Essay; attempt.
Profferer
n.
• One who proffers something.
Proficient
n.
• One who has made considerable advances in any business, art, science, or branch of learning; an expert; an adept; as, proficient in a trade; a proficient in mathematics, music, etc.
a.
• Well advanced in any branch of knowledge or skill; possessed of considerable acquirements; well-skilled; versed; adept,
Proficiently
adv.
• In a proficient manner.
Proficuous
a.
• Profitable; advantageous; useful.
Profile
n.
• An outline, or contour; as, the profile of an apple.
(Paint & Sculp.) A human head represented sidewise, or in a side view; the side face or half face.
(Arch.) A section of any member, made at right angles with its main lines, showing the exact shape of moldings and the like.
(Civil Engin.) A drawing exhibiting a vertical section of the ground along a surveyed line, or graded work, as of a railway, showing elevations, depressions, grades, etc.
v. t.
• to draw the outline of; to draw in profile, as an architectural member.
(Mech.) To shape the outline of an object by passing a cutter around it.
Profiling
n.
(Fort.) In the construction of fieldworks, the erection at proper intervals of wooden profiles, to show to the workmen the sectional form of the parapets at those points.
Profilist
n.
• One who takes profiles.
Profit
n.
• Acquisition beyond expenditure; excess of value received for producing, keeping, or selling, over cost; hence, pecuniary gain in any transaction or occupation; emolument; as, a profit on the sale of goods.
• Accession of good; valuable results; useful consequences; benefit; avail; gain; as, an office of profit,
v. t.
• To be of service to; to be good to; to help on; to benefit; to advantage; to avail; to aid; as, truth profits all men.
v. i.
• To gain advantage; to make improvement; to improve; to gain; to advance.
• To be of use or advantage; to do or bring good.
Profitable
a.
• Yielding or bringing profit or gain; gainful; lucrative; useful; helpful; advantageous; beneficial; as, a profitable trade; profitable business; a profitable study or profession.
Profiting
n.
• Gain; advantage; profit.
Profitless
a.
• Without profit; unprofitable.
Profligacy
n.
• The quality of state of being profligate; a profligate or very vicious course of life; a state of being abandoned in moral principle and in vice; dissoluteness.
Profligate
a.
• Overthrown; beaten; conquered.
• Broken down in respect of rectitude, principle, virtue, or decency; openly and shamelessly immoral or vicious; dissolute; as, profligate man or wretch.
n.
• An abandoned person; one openly and shamelessly vicious; a dissolute person.
v. t.
• To drive away; to overcome.
Profligately
adv.
• In a profligate manner.
Profligateness
n.
• The quality of being profligate; an abandoned course of life; profligacy.
Profligation
n.
• Defeat; rout; overthrow.
Profluence
n.
• Quality of being profluent; course.
Profluent
a.
• Flowing forward,
Profound
a.
• Descending far below the surface; opening or reaching to a great depth; deep.
• Intellectually deep; entering far into subjects; reaching to the bottom of a matter, or of a branch of learning; thorough; as, a profound investigation or treatise; a profound scholar; profound wisdom.
• Characterized by intensity; deeply felt; pervading; overmastering; far-reaching; strongly impressed; as, a profound sleep.
• Bending low, exhibiting or expressing deep humility; lowly; submissive; as, a profound bow.
n.
• The deep; the sea; the ocean.
• An abyss.
v. t.
• To cause to sink deeply; to cause to dive or penetrate far down.
v. i.
• To dive deeply; to penetrate.
Profoundly
adv.
• In a profound manner.
Profoundness
n.
• The quality or state of being profound; profundity; depth.
Profulgent
a.
• Shining forth; brilliant; effulgent.
Profundity
n.
• The quality or state of being profound; depth of place, knowledge, feeling, etc.
Profuse
a.
• Pouring forth with fullness or exuberance; bountiful; exceedingly liberal; giving without stint; as, a profuse government; profuse hospitality.
• Superabundant; excessive; prodigal; lavish; as, profuse expenditure.
v. t.
• To pour out; to give or spend liberally; to lavish; to squander.
Profusely
adv.
• In a profuse manner.
Profuseness
n.
• Extravagance; profusion.
Profusion
n.
• The act of one who is profuse; a lavishing or pouring out without sting.
• Abundance; exuberant plenty; lavish supply; as, a profusion of commodities.
Profusive
a.
• Profuse; lavish; prodigal.
Prog
v. i.
• To wander about and beg; to seek food or other supplies by low arts; to seek for advantage by mean shift or tricks.
• To steal; to rob; to filch.
• To prick; to goad; to progue.
n.
• Victuals got by begging, or vagrancy; victuals of any kind; food; supplies.
• A vagrant beggar; a tramp.
• A goal; progue.
Progenerate
v. t.
• To beget; to generate; to produce; to procreate; as, to progenerate a race.
Progeneration
n.
• The act of begetting; propagation.
Progenitor
n.
• An ancestor in the direct line; a forefather.
Progenitorship
n.
• The state of being a progenitor.
Progenitress
n.
• A female progenitor.
Progeniture
n.
• A begetting, or birth.
Progeny
n.
• Descendants of the human kind, or offspring of other animals; children; offspring; race, lineage.
Proglottid
n.
(Zool) Proglottis.
Proglottis
n.
(Zool) One of the free, or nearly free, segments of a tapeworm. It contains both male and female reproductive organs, and is capable of a brief independent existence.
Prognathi
n. pl.
(Zool) A comprehensive group of mankind, including those that have prognathous jaws.
Prognathic
a.
(Anat.) Prognathous.
Prognathism
n.
(Anat.) Projection of the jaws.
Prognathous
a.
(Anat.) Having the jaws projecting beyond the upper part of the face; — opposed to orthognathous. See Gnathic index, under Gnathic.
Progne
n.
(Zool.) A swallow.
• A genus of swallows including the purple martin. See Martin.
• An American butterfly (Polygonia, or Vanessa, Progne). It is orange and black above, grayish beneath, with an L-shaped silver mark on the hind wings. Called also gray comma.
Prognosis
n.
(Med.) The act or art of foretelling the course and termination of a disease; also, the outlook afforded by this act of judgment; as, the prognosis of hydrophobia is bad.
Prognostic
n.
• That which prognosticates; a sign by which a future event may be known or foretold; an indication; a sign or omen; hence, a foretelling; a prediction.
(Med.) A sign or symptom indicating the course and termination of a disease.
v. t.
• To prognosticate.
Prognosticable
a.
• Capable of being prognosticated or foretold.
Prognosticate
v. t.
• To indicate as future; to foretell from signs or symptoms; to prophesy; to foreshow; to predict; as, to prognosticate evil.
Prognostication
n.
• The act of foreshowing or foretelling something future by present signs; prediction.
• That which foreshows; a foretoken.
Prognosticator
n.
• One who prognosticates; a foreknower or foreteller of a future course or event by present signs.
Program
n.
• Same as Programme.
Programma
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) Any law, which, after it had passed the Athenian senate, was fixed on a tablet for public inspection previously to its being proposed to the general assembly of the people.
• An edict published for public information; an official bulletin; a public proclamation.
• See Programme.
• A preface.
Programme
n.
• That which is written or printed as a public notice or advertisement; a scheme; a prospectus; especially, a brief outline or explanation of the order to be pursued, or the subjects embraced, in any public exercise, performance, or entertainment; a preliminary sketch.
Progress
n.
• A moving or going forward; a proceeding onward; an advance; specifically: (a) In actual space, as the progress of a ship, carriage, etc. (b) In the growth of an animal or plant; increase. (c) In business of any kind; as, the progress of a negotiation; the progress of art. (d) In knowledge; in proficiency; as, the progress of a child at school. (e) Toward ideal completeness or perfection in respect of quality or condition; — applied to individuals, communities, or the race; as, social, moral, religious, or political progress.
• A journey of state; a circuit; especially, one made by a sovereign through parts of his own dominions.
v. i.
• To make progress; to move forward in space; to continue onward in course; to proceed; to advance; to go on; as, railroads are progressing.
• To make improvement; to advance.
v. t.
• To make progress in; to pass through.
Progression
n.
• The act of moving forward; a proceeding in a course; motion onward.
• Course; passage; lapse or process of time.
(Math.) Regular or proportional advance in increase or decrease of numbers; continued proportion, arithmetical, geometrical, or harmonic.
(Mus.) A regular succession of tones or chords; the movement of the parts in harmony; the order of the modulations in a piece from key to key.
Progressional
a.
• Of or pertaining to progression; tending to, or capable of, progress.
Progressionist
n.
• One who holds to a belief in the progression of society toward perfection.
• One who maintains the doctrine of progression in organic forms; — opposed to uniformitarian.
Progressist
n.
• One who makes, or holds to, progress; a progressionist.
Progressive
a.
• Moving forward; proceeding onward; advancing; evincing progress; increasing; as, progressive motion or course; — opposed to retrograde.
• Improving; as, art is in a progressive state.
Progue
v. i.
• To prog.
n.
• A sharp point; a goad.
v. t.
• To prick; to goad.
Proheme
n.
• Proem.
Prohibit
v. t.
• To forbid by authority; to interdict; as, God prohibited Adam from eating of the fruit of a certain tree; we prohibit a person from doing a thing, and also the doing of the thing; as, the law prohibits men from stealing, or it prohibits stealing.
• To hinder; to debar; to prevent; to preclude.
Prohibiter
n.
• One who prohibits or forbids; a forbidder; an interdicter.
Prohibition
n.
• The act of prohibiting; a declaration or injunction forbidding some action; interdict.
• Specifically, the forbidding by law of the sale of alcoholic liquors as beverages.
Prohibitionist
n.
• One who favors prohibitory duties on foreign goods in commerce; a protectionist.
• One who favors the prohibition of the sale (or of the sale and manufacture) of alcoholic liquors as beverages.
Prohibitive
a.
• That prohibits; prohibitory; as, a tax whose effect is prohibitive.
Prohibitory
a.
• Tending to prohibit, forbid, or exclude; implying prohibition; forbidding; as, a prohibitory law; a prohibitory price.
Proin
v. t.
• To lop; to trim; to prune; to adorn.
v. i.
• To employed in pruning.
Proitor
n.
• A traitor.
Project
n.
• The place from which a thing projects, or starts forth.
• That which is projected or designed; something intended or devised; a scheme; a design; a plan.
• An idle scheme; an impracticable design; as, a man given to projects.
v. t.
• To throw or cast forward; to shoot forth.
• To cast forward or revolve in the mind; to contrive; to devise; to scheme; as, to project a plan.
(Persp.) To draw or exhibit, as the form of anything; to delineate; as, to project a sphere, a map, an ellipse, and the like; — sometimes with on, upon, into, etc.; as, to project a line or point upon a plane. See Projection, 4.
v. i.
• To shoot forward; to extend beyond something else; to be prominent; to jut; as, the cornice projects; branches project from the tree.
• To form a project; to scheme.
Projectile
a.
• Projecting or impelling forward; as, a projectile force.
• Caused or imparted by impulse or projection; impelled forward; as, projectile motion.
n.
• A body projected, or impelled forward, by force; especially, a missile adapted to be shot from a firearm.
(Mech.) A part of mechanics which treats of the motion, range, time of flight, etc., of bodies thrown or driven through the air by an impelling force.
Projection
n.
• The act of throwing or shooting forward.
• A jutting out; also, a part jutting out, as of a building; an extension beyond something else.
• The act of scheming or planning; also, that which is planned; contrivance; design; plan.
(Persp.) The representation of something; delineation; plan; especially, the representation of any object on a perspective plane, or such a delineation as would result were the chief points of the object thrown forward upon the plane, each in the direction of a line drawn through it from a given point of sight, or central point; as, the projection of a sphere. The several kinds of projection differ according to the assumed point of sight and plane of projection in each.
(Geog.) Any method of representing the surface of the earth upon a plane.
Projectment
n.
• Design; contrivance; projection.
Projector
n.
• One who projects a scheme or design; hence, one who forms fanciful or chimerical schemes.
Projecture
n.
• A jutting out beyond a surface.
Projet
n.
• A plan proposed; a draft of a proposed measure; a project.
Proke
v. i.
• To poke; to thrust.
Prolapse
n.
(Med.) The falling down of a part through the orifice with which it is naturally connected, especially of the uterus or the rectum.
v. i.
• To fall down or out; to protrude.
Prolapsion
n.
(Med.) Prolapse.
Prolapsus
n.
(Med.) Prolapse.
Prolate
a.
• Stretched out; extended; especially, elongated in the direction of a line joining the poles; as, a prolate spheroid; — opposed to oblate.
v. t.
• To utter; to pronounce.
Prolation
n.
• The act of prolating or pronouncing; utterance; pronunciation.
• The act of deferring; delay.
(Mus.) A mediaeval method of determining of the proportionate duration of semibreves and minims.
Prolatum
n.
(Geom.) A prolate spheroid. See Ellipsoid of revolution, under Ellipsoid.
Proleg
n.
(Zool.) One of the fleshy legs found on the abdominal segments of the larvae of Lepidoptera, sawflies, and some other insects. Those of Lepidoptera have a circle of hooks. Called also proped, propleg, and falseleg.
Prolegate
n.
(Rom. Hist.) The deputy or substitute for a legate.
Prolegomenary
a.
• Of the nature of a prolegomenon; preliminary; introductory; prefatory.
Prolegomenon
n.
• A preliminary remark or observation; an introductory discourse prefixed to a book or treatise.
Prolepsis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure by which objections are anticipated or prevented.
• A necessary truth or assumption; a first or assumed principle.
(Chron.) An error in chronology, consisting in an event being dated before the actual time.
(Gram.) The application of an adjective to a noun in anticipation, or to denote the result, of the action of the verb; as, to strike one dumb.
Proleptically
adv.
• In a proleptical manner.
Proleptics
n.
(Med.) The art and science of predicting in medicine.
Proletaire
n.
• One of the common people; a low person; also, the common people as a class or estate in a country.
Proletaneous
a.
• Having a numerous offspring.
Proletarian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the proletaries; belonging to the commonalty; hence, mean; vile; vulgar.
n.
• A proletary.
Proletariat
n.
• The indigent class in the State; the body of proletarians.
Proletariate
n.
• The lower classes; beggars.
Proletary
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A citizen of the lowest class, who served the state, not with property, but only by having children; hence, a common person.
Prolicide
n.
• The crime of destroying one's offspring, either in the womb or after birth.
Proliferate
v. t.
(Biol.) To produce or form cells; especially, to produce cells rapidly.
(Zool.) To produce zooids by budding.
Proliferation
n.
(Biol.) The continuous development of cells in tissue formation; cell formation.
(Zool.) The production of numerous zooids by budding, especially when buds arise from other buds in succession.
Proliferous
a.
(Bot.) Bearing offspring; — applied to a flower from within which another is produced, or to a branch or frond from which another rises, or to a plant which is reproduced by buds or gemmae.
(Zool.) Producing young by budding.
• Producing sexual zooids by budding; — said of the blastostyle of a hydroid.
• Producing a cluster of branchlets from a larger branch; — said of corals.
Prolific
a.
• Having the quality of generating; producing young or fruit; generative; fruitful; productive; — applied to plants producing fruit, animals producing young, etc.; — usually with the implied idea of frequent or numerous production; as, a prolific tree, female, and the like.
• Serving to produce; fruitful of results; active; as, a prolific brain; a controversy prolific of evil.
(Bot.) Proliferous.
Prolificacy
n.
• Prolificness.
Prolifical
a.
• Producing young or fruit abundantly; fruitful; prolific.
Prolificate
v. t.
• To make prolific; to fertilize; to impregnate.
Prolification
n.
• The generation of young.
(Bot.) Reproduction by the growth of a plant, or part of a plant, directly from an older one, or by gemmae.
Prolificness
n.
• The quality or state of being prolific; fruitfulness; prolificacy.
Prolix
a.
• Extending to a great length; unnecessarily long; minute in narration or argument; excessively particular in detail; — rarely used except with reference to discourse written or spoken; as, a prolix oration; a prolix poem; a prolix sermon.
• Indulging in protracted discourse; tedious; wearisome; — applied to a speaker or writer.
Prolixious
a.
• Dilatory; tedious; superfluous.
Prolixity
n.
• The quality or state of being prolix; great length; minute detail; as, prolixity in discourses and writings.
Prolixly
adv.
• In a prolix manner.
Prolixness
n.
• Prolixity.
Proll
v. t.
• To search or prowl after; to rob; to plunder.
v. i.
• To prowl about; to rob.
Proller
n.
• Prowler; thief.
Prolocutor
n.
• One who speaks for another.
• The presiding officer of a convocation.
Prolog
n. & v.
• Prologue.
Prologize
v. i.
• To deliver a Prologue.
Prologizer
n.
• One who prologizes.
Prologue
n.
• The preface or introduction to a discourse, poem, or performance; as, the prologue of Chaucer's "Canterbury Tales;" esp., a discourse or poem spoken before a dramatic performance
• One who delivers a prologue.
v. t.
• To introduce with a formal preface, or prologue.
Prolong
v. t.
• To extend in space or length; as, to prolong a line.
• To lengthen in time; to extend the duration of; to draw out; to continue; as, to prolong one's days.
• To put off to a distant time; to postpone.
Prolongable
a.
• Capable of being prolonged; as, life is prolongable by care.
Prolongate
v. t.
• To prolong; to extend in space or in time.
Prolongation
n.
• The act of lengthening in space or in time; extension; protraction.
• That which forms an additional length.
Prolonge
n.
(Field Artillery) A rope with a hook and a toggle, sometimes used to drag a gun carriage or to lash it to the limber, and for various other purposes.
Prolonger
n.
• One who, or that which, causes an extension in time or space.
Prolongment
n.
• Prolongation.
Prolusion
n.
• A trial before the principal performance; a prelude; hence, an introductory essay or exercise.
Promanation
n.
• The act of flowing forth; emanation; efflux.
Promenade
n.
• A walk for pleasure, display, or exercise.
• A place for walking; a public walk.
v. i.
• To walk for pleasure, display, or exercise.
Promenader
n.
• One who promenades.
Promerit
v. t.
• To oblige; to confer a favor on.
• To deserve; to procure by merit.
Promerops
n.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of very brilliant birds belonging to Promerops, Epimarchus, and allied genera, closely related to the paradise birds, and mostly native of New Guinea. They have a long curved beak and a long graduated tail.
Promerphological
a.
(Biol.) Relating to promorphology; as, a promorphological conception.
Promethea
n.
(Zool.) A large American bombycid moth (Callosamia promethea). Its larva feeds on the sassafras, wild cherry, and other trees, and suspends its cocoon from a branch by a silken band.
Promethean
a.
• Of or pertaining to Prometheus. See Prometheus.
• Having a life-giving quality; inspiring.
n.
(Old Chem.) An apparatus for automatic ignition.
• A kind of lucifer match.
Prometheus
n.
(Class. Myth.) The son of Iapetus (one of the Titans) and Clymene, fabled by the poets to have surpassed all mankind in knowledge, and to have formed men of clay to whom he gave life by means of fire stolen from heaven. Jupiter, being angry at this, sent Mercury to bind Prometheus to Mount Caucasus, where a vulture preyed upon his liver.
Prominent
a.
• Standing out, or projecting, beyond the line surface of something; jutting; protuberant; in high relief; as, a prominent figure on a vase.
• Hence; Distinctly manifest; likely to attract attention from its size or position; conspicuous; as, a prominent feature of the face; a prominent building.
• Eminent; distinguished above others; as, a prominent character.
Prominently
adv.
• In a prominent manner.
Promiscuity
n.
• Promiscuousness; confusion.
Promiscuous
a.
• Consisting of individuals united in a body or mass without order; mingled; confused; undistinguished; as, a promiscuous crowd or mass.
• Distributed or applied without order or discrimination; not restricted to an individual; common; indiscriminate; as, promiscuous love or intercourse.
Promiscuously
adv.
• In a promiscuous manner.
Promiscuousness
n.
• The quality or state of being promiscuous.
Promise
a.
• In general, a declaration, written or verbal, made by one person to another, which binds the person who makes it to do, or to forbear to do, a specified act; a declaration which gives to the person to whom it is made a right to expect or to claim the performance or forbearance of a specified act.
(Law) An engagement by one person to another, either in words or in writing, but properly not under seal, for the performance or nonperformance of some particular thing. The word promise is used to denote the mere engagement of a person, without regard to the consideration for it, or the corresponding duty of the party to whom it is made.
• That which causes hope, expectation, or assurance; especially, that which affords expectation of future distinction; as, a youth of great promise.
• Bestowal, fulfillment, or grant of what is promised.
v. t.
• To engage to do, give, make, or to refrain from doing, giving, or making, or the like; to covenant; to engage; as, to promise a visit; to promise a cessation of hostilities; to promise the payment of money.
• To afford reason to expect; to cause hope or assurance of; as, the clouds promise rain.
• To make declaration of or give assurance of, as some benefit to be conferred; to pledge or engage to bestow; as, the proprietors promised large tracts of land; the city promised a reward.
v. i.
• To give assurance by a promise, or binding declaration.
• To afford hopes or expectation; to give ground to expect good; rarely, to give reason to expect evil.
Promisee
n.
(Law) The person to whom a promise is made.
Promiser
n.
• One who promises.
Promising
a.
• Making a promise or promises; affording hope or assurance; as, promising person; a promising day.
Promisor
n.
(Law) One who engages or undertakes; a promiser.
Promissive
a.
• Making a promise; implying a promise; promising.
Promissorily
adv.
• In a promissory manner.
Promissory
a.
• Containing a promise or binding declaration of something to be done or forborne.
Promont
n.
• Promontory.
Promontory
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A high point of land or rock projecting into the sea beyond the line of coast; a headland; a high cape.
(Anat.) A projecting part. Especially: (a) The projecting angle of the ventral side of the sacrum where it joins the last lumbar vertebra. (b) A prominence on the inner wall of the tympanum of the ear.
Promorphologist
n.
(Biol.) One versed in the science of promorphology.
Promorphology
n.
(Biol.) Crystallography of organic forms; — a division of morphology created by Haeckel. It is essentially stereometric, and relates to a mathematical conception of organic forms. See Tectology.
Promote
v. t.
• To contribute to the growth, enlargement, or prosperity of (any process or thing that is in course); to forward; to further; to encourage; to advance; to excite; as, to promote learning; to promote disorder; to promote a business venture.
• To exalt in station, rank, or honor; to elevate; to raise; to prefer; to advance; as, to promote an officer.
v. i.
• To urge on or incite another, as to strife; also, to inform against a person.
Promoter
n.
• One who, or that which, forwards, advances, or promotes; an encourager; as, a promoter of charity or philosophy.
• Specifically, one who sets on foot, and takes the preliminary steps in, a scheme for the organization of a corporation, a joint-stock company, or the like.
• One who excites; as, a promoter of sedition.
• An informer; a makebate.
Promotive
a.
• Tending to advance, promote, or encourage.
Promottion
n.
• The act of promoting, advancing, or encouraging; the act of exalting in rank or honor; also, the condition of being advanced, encouraged, or exalted in honor; preferment.
Promove
v. t.
• To move forward; to advance; to promote.
Promover
n.
• A promoter.
Prompt
n.
(Com.) A limit of time given for payment of an account for produce purchased, this limit varying with different goods. See Prompt-note.
v. t.
• To assist or induce the action of; to move to action; to instigate; to incite.
• To suggest; to dictate.
• To remind, as an actor or an orator, of words or topics forgotten.
Prompter
n.
• One who, or that which, prompts; one who admonishes or incites to action.
• One who reminds another, as an actor or an orator, of the words to be spoken next; specifically, one employed for this purpose in a theater.
Promptitude
n.
• The quality of being prompt; quickness of decision and action when occasion demands; alacrity; as, promptitude in obedience.
Promptly
adv.
• In a prompt manner.
Promptness
n.
• Promptitude; readiness; quickness of decision or action.
• Cheerful willingness; alacrity.
Promptuary
a.
• Of or pertaining to preparation.
n.
• That from which supplies are drawn; a storehouse; a magazine; a repository.
Prompture
n.
• Suggestion; incitement; prompting.
Promt
a.
• Ready and quick to act as occasion demands; meeting requirements readily; not slow, dilatory, or hesitating in decision or action; responding on the instant; immediate; as, prompt in obedience or compliance; — said of persons.
• Done or rendered quickly, readily, or immediately; given without delay or hesitation; — said of conduct; as, prompt assistance.
• Easy; unobstructed.
Promulgate
v. t.
• To make known by open declaration, as laws, decrees, or tidings; to publish; as, to promulgate the secrets of a council.
Promulgation
n.
• The act of promulgating; publication; open declaration; as, the promulgation of the gospel.
Promulgator
n.
• One who promulgates or publishes.
Promulge
v. t.
• To promulgate; to publish or teach.
Promulger
n.
• One who promulges or publishes what was before unknown.
Promuscis
n.
(Zool.) The proboscis of hemipterous insects. See Illust. under Hemiptera.
Pronaos
n.
(Arch.) The porch or vestibule of a temple.
Pronate
a.
• Somewhat prone; inclined; as, pronate trees.
Pronation
n.
(Physiol.) The act of turning the palm or palmar surface of the forefoot downward.
• That motion of the forearm whereby the palm or palmar, surface is turned downward.
• The position of the limb resulting from the act of pronation. Opposed to supination.
Pronator
n.
(Anat.) A muscle which produces pronation.
Prone
a.
• Bending forward; inclined; not erect.
• Prostrate; flat; esp., lying with the face down; — opposed to supine.
• Headlong; running downward or headlong.
• Sloping, with reference to a line or surface; declivous; inclined; not level.
• Inclined; propense; disposed; — applied to the mind or affections, usually in an ill sense. Followed by to.
Pronely
adv.
• In a prone manner or position.
Proneness
n.
• The quality or state of being prone, or of bending downward; as, the proneness of beasts is opposed to the erectness of man.
• The state of lying with the face down; — opposed to supineness.
• Descent; declivity; as, the proneness of a hill.
• Inclination of mind, heart, or temper; propension; disposition; as, proneness to self-gratification.
Pronephric
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the pronephros.
Prong
n.
• A sharp-pointed instrument.
• The tine of a fork, or of a similar instrument; as, a fork of two or three prongs.
(Zool.) A sharp projection, as of an antler.
• The fang of a tooth.
Prongbuck
n.
(Zool.) The springbuck.
• The pronghorn.
Pronged
a.
• Having prongs or projections like the tines of a fork; as, a three-pronged fork.
Pronghorn
n.
(Zool.) An American antelope (Antilocapra Americana), native of the plain near the Rocky Mountains. The upper parts are mostly yellowish brown; the under parts, the sides of the head and throat, and the buttocks, are white. The horny sheath of the horns is shed annually. Called also cabree, cabut, prongbuck, and pronghorned antelope.
Pronity
n.
• Proneness; propensity.
Pronominal
a.
• Belonging to, or partaking of the nature of, a pronoun.
Pronominalize
v. t.
• To give the effect of a pronoun to; as, to pronominalize the substantives person, people, etc.
Pronominally
adv.
• In a pronominal manner with the nature or office of a pronoun; as a pronoun.
Prononce
a.
• Strongly marked; decided, as in manners, etc.
Pronotary
n.
• See Prothonotary.
Pronotum
n.
(Zool.) The dorsal plate of the prothorax in insects. See Illust. of Coleoptera.
Pronoun
n.
(Gram.) A word used instead of a noun or name, to avoid the repetition of it. The personal pronouns in English are I, thou or you, he, she, it, we, ye, and they.
Pronounce
v. t.
• To utter articulately; to speak out or distinctly; to utter, as words or syllables; to speak with the proper sound and accent as, adults rarely learn to pronounce a foreign language correctly.
• To utter officially or solemnly; to deliver, as a decree or sentence; as, to pronounce sentence of death.
• To speak or utter rhetorically; to deliver; to recite; as, to pronounce an oration.
• To declare or affirm; as, he pronounced the book to be a libel; he pronounced the act to be a fraud.
v. i.
• To give a pronunciation; to articulate; as, to pronounce faultlessly.
• To make declaration; to utter on opinion; to speak with confidence.
n.
• Pronouncement; declaration; pronunciation.
Pronounceable
a.
• Capable of being pronounced.
Pronounced
a.
• Strongly marked; unequivocal; decided.
Pronouncement
n.
• The act of pronouncing; a declaration; a formal announcement.
Pronouncer
n.
• One who pronounces, utters, or declares; also, a pronouncing book.
Pronouncing
a.
• Pertaining to, or indicating, pronunciation; as, a pronouncing dictionary.
Pronubial
a.
• Presiding over marriage.
Pronucleus
n.
(Biol.) One of the two bodies or nuclei (called male and female pronuclei) which unite to form the first segmentation nucleus of an impregnated ovum.
Pronuncial
a.
• Of or pertaining to pronunciation; pronunciative.
Pronunciamento
n.
• A proclamation or manifesto; a formal announcement or declaration.
Pronunciamiento
n.
• See Pronunciamento.
Pronunciation
n.
• The act of uttering with articulation; the act of giving the proper sound and accent; utterance; as, the pronunciation of syllables of words; distinct or indistinct pronunciation.
• The mode of uttering words or sentences.
(Rhet.) The art of manner of uttering a discourse publicly with propriety and gracefulness; — now called delivery.
Pronunciative
a.
• Of or pertaining to pronunciation.
• Uttering confidently; dogmatical.
Pronunciator
n.
• One who pronounces; a pronouncer.
Pronunciatory
a.
• Of or pertaining to pronunciation; that pronounces.
Proocutorship
n.
• The office of a prolocutor.
Proof
n.
• Any effort, process, or operation designed to establish or discover a fact or truth; an act of testing; a test; a trial.
• That degree of evidence which convinces the mind of any truth or fact, and produces belief; a test by facts or arguments that induce, or tend to induce, certainty of the judgment; conclusive evidence; demonstration.
• The quality or state of having been proved or tried; firmness or hardness that resists impression, or does not yield to force; impenetrability of physical bodies.
• Firmness of mind; stability not to be shaken.
(Print.) A trial impression, as from type, taken for correction or examination; — called also proof sheet.
(Math.) A process for testing the accuracy of an operation performed. Cf. Prove, v. t., 5.
• Armor of excellent or tried quality, and deemed impenetrable; properly, armor of proof.
a.
• Used in proving or testing; as, a proof load, or proof charge.
• Firm or successful in resisting; as, proof against harm; waterproof; bombproof.
• Being of a certain standard as to strength; — said of alcoholic liquors.
Proofless
a.
• Wanting sufficient evidence to induce belief; not proved.
Proostracum
n.
(Zool.) The anterior prolongation of the guard of the phragmocone of belemnites and allied fossil cephalopods, whether horny or calcareous. See Illust. of Phragmocone.
Prootic
a.
(Anat.) In front of the auditory capsule; — applied especially to a bone, or center of ossification, in the periotic capsule.
n.
• A prootic bone.
Prop
n.
• A shell, used as a die. See Props.
v. t.
• To support, or prevent from falling, by placing something under or against; as, to prop up a fence or an old building; (.) to sustain; to maintain; as, to prop a declining state.
n.
• That which sustains an incumbent weight; that on which anything rests or leans for support; a support; a stay; as, a prop for a building.
Propaedeutics
n.
• The preliminary learning connected with any art or science; preparatory instruction.
Propagable
a.
• Capable of being propagated, or of being continued or multiplied by natural generation or production.
• Capable of being spread or extended by any means; — said of tenets, doctrines, or principles.
Propaganda
n.
(R. C. Ch.) A congregation of cardinals, established in 1622, charged with the management of missions.
• The college of the Propaganda, instituted by Urban VIII. (1623-1644) to educate priests for missions in all parts of the world.
• Hence, any organization or plan for spreading a particular doctrine or a system of principles.
Propagandism
n.
• The art or practice of propagating tenets or principles; zeal in propagating one's opinions.
Propagandist
n.
• A person who devotes himself to the spread of any system of principles.
Propagate
v. t.
• To cause to continue or multiply by generation, or successive production; — applied to animals and plants; as, to propagate a breed of horses or sheep; to propagate a species of fruit tree.
• To cause to spread to extend; to impel or continue forward in space; as, to propagate sound or light.
• To spread from person to person; to extend the knowledge of; to originate and spread; to carry from place to place; to disseminate; as, to propagate a story or report; to propagate the Christian religion.
• To multiply; to increase.
• To generate; to produce.
v. i.
• To have young or issue; to be produced or multiplied by generation, or by new shoots or plants; as, rabbits propagate rapidly.
Propagation
n.
• The act of propagating; continuance or multiplication of the kind by generation or successive production; as, the propagation of animals or plants.
• The spreading abroad, or extension, of anything; diffusion; dissemination; as, the propagation of sound; the propagation of the gospel.
Propagative
a.
• Producing by propagation, or by a process of growth.
Propagator
n.
• One who propagates; one who continues or multiplies.
Propagulum
n.
(Bot.) A runner terminated by a germinating bud.
Propane
n.
(Chem.) A heavy gaseous hydrocarbon, C3H8, of the paraffin series, occurring naturally dissolved in crude petroleum, and also made artificially; — called also propyl hydride.
Propargyl
n.
(Chem.) Same as Propinyl.
Proparoxytone
n.
(Gr. Gram.) A word which has the acute accent on the antepenult.
Proped
n.
(Zool.) Same as Proleg.
Propel
v. t.
• To drive forward; to urge or press onward by force; to move, or cause to move; as, the wind or steam propels ships; balls are propelled by gunpowder.
Propeller
n.
• One who, or that which, propels.
• A contrivance for propelling a steam vessel, usually consisting of a screw placed in the stern under water, and made to revolve by an engine; a propeller wheel.
• A steamboat thus propelled; a screw steamer.
Propend
v. i.
• To lean toward a thing; to be favorably inclined or disposed; to incline; to tend.
Propendency
n.
• Propensity.
• Attentive deliberation.
Propendent
a.
• Inclining forward or toward.
Propene
n.
(Chem.) Same as Propylene.
Propense
a.
• Leaning toward, in a moral sense; inclined; disposed; prone; as, women propense to holiness.
Propension
n.
• The quality or state of being propense; propensity.
Propensity
n.
• The quality or state of being propense; natural inclination; disposition to do good or evil; bias; bent; tendency.
Propenyl
n.
(Chem.) A hypothetical hydrocarbon radical, C3H5, isomeric with allyl and glyceryl, and regarded as the essential residue of glycerin. Cf. Allyl, and Glyceryl.
Propepsin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) See Persinogen.
Propeptone
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A product of gastric digestion intermediate between albumin and peptone, identical with hemialbumose.
Proper
a.
• Belonging to one; one's own; individual.
• Belonging to the natural or essential constitution; peculiar; not common; particular; as, every animal has his proper instincts and appetites.
• Befitting one's nature, qualities, etc.; suitable in all respect; appropriate; right; fit; decent; as, water is the proper element for fish; a proper dress.
• Becoming in appearance; well formed; handsome.
• Pertaining to one of a species, but not common to the whole; not appellative; — opposed to common; as, a proper name; Dublin is the proper name of a city.
• Rightly so called; strictly considered; as, Greece proper; the garden proper.
(Her.) Represented in its natural color; — said of any object used as a charge.
adv.
• Properly; hence, to a great degree; very; as, proper good.
Properate
v. t. & i.
• To hasten, or press forward.
Properation
n.
• The act of hastening; haste.
Properispome
n.
(Gr. Gram.) Properispomenon.
Properispomenon
n.
(Gr. Gram.) A word which has the circumflex accent on the penult.
Properly
adv.
• In a proper manner; suitably; fitly; strictly; rightly; as, a word properly applied; a dress properly adjusted.
• Individually; after one's own manner.
Properness
n.
• The quality of being proper.
• Tallness; comeliness.
Propertied
a.
• Possessing property; holding real estate, or other investments of money.
Property
n.
• That which is proper to anything; a peculiar quality of a thing; that which is inherent in a subject, or naturally essential to it; an attribute; as, sweetness is a property of sugar.
• An acquired or artificial quality; that which is given by art, or bestowed by man; as, the poem has the properties which constitute excellence.
• The exclusive right of possessing, enjoying, and disposing of a thing; ownership; title.
• That to which a person has a legal title, whether in his possession or not; thing owned; an estate, whether in lands, goods, or money; as, a man of large property, or small property.
• All the adjuncts of a play except the scenery and the dresses of the actors; stage requisites.
• Propriety; correctness.
v. t.
• To invest which properties, or qualities.
• To make a property of; to appropriate.
Prophane
a. & v. t.
• See Profane.
Prophasis
n.
(Med.) Foreknowledge of a disease; prognosis.
Prophecy
n.
• A declaration of something to come; a foretelling; a prediction; esp., an inspired foretelling.
(Script.) A book of prophecies; a history; as, the prophecy of Ahijah.
• Public interpretation of Scripture; preaching; exhortation or instruction.
Prophesier
n.
• A prophet.
Prophesy
v. t.
• To foretell; to predict; to prognosticate.
• To foreshow; to herald; to prefigure.
v. i.
• To utter predictions; to make declaration of events to come.
• To give instruction in religious matters; to interpret or explain Scripture or religious subjects; to preach; to exhort; to expound.
Prophet
n.
• One who prophesies, or foretells events; a predicter; a foreteller.
• One inspired or instructed by God to speak in his name, or announce future events, as, Moses, Elijah, etc.
• An interpreter; a spokesman.
(Zool.) A mantis.
Prophetess
n.
• A female prophet.
Propheticality
n.
• Propheticalness.
Prophetically
adv.
• In a prophetical manner; by way of prediction.
Propheticalness
n.
• The quality or state of being prophetical; power or capacity to foretell.
Prophetize
v. i.
• To give predictions; to foreshow events; to prophesy.
Prophoric
a.
• Enunciative.
Prophragma
n.
(Zool.) An internal dorsal chitinous process between the first two divisions of the thorax of insects.
Prophylactic
n.
(Med.) A medicine which preserves or defends against disease; a preventive.
Prophylaxis
n.
(Med.) The art of preserving from, or of preventing, disease; the observance of the rules necessary for the preservation of health; preservative or preventive treatment.
Propice
a.
• Fit; propitious.
Propidene
n.
(Chem.) The unsymmetrical hypothetical hydrocarbon radical, CH3.CH2.CH, analogous to ethylidene, and regarded as the type of certain derivatives of propane; — called also propylidene.
Propination
n.
• The act of pledging, or drinking first, and then offering the cup to another.
Propine
v. t.
• To pledge; to offer as a toast or a health in the manner of drinking, that is, by drinking first and passing the cup.
• Hence, to give in token of friendship.
• To give, or deliver; to subject.
n.
• A pledge.
• A gift; esp., drink money.
n.
(Chem.) Same as Allylene.
Propinquity
n.
• Nearness in place; neighborhood; proximity.
• Nearness in time.
• Nearness of blood; kindred; affinity.
Propinyl
n.
(Chem.) A hydrocarbon radical regarded as an essential residue of propine and allied compounds.
Propiolate
n.
• A salt of propiolic acid.
Propiolic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an organic acid (called also propargylic acid) of the acetylene or tetrolic series, analogous to propionic acid, and obtained as a white crystalline substance.
Propionate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of propionic acid.
Propione
n.
(Chem.) The ketone of propionic acid, obtained as a colorless fragrant liquid.
Propionic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an organic acid which is produced in the distillation of wood, in the fermentation of various organic substances, as glycerin, calcium lactate, etc., and is obtained as a colorless liquid having a sharp, pungent odor. Propionic acid is so called because it is the first or lowest member of the fatty acid series whose salts have a fatty feel.
Propionyl
n.
(Chem.) The hypothetical radical C3H5O, regarded as the essential residue of propionic acid and certain related compounds.
Propithecus
n.
(Zool.) A genus including the long-tailed, or diadem, indris. See Indris.
Propitiable
a.
• Capable of being propitiated.
Propitiate
v. t.
• To appease to render favorable; to make propitious; to conciliate.
v. i.
• To make propitiation; to atone.
Propitiation
n.
• The act of appeasing the wrath and conciliating the favor of an offended person; the act of making propitious.
(Theol.) That which propitiates; atonement or atoning sacrifice; specifically, the influence or effects of the death of Christ in appeasing the divine justice, and conciliating the divine favor.
Propitiator
n.
• One who propitiates or appeases.
Propitiatorily
adv.
• By way of propitiation.
Propitiatory
a.
• Having the power to make propitious; pertaining to, or employed in, propitiation; expiatory; as, a propitiatory sacrifice.
n.
(Jewish Antiq.) The mercy seat; — so called because a symbol of the propitiated Jehovah.
Propitious
a.
• Convenient; auspicious; favorable; kind; as, a propitious season; a propitious breeze.
• Hence, kind; gracious; merciful; helpful; — said of a person or a divinity.
Proplasm
n.
• A mold; a matrix.
Proplastic
a.
• Forming a mold.
Proplastics
n.
• The art of making molds for castings.
Propleg
n.
(Zool.) Same as Proleg.
Propodial
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the propodialia, or the parts of the limbs to which they belong.
Propodiale
n.
(Anat.) The bone of either the upper arm or the thing, the propodialia being the humerus and femur.
Propodite
n.
(Zool.) The sixth joint of a typical leg of a crustacean; usually, the penultimate joint.
Propodium
n.
(Zool.) The anterior portion of the foot of a mollusk.
• The segment which forms the posterior part of the thorax of a hymenopterous insect.
Propolis
n.
• Same as Bee glue, under Bee.
Propone
v. t.
• To propose; to bring forward.
Proponent
a.
• Making proposals; proposing.
n.
• One who makes a proposal, or lays down a proposition.
(Law) The propounder of a thing.
Proportion
n.
• The relation or adaptation of one portion to another, or to the whole, as respect magnitude, quantity, or degree; comparative relation; ratio; as, the proportion of the parts of a building, or of the body.
• Harmonic relation between parts, or between different things of the same kind; symmetrical arrangement or adjustment; symmetry; as, to be out of proportion.
• The portion one receives when a whole is distributed by a rule or principle; equal or proper share; lot.
• A part considered comparatively; a share.
(Math.) The equality or similarity of ratios, especially of geometrical ratios; or a relation among quantities such that the quotient of the first divided by the second is equal to that of the third divided by the fourth; — called also geometrical proportion, in distinction from arithmetical proportion, or that in which the difference of the first and second is equal to the difference of the third and fourth.
• The rule of three, in arithmetic, in which the three given terms, together with the one sought, are proportional
v. t.
• To adjust in a suitable proportion, as one thing or one part to another; as, to proportion the size of a building to its height; to proportion our expenditures to our income.
• To form with symmetry or suitableness, as the parts of the body.
• To divide into equal or just shares; to apportion.
Proportionable
a.
• Capable of being proportioned, or made proportional; also, proportional; proportionate.
Proportionably
adv.
• Proportionally.
Proportional
a.
• Having a due proportion, or comparative relation; being in suitable proportion or degree; as, the parts of an edifice are proportional.
• Relating to, or securing, proportion.
n.
(Math.) Any number or quantity in a proportion; as, a mean proportional.
(Chem.) The combining weight or equivalent of an element.
Proportionality
n.
• The state of being in proportion.
Proportionally
adv.
• In proportion; in due degree; adapted relatively; as, all parts of the building are proportionally large.
Proportionate
a.
• Adjusted to something else according to a proportion; proportional.
v. t.
• To make proportional; to adjust according to a settled rate, or to due comparative relation; to proportion; as, to proportionate punishment to crimes.
Proportionately
adv.
• In a proportionate manner; with due proportion; proportionally.
Proportionateness
n.
• The quality or state of being proportionate.
Proportionless
a.
• Without proportion; unsymmetrical.
Proportionment
n.
• The act or process of dividing out proportionally.
Proposal
n.
• That which is proposed, or propounded for consideration or acceptance; a scheme or design; terms or conditions proposed; offer; as, to make proposals for a treaty of peace; to offer proposals for erecting a building; to make proposals of marriage.
(Law) The offer by a party of what he has in view as to an intended business transaction, which, with acceptance, constitutes a contract.
Propose
v. t.
• To set forth.
• To offer for consideration, discussion, acceptance, or adoption; as, to propose terms of peace; to propose a question for discussion; to propose an alliance; to propose a person for office.
• To set before one's self or others as a purpose formed; hence, to purpose; to intend.
v. i.
• To speak; to converse.
• To form or declare a purpose or intention; to lay a scheme; to design; as, man proposes, but God disposes.
• To offer one's self in marriage.
n.
• Talk; discourse.
Proposer
n.
• One who proposes or offers anything for consideration or adoption.
• A speaker; an orator.
Proposition
n.
• The act of setting or placing before; the act of offering.
• That which is proposed; that which is offered, as for consideration, acceptance, or adoption; a proposal; as, the enemy made propositions of peace; his proposition was not accepted.
• A statement of religious doctrine; an article of faith; creed; as, the propositions of Wyclif and Huss.
(Gram. & Logic) A complete sentence, or part of a sentence consisting of a subject and predicate united by a copula; a thought expressed or propounded in language; a from of speech in which a predicate is affirmed or denied of a subject; as, snow is white.
(Math.) A statement in terms of a truth to be demonstrated, or of an operation to be performed.
(Rhet.) That which is offered or affirmed as the subject of the discourse; anything stated or affirmed for discussion or illustration.
(Poetry) The part of a poem in which the author states the subject or matter of it.
Propositional
a.
• Pertaining to, or in the nature of, a proposition; considered as a proposition; as, a propositional sense.
Propound
v. t.
• To offer for consideration; to exhibit; to propose; as, to propound a question; to propound an argument.
(Eccl.) To propose or name as a candidate for admission to communion with a church.
Propounder
n.
• One who propounds, proposes, or offers for consideration.
Propretor
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A magistrate who, having been pretor at home, was appointed to the government of a province.
Proprietary
n.
• A proprietor or owner; one who has exclusive title to a thing; one who possesses, or holds the title to, a thing in his own right.
• A body proprietors, taken collectively.
(Eccl.) A monk who had reserved goods and effects to himself, notwithstanding his renunciation of all at the time of profession.
a.
• Belonging, or pertaining, to a proprietor; considered as property; owned; as, proprietary medicine.
Proprietor
n.
• One who has the legal right or exclusive title to anything, whether in possession or not; an owner; as, the proprietor of farm or of a mill.
Proprietorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to ownership; proprietary; as, proprietorial rights.
Proprietorship
n.
• The state of being proprietor; ownership.
Proprietress
n.
• A female proprietor.
Propriety
n.
• Individual right to hold property; ownership by personal title; property.
• That which is proper or peculiar; an inherent property or quality; peculiarity.
• The quality or state of being proper; suitableness to an acknowledged or correct standard or rule; consonance with established principles, rules, or customs; fitness; appropriateness; as, propriety of behavior, language, manners, etc.
Proproctor
n.
• A assistant proctor.
Props
n. pl.
• A game of chance, in which four sea shells, each called a prop, are used instead of dice.
Propterygium
n
(Anat.) The anterior of three principal cartilages in the fins of some fishes.
Propugn
v. t.
• To contend for; to defend; to vindicate.
Propugnacle
n.
• A fortress.
Propugnation
n.
• Means of defense; defense.
Propugner
n.
• A defender; a vindicator.
Propulsation
n.
• The act of driving away or repelling; a keeping at a distance.
Propulse
v. t.
• To repel; to drive off or away.
Propulsion
n.
• The act driving forward or away; the act or process of propelling; as, steam propulsion.
• An impelling act or movement.
Propulsive
a.
• Tending, or having power, to propel; driving on; urging.
Propulsory
a.
• Propulsive.
Propyl
n.
(Chem.) The hypothetical radical C3H7, regarded as the essential residue of propane and related compounds.
Propylaeum
n.
(Anc. Classical Arch.) Any court or vestibule before a building or leading into any inclosure.
Propylene
n.
(Chem.) A colorless gaseous hydrocarbon (C3H6) of the ethylene series, having a garlic odor. It occurs in coal gas, and is produced artificially in various ways. Called also propene.
Propylic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, propyl; as, propylic alcohol.
Propylidene
n.
(Chem.) See Propidene.
Propylon
n.
(Anc. Arch.) The porch, vestibule, or entrance of an edifice.
Proratable
a.
• Capable of being prorated, or divided proportionately.
Prorate
v. t.
• To divide or distribute proportionally; to assess pro rata.
Prore
n.
• The prow or fore part of a ship.
Prorector
n.
• An officer who presides over the academic senate of a German university.
Prorectorate
n.
• The office of prorector.
Prorenal
a.
(Anat.) Pronephric.
Proreption
n.
• A creeping on.
Prorhinal
a.
(Anat.) Situated in front of the nasal chambers.
Prorogate
v. t.
• To prorogue.
Prorogation
n.
• The act of counting in duration; prolongation.
• The act of proroguing; the ending of the session of Parliament, and postponing of its business, by the command of the sovereign.
Prorogue
v. t.
• To protract; to prolong; to extend.
• To defer; to delay; to postpone; as, to proroguedeath; to prorogue a marriage.
• To end the session of a parliament by an order of the sovereign, thus deferring its business.
Proruption
n.
• The act or state of bursting forth; a bursting out.
Prosaicism
n.
• The quality or state of being prosaic; a prosaic manner or style.
Prosaism
n.
• That which is in the form of prose writing; a prosaic manner.
Prosaist
n.
• A writer of prose; an unpoetical writer.
Prosal
a
• Of or pertaining to prose; prosaic.
Proscenium
n.
(Anc. Theater) The part where the actors performed; the stage.
(Modern Theater) The part of the stage in front of the curtain; sometimes, the curtain and its framework.
Proscolex
n.
(Zool.) An early larval form of a trematode worm; a redia. See Redia.
Proscribe
v. t.
• To doom to destruction; to put out of the protection of law; to outlaw; to exile; as, Sylla and Marius proscribed each other's adherents.
• To denounce and condemn; to interdict; to prohibit; as, the Puritans proscribed theaters.
Proscriber
n.
• One who, or that which, proscribes, denounces, or prohibits.
Proscript
n.
• A proscription; a prohibition; an interdict.
• One who is proscribed.
Proscription
n.
• The act of proscribing; a dooming to death or exile; outlawry; specifically, among the ancient Romans, the public offer of a reward for the head of a political enemy; as, under the triumvirate, many of the best Roman citizens fell by proscription.
• The state of being proscribed; denunciation; interdiction; prohibition.
Proscriptional
a.
• Proscriptive.
Proscriptionist
n.
• One who proscribes.
Proscriptive
a.
• Of or pertaining to proscription; consisting in, or of the nature of, proscription; proscribing.
Prosdist
n.
• One skilled in prosody.
Prose
n.
• The ordinary language of men in speaking or writing; language not cast in poetical measure or rhythm; — contradistinguished from verse, or metrical composition.
• Hence, language which evinces little imagination or animation; dull and commonplace discourse.
(R. C. Ch.) A hymn with no regular meter, sometimes introduced into the Mass. See Sequence.
a.
• Pertaining to, or composed of, prose; not in verse; as, prose composition.
• Possessing or exhibiting unpoetical characteristics; plain; dull; prosaic; as, the prose duties of life.
v. t.
• To write in prose.
• To write or repeat in a dull, tedious, or prosy way.
v. i.
• To write prose.
Prosector
n.
• One who makes dissections for anatomical illustration; usually, the assistant of a professional anatomist.
Prosecutable
a.
• Capable of being prosecuted; liable to prosecution.
Prosecute
v. t.
• To follow or pursue with a view to reach, execute, or accomplish; to endeavor to obtain or complete; to carry on; to continue; as, to prosecute a scheme, hope, or claim.
• To seek to obtain by legal process; as, to prosecute a right or a claim in a court of law.
(Law) To pursue with the intention of punishing; to accuse of some crime or breach of law, or to pursue for redress or punishment, before a legal tribunal; to proceed against judicially; as, to prosecute a man for trespass, or for a riot.
v. i.
• To follow after.
(Law) To institute and carry on a legal prosecution; as, to prosecute for public offenses.
Prosecution
n.
• The act or process of prosecuting, or of endeavoring to gain or accomplish something; pursuit by efforts of body or mind; as, the prosecution of a scheme, plan, design, or undertaking; the prosecution of war.
(Law) The institution and carrying on of a suit in a court of law or equity, to obtain some right, or to redress and punish some wrong; the carrying on of a judicial proceeding in behalf of a complaining party, as distinguished from defense.
• The institution, or commencement, and continuance of a criminal suit; the process of exhibiting formal charges against an offender before a legal tribunal, and pursuing them to final judgment on behalf of the state or government, as by indictment or information.
• The party by whom criminal proceedings are instituted.
Prosecutor
n.
• One who prosecutes or carries on any purpose, plan, or business.
(Law) The person who institutes and carries on a criminal suit against another in the name of the government.
Prosecutrix
n.
• A female prosecutor.
Proselyte
n.
• A new convert especially a convert to some religion or religious sect, or to some particular opinion, system, or party; thus, a Gentile converted to Judaism, or a pagan converted to Christianity, is a proselyte.
v. t.
• To convert to some religion, opinion, or system; to bring over.
Proselytism
n.
• The act or practice of proselyting; the making of converts to a religion or a religious sect, or to any opinion, system, or party.
• Conversion to a religion, system, or party.
Proselytize
v. t.
• To convert to some religion, system, opinion, or the like; to bring, or cause to come, over; to proselyte.
v. i.
• To make converts or proselytes.
Proselytizer
n.
• One who proselytes.
Proseman
n.
• A writer of prose.
Proseminary
n.
• A seminary which prepares pupils for a higher institution.
Prosemination
n.
• Propagation by seed.
Prosencephalic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the prosencephalon.
Prosencephalon
n.
(Anat.) The anterior segment of the brain, including the cerebrum and olfactory lobes; the forebrain
• The cerebrum.
Prosenchyma
n.
(Bot.) A general term applied to the tissues formed of elongated cells, especially those with pointed or oblique extremities, as the principal cells of ordinary wood.
Proser
n.
• A writer of prose.
• One who talks or writes tediously.
Prosiliency
n.
• The act of leaping forth or forward; projection.
Prosily
adv.
• In a prosy manner.
Prosimetrical
a.
• Consisting both of prose and verse.
Prosimiae
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Lemuroidea.
Prosiness
n.
• The quality or state of being prosy; tediousness; tiresomeness.
Prosing
n.
• Writing prose; speaking or writing in a tedious or prosy manner.
Prosingly
adv.
• Prosily.
Prosiphon
n.
(Zool.) A minute tube found in the protocon of ammonites, and not connected with the true siphon.
Proslavery
a.
• Favoring slavery.
n.
• Advocacy of slavery.
Prosnostic
a.
• Indicating something future by signs or symptoms; foreshowing; aiding in prognosis; as, the prognostic symptoms of a disease; prognostic signs.
Prosobranch
n.
(Zool.) One of the Prosobranchiata.
Prosobranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) The highest division, or subclass, of gastropod mollusks, including those that have the gills situated anteriorly, or forward of the heart, and the sexes separate.
Prosocoele
n.
(Anat.) The entire cavity of the prosencephalon.
Prosocoelia
n.
(Anat.) Same as Prosocoele.
Prosodiacal
a.
• Prosodical.
Prosodiacally
adv.
• Prosodically.
Prosodial
a.
• Prosodical.
Prosodian
n.
• A prosodist.
Prosodical
a.
• Of or pertaining to prosody; according to the rules of prosody.
Prosody
n.
• That part of grammar which treats of the quantity of syllables, of accent, and of the laws of versification or metrical composition.
Prosoma
n.
(Zool.) The anterior of the body of an animal, as of a cephalopod; the thorax of an arthropod.
Prosopalgia
n.
(Med.) Facial neuralgia.
Prosopocephala
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Scaphopoda.
Prosopolepsy
n.
• Respect of persons; especially, a premature opinion or prejudice against a person, formed from his external appearance.
Prosopulmonata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of pulmonate mollusks having the breathing organ situated on the neck, as in the common snail.
Prospect
n.
• That which is embraced by eye in vision; the region which the eye overlooks at one time; view; scene; outlook.
• Especially, a picturesque or widely extended view; a landscape; hence, a sketch of a landscape
• A position affording a fine view; a lookout.
• Relative position of the front of a building or other structure; face; relative aspect.
• The act of looking forward; foresight; anticipation; as, a prospect of the future state.
• That which is hoped for; ground for hope or expectation; expectation; probable result; as, the prospect of success.
v. t.
• To look over; to explore or examine for something; as, to prospect a district for gold.
v. i.
• To make a search; to seek; to explore, as for mines or the like; as, to prospect for gold.
Prospection
n.
• The act of looking forward, or of providing for future wants; foresight.
Prospective
a.
• Of or pertaining to a prospect; furnishing a prospect; perspective.
• Looking forward in time; acting with foresight; — opposed to retrospective.
• Being within view or consideration, as a future event or contingency; relating to the future: expected; as, a prospective benefit.
n.
• The scene before or around, in time or in space; view; prospect.
• A perspective glass.
Prospectively
adv.
• In a prospective manner.
Prospectiveness
n.
• Quality of being prospective.
Prospectless
a.
• Having no prospect.
Prospector
n.
• One who prospects; especially, one who explores a region for minerals and precious metals.
Prospectus
n.
• A summary, plan, or scheme of something proposed, affording a prospect of its nature; especially, an exposition of the scheme of an unpublished literary work.
Prosper
v. t.
• To favor; to render successful.
v. i.
• To be successful; to succeed; to be fortunate or prosperous; to thrive; to make gain.
• To grow; to increase.
Prosperity
n.
• The state of being prosperous; advance or gain in anything good or desirable; successful progress in any business or enterprise; attainment of the object desired; good fortune; success; as, commercial prosperity; national prosperity.
Prosphysis
n.
(Med.) A growing together of parts; specifically, a morbid adhesion of the eyelids to each other or to the eyeball.
Prospicience
n.
• The act of looking forward.
Prostate
a.
(Anat.) Standing before; — applied to a gland which is found in the males of most mammals, and is situated at the neck of the bladder where this joins the urethra.
n.
• The prostate gland.
Prostatic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the prostate gland.
Prostatitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the prostate.
Prosternation
n.
• Dejection; depression.
Prosternum
n.
(Zool.) The ventral plate of the prothorax of an insect.
Prosthesis
n.
(Surg.) The addition to the human body of some artificial part, to replace one that is wanting, as a log or an eye; — called also prothesis.
(Gram.) The prefixing of one or more letters to the beginning of a word, as in beloved.
Prosthetic
a.
• Of or pertaining to prosthesis; prefixed, as a letter or letters to a word.
Prostibulous
a.
• Of or pertaining to prostitutes or prostitution; meretricious.
Prostitute
v. t.
• To offer, as a woman, to a lewd use; to give up to lewdness for hire.
• To devote to base or unworthy purposes; to give up to low or indiscriminate use; as, to prostitute talents; to prostitute official powers.
a.
• Openly given up to lewdness; devoted to base or infamous purposes.
n.
• A woman giver to indiscriminate lewdness; a strumpet; a harlot.
• A base hireling; a mercenary; one who offers himself to infamous employments for hire.
Prostitution
n.
• The act or practice of prostituting or offering the body to an indiscriminate intercourse with men; common lewdness of a woman.
• The act of setting one's self to sale, or of devoting to infamous purposes what is in one's power; as, the prostitution of abilities; the prostitution of the press.
Prostitutor
n.
• One who prostitutes; one who submits himself, of or offers another, to vile purposes.
Prostomium
n.
(Zool.) That portion of the head of an annelid situated in front of the mouth.
Prostrate
a.
• Lying at length, or with the body extended on the ground or other surface; stretched out; as, to sleep prostrate
• Lying at mercy, as a supplicant.
• Lying in a humble, lowly, or suppliant posture.
(Bot.) Trailing on the ground; procumbent.
v. t.
• To lay fiat; to throw down; to level; to fell; as, to prostrate the body; to prostrate trees or plants.
• to overthrow; to demolish; to destroy; to deprive of efficiency; to ruin; as, to prostrate a village; to prostrate a government; to prostrate law or justice.
• To throw down, or cause to fall in humility or adoration; to cause to bow in humble reverence; used reflexively; as, he prostrated himself.
• To cause to sink totally; to deprive of strength; to reduce; as, a person prostrated by fever.
Prostration
n.
• The act of prostrating, throwing down, or laying fiat; as, the prostration of the body.
• The act of falling down, or of bowing in humility or adoration; primarily, the act of falling on the face, but usually applied to kneeling or bowing in reverence and worship.
• The condition of being prostrate; great depression; lowness; dejection; as, a postration of spirits.
(Med.) A latent, not an exhausted, state of the vital energies; great oppression of natural strength and vigor.
Prostyle
a.
(Arch.) Having columns in front.
n.
• A prostyle portico or building.
Prosy
a.
• Of or pertaining to prose; like prose.
• Dull and tedious in discourse or writing; prosaic.
Prosylogism
n.
(Logic) A syllogism preliminary or logically essential to another syllogism; the conclusion of such a syllogism, which becomes a premise of the following syllogism.
Protactic
a.
• Giving a previous narrative or explanation, as of the plot or personages of a play; introductory.
Protagon
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A nitrogenous phosphorized principle found in brain tissue. By decomposition it yields neurine, fatty acids, and other bodies.
Protagonist
n.
• One who takes the leading part in a drama; hence, one who takes lead in some great scene, enterprise, conflict, or the like.
Protamin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) An amorphous nitrogenous substance found in the spermatic fluid of salmon. It is soluble in water, which an alkaline reaction, and unites with acids and metallic bases.
Protandric
a.
(Zool.) Having male sexual organs while young, and female organs later in life.
Protandrous
a.
(Bot.) Proterandrous.
Protasis
n.
• A proposition; a maxim.
(Gram.) The introductory or subordinate member of a sentence, generally of a conditional sentence; — opposed to apodosis. See Apodosis.
• The first part of a drama, of a poem, or the like; the introduction; opposed to epitasis.
Protatic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the protasis of an ancient play; introductory.
Proteaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of or pertaining to the Proteaceae, an order of apetalous evergreen shrubs, mostly natives of the Cape of Good Hope or of Australia.
Protean
a.
• Of or pertaining to Proteus; characteristic of Proteus.
• Exceedingly variable; readily assuming different shapes or forms; as, an amoeba is a protean animalcule.
Proteanly
adv.
• In a protean manner.
Protect
v. t.
• To cover or shield from danger or injury; to defend; to guard; to preserve in safety; as, a father protects his children.
Protectingly
adv.
• By way of protection; in a protective manner.
Protection
n.
• The act of protecting, or the state of being protected; preservation from loss, injury, or annoyance; defense; shelter; as, the weak need protection.
• That which protects or preserves from injury; a defense; a shield; a refuge.
• A writing that protects or secures from molestation or arrest; a pass; a safe-conduct; a passport.
(Polit. Econ.) A theory, or a policy, of protecting the producers in a country from foreign competition in the home market by the imposition of such discriminating duties on goods of foreign production as will restrict or prevent their importation; — opposed to free trade.
Protectionism
n.
(Polit. Econ.) The doctrine or policy of protectionists. See Protection, 4.
Protectionist
n.
(Polit. Econ.) One who favors protection. See Protection, 4.
Protective
a.
• Affording protection; sheltering; defensive.
Protectiveness
n.
• The quality or state of being protective.
Protector
n.
• One who, or that which, defends or shields from injury, evil, oppression, etc.; a defender; a guardian; a patron.
(Eng. Hist.) One having the care of the kingdom during the king's minority; a regent.
(R. C. Ch.) A cardinal, from one of the more considerable Roman Catholic nations, who looks after the interests of his people at Rome; also, a cardinal who has the same relation to a college, religious order, etc.
Protectoral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a protector; protectorial; as, protectoral power.
Protectorate
n.
• Government by a protector; — applied especially to the government of England by Oliver Cromwell.
• The authority assumed by a superior power over an inferior or a dependent one, whereby the former protects the latter from invasion and shares in the management of its affairs.
Protectorial
a.
• Same as Protectoral.
Protectorless
a.
• Having no protector; unprotected.
Protectorship
• , The office of a protector or regent; protectorate.
Proteid
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) One of a class of amorphous nitrogenous principles, containing, as a rule, a small amount of sulphur; an albuminoid, as blood fibrin, casein of milk, etc. Proteids are present in nearly all animal fluids and make up the greater part of animal tissues and organs. They are also important constituents of vegetable tissues. See 2d Note under Food.
Proteidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of aquatic amphibians having prominent external gills and four legs. It includes Proteus and Menobranchus (Necturus). Called also Proteoidea, and Proteida.
Proteiform
a.
(Zool.) Changeable in form; resembling a Proteus, or an amoeba.
Protein
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A body now known as alkali albumin, but originally considered to be the basis of all albuminous substances, whence its name.
Proteinaceous
a.
(Physiol. Chem.) Of or related to protein; albuminous; proteid.
Proteinous
a.
• Proteinaceuos.
Proteles
n.
(Zool.) A South Africa genus of Carnivora, allied to the hyenas, but smaller and having weaker jaws and teeth. It includes the aard-wolf.
Protend
v. t.
• To hold out; to stretch forth.
Protense
n.
• Extension.
Protension
n.
• A drawing out; extension.
Protensive
a.
• Drawn out; extended.
Proteolysis
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) The digestion or dissolving of proteid matter by proteolytic ferments.
Proteolytic
a.
(Physiol.) Converting proteid or albuminous matter into soluble and diffusible products, as peptones.
Proterandrous
a.
(Bot.) Having the stamens come to maturity before the pistil; — opposed to proterogynous.
Proterandry
n.
(Bot.) The condition of being proterandrous.
Proteranthous
a.
(Bot.) Having flowers appearing before the leaves; — said of certain plants.
Proteroglypha
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of serpents including those that have permanently erect grooved poison fangs, with ordinary teeth behind them in the jaws. It includes the cobras, the asps, and the sea snakes. Called also Proteroglyphia.
Proterogynous
a.
(Bot.) Having the pistil come to maturity before the stamens; protogynous; — opposed to proterandrous.
Proterosaurus
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct genus of reptiles of the Permian period. Called also Protosaurus.
Protervity
n.
• Peevishness; petulance.
Protest
v. i.
• To affirm in a public or formal manner; to bear witness; to declare solemnly; to avow.
• To make a solemn declaration (often a written one) expressive of opposition; — with against; as, he protest against your votes.
v. t.
• To make a solemn declaration or affirmation of; to proclaim; to display; as, to protest one's loyalty.
• To call as a witness in affirming or denying, or to prove an affirmation; to appeal to.
n.
• A solemn declaration of opinion, commonly a formal objection against some act; especially, a formal and solemn declaration, in writing, of dissent from the proceedings of a legislative body; as, the protest of lords in Parliament.
(Law) A solemn declaration in writing, in due form, made by a notary public, usually under his notarial seal, on behalf of the holder of a bill or note, protesting against all parties liable for any loss or damage by the nonacceptance or nonpayment of the bill, or by the nonpayment of the note, as the case may be.
• A declaration made by the master of a vessel before a notary, consul, or other authorized officer, upon his arrival in port after a disaster, stating the particulars of it, and showing that any damage or loss sustained was not owing to the fault of the vessel, her officers or crew, but to the perils of the sea, etc., ads the case may be, and protesting against them.
• A declaration made by a party, before or while paying a tax, duty, or the like, demanded of him, which he deems illegal, denying the justice of the demand, and asserting his rights and claims, in order to show that the payment was not voluntary.
Protestancy
n.
• Protestantism.
Protestant
n.
• One who protests; — originally applied to those who adhered to Luther, and protested against, or made a solemn declaration of dissent from, a decree of the Emperor Charles V. and the Diet of Spires, in 1529, against the Reformers, and appealed to a general council; — now used in a popular sense to designate any Christian who does not belong to the Roman Catholic or the Greek Church.
a.
• Making a protest; protesting.
• Of or pertaining to the faith and practice of those Christians who reject the authority of the Roman Catholic Church; as, Protestant writers.
Protestantical
a.
• Protestant.
Protestantism
n.
• The quality or state of being protestant, especially against the Roman Catholic Church; the principles or religion of the Protestants.
Protestantly
adv.
• Like a Protestant; in conformity with Protestantism.
Protestation
n.
• The act of making a protest; a public avowal; a solemn declaration, especially of dissent.
(Law) Formerly, a declaration in common-law pleading, by which the party interposes an oblique allegation or denial of some fact, protesting that it does or does not exist, and at the same time avoiding a direct affirmation or denial.
Protestator
n.
• One who makes protestation; a protester.
Protester
n.
• One who protests; one who utters a solemn declaration.
(Law) One who protests a bill of exchange, or note.
Protestingly
adv.
• By way of protesting.
Proteus
n.
(Class. Myth.) A sea god in the service of Neptune who assumed different shapes at will. Hence, one who easily changes his appearance or principles.
(Zool.) A genus of aquatic eel-shaped amphibians found in caves in Austria. They have permanent external gills as well as lungs. The eyes are small and the legs are weak.
• A changeable protozoan; an amoeba.
Prothallium
n.
(Bot.) Same as Prothallus.
Prothallus
n.
(Bot.) The minute primary growth from the spore of ferns and other Pteridophyta, which bears the true sexual organs; the oophoric generation of ferns, etc.
Prothesis
n.
(Eccl.) A credence table; — so called by the Eastern or Greek Church.
(Med.) See Prosthesis.
Prothetic
a.
• Of or pertaining to prothesis; as, a prothetic apparatus.
Prothonotaryship
n.
• Office of a prothonotary.
Prothoracic
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the prothorax.
Prothorax
n.
(Zool.) The first or anterior segment of the thorax in insects. See Illusts. of Butterfly and Coleoptera.
Prothyalosome
n.
(Biol.) Same as Prothyalosoma.
Protist
n.
(Zool.) One of the Protista.
Protista
n. pl.
(Zool.) A provisional group in which are placed a number of low microscopic organisms of doubtful nature. Some are probably plants, others animals.
Protiston
n.
(Zool.) One of the Protista.
Protocanonical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the first canon, or that which contains the authorized collection of the books of Scripture; — opposed to deutero-canonical.
Protocatechuic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an organic acid which is obtained as a white crystalline substance from catechin, asafetida, oil of cloves, etc., and by distillation itself yields pyrocatechin.
Protocercal
a.
(Zool.) Having a caudal fin extending around the end of the vertebral column, like that which is first formed in the embryo of fishes; diphycercal.
Protococcus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of minute unicellular algae including the red snow plant (Protococcus nivalis).
Protocol
n.
• The original copy of any writing, as of a deed, treaty, dispatch, or other instrument.
• The minutes, or rough draught, of an instrument or transaction.
(Diplomacy) A preliminary document upon the basis of which negotiations are carried on.
• A convention not formally ratified.
• An agreement of diplomatists indicating the results reached by them at a particular stage of a negotiation.
v. t.
• To make a protocol of.
v. i.
• To make or write protocols, or first draughts; to issue protocols.
Protocolist
n.
• One who draughts protocols.
Protoconch
n.
(Zool.) The embryonic shell, or first chamber, of ammonites and other cephalopods.
Protogine
n.
(Min.) A kind of granite or gneiss containing a silvery talcose mineral.
Protogynous
a.
(Bot.) Same as Proterogynous.
Protohippus
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of fossil horses from the Lower Pliocene. They had three toes on each foot, the lateral ones being small.
Protomartyr
n.
• The first martyr; the first who suffers, or is sacrificed, in any cause; — applied esp. to Stephen, the first Christian martyr.
Protomerite
n.
(Zool.) The second segment of one of the Gregarinae.
Protomorphic
a.
(Biol.) Having the most primitive character; in the earliest form; as, a protomorphic layer of tissue.
Protonema
n.
(Bot.) The primary growth from the spore of a moss, usually consisting of branching confervoid filaments, on any part of which stem and leaf buds may be developed.
Protonotary
n.
• Same as Prothonotary.
Protoorganism
n.
(Biol.) An organism whose nature is so difficult to determine that it might be referred to either the animal or the vegetable kingdom.
Protopapas
n.
(Gr. Ch.) A protopope.
Protophyte
n.
(Bot.) Any unicellular plant, or plant forming only a plasmodium, having reproduction only by fission, gemmation, or cell division.
Protophytology
n.
• Paleobotany.
Protopine
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid found in opium in small quantities, and extracted as a white crystalline substance.
Protoplasm
n.
(Biol.) The viscid and more or less granular material of vegetable and animal cells, possessed of vital properties by which the processes of nutrition, secretion, and growth go forward; the so-called " physical basis of life;" the original cell substance, cytoplasm, cytoblastema, bioplasm sarcode, etc.
Protoplasmatic
a.
• Protoplasmic.
Protoplasmic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the first formation of living bodies.
(Biol.) Of or pertaining to protoplasm; consisting of, or resembling, protoplasm.
Protoplast
n.
• The thing first formed; that of which there are subsequent copies or reproductions; the original.
(Biol.) A first-formed organized body; the first individual, or pair of individuals, of a species.
Protoplasta
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of fresh-water rhizopods including those that have a soft body and delicate branched pseudopodia. The genus Gromia is one of the best-known.
Protoplastic
a.
• First-formed.
Protopodite
n.
(Zool.) The basal portion, or two proximal and more or less consolidated segments, of an appendage of a crustacean.
Protopope
n.
(Gr. Ch.) One of the clergy of first rank in the lower order of secular clergy; an archpriest; — called also protopapas.
Protopterus
n.
(Zool.) See Komtok.
Protosalt
n.
(Chem.) A salt derived from a protoxide base.
Protosilicate
n.
(Chem.) A silicate formed with the lowest proportion of silicic acid, or having but one atom of silicon in the molecule.
Protosomite
n.
(Zool.) One of the primitive segments, or metameres, of an animal.
Protosulphide
n.
(Chem.) That one of a series of sulphides of any element which has the lowest proportion of sulphur; a sulphide with but one atom of sulphur in the molecule.
Protosulphuret
n.
(Chem.) A protosulphide.
Prototheria
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Monotremata.
Prototracheata
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Malacopoda.
Prototype
n.
• An original or model after which anything is copied; the pattern of anything to be engraved, or otherwise copied, cast, or the like; a primary form; exemplar; archetype.
Protovertebra
n.
(Anat.) One of the primitive masses, or segments, into which the mesoblast of the vertebrate embryo breaks up on either side of the anterior part of the notochord; a mesoblastic, or protovertebral, somite. See Illust. of Ectoderm.
Protovertebral
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the protovertebrae.
Protoxide
n.
(Chem.) That one of a series of oxides having the lowest proportion of oxygen. See Proto-, 2 (b).
Protoxidize
v. t.
(Chem.) To combine with oxygen, as any elementary substance, in such proportion as to form a protoxide.
Protozoa
n. pl.
(Zool.) The lowest of the grand divisions of the animal kingdom.
Protozoan
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Protozoa.
n.
• One of the Protozoa.
Protozoic
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Protozoa.
(Geol.) Containing remains of the earliest discovered life of the globe, which included mollusks, radiates and protozoans.
Protozoon
n.
(Zool.) One of the Protozoa.
• A single zooid of a compound protozoan.
Protozoonite
n.
(Zool.) One of the primary, or first-formed, segments of an embryonic arthropod.
Protracheata
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Malacopoda.
Protract
v. t.
• To draw out or lengthen in time or (rarely) in space; to continue; to prolong; as, to protract an argument; to protract a war.
• To put off to a distant time; to delay; to defer; as, to protract a decision or duty.
(Surv.) To draw to a scale; to lay down the lines and angles of, with scale and protractor; to plot.
(Zool.) To extend; to protrude; as, the cat can protract its claws; — opposed to retract.
n.
• Tedious continuance or delay.
Protracted
a.
• Prolonged; continued.
Protracter
n.
• A protractor.
Protractile
a.
• Capable of being protracted, or protruded; protrusile.
Protraction
n.
• A drawing out, or continuing; the act of delaying the termination of a thing; prolongation; continuance; delay; as, the protraction of a debate.
(Surv.) The act or process of making a plot on paper.
• A plot on paper.
Protractive
a.
• Drawing out or lengthening in time; prolonging; continuing; delaying.
Protractor
n.
• One who, or that which, protracts, or causes protraction.
• A mathematical instrument for laying down and measuring angles on paper, used in drawing or in plotting. It is of various forms, semicircular, rectangular, or circular.
(Surg.) An instrument formerly used in extracting foreign or offensive matter from a wound.
(Anat.) A muscle which extends an organ or part; — opposed to retractor.
• An adjustable pattern used by tailors.
Protreptical
a.
• Adapted to persuade; hortatory; persuasive.
Protrudable
a.
• That may be protruded; protrusile.
Protrude
v. t.
• To thrust forward; to drive or force along.
• To thrust out, as through a narrow orifice or from confinement; to cause to come forth.
v. i.
• To shoot out or forth; to be thrust forward; to extend beyond a limit; to project.
Protrusile
a.
• Capable of being protruded or thrust out; protractile; protrusive.
Protrusion
n.
• The act of protruding or thrusting forward, or beyond the usual limit.
• The state of being protruded, or thrust forward.
Protrusive
a.
• Thrusting or impelling forward; as, protrusive motion.
• Capable of being protruded; protrusile.
Protrusively
adv.
• In a protrusive manner.
Protuberance
n.
• That which is protuberant swelled or pushed beyond the surrounding or adjacent surface; a swelling or tumor on the body; a prominence; a bunch or knob; an elevation.
Protuberancy
n.
• The quality or state of being protuberant; protuberance; prominence.
Protuberant
a.
• Prominent, or excessively prominent; bulging beyond the surrounding or adjacent surface; swelling; as, a protuberant joint; a protuberant eye.
Protuberate
v. i.
• To swell, or be prominent, beyond the adjacent surface; to bulge out.
Protuberation
n.
• The act of swelling beyond the surrounding surface.
Protuberous
a.
• Protuberant.
Protureter
n.
(Anat.) The duct of a pronephros.
Protyle
n.
(Chem. & Astron.) The hypothetical homogeneous cosmic material of the original universe, supposed to have been differentiated into what are recognized as distinct chemical elements.
Proud
a.
• Feeling or manifesting pride, in a good or bad sense
• Possessing or showing too great self-esteem; overrating one's excellences; hence, arrogant; haughty; lordly; presumptuous.
• Having a feeling of high self-respect or self-esteem; exulting (in); elated; — often with of; as, proud of one's country
• Giving reason or occasion for pride or self-gratulation; worthy of admiration; grand; splendid; magnificent; admirable; ostentatious.
• Excited by sexual desire; — applied particularly to the females of some animals.
Proudish
a.
• Somewhat proud.
Proudling
n.
• A proud or haughty person.
Proudly
adv.
• In a proud manner; with lofty airs or mien; haughtily; arrogantly; boastfully.
Proudness
n.
• The quality of being proud; pride.
Proustite
n.
(Min.) A sulphide of arsenic and silver of a beautiful cochineal-red color, occurring in rhombohedral crystals, and also massive; ruby silver.
Provable
a.
• Capable of being proved; demonstrable.
Provant
v. t.
• To supply with provender or provisions; to provide for.
a.
• Provided for common or general use, as in an army; hence, common in quality; inferior.
Prove
v. t.
• To try or to ascertain by an experiment, or by a test or standard; to test; as, to prove the strength of gunpowder or of ordnance; to prove the contents of a vessel by a standard measure.
• To evince, establish, or ascertain, as truth, reality, or fact, by argument, testimony, or other evidence.
• To ascertain or establish the genuineness or validity of; to verify; as, to prove a will.
• To gain experience of the good or evil of; to know by trial; to experience; to suffer.
(Arith.) To test, evince, ascertain, or verify, as the correctness of any operation or result; thus, in subtraction, if the difference between two numbers, added to the lesser number, makes a sum equal to the greater, the correctness of the subtraction is proved.
(Printing) To take a trial impression of; to take a proof of; as, to prove a page.
v. i.
• To make trial; to essay.
• To be found by experience, trial, or result; to turn out to be; as, a medicine proves salutary; the report proves false.
• To succeed; to turn out as expected.
Provect
a.
• Carried forward; advanced.
Provection
n.
(Philol.) A carrying forward, as of a final letter, to a following word; as, for example, a nickname for an ekename.
Proveditor
n.
• One employed to procure supplies, as for an army, a steamer, etc.; a purveyor; one who provides for another.
Provedore
n.
• A proveditor; a purveyor.
Proven&cced;al
a.
• Of or pertaining to Provence or its inhabitants.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Provence in France.
• The Provencal language. See Langue d'oc.
Proven
p. p. or a.
• Proved.
Provencial
a.
• Of or pertaining to Provence in France.
Provend
n.
• See Provand.
Provender
n.
• Dry food for domestic animals, as hay, straw, corn, oats, or a mixture of ground grain; feed.
• Food or provisions.
Provent
n.
• See Provand.
Proventricle
n.
(Anat.) Proventriculus.
Proventriulus
n.
(Anat.) The glandular stomach of birds, situated just above the crop.
Prover
n.
• One who, or that which, proves.
Proverb
n.
• An old and common saying; a phrase which is often repeated; especially, a sentence which briefly and forcibly expresses some practical truth, or the result of experience and observation; a maxim; a saw; an adage.
• A striking or paradoxical assertion; an obscure saying; an enigma; a parable.
• A familiar illustration; a subject of contemptuous reference.
• A drama exemplifying a proverb.
v. t.
• To name in, or as, a proverb.
• To provide with a proverb.
v. i.
• To write or utter proverbs.
Proverbial
a.
• Mentioned or comprised in a proverb; used as a proverb; hence, commonly known; as, a proverbial expression; his meanness was proverbial.
• Of or pertaining to proverbs; resembling a proverb.
Proverbialism
n.
• A proverbial phrase.
Proverbialist
n.
• One who makes much use of proverbs in speech or writing; one who composes, collects, or studies proverbs.
Proverbialize
v. t. & i.
• To turn into a proverb; to speak in proverbs.
Proverbially
adv.
• In a proverbial manner; by way of proverb; hence, commonly; universally; as, it is proverbially said; the bee is proverbially busy.
Provessel
a.
• Openly declared, avowed, acknowledged, or claimed; as, a professed foe; a professed tyrant; a professed Christian.
Provexity
n.
• Great advance in age.
Provide
v. t.
• To look out for in advance; to procure beforehand; to get, collect, or make ready for future use; to prepare.
• To supply; to afford; to contribute.
• To furnish; to supply; — formerly followed by of, now by with.
• To establish as a previous condition; to stipulate; as, the contract provides that the work be well done.
• To foresee.
• To appoint to an ecclesiastical benefice before it is vacant. See Provisor.
v. i.
• To procure supplies or means in advance; to take measures beforehand in view of an expected or a possible future need, especially a danger or an evil; — followed by against or for; as, to provide against the inclemency of the weather; to provide for the education of a child.
• To stipulate previously; to condition; as, the agreement provides for an early completion of the work.
Provided
conj.
• On condition; by stipulation; with the understanding; if; — usually followed by that; as, provided that nothing in this act shall prejudice the rights of any person whatever.
Providence
n.
• The act of providing or preparing for future use or application; a making ready; preparation.
• Foresight; care; especially, the foresight and care which God manifests for his creatures; hence, God himself, regarded as exercising a constant wise prescience.
(Theol.) A manifestation of the care and superintendence which God exercises over his creatures; an event ordained by divine direction.
• Prudence in the management of one's concerns; economy; frugality.
Provident
a.
• Foreseeing wants and making provision to supply them; prudent in preparing for future exigencies; cautious; economical; — sometimes followed by of; as, aprovident man; an animal provident of the future.
Providential
a.
• Effected by, or referable to, divine direction or superintendence; as, the providential contrivance of thing; a providential escape.
Providently
adv.
• In a provident manner.
Providentness
n.
• The quality or state of being provident; carefulness; prudence; economy.
Provider
n.
• One who provides, furnishes, or supplies; one who procures what is wanted.
Providore
n.
• One who makes provision; a purveyor.
Province
n.
(Roman Hist.) A country or region, more or less remote from the city of Rome, brought under the Roman government; a conquered country beyond the limits of Italy.
• A country or region dependent on a distant authority; a portion of an empire or state, esp. one remote from the capital.
• A region of country; a tract; a district.
• A region under the supervision or direction of any special person; the district or division of a country, especially an ecclesiastical division, over which one has jurisdiction; as, the province of Canterbury, or that in which the archbishop of Canterbury exercises ecclesiastical authority.
• The proper or appropriate business or duty of a person or body; office; charge; jurisdiction; sphere.
• Specif.: Any political division of the Dominion of Canada, having a governor, a local legislature, and representation in the Dominion parliament. Hence, colloquially, The Provinces, the Dominion of Canada.
Provincial
a.
• Of or pertaining to province; constituting a province; as, a provincial government; a provincial dialect.
• Exhibiting the ways or manners of a province; characteristic of the inhabitants of a province; not cosmopolitan; countrified; not polished; rude; hence, narrow; illiberal.
• Of or pertaining to an ecclesiastical province, or to the jurisdiction of an archbishop; not ecumenical; as, a provincial synod.
• Of or pertaining to Provence; Provencal.
n.
• A person belonging to a province; one who is provincial.
(R. C. Ch.) A monastic superior, who, under the general of his order, has the direction of all the religious houses of the same fraternity in a given district, called a province of the order.
Provincialism
n.
• A word, or a manner of speaking, peculiar to a province or a district remote from the mother country or from the metropolis; a provincial characteristic; hence, narrowness; illiberality.
Provincialist
n.
• One who lives in a province; a provincial.
Provinciality
n.
• The quality or state of being provincial; peculiarity of language characteristic of a province.
Provincialize
v. t.
• To render provincial.
Provincially
adv.
• In a provincial manner.
Provinciate
v. t.
• To convert into a province or provinces.
Provine
v. i.
• To lay a stock or branch of a vine in the ground for propagation.
Provision
n.
• The act of providing, or making previous preparation.
• That which is provided or prepared; that which is brought together or arranged in advance; measures taken beforehand; preparation.
• Especially, a stock of food; any kind of eatables collected or stored; — often in the plural.
• That which is stipulated in advance; a condition; a previous agreement; a proviso; as, the provisions of a contract; the statute has many provisions.
(R. C. Ch.) A canonical term for regular induction into a benefice, comprehending nomination, collation, and installation.
(Eng. Hist.) A nomination by the pope to a benefice before it became vacant, depriving the patron of his right of presentation.
v. t.
• To supply with food; to victual; as, to provision a garrison.
Provisional
a.
• Of the nature of a provision; serving as a provision for the time being; — used of partial or temporary arrangements; as, a provisional government; a provisional treaty.
Provisionally
adv.
• By way of provision for the time being; temporarily.
Provisionary
a.
• Provisional.
Proviso
n.
• An article or clause in any statute, agreement, contract, grant, or other writing, by which a condition is introduced, usually beginning with the word provided; a conditional stipulation that affects an agreement, contract, law, grant, or the like; as, the contract was impaired by its proviso.
Provisor
n.
• One who provides; a purveyor.
(R. C. Ch.) The purveyor, steward, or treasurer of a religious house.
• One who is regularly inducted into a benefice. See Provision, 5.
(Eng. Hist.) One who procures or receives a papal provision. See Provision, 6.
Provisorily
adv.
• In a provisory manner; conditionally; subject to a proviso; as, to admit a doctrine provisorily.
Provisorship
n.
• The office or position of a provisor.
Provisory
a.
• Of the nature of a proviso; containing a proviso or condition; conditional; as, a provisory clause.
• Making temporary provision; provisional.
Provocation
n.
• The act of provoking, or causing vexation or, anger.
• That which provokes, or excites anger; the cause of resentment; as, to give provocation.
• Incitement; stimulus; as, provocation to mirth.
(Law) Such prior insult or injury as may be supposed, under the circumstances, to create hot blood, and to excuse an assault made in retort or redress.
• An appeal to a court.
Provocative
a.
• Serving or tending to provoke, excite, or stimulate; exciting.
n.
• Anything that is provocative; a stimulant; as, a provocative of appetite.
Provocativeness
n.
• Quality of being provocative.
Provocatory
a.
• Provocative.
Provokable
a.
• That may be provoked.
Provoke
v. t.
• To call forth; to call into being or action; esp., to incense to action, a faculty or passion, as love, hate, or ambition; hence, commonly, to incite, as a person, to action by a challenge, by taunts, or by defiance; to exasperate; to irritate; to offend intolerably; to cause to retaliate.
v. i.
• To cause provocation or anger.
• To appeal.
Provokement
n.
• The act that which, provokes; one who excites anger or other passion, or incites to action; as, a provoker of sedition.
Provoking
a.
• Having the power or quality of exciting resentment; tending to awaken passion or vexation; as, provoking words or treatment.
Provost
n.
• A person who is appointed to superintend, or preside over, something; the chief magistrate in some cities and towns; as, the provost of Edinburgh or of Glasgow, answering to the mayor of other cities; the provost of a college, answering to president; the provost or head of certain collegiate churches.
• The keeper of a prison.
Provostship
n.
• The office of a provost.
Prow
n.
• The fore part of a vessel; the bow; the stem; hence, the vessel itself.
n.
• See Proa.
a.
• Valiant; brave; gallant; courageous.
n.
• Benefit; profit; good; advantage.
Prowess
n.
• Distinguished bravery; valor; especially, military bravery and skill; gallantry; intrepidity; fearlessness.
Prowl
v. t.
• To rove over, through, or about in a stealthy manner; esp., to search in, as for prey or booty.
• To collect by plunder; as, to prowl money.
v. i.
• To rove or wander stealthily, esp. for prey, as a wild beast; hence, to prey; to plunder.
n.
• The act of prowling.
Prowler
n.
• One that prowls.
Prowling
a.
• Accustomed to prowl, or engaged in roving stealthily, as for prey.
Prox
n.
• "The ticket or list of candidates at elections, presented to the people for their votes."
Proxene
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) An officer who had the charge of showing hospitality to those who came from a friendly city or state.
Proxenet
n.
• A negotiator; a factor.
Proximad
adv.
(Anat.) Toward a proximal part; on the proximal side of; proximally.
Proximal
a.
• Toward or nearest, as to a body, or center of motion of dependence; proximate.
(Biol.) Situated near the point of attachment or origin; as, the proximal part of a limb.
• Of or pertaining to that which is proximal; as, the proximal bones of a limb. Opposed to distal.
Proximally
adv.
(Anat.) On or toward a proximal part; proximad.
Proximate
a.
• Nearest; next immediately preceding or following.
Proximately
adv.
• In a proximate manner, position, or degree; immediately.
Proxime
a.
• Next; immediately preceding or following.
Proximious
a.
• Proximate.
Proximity
n.
• The quality or state of being next in time, place, causation, influence, etc.; immediate nearness, either in place, blood, or alliance.
Proximo
• In the next month after the present; — often contracted to prox.; as, on the 3d proximo.
Proxy
n.
• The agency for another who acts through the agent; authority to act for another, esp. to vote in a legislative or corporate capacity.
• The person who is substituted or deputed to act or vote for another.
• A writing by which one person authorizes another to vote in his stead, as in a corporation meeting.
(Eng. Law) The written appointment of a proctor in suits in the ecclesiastical courts.
(Eccl.) See Procuration.
v. i.
• To act or vote by proxy; to do anything by the agency of another.
Proxyship
n.
• The office or agency of a proxy.
Pruce
n.
• Prussian leather.
Prude
n.
• A woman of affected modesty, reserve, or coyness; one who is overscrupulous or sensitive; one who affects extraordinary prudence in conduct and speech.
Prudence
n.
• The quality or state of being prudent; wisdom in the way of caution and provision; discretion; carefulness; hence, also, economy; frugality.
Prudency
n.
• Prudence.
Prudent
a.
• Sagacious in adapting means to ends; circumspect in action, or in determining any line of conduct; practically wise; judicious; careful; discreet; sensible; — opposed to rash; as, a prudent man; dictated or directed by prudence or wise forethought; evincing prudence; as, prudent behavior.
• Frugal; economical; not extravagant; as, a prudent woman; prudent expenditure of money
Prudential
a.
• Proceeding from, or dictated or characterized by, prudence; prudent; discreet; sometimes, selfish or pecuniary as distinguished from higher motives or influences; as, prudential motives.
• Exercising prudence; discretionary; advisory; superintending or executive; as, a prudential committee.
n.
• That which relates to or demands the exercise of, discretion or prudence; — usually in the pl.
Prudentialist
n.
• One who is governed by, or acts from, prudential motives.
Prudentiality
n.
• The quality or state of being prudential.
Prudentially
adv.
• In a prudential manner; prudently.
Prudently
adv.
• In a prudent manner.
Prudery
n.
• The quality or state of being prudish; excessive or affected scrupulousness in speech or conduct; stiffness; coyness.
Prudhomme
n.
• A trustworthy citizen; a skilled workman. See Citation under 3d Commune, 1.
Prudish
a.
• Like a prude; very formal, precise, or reserved; affectedly severe in virtue; as, a prudish woman; prudish manners.
Prudishly
adv.
• In a prudish manner.
Pruinate
a.
• Same as Pruinose.
Pruinose
a.
• Frosty; covered with fine scales, hairs, dust, bloom, or the like, so as to give the appearance of frost.
Pruinous
a.
• Frosty; pruinose.
Prune
v. t.
• To lop or cut off the superfluous parts, branches, or shoots of; to clear of useless material; to shape or smooth by trimming; to trim: as, to prune trees; to prune an essay.
• To cut off or cut out, as useless parts.
• To preen; to prepare; to dress.
v. i.
• To dress; to prink; -used humorously or in contempt.
n.
• A plum; esp., a dried plum, used in cookery; as, French or Turkish prunes; California prunes.
Prunella
n.
(Med.) Angina, or angina pectoris.
• Thrush.
Prunelle
n.
• A kind of small and very acid French plum; — applied especially to the stoned and dried fruit.
Prunello
n.
• A species of dried plum; prunelle.
Pruner
n.
• One who prunes, or removes, what is superfluous.
(Zool.) Any one of several species of beetles whose larvae gnaw the branches of trees so as to cause them to fall, especially the American oak pruner (Asemum moestum), whose larva eats the pith of oak branches, and when mature gnaws a circular furrow on the inside nearly to the bark. When the branches fall each contains a pupa.
Pruniferous
a.
• Bearing plums.
Pruning
n.
• The act of trimming, or removing what is superfluous.
(Falconry) That which is cast off by bird in pruning her feathers; leavings.
Prunus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of trees with perigynous rosaceous flowers, and a single two-ovuled carpel which usually becomes a drupe in ripening.
Prurient
a.
• Uneasy with desire; itching; especially, having a lascivious curiosity or propensity; lustful.
Pruriginous
a.
(Med.) Tending to, or caused by, prurigo; affected by, or of the nature of, prurigo.
Prurigo
n.
(Med.) A papular disease of the skin, of which intense itching is the chief symptom, the eruption scarcely differing from the healthy cuticle in color.
Pruritus
n.
(Med.) Itching.
Prussian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Prussia.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Prussia.
Prussiate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of prussic acid; a cyanide.
Prussic
a.
(Old Chem.) designating the acid now called hydrocyanic acid, but formerly called prussic acid, because Prussian blue is derived from it or its compounds. See Hydrocyanic.
Prutenic
a.
(Astron.) Prussian; — applied to certain astronomical tables published in the sixteenth century, founded on the principles of Copernicus, a Prussian.
Pry
n.
• A lever; also, leverage.
v. t.
• To raise or move, or attempt to raise or move, with a pry or lever; to prize.
v. i.
• To peep narrowly; to gaze; to inspect closely; to attempt to discover something by a scrutinizing curiosity; — often implying reproach.
n.
• Curious inspection; impertinent peeping.
Pryan
n.
(Mining) See Prian.
Prying
a.
• Inspecting closely or impertinently.
Pryingly
adv.
• In a prying manner.
Prytaneum
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A public building in certain Greek cities; especially, a public hall in Athens regarded as the home of the community, in which official hospitality was extended to distinguished citizens and strangers.
Prytanis
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A member of one of the ten sections into which the Athenian senate of five hundred was divided, and to each of which belonged the presidency of the senate for about one tenth of the year.
Prytany
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The period during which the presidency of the senate belonged to the prytanes of the section.
Prythee
interj.
• See Prithee.
Psalm
n.
• A sacred song; a poetical composition for use in the praise or worship of God.
• Especially, one of the hymns by David and others, collected into one book of the Old Testament, or a modern metrical version of such a hymn for public worship.
v. t.
• To extol in psalms; to sing; as, psalming his praises.
Psalmist
n.
• A writer or composer of sacred songs; — a title particularly applied to David and the other authors of the Scriptural psalms.
(R. C. Ch.) A clerk, precentor, singer, or leader of music, in the church.
Psalmistry
n.
• The use of psalms in devotion; psalmody.
Psalmodist
n.
• One who sings sacred songs; a psalmist.
Psalmodize
v. i.
• To practice psalmody.
Psalmody
n.
• The act, practice, or art of singing psalms or sacred songs; also, psalms collectively, or a collection of psalms.
Psalmograph
n.
• A writer of psalms; a psalmographer.
Psalmography
n.
• The act or practice of writing psalms, or sacred songs.
Psalter
n.
• The Book of Psalms; — often applied to a book containing the Psalms separately printed.
• Specifically, the Book of Psalms as printed in the Book of Common Prayer; among the Roman Catholics, the part of the Breviary which contains the Psalms arranged for each day of the week.
(R. C. Ch.) A rosary, consisting of a hundred and fifty beads, corresponding to the number of the psalms.
Psalterial
a.
• Of or pertaining to the psalterium.
Psalterium
n.
(Anat.) The third stomach of ruminants. See Manyplies.
• The lyra of the brain.
Psaltery
n.
• A stringed instrument of music used by the Hebrews, the form of which is not known.
Psammite
n.
(Min.) A species of micaceous sandstone.
Psarolite
n.
(Paleon.) A silicified stem of tree fern, found in abundance in the Triassic sandstone.
Psellism
n.
• Indistinct pronunciation; stammering.
Psephism
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A proposition adopted by a majority of votes; especially, one adopted by vote of the Athenian people; a statute.
Pseudaesthesia
n.
(Physiol.) False or imaginary feeling or sense perception such as occurs in hypochondriasis, or such as is referred to an organ that has been removed, as an amputated foot.
Pseudembryo
n.
(Zool.) A false embryo.
• An asexual form from which the true embryo is produced by budding.
Pseudepigraphous
a.
• Inscribed with a false name.
Pseudepigraphy
n.
• The ascription of false names of authors to works.
Pseudhaemal
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the vascular system of annelids.
Pseudobacteria
n. pl.
(Biol.) Microscopic organic particles, molecular granules, powdered inorganic substances, etc., which in form, size, and grouping resemble bacteria.
Pseudoblepsis
n.
(Med.) False or depraved sight; imaginary vision of objects.
Pseudobranch
n.
(Anat.) Same as Pseudobranchia.
Pseudobranchia
n.
(Anat.) A rudimentary branchia, or gill.
Pseudocarp
n.
(Bot.) That portion of an anthocarpous fruit which is not derived from the ovary, as the soft part of a strawberry or of a fig.
Pseudocoele
n.
• Same as Pseudocoelia.
Pseudocoelia
n.
(Anat.) The fifth ventricle in the mammalian brain. See Ventricle.
Pseudodox
a.
• Not true in opinion or doctrine; false.
n.
• A false opinion or doctrine.
Pseudofilaria
n.
(Zool.) One of the two elongated vibratile young formed by fission of the embryo during the development of certain Gregarinae.
Pseudograph
n.
• A false writing; a spurious document; a forgery.
Pseudography
n.
• False writing; forgery.
Pseudohalter
n.
(Zool.) One of the rudimentary front wings of certain insects (Stylops). They resemble the halteres, or rudimentary hind wings, of Diptera.
Pseudologist
n.
• One who utters falsehoods; a liar.
Pseudology
n.
• Falsehood of speech.
Pseudomorph
n.
• An irregular or deceptive form.
(Crystallog.) A pseudomorphous crystal, as a crystal consisting of quartz, but having the cubic form of fluor spar, the fluor crystal having been changed to quartz by a process of substitution.
Pseudomorphism
n.
(Crystallog.) The state of having, or the property of taking, a crystalline form unlike that which belongs to the species.
Pseudomorphous
a.
• Not having the true form.
Pseudonavicella
n.
(Zool.) Same as Pseudonavicula.
Pseudonavicula
n.
(Zool.) One of the minute spindle-shaped embryos of Gregarinae and some other Protozoa.
Pseudoneuroptera
n. pl.
(Zool.) division of insects (Zool.) reticulated wings, as in the Neuroptera, but having an active pupa state. It includes the dragon flies, May flies, white ants, etc. By some zoologists they are classed with the Orthoptera; by others, with the Neuroptera.
Pseudoneuropterous
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Pseudoneuroptera.
Pseudonumity
n.
• The using of fictitious names, as by authors.
Pseudonym
n.
• A fictitious name assumed for the time, as by an author; a pen name.
Pseudonymous
a.
• Bearing a false or fictitious name; as, a pseudonymous work.
Pseudopod
n.
(Biol.) Any protoplasmic filament or irregular process projecting from any unicellular organism, or from any animal or plant call.
(Zool.) A rhizopod.
Pseudopodial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a pseudopod, or to pseudopodia. See Illust. of Heliozoa.
Pseudopodium
n.
• Same as Pseudopod.
Pseudopupa
n.
(Zool.) A stage intermediate between the larva and pupa of bees and certain other hymenopterous insects.
Pseudorhabdite
n.
(Zool.) One of the peculiar rodlike corpuscles found in the integument of certain Turbellaria. They are filled with a soft granular substance.
Pseudoscope
n.
(Opt.) An instrument which exhibits objects with their proper relief reversed; — an effect opposite to that produced by the stereoscope.
Pseudoscopic
a.
(Opt.) Of, pertaining to, or formed by, a pseudoscope; having its parts appearing with the relief reversed; as, a pseudoscopic image.
Pseudoscorpiones
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of Arachnoidea having the palpi terminated by large claws, as in the scorpions, but destitute of a caudal sting; the false scorpions. Called also Pseudoscorpii, and Pseudoscorpionina. See Illust. of Book scorpion, under Book.
Pseudosphere
n.
(Geom.) The surface of constant negative curvature generated by the revolution of a tractrix. This surface corresponds in non-Euclidian space to the sphere in ordinary space. An important property of the surface is that any figure drawn upon it can be displaced in any way without tearing it or altering in size any of its elements.
Pseudospore
n.
(Bot.) A peculiar reproductive cell found in some fungi.
Pseudostella
n.
(Astron.) Any starlike meteor or phenomenon.
Pseudostoma
n.
(Anat.) A group of cells resembling a stoma, but without any true aperture among them.
Pseudotetramera
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of beetles having the fifth tarsal joint minute and obscure, so that there appear to be but four joints.
Pseudotinea
n.
(Zool.) The bee moth, or wax moth (Galleria).
Pseudoturbinal
a.
(Anat.) See under Turbinal.
Pseudovary
n.
(Zool.) The organ in which pseudova are produced; — called also pseudovarium.
Pseudovum
n.
(Zool.) An egglike germ produced by the agamic females of some insects and other animals, and by the larvae of certain insects. It is capable of development without fertilization. See Illust. of Paedogenesis.
Pshaw
interj.
• Pish! pooch! — an exclamation used as an expression of contempt, disdain, dislike, etc.
v. i.
• To express disgust or contemptuous disapprobation, as by the exclamation " Pshaw!"
Psilanthropic
a.
• Pertaining to, or embodying, psilanthropy. "A psilanthropic explanation."
Psilanthropism
n.
• Psilanthropy.
Psilanthropist
n.
• One who believes that Christ was a mere man.
Psilanthropy
n.
• The doctrine of the merely human existence of Christ.
Psilology
n.
• Love of empty of empty talk or noise.
Psilomelane
n.
(Min.) A hydrous oxide of manganese, occurring in smooth, botryoidal forms, and massive, and having an iron-black or steel-gray color.
Psilopaedes
n. pl.
(Zool.) birds whose young at first have down on the pterylae only; — called also Gymnopaedes.
Psilopaedic
a.
(Zool.) Having down upon the pterylae only; — said of the young of certain birds.
Psilosopher
n.
• A superficial or narrow pretender to philosophy; a sham philosopher.
Psittaci
n. pl.
(Zool.) The order of birds which comprises the parrots.
Psoas
n.
(Anat.) An internal muscle arising from the lumbar vertebrae and inserted into the femur. In man there are usually two on each side, and the larger one, or great psoas, forms a part of the iliopsoas.
Psora
n.
(Med.) A cutaneous disease; especially, the itch.
Psoriasis
n.
(Med.) The state of being affected with psora.
• A cutaneous disease, characterized by imbricated silvery scales, affecting only the superficial layers of the skin.
Psoric
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to psora.
Psorosperm
n.
(Zool.) A minute parasite, usually the young of Gregarinae, in the pseudonavicula stage.
Psychagogic
a.
• Attractive; persuasive.
Psychagogue
n.
• A necromancer.
Psychal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the soul; psychical.
Psyche
n.
(Class Myth.) A lovely maiden, daughter of a king and mistress of Eros, or Cupid. She is regarded as the personification of the soul.
• The soul; the vital principle; the mind.
• A cheval glass.
Psychian
n.
(Zool.) Any small moth of the genus Psyche and allied genera (family Psychidae). The larvae are called basket worms. See Basket worm, under Basket.
Psychiatric
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to psychiatria.
Psychics
n.
• Psychology.
Psychism
n.
(Philos.) The doctrine of Quesne, that there is a fluid universally diffused, end equally animating all living beings, the difference in their actions being due to the difference of the individual organizations.
Psychogenesis
n.
• Genesis through an internal force, as opposed to natural selection.
Psychography
n.
• A description of the phenomena of mind.
(Spiritualism) Spirit writing.
Psychologist
n.
• One who is versed in, devoted to, psychology.
Psychologue
n.
• A psychologist.
Psychology
n.
• The science of the human soul; specifically, the systematic or scientific knowledge of the powers and functions of the human soul, so far as they are known by consciousness; a treatise on the human soul.
Psychomachy
n.
• A conflict of the soul with the body.
Psychomancy
n.
• Necromancy.
Psychometry
n.
(Physiol.) The art of measuring the duration of mental processes, or of determining the time relations of mental phenomena.
Psychopannychism
n.
(Theol.) The doctrine that the soul falls asleep at death, and does not wake until the resurrection of the body.
Psychopathy
n.
(Med.) Mental disease. See Psychosis, 2.
Psychophysical
a.
• Of or pertaining to psychophysics; involving the action or mutual relations of the psychical and physical in man.
Psychophysics
n.
• The science of the connection between nerve action and consciousness; the science which treats of the relations of the psychical and physical in their conjoint operation in man; the doctrine of the relation of function or dependence between body and soul.
Psychopomp
n.
(Myth.) A leader or guide of souls .
Psychosis
n.
• Any vital action or activity.
(Med.) A disease of the mind; especially, a functional mental disorder, that is, one unattended with evident organic changes.
Psychozoic
a.
(Geol.) Designating, or applied to the Era of man; as, the psychozoic era.
Psychrometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring the tension of the aqueous vapor in the atmosphere, being essentially a wet and dry bulb hygrometer.
Psychrometrical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the psychrometer or psychrometry.
Psychrometry
n.
• Hygrometry.
Psylla
n.
(Zool.) Any leaping plant louse of the genus Psylla, or family Psyllidae.
Ptarmigan
n.
(Zool.) Any grouse of the genus Lagopus, of which numerous species are known. The feet are completely feathered. Most of the species are brown in summer, but turn white, or nearly white, in winter.
Ptenoglossa
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of gastropod mollusks having the teeth of the radula arranged in long transverse rows, somewhat like the barbs of a feather.
Ptenoglossate
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Ptenoglossa.
Pteranodon
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of American Cretaceous pterodactyls destitute of teeth. Several species are known, some of which had an expanse of wings of twenty feet or more.
Pteranodontia
n. pl.
(Paleon.) A group of pterodactyls destitute of teeth, as in the genus Pteranodon.
Pterichthys
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of Devonian fossil fishes with winglike appendages. The head and most of the body were covered with large bony plates. See Placodermi.
Pteridologist
n.
• One who is versed in pteridology.
Pteridology
n.
• That department of botany which treats of ferns.
Pteridomania
n.
• A madness, craze, or strong fancy, for ferns.
Pteridophyta
n. pl.
(Bot.) A class of flowerless plants, embracing ferns, horsetails, club mosses, quillworts, and other like plants. See the Note under Cryptogamia.
Pterobranchia
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of marine Bryozoa, having a bilobed lophophore and an axial cord. The genus Rhabdopleura is the type. Called also Podostomata. See Rhabdopleura.
Pteroceras
n.
(Zool.) A genus of large marine gastropods having the outer border of the lip divided into lobes; — called also scorpion shell.
Pterocletes
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of birds including the sand grouse. They are in some respects intermediate between the pigeons and true grouse. Called also Pteroclomorphae.
Pterodactyl
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct flying reptile; one of the Pterosauria. See Illustration in Appendix.
Pterodactyli
n. pl.
(Paleon.) Same as Pterosauria.
Pteroglossal
a.
(Zool.) Having the tongue finely notched along the sides, so as to have a featherlike appearance, as the toucans.
Pteron
n.
(Anat.) The region of the skull, in the temporal fossa back of the orbit, where the great wing of the sphenoid, the temporal, the parietal, and the frontal hones approach each other.
Pteropappi
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Odontotormae.
Pterophore
n.
(Zool.) Any moth of the genus Pterophorus and allied genera; a plume moth. See Plume moth, under Plume.
Pteropod
n.
(Zool.) One of the Pteropoda.
Pteropoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) A class of Mollusca in which the anterior lobes of the foot are developed in the form of broad, thin, winglike organs, with which they swim at near the surface of the sea.
Pteropodous
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Pteropoda.
Pterosaur
n.
(Paleon.) A pterodactyl.
Pterosauria
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct order of flying reptiles of the Mesozoic age; the pterodactyls; — called also Pterodactyli, and Ornithosauria.
Pterosaurian
a.
(Paleon.) Of or pertaining to the Pterosauria.
Pterostigma
n.
(Zool.) A thickened opaque spot on the wings of certain insects.
Pterotic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to, or designating, a bone between the prootic and epiotic in the dorsal and outer part of the periotic capsule of many fishes.
n.
• The pterotic bone.
Pterygium
n.
(Med.) A superficial growth of vascular tissue radiating in a fanlike manner from the cornea over the surface of the eye.
Pterygoid
a.
(Anat.) Like a bird's wing in form; as, a pterygoid bone
• Of, pertaining to, or in the region of, the pterygoid bones, pterygoid processes, or the whole sphenoid bone.
n.
• A pterygoid bone.
Pterygomaxillary
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the inner pterygoid plate, or pterygoid bone, and the lower jaw.
Pterygopalatine
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the pterygoid processes and the palatine bones.
Pterygopodium
n.
(Anat.) A specially modified part of the ventral fin in male elasmobranchs, which serves as a copulatory organ, or clasper.
Pterygoquadrate
a.
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or representing the pterygoid and quadrate bones or cartilages.
Pteryla
n.
(Zool.) One of the definite areas of the skin of a bird on which feathers grow; — contrasted with apteria.
Pterylography
n.
(Zool.) The study or description of the arrangement of feathers, or of the pterylae, of birds.
Pterylosis
n.
(Zool.) The arrangement of feathers in definite areas.
Ptilocerque
n.
(Zool.) The pentail.
Ptilopaedes
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Dasypaedes.
Ptilopaedic
a.
(Zool.) Having nearly the whole surface of the skin covered with down; dasypaedic; — said of the young of certain birds.
Ptilopteri
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of birds including only the penguins.
Ptilosis
n.
(Zool.) Same as Pterylosis.
Ptisan
n.
• A decoction of barley with other ingredients; a farinaceous drink.
(Med.) An aqueous medicine, containing little, if any, medicinal agent; a tea or tisane.
Ptolemaic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Ptolemy, the geographer and astronomer.
Ptolemaist
n.
• One who accepts the astronomical system of Ptolemy.
Ptomaine
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) One of a class of animal bases or alkaloids formed in the putrefaction of various kinds of albuminous matter, and closely related to the vegetable alkaloids; a cadaveric poison. The ptomaines, as a class, have their origin in dead matter, by which they are to be distinguished from the leucomaines.
Ptosis
n.
(Med.) Drooping of the upper eyelid, produced by paralysis of its levator muscle.
Ptyalin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) An unorganized amylolytic ferment, on enzyme, present in human mixed saliva and in the saliva of some animals.
Ptyalism
n.
• Salivation, or an excessive flow of saliva.
Ptyalogogue
n.
(Med.) A ptysmagogue.
Ptysmagogue
n.
(Med.) A medicine that promotes the discharge of saliva.
Ptyxis
n.
(Bot.) The way in which a leaf is sometimes folded in the bud.
Pubble
a.
• Puffed out, pursy; pudgy; fat.
Puberal
a.
• Of or pertaining to puberty.
Puberty
n.
• The earliest age at which persons are capable of begetting or bearing children, usually considered, in temperate climates, to be about fourteen years in males and twelve in females.
(Bot.) The period when a plant first bears flowers.
Puberulent
a.
(Bot.) Very minutely downy.
Pubes
n.
(Anat.) The hair which appears upon the lower part of the hypogastric region at the age of puberty.
• Hence (as more commonly used), the lower part of the hypogastric region; the pubic region.
(Bot.) The down of plants; a downy or villous substance which grows on plants; pubescence.
Pubescence
n.
• The quality or state of being pubescent, or of having arrived at puberty.
• A covering of soft short hairs, or down, as one some plants and insects; also, the state of being so covered.
Pubescency
n.
• Pubescence.
Pubescent
a.
• Arrived at puberty.
• Covered with pubescence, or fine short hairs, as certain insects, and the leaves of some plants.
Pubic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the pubes; in the region of the pubes; as, the pubic bone; the pubic region, or the lower part of the hypogastric region. See Pubes.
• Of or pertaining to the pubis.
Pubis
n.
(Anat.) The ventral and anterior of the three principal bones composing either half of the pelvis; sharebone; pubic bone.
Public
a.
• Of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; — opposed to private; as, the public treasury.
• Open to the knowledge or view of all; general; common; notorious; as, public report; public scandal.
• Open to common or general use; as, a public road; a public house.
n.
• The general body of mankind, or of a nation, state, or community; the people, indefinitely; as, the American public; also, a particular body or aggregation of people; as, an author's public.
• A public house; an inn.
Publican
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A farmer of the taxes and public revenues; hence, a collector of toll or tribute. The inferior officers of this class were often oppressive in their exactions, and were regarded with great detestation.
• The keeper of an inn or public house; one licensed to retail beer, spirits, or wine.
Publication
n.
• The act of publishing or making known; notification to the people at large, either by words, writing, or printing; proclamation; divulgation; promulgation; as, the publication of the law at Mount Sinai; the publication of the gospel; the publication of statutes or edicts.
• The act of offering a book, pamphlet, engraving, etc., to the public by sale or by gratuitous distribution.
• That which is published or made known; especially, any book, pamphlet, etc., offered for sale or to public notice; as, a daily or monthly publication.
• An act done in public.
Publicist
n.
• A writer on the laws of nature and nations; one who is versed in the science of public right, the principles of government, etc.
Publicity
n.
• The quality or state of being public, or open to the knowledge of a community; notoriety; publicness.
Publicly
adv.
• With exposure to popular view or notice; without concealment; openly; as, property publicly offered for sale; an opinion publicly avowed; a declaration publicly made.
• In the name of the community.
Publicness
n.
• The quality or state of being public, or open to the view or notice of people at large; publicity; notoriety; as, the publicness of a sale.
• The quality or state of belonging to the community; as, the publicness of property.
Publish
v. t.
• To make public; to make known to mankind, or to people in general; to divulge, as a private transaction; to promulgate or proclaim, as a law or an edict.
• To make known by posting, or by reading in a church; as, to publish banns of marriage.
• To send forth, as a book, newspaper, musical piece, or other printed work, either for sale or for general distribution; to print, and issue from the press.
• To utter, or put into circulation; as, to publish counterfeit paper.
Publishable
a.
• Capable of being published; suitable for publication.
Publisher
n.
• One who publishes; as, a publisher of a book or magazine.
Publishment
n.
• The act or process of making publicly known; publication.
• A public notice of intended marriage, required by the laws of some States.
Puccoon
n.
(Bot.) Any one of several plants yielding a red pigment which is used by the North American Indians, as the bloodroot and two species of Lithospermum (L. hirtum, and L. canescens); also, the pigment itself.
Puce
a.
• Of a dark brown or brownish purple color.
Pucel
n.
• See Pucelle.
Pucelage
n.
• Virginity.
Pucelle
n.
• A maid; a virgin.
Puceron
n.
(Zool.) Any plant louse, or aphis.
Pucherite
n.
(Min.) Vanadate of bismuth, occurring in minute reddish brown crystals.
Puck
n.
(Mediaeval Myth.) A celebrated fairy, "the merry wanderer of the night;" — called also Robin Goodfellow, Friar Rush, Pug, etc.
(Zool.) The goatsucker.
Puckball
n.
• A puffball.
Pucker
v. t. & i.
• To gather into small folds or wrinkles; to contract into ridges and furrows; to corrugate; — often with up; as, to pucker up the mouth.
n.
• A fold; a wrinkle; a collection of folds.
• A state of perplexity or anxiety; confusion; bother; agitation.
Puckerer
n.
• One who, or that which, puckers.
Puckery
a.
• Producing, or tending to produce, a pucker; as, a puckery taste.
• Inclined to become puckered or wrinkled; full of puckers or wrinkles.
Puckfist
n.
• A puffball.
Puckish
a.
• Resembling Puck; merry; mischievous.
Pucras
n.
(Zool.) See Koklass.
Pud
n.
• Same as Pood.
n.
• The hand; the first.
Puddening
n.
(Naut.) A quantity of rope-yarn, or the like, placed, as a fender, on the bow of a boat.
• A bunch of soft material to prevent chafing between spars, or the like.
Pudder
v. i.
• To make a tumult or bustle; to splash; to make a pother or fuss; to potter; to meddle.
v. t.
• To perplex; to embarrass; to confuse; to bother; as, to pudder a man.
n.
• A pother; a tumult; a confused noise; turmoil; bustle.
Pudding
n.
• A species of food of a soft or moderately hard consistence, variously made, but often a compound of flour or meal, with milk and eggs, etc.
• Anything resembling, or of the softness and consistency of, pudding.
• An intestine; especially, an intestine stuffed with meat, etc.; a sausage.
• Any food or victuals.
(Naut.) Same as Puddening.
Puddle
n.
• A small quantity of dirty standing water; a muddy plash; a small pool.
• Clay, or a mixture of clay and sand, kneaded or worked, when wet, to render it impervious to water.
v. t.
• To make foul or muddy; to pollute with dirt; to mix dirt with (water).
• To make dense or close, as clay or loam, by working when wet, so as to render impervious to water.
• To make impervious to liquids by means of puddle; to apply puddle to.
• To subject to the process of puddling, as iron, so as to convert it from the condition of cast iron to that of wrought iron.
v. i.
• To make a dirty stir.
Puddler
n.
• One who converts cast iron into wrought iron by the process of puddling.
Puddling
n.
(Hydraul. Engin.) The process of working clay, loam, pulverized ore, etc., with water, to render it compact, or impervious to liquids; also, the process of rendering anything impervious to liquids by means of puddled material.
• Puddle. See Puddle, n., 2.
(Metal.) The art or process of converting cast iron into wrought iron or steel by subjecting it to intense heat and frequent stirring in a reverberatory furnace in the presence of oxidizing substances, by which it is freed from a portion of its carbon and other impurities.
Puddly
a.
• Consisting of, or resembling, puddles; muddy; foul.
Puddock
n.
• A small inclosure.
Pudency
n.
• Modesty; shamefacedness.
Pudenda
n. pl.
(Anat.) The external organs of generation.
Pudendal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the pudenda, or pudendum.
Pudendum
n.
(Anat.) The external organs of generation, especially of the female; the vulva.
Pudgy
a.
• Short and fat or sturdy; dumpy; podgy; as, a short, pudgy little man; a pudgy little hand.
Pudic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the external organs of generation.
Pudical
a.
(Anat.) Pudic.
Pudicity
n.
• Modesty; chastity.
Pudu
n.
(Zool.) A very small deer (Pudua humilis), native of the Chilian Andes. It has simple spikelike antlers, only two or three inches long.
Pue
v. i.
• To make a low whistling sound; to chirp, as birds.
Pueblo
n.
• A communistic building erected by certain Indian tribes of Arizona and New Mexico. It is often of large size and several stories high, and is usually built either of stone or adobe. The term is also applied to any Indian village in the same region.
Puefellow
n.
• A pewfellow.
Puer
n.
• The dung of dogs, used as an alkaline steep in tanning.
Puerco
n.
• A hog.
Puerile
a.
• Boyish; childish; trifling; silly.
Puerilely
adv.
• In a puerile manner; childishly.
Puerileness
n.
• The quality of being puerile; puerility.
Puerility
n.
• The quality of being puerile; childishness; puerileness.
• That which is puerile or childish; especially, an expression which is flat, insipid, or silly.
Puerperal
a.
• Of or pertaining to childbirth; as, a puerperal fever.
Puerperous
a.
• Bearing children.
Puet
n.
(Zool.) The pewit.
Puff
n.
• A sudden and single emission of breath from the mouth; hence, any sudden or short blast of wind; a slight gust; a whiff.
• Anything light and filled with air. Specifically: (a) A puffball. (b) kind of light pastry. (c) A utensil of the toilet for dusting the skin or hair with powder.
• An exaggerated or empty expression of praise, especially one in a public journal.
v. i.
• To blow in puffs, or with short and sudden whiffs.
• To blow, as an expression of scorn; — with at.
• To breathe quick and hard, or with puffs, as after violent exertion.
• To swell with air; to be dilated or inflated.
• To breathe in a swelling, inflated, or pompous manner; hence, to assume importance.
v. t.
• To drive with a puff, or with puffs.
• To repel with words; to blow at contemptuously.
• To cause to swell or dilate; to inflate; to ruffle with puffs; — often with up; as a bladder puffed with air.
• To inflate with pride, flattery, self-esteem, or the like; — often with up.
• To praise with exaggeration; to flatter; to call public attention to by praises; to praise unduly.
a.
• Puffed up; vain.
Puffball
n.
(Bot.) A kind of ball-shaped fungus (Lycoperdon giganteum, and other species of the same genus) full of dustlike spores when ripe; — called also bullfist, bullfice, puckfist, puff, and puffin.
Puffer
n.
• One who puffs; one who praises with noisy or extravagant commendation.
• One who is employed by the owner or seller of goods sold at suction to bid up the price; a by-bidder.
(Zool.) Any plectognath fish which inflates its body, as the species of Tetrodon and Diodon; — called also blower, puff-fish, swellfish, and globefish.
• The common, or harbor, porpoise.
(Dyeing) A kier.
Puffery
n.
• The act of puffing; bestowment of extravagant commendation.
Puffin
n.
(Zool.) An arctic sea bird Fratercula arctica) allied to the auks, and having a short, thick, swollen beak, whence the name; — called also bottle nose, cockandy, coulterneb, marrot, mormon, pope, and sea parrot.
(Bot.) The puffball.
• A sort of apple.
Puffiness
n.
• The quality or state of being puffy.
Puffing
• a. & n. from Puff, v. i. & t.
Puffingly
adv.
• In a puffing manner; with vehement breathing or shortness of breath; with exaggerated praise.
Puffy
a.
• Swelled with air, or any soft matter; tumid with a soft substance; bloated; fleshy; as, a puffy tumor.
• Hence, inflated; bombastic; as, a puffy style.
Pug
v. t.
• To mix and stir when wet, as clay for bricks, pottery, etc.
• To fill or stop with clay by tamping; to fill in or spread with mortar, as a floor or partition, for the purpose of deadening sound. See Pugging, 2.
n.
• Tempered clay; clay moistened and worked so as to be plastic.
• A pug mill.
n.
• An elf, or a hobgoblin; also same as Puck.
• A name for a monkey.
• A name for a fox.
• An intimate; a crony; a dear one.
• Chaff; the refuse of grain.
• A prostitute.
(Zool.) One of a small breed of pet dogs having a short nose and head; a pug dog.
(Zool.) Any geometrid moth of the genus Eupithecia.
Pugger
v. t.
• To pucker.
Puggered
a.
• Puckered.
Pugging
n.
• The act or process of working and tempering clay to make it plastic and of uniform consistency, as for bricks, for pottery, etc.
(Arch.) Mortar or the like, laid between the joists under the boards of a floor, or within a partition, to deaden sound; — in the United States usually called deafening.
a.
• Thieving.
Pugh
interj.
• Pshaw! pish! — a word used in contempt or disdain.
Pugil
n.
• As much as is taken up between the thumb and two first fingers.
Pugilism
n.
• The practice of boxing, or fighting with the fist.
Pugilist
n.
• One who fights with his fists; esp., a professional prize fighter; a boxer.
Pugilistic
a.
• Of or pertaining to pugillism.
Pugnacious
a.
• Disposed to fight; inclined to fighting; quarrelsome; fighting.
Pugnacity
n.
• Inclination or readiness to fight; quarrelsomeness.
Puh
interj.
• The same as Pugh.
Puisne
a.
• Later in age, time, etc.; subsequent.
• Puny; petty; unskilled.
(Law) Younger or inferior in rank; junior; associate; as, a chief justice and three puisne justices of the Court of Common Pleas; the puisne barons of the Court of Exchequer.
n.
• One who is younger, or of inferior rank; a junior; esp., a judge of inferior rank.
Puisny
a.
• Puisne; younger; inferior; petty; unskilled.
Puissance
n.
• Power; strength; might; force; potency.
Puissant
a.
• Powerful; strong; mighty; forcible; as, a puissant prince or empire.
Puissantly
adv.
• In a puissant manner; powerfully; with great strength.
Puissantness
n.
• The state or quality of being puissant; puissance; power.
Puit
n.
• A well; a small stream; a fountain; a spring.
Puke
v. i.
• To eject the contests of the stomach; to vomit; to spew.
v. t.
• To eject from the stomach; to vomit up.
n.
• A medicine that causes vomiting; an emetic; a vomit.
a.
• Of a color supposed to be between black and russet.
Puker
n.
• One who pukes, vomits.
• That which causes vomiting.
Pulas
n.
(Bot.) The East Indian leguminous tree Butea frondosa. See Gum Butea, under Gum.
Pulchritude
n.
• That quality of appearance which pleases the eye; beauty; comeliness; grace; loveliness.
• Attractive moral excellence; moral beauty.
Pule
v. i.
• To cry like a chicken.
• To whimper; to whine, as a complaining child.
Puler
n.
• One who pules; one who whines or complains; a weak person.
Pulex
n.
(Zool.) A genus of parasitic insects including the fleas. See Flea.
Pulicene
a.
• Pertaining to, or abounding in, fleas; pulicose.
Puling
n.
• A cry, as of a chicken,; a whining or whimpering.
a.
• Whimpering; whining; childish.
Pulingly
adv.
• With whining or complaint.
Pulkha
n.
• A Laplander's traveling sledge. See Sledge.
Pull
v. t.
• To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly.
• To draw apart; to tear; to rend.
• To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward one; to pluck; as, to pull fruit; to pull flax; to pull a finch.
• To move or operate by the motion of drawing towards one; as, to pull a bell; to pull an oar.
(Horse Racing) To hold back, and so prevent from winning; as, the favorite was pulled.
(Print.) To take or make, as a proof or impression; — hand presses being worked by pulling a lever.
(Cricket) To strike the ball in a particular manner. See Pull, n., 8.
v. i.
• To exert one's self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope.
n.
• The act of pulling or drawing with force; an effort to move something by drawing toward one.
• A contest; a struggle; as, a wrestling pull.
• A pluck; loss or violence suffered.
• A knob, handle, or lever, etc., by which anything is pulled; as, a drawer pull; a bell pull.
• The act of rowing; as, a pull on the river.
• The act of drinking; as, to take a pull at the beer, or the mug.
• Something in one's favor in a comparison or a contest; an advantage; means of influencing; as, in weights the favorite had the pull.
(Cricket) A kind of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the side.
Pullail
n.
• Poultry.
Pullback
n.
• That which holds back, or causes to recede; a drawback; a hindrance.
(Arch) The iron hook fixed to a casement to pull it shut, or to hold it party open at a fixed point.
Pulled
a.
• Plucked; pilled; moulting.
Pullen
n.
• Poultry.
Puller
n.
• One who, or that which, pulls.
Pullet
n.
• A young hen, or female of the domestic fowl.
Pulley
n.
(Mach.) A wheel with a broad rim, or grooved rim, for transmitting power from, or imparting power to, the different parts of machinery, or for changing the direction of motion, by means of a belt, cord, rope, or chain.
b. t.
• To raise or lift by means of a pulley.
Pullicate
n.
• A kind of checked cotton or silk handkerchief.
Pullulate
v. i.
• To germinate; to bud; to multiply abundantly.
Pullulation
n.
• A germinating, or budding.
Pullus
n.
(Zool.) A chick; a young bird in the downy stage.
Pulmocutaneous
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the lungs and the akin; as, the pulmocutaneous arteries of the frog.
Pulmogasteropoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Pulmonata.
Pulmograde
a.
(Zool.) Swimming by the expansion and contraction, or lunglike movement, of the body, or of the disk, as do the medusae.
Pulmometer
n.
(Physiol.) A spirometer.
Pulmonarian
n.
(Zool.) Any arachnid that breathes by lunglike organs, as the spiders and scorpions. Also used adjectively.
Pulmonary
a.
• Of or pertaining to the lungs; affecting the lungs; pulmonic.
n.
(Bot.) Lungwort.
Pulmonata
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive division, or sub-class, of hermaphrodite gastropods, in which the mantle cavity is modified into an air-breathing organ, as in Helix, or land snails, Limax, or garden slugs, and many pond snails, as Limnaea and Planorbis.
Pulmonate
a.
(Zool.) Having breathing organs that act as lungs.
• Pertaining to the Pulmonata.
n.
• One of the Pulmonata.
Pulmonated
a.
• same as Pulmonate (a).
Pulmonibranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Pulmonata.
Pulmonibranchiate
a. & n.
(Zool.) Same as Pulmonate.
Pulmonic
a.
• Relating to, or affecting the lungs; pulmonary.
n.
• A pulmonic medicine.
Pulmonifera
n. pl.
(Zool.) Same as Pulmonata.
Pulmoniferous
a.
(Zool.) Having lungs; pulmonate.
Pulp
n.
• A moist, slightly cohering mass, consisting of soft, undissolved animal or vegetable matter.
(Anat.) A tissue or part resembling pulp; especially, the soft, highly vascular and sensitive tissue which fills the central cavity, called the pulp cavity, of teeth.
(Bot.) The soft, succulent part of fruit; as, the pulp of a grape
• The exterior part of a coffee berry
• The material of which paper is made when ground up and suspended in water.
v. t.
• To reduce to pulp.
• To deprive of the pulp, or integument.
Pulpatoon
n.
• A kind of delicate confectionery or cake, perhaps made from the pulp of fruit.
Pulpiness
n.
• the quality or state of being pulpy.
Pulpit
n.
• An elevated place, or inclosed stage, in a church, in which the clergyman stands while preaching.
• The whole body of the clergy; preachers as a class; also, preaching.
• A desk, or platform, for an orator or public speaker.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the pulpit, or preaching; as, a pulpit orator; pulpit eloquence.
Pulpited
a.
• Placed in a pulpit.
Pulpiteer
n.
• One who speaks in a pulpit; a preacher; — so called in contempt.
Pulpiter
n.
• A preacher.
Pulpitical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the pulpit; suited to the pulpit.
Pulpitish
a.
• Of or pertaining to the pulpit; like preaching.
Pulpitry
n.
• The teaching of the pulpit; preaching.
Pulpous
a.
• Containing pulp; pulpy.
Pulpy
n.
• Like pulp; consisting of pulp; soft; fleshy; succulent; as, the pulpy covering of a nut; the pulpy substance of a peach or a cherry.
Pulque
n.
• An intoxicating Mexican drink. See Agave.
Pulsate
v. i.
• To throb, as a pulse; to beat, as the heart.
Pulsatile
a.
• Capable of being struck or beaten; played by beating or by percussion; as, a tambourine is a pulsatile musical instrument.
• Pulsating; throbbing, as a tumor.
Pulsatilla
n.
(Bot.) A genus of ranunculaceous herbs including the pasque flower. This genus is now merged in Anemone. Some species, as Anemone Pulsatilla, Anemone pratensis, and Anemone patens, are used medicinally.
Pulsation
n.
(Physiol.) A beating or throbbing, especially of the heart or of an artery, or in an inflamed part; a beat of the pulse.
• A single beat or throb of a series.
• A stroke or impulse by which some medium is affected, as in the propagation of sounds.
(Law) Any touching of another's body willfully or in anger. This constitutes battery.
Pulsative
a.
• Beating; throbbing.
Pulsator
n.
• A beater; a striker.
(Mech.) That which beats or throbs in working.
Pulsatory
a.
• Capable of pulsating; throbbing.
Pulse
n.
• Leguminous plants, or their seeds, as beans, pease, etc.
n.
(Physiol.) The beating or throbbing of the heart or blood vessels, especially of the arteries.
• Any measured or regular beat; any short, quick motion, regularly repeated, as of a medium in the transmission of light, sound, etc.; oscillation; vibration; pulsation; impulse; beat; movement.
v. i.
• To beat, as the arteries; to move in pulses or beats; to pulsate; to throb.
v. t.
• To drive by a pulsation; to cause to pulsate.
Pulseless
a.
• Having no pulsation; lifeless.
Pulselessness
n.
• The state of being pulseless.
Pulsific
a.
• Exciting the pulse; causing pulsation.
Pulsimeter
n.
(Physiol.) A sphygmograph.
Pulsion
n.
• The act of driving forward; propulsion; — opposed to suction or traction.
Pulsive
a.
• Tending to compel; compulsory.
Pulsometer
n.
• A device, with valves, for raising water by steam, partly by atmospheric pressure, and partly by the direct action of the steam on the water, without the intervention of a piston; — also called vacuum pump.
• A pulsimeter.
Pult
v. t.
• To put.
Pultaceous
a.
• Macerated; softened; nearly fluid.
Pulu
n.
• A vegetable substance consisting of soft, elastic, yellowish brown chaff, gathered in the Hawaiian Islands from the young fronds of free ferns of the genus Cibotium, chiefly C. Menziesii; — used for stuffing mattresses, cushions, etc., and as an absorbent.
Pulveraceous
a.
(Bot.) Having a finely powdered surface; pulverulent.
Pulverate
v. t.
• To beat or reduce to powder or dust; to pulverize.
Pulverine
n.
• Ashes of barilla.
Pulverizable
a.
• Admitting of being pulverized; pulverable.
Pulverization
n.
• The action of reducing to dust or powder.
Pulverize
v. t.
• To reduce of fine powder or dust, as by beating, grinding, or the like; as, friable substances may be pulverized by grinding or beating, but to pulverize malleable bodies other methods must be pursued.
v. i.
• To become reduced to powder; to fall to dust; as, the stone pulverizes easily.
Pulverizer
n.
• One who, or that which, pulverizes.
Pulverous
a.
• Consisting of dust or powder; like powder.
Pulverulence
n.
• The state of being pulverulent; abundance of dust or powder; dustiness.
Pulverulent
a.
• Consisting of, or reducible to, fine powder; covered with dust or powder; powdery; dusty.
Pulvil
n.
• A sweet-scented powder; pulvillio.
v. t.
• To apply pulvil to.
Pulvillus
n.
(Zool.) One of the minute cushions on the feet of certain insects.
Pulvinar
n.
(Anat.) A prominence on the posterior part of the thalamus of the human brain.
Pulvinic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained by the decomposition of vulpinic acid, as a white crystalline substance.
Pulvinulus
n.
(Zool.) Same as Pulvillus.
Puma
n.
(Zool.) A large American carnivore (Felis concolor), found from Canada to Patagonia, especially among the mountains. Its color is tawny, or brownish yellow, without spots or stripes. Called also catamount, cougar, American lion, mountain lion, and panther or painter.
Pume
n.
(Zool.) A stint.
Pumicate
v. t.
• To make smooth with pumice.
Pumice
n.
(Min.) A very light porous volcanic scoria, usually of a gray color, the pores of which are capillary and parallel, giving it a fibrous structure. It is supposed to be produced by the disengagement of watery vapor without liquid or plastic lava. It is much used, esp. in the form of powder, for smoothing and polishing. Called also pumice stone.
Pumiced
a.
(Far.) Affected with a kind of chronic laminitis in which there is a growth of soft spongy horn between the coffin bone and the hoof wall. The disease is called pumiced foot, or pumice foot.
Pumiceous
a.
• Of or pertaining to pumice; resembling pumice.
Pumiciform
a.
• Resembling, or having the structure of, pumice.
Pummace
n.
• Same as Pomace.
Pummel
n. & v. t.
• Same as Pommel.
Pump
n.
• A low shoe with a thin sole.
n.
• An hydraulic machine, variously constructed, for raising or transferring fluids, consisting essentially of a moving piece or piston working in a hollow cylinder or other cavity, with valves properly placed for admitting or retaining the fluid as it is drawn or driven through them by the action of the piston.
v. t.
• To raise with a pump, as water or other liquid.
• To draw water, or the like, from; to from water by means of a pump; as, they pumped the well dry; to pump a ship.
• Figuratively, to draw out or obtain, as secrets or money, by persistent questioning or plying; to question or ply persistently in order to elicit something, as information, money, etc.
v. i.
• To work, or raise water, a pump.
Pumpage
n.
• That which is raised by pumps, or the work done by pumps.
Pumper
n.
• One who pumps; the instrument or machine used in pumping.
Pumpernickel
n.
• A sort of bread, made of unbolted rye, which forms the chief food of the Westphalian peasants. It is acid but nourishing.
Pumpet
n.
• A pompet.
Pumping
• a. & n. from pump.
Pumpion
n.
(Bot.) See Pumpkin.
Pumpkin
n.
(Bot.) A well-known trailing plant (Cucurbita pepo) and its fruit, — used for cooking and for feeding stock; a pompion.
Pumy
a.
• Large and rounded.
Pun
v. t.
• To pound.
n.
• A play on words which have the same sound but different meanings; an expression in which two different applications of a word present an odd or ludicrous idea; a kind of quibble or equivocation.
v. i.
• To make puns, or a pun; to use a word in a double sense, especially when the contrast of ideas is ludicrous; to play upon words; to quibble.
v. t.
• To persuade or affect by a pun.
Punch
n.
• A beverage composed of wine or distilled liquor, water (or milk), sugar, and the juice of lemon, with spice or mint; — specifically named from the kind of spirit used; as rum punch, claret punch, champagne punch, etc.
n.
• The buffoon or harlequin of a puppet show.
n.
• A short, fat fellow; anything short and thick.
• One of a breed of large, heavy draught horses; as, the Suffolk punch.
v. t.
• To thrust against; to poke; as, to punch one with the end of a stick or the elbow.
n.
• A thrust or blow.
n.
• A tool, usually of steel, variously shaped at one end for different uses, and either solid, for stamping or for perforating holes in metallic plates and other substances, or hollow and sharpedged, for cutting out blanks, as for buttons, steel pens, jewelry, and the like; a die.
(Pile Driving) An extension piece applied to the top of a pile; a dolly.
• A prop, as for the roof of a mine.
v. t.
• To perforate or stamp with an instrument by pressure, or a blow; as, to punch a hole; to punch ticket.
Puncheon
n.
• A figured stamp, die, or punch, used by goldsmiths, cutlers, etc.
(Carp.) A short, upright piece of timber in framing; a short post; an intermediate stud.
• A split log or heavy slab with the face smoothed; as, a floor made of puncheons.
• A cask containing, sometimes 84, sometimes 120, gallons.
Puncher
n.
• One who, or that which, punches.
Punchin
n.
• See Puncheon.
Punchinello
n.
• A punch; a buffoon; originally, in a puppet show, a character represented as fat, short, and humpbacked.
Punchy
a.
• Short and thick, or fat.
Punctator
n.
• One who marks with points. specifically, one who writes Hebrew with points; — applied to a Masorite.
Puncticular
a.
• Comprised in, or like, a point; exact.
Punctiform
a.
• Having the form of a point.
Punctilio
n.
• A nice point of exactness in conduct, ceremony, or proceeding; particularity or exactness in forms; as, the punctilios of a public ceremony.
Punctillous
a.
• Attentive to punctilio; very nice or exact in the forms of behavior, etiquette, or mutual intercourse; precise; exact in the smallest particulars.
Punction
n.
• A puncturing, or pricking; a puncture.
Punctist
n.
• A punctator.
Puncto
n.
• A nice point of form or ceremony.
• A term applied to the point in fencing.
Punctual
a.
• Consisting in a point; limited to a point; unextended.
• Observant of nice points; punctilious; precise.
• Appearing or done at, or adhering exactly to, a regular or an appointed time; precise; prompt; as, a punctual man; a punctual payment.
Punctualist
n.
• One who is very exact in observing forms and ceremonies.
Punctuality
n.
• The quality or state of being punctual; especially, adherence to the exact time of an engagement; exactness.
Punctually
adv.
• In a punctual manner; promptly; exactly.
Punctualness
n.
• Punctuality; exactness.
Punctuate
v. t.
• To mark with points; to separate into sentences, clauses, etc., by points or stops which mark the proper pauses in expressing the meaning.
Punctuation
n.
(Gram.) The act or art of punctuating or pointing a writing or discourse; the art or mode of dividing literary composition into sentences, and members of a sentence, by means of points, so as to elucidate the author's meaning.
Punctuative
a.
• Of or belonging to points of division; relating to punctuation.
Punctuator
n.
• One who punctuates, as in writing; specifically, a punctator.
Punctuist
n.
• A punctator.
Punctum
n.
• A point.
Puncturation
n.
• The act or process of puncturing. See Acupuncture.
Puncture
n.
• The act of puncturing; perforating with something pointed.
• A small hole made by a point; a slight wound, bite, or sting; as, the puncture of a nail, needle, or pin.
v. t.
• To pierce with a small, pointed instrument, or the like; to prick; to make a puncture in; as, to puncture the skin.
Punctured
a.
• Having the surface covered with minute indentations or dots.
(Med.) Produced by puncture; having the characteristics of a puncture; as, a punctured wound.
Pundit
n.
• A learned man; a teacher; esp., a Brahman versed in the Sanskrit language, and in the science, laws, and religion of the Hindoos; in Cashmere, any clerk or native official.
Pundle
n.
• A short and fat woman; a squab.
Punese
n.
(Zool.) A bedbug.
Pung
n.
• A kind of plain sleigh drawn by one horse; originally, a rude oblong box on runners.
Pungence
n.
• Pungency.
Pungency
n.
• The quality or state of being pungent or piercing; keenness; sharpness; piquancy; as, the pungency of ammonia.
Pungent
a.
• Causing a sharp sensation, as of the taste, smell, or feelings; pricking; biting; acrid; as, a pungent spice.
• Sharply painful; penetrating; poignant; severe; caustic; stinging.
(Bot.) Prickly-pointed; hard and sharp.
Pungently
adv.
• In a pungent manner; sharply.
Pungled
a.
• Shriveled or shrunken; — said especially of grain which has lost its juices from the ravages of insects, such as the wheat midge, or Trips (Thrips cerealium).
Pungy
n.
• A small sloop or shallop, or a large boat with sails.
Punic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the ancient Carthaginians.
• Characteristic of the ancient Carthaginians; faithless; treacherous; as, Punic faith.
Punice
n.
(Zool.) See Punese.
v. t.
• To punish.
Puniness
n.
• The quality or state of being puny; littleness; pettiness; feebleness.
Punish
v. t.
• To impose a penalty upon; to afflict with pain, loss, or suffering for a crime or fault, either with or without a view to the offender's amendment; to cause to suffer in retribution; to chasten; as, to punish traitors with death; a father punishes his child for willful disobedience.
• To inflict a penalty for (an offense) upon the offender; to repay, as a fault, crime, etc., with pain or loss; as, to punish murder or treason with death.
• To injure, as by beating; to pommel.
Punishable
a.
• Deserving of, or liable to, punishment; capable of being punished by law or right; — said of person or offenses.
Punisher
n.
• One who inflicts punishment.
Punishment
n.
• The act of punishing.
• Any pain, suffering, or loss inflicted on a person because of a crime or offense.
(Law) A penalty inflicted by a court of justice on a convicted offender as a just retribution, and incidentally for the purposes of reformation and prevention.
Punition
n.
• Punishment.
Punitive
a.
• Of or pertaining to punishment; involving, awarding, or inflicting punishment; as, punitive law or justice.
Punitory
a.
• Punishing; tending to punishment; punitive.
Punk
n.
• Wood so decayed as to be dry, crumbly, and useful for tinder; touchwood.
• A fungus (Polyporus fomentarius, etc.) sometimes dried for tinder; agaric.
• An artificial tinder. See Amadou, and Spunk.
• A prostitute; a strumpet.
Punka
n.
• A machine for fanning a room, usually a movable fanlike frame covered with canvas, and suspended from the ceiling. It is kept in motion by pulling a cord.
Punkin
n.
• A pumpkin.
Punkling
n.
• A young strumpet.
Punner
n.
• A punster.
Punnet
n.
• A broad, shallow basket, for displaying fruit or flowers.
Punnology
n.
• The art or practice of punning; paronomasia.
Punster
n.
• One who puns, or is skilled in, or given to, punning; a quibbler; a low wit.
Punt
v. i.
• To play at basset, baccara, faro. or omber; to gamble.
n.
• Act of playing at basset, baccara, faro, etc.
n.
(Naut.) A flat-bottomed boat with square ends. It is adapted for use in shallow waters.
v. t.
• To propel, as a boat in shallow water, by pushing with a pole against the bottom; to push or propel (anything) with exertion.
(Football) To kick (the ball) before it touches the ground, when let fall from the hands.
n.
(Football) The act of punting the ball.
Punter
n.
• One who punts; specifically, one who plays against the banker or dealer, as in baccara and faro.
n.
• One who punts a football; also, one who propels a punt.
Punto
n.
(Fencing) A point or hit.
Punty
n.
(Glass Making) See Pontee.
Puny
a.
• Imperfectly developed in size or vigor; small and feeble; inferior; petty.
n.
• A youth; a novice.
Puoy
n.
• Same as Poy, n., 3.
Pup
n.
(Zool.) A young dog; a puppy.
• a young seal.
v. i.
• To bring forth whelps or young, as the female of the canine species.
Pupa
n.
(Zool.) Any insect in that stage of its metamorphosis which usually immediately precedes the adult, or imago, stage.
(Zool.) A genus of air-breathing land snails having an elongated spiral shell.
Pupal
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to a pupa, or the condition of a pupa.
Pupate
v. i.
(Zool.) To become a pupa.
Pupation
n.
(Zool.) the act of becoming a pupa.
Pupe
n.
(Zool.) A pupa.
Pupelo
n.
• Cider brandy.
Pupigerous
a.
(Zool.) Bearing or containing a pupa; — said of dipterous larvae which do not molt when the pupa is formed within them.
Pupil
n.
(Anat.) The aperture in the iris; the sight, apple, or black of the eye. See the Note under Eye, and Iris.
n.
• A youth or scholar of either sex under the care of an instructor or tutor.
• A person under a guardian; a ward.
(Civil Law) A boy or a girl under the age of puberty, that is, under fourteen if a male, and under twelve if a female.
Pupilage
n.
• The state of being a pupil.
Pupillarity
n.
(Scots Law) The period before puberty, or from birth to fourteen in males, and twelve in females.
Pupillary
a.
• Of or pertaining to a pupil or ward.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the pupil of the eye.
Pupillometer
n.
(Physiol.) An instrument for measuring the size of the pupil of the pupil of the eye.
Pupipara
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Diptera in which the young are born in a stage like the pupa. It includes the sheep tick, horse tick, and other parasites. Called also Homaloptera.
Pupiparous
a.
(Zool.) Bearing, or containing, a pupa; — said of the matured larvae, or larval skins, of certain Diptera.
• Of or pertaining to the Pupipara.
Pupivora
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of parasitic Hymenoptera, including the ichneumon flies, which destroy the larvae and pupae of insects.
Pupivorous
a.
(Zool.) Feeding on the pupae of insects.
Puplican
n.
• Publican.
Puppet
n.
• A small image in the human form; a doll.
• A similar figure moved by the hand or by a wire in a mock drama; a marionette; a wooden actor in a play.
• One controlled in his action by the will of another; a tool; — so used in contempt.
(Mach.) The upright support for the bearing of the spindle in a lathe.
Puppetish
a.
• Resembling a puppet in appearance or action; of the nature of a puppet.
Puppetman
n.
• A master of a puppet show.
Puppetry
n.
• Action or appearance resembling that of a puppet, or puppet show; hence, mere form or show; affectation.
Puppy
n.
(Zool.) The young of a canine animal, esp. of the common dog; a whelp.
• A name of contemptuous reproach for a conceited and impertinent person.
v. i.
• To bring forth whelps; to pup.
Puppyhood
n.
• The time or state of being a puppy; the time of being young and undisciplined.
Puppyish
a.
• Like a puppy.
Puppyism
n.
• Extreme meanness, affectation, conceit, or impudence.
Pur
v. i.
• To utter a low, murmuring, continued sound, as a cat does when pleased.
v. t.
• To signify or express by purring.
n.
• The low, murmuring sound made by a cat to express contentment or pleasure.
Purana
n.
• One of a class of sacred Hindoo poetical works in the Sanskrit language which treat of the creation, destruction, and renovation of worlds, the genealogy and achievements of gods and heroes, the reigns of the Manus, and the transactions of their descendants. The principal Puranas are eighteen in number, and there are the same number of supplementary books called Upa Puranas.
Puranic
a.
• Pertaining to the Puranas.
Purblind
a.
• Wholly blind.
• Nearsighted, or dim-sighted; seeing obscurely; as, a purblind eye; a purblind mole.
Purcelane
n.
(Bot.) Purslane.
Purchasable
a.
• Capable of being bought, purchased, or obtained for a consideration; hence, venal; corrupt.
Purchase
v. t.
• To pursue and obtain; to acquire by seeking; to gain, obtain, or acquire.
• To obtain by paying money or its equivalent; to buy for a price; as, to purchase land, or a house.
• To obtain by any outlay, as of labor, danger, or sacrifice, etc.; as, to purchase favor with flattery.
• To expiate by a fine or forfeit.
(Law) To acquire by any means except descent or inheritance.
• To buy for a price.
• To apply to (anything) a device for obtaining a mechanical advantage; to get a purchase upon, or apply a purchase to; as, to purchase a cannon.
v. i.
• To put forth effort to obtain anything; to strive; to exert one's self.
• To acquire wealth or property.
n.
• The act of seeking, getting, or obtaining anything.
• The act of seeking and acquiring property.
• The acquisition of title to, or properly in, anything for a price; buying for money or its equivalent.
• That which is obtained, got, or acquired, in any manner, honestly or dishonestly; property; possession; acquisition.
• That which is obtained for a price in money or its equivalent.
• Any mechanical hold, or advantage, applied to the raising or removing of heavy bodies, as by a lever, a tackle, capstan, and the like; also, the apparatus, tackle, or device by which the advantage is gained.
(Law) Acquisition of lands or tenements by other means than descent or inheritance, namely, by one's own act or agreement.
Purchaser
n.
• One who purchases; one who acquires property for a consideration, generally of money; a buyer; a vendee.
(Law) One who acquires an estate in lands by his own act or agreement, or who takes or obtains an estate by any means other than by descent or inheritance.
Purdah
n.
• A curtain or screen; also, a cotton fabric in blue and white stripes, used for curtains.
Pure
a.
• Separate from all heterogeneous or extraneous matter; free from mixture or combination; clean; mere; simple; unmixed; as, pure water; pure clay; pure air; pure compassion.
• Free from moral defilement or quilt; hence, innocent; guileless; chaste; — applied to persons.
• Free from that which harms, vitiates, weakens, or pollutes; genuine; real; perfect; — applied to things and actions.
(Script.) Ritually clean; fitted for holy services.
(Phonetics) Of a single, simple sound or tone; — said of some vowels and the unaspirated consonants.
Pured
a.
• Purified; refined.
Puree
n.
• A dish made by boiling any article of food to a pulp and rubbing it through a sieve; as, a puree of fish, or of potatoes; especially, a soup the thickening of which is so treated.
Purely
adv.
• In a pure manner (in any sense of the adjective).
• Nicely; prettily.
Pureness
n.
• The state of being pure (in any sense of the adjective).
Purfile
n.
• A sort of ancient trimming of tinsel and thread for women's gowns; — called also bobbinwork.
Purfle
v. t.
• To decorate with a wrought or flowered border; to embroider; to ornament with metallic threads; as, to purfle with blue and white.
(Her.) To ornament with a bordure of emines, furs, and the like; also, with gold studs or mountings.
Purfled
a.
• Ornamented; decorated; esp., embroidered on the edges.
Purfling
n.
• Ornamentation on the border of a thing; specifically, the inlaid border of a musical instrument, as a violin.
Purgament
n.
• That which is excreted; excretion.
(Med.) A cathartic; a purgative.
Purgation
n.
• The act of purging; the act of clearing, cleansing, or putifying, by separating and carrying off impurities, or whatever is superfluous; the evacuation of the bowels.
(Law) The clearing of one's self from a crime of which one was publicly suspected and accused. It was either canonical, which was prescribed by the canon law, the form whereof used in the spiritual court was, that the person suspected take his oath that he was clear of the matter objected against him, and bring his honest neighbors with him to make oath that they believes he swore truly; or vulgar, which was by fire or water ordeal, or by combat. See Ordeal.
Purgative
a
• Having the power or quality of purging; cathartic.
n.
(Med.) A purging medicine; a cathartic.
Purgatively
adv.
• In a purgative manner.
Purgatorian
n.
• One who holds to the doctrine of purgatory.
Purgatory
a.
• Tending to cleanse; cleansing; expiatory.
n.
• A state or place of purification after death; according to the Roman Catholic creed, a place, or a state believed to exist after death, in which the souls of persons are purified by expiating such offenses committed in this life as do not merit eternal damnation, or in which they fully satisfy the justice of God for sins that have been forgiven. After this purgation from the impurities of sin, the souls are believed to be received into heaven.
Purge
v. t.
• To cleanse, clear, or purify by separating and carrying off whatever is impure, heterogeneous, foreign, or superfluous.
(Med.) To operate on as, or by means of, a cathartic medicine, or in a similar manner.
• To clarify; to defecate, as liquors.
• To clear of sediment, as a boiler, or of air, as a steam pipe, by driving off or permitting escape.
• To clear from guilt, or from moral or ceremonial defilement; as, to purge one of guilt or crime.
(Law) To clear from accusation, or the charge of a crime or misdemeanor, as by oath or in ordeal.
• To remove in cleansing; to deterge; to wash away; — often followed by away.
v. i.
• To become pure, as by clarification.
• To have or produce frequent evacuations from the intestines, as by means of a cathartic.
n.
• The act of purging.
• That which purges; especially, a medicine that evacuates the intestines; a cathartic.
Purger
n.
• One who, or that which, purges or cleanses; especially, a cathartic medicine.
Purgery
n.
• The part of a sugarhouse where the molasses is drained off from the sugar.
Purging
a.
• That purges; cleansing.
n.
(Med.) The act of cleansing; excessive evacuations; especially, diarrhea.
Puri
n.
(Chem.) See Euxanthin.
Purification
n.
• The act of purifying; the act or operation of separating and removing from anything that which is impure or noxious, or heterogeneous or foreign to it; as, the purification of liquors, or of metals.
• The act or operation of cleansing ceremonially, by removing any pollution or defilement.
• A cleansing from guilt or the pollution of sin; the extinction of sinful desires, appetites, and inclinations.
Purificative
a.
• Having power to purify; tending to cleanse.
Purificator
n.
• One who, or that which, purifies; a purifier.
Purifier
n.
• One who, or that which, purifies or cleanses; a cleanser; a refiner.
Puriform
a.
(Med.) In the form of pus.
Purify
v. t.
• To make pure or clear from material defilement, admixture, or imperfection; to free from extraneous or noxious matter; as, to purify liquors or metals; to purify the blood; to purify the air.
• Hence, in figurative uses: (a) To free from guilt or moral defilement; as, to purify the heart.
• To free from ceremonial or legal defilement
• To free from improprieties or barbarisms; as, to purify a language
v. i.
• To grow or become pure or clear.
Purim
n.
• A Jewish festival, called also the Feast of Lots, instituted to commemorate the deliverance of the Jews from the machinations of Haman.
Purism
n.
• Rigid purity; the quality of being affectedly pure or nice, especially in the choice of language; over-solicitude as to purity.
Purist
n.
• One who aims at excessive purity or nicety, esp. in the choice of language.
• One who maintains that the New Testament was written in pure Greek.
Puritan
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) One who, in the time of Queen Elizabeth and the first two Stuarts, opposed traditional and formal usages, and advocated simpler forms of faith and worship than those established by law; — originally, a term of reproach. The Puritans formed the bulk of the early population of New England.
• One who is scrupulous and strict in his religious life; — often used reproachfully or in contempt; one who has overstrict notions.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Puritans; resembling, or characteristic of, the Puritans.
Puritanically
adv.
• In a puritanical manner.
Puritanism
n.
• The doctrines, notions, or practice of Puritans.
Puritanize
v. i.
• To agree with, or teach, the doctrines of Puritans; to conform to the practice of Puritans.
Purity
n.
• The condition of being pure.
• freedom from foreign admixture or deleterious matter; as, the purity of water, of wine, of drugs, of metals.
• Cleanness; freedom from foulness or dirt.
• Freedom from guilt or the defilement of sin; innocence; chastity; as, purity of heart or of life.
• Freedom from any sinister or improper motives or views.
• Freedom from foreign idioms, or from barbarous or improper words or phrases; as, purity of style.
Purl
v. t.
• To decorate with fringe or embroidery.
n.
• An embroidered and puckered border; a hem or fringe, often of gold or silver twist; also, a pleat or fold, as of a band.
• An inversion of stitches in knitting, which gives to the work a ribbed or waved appearance.
v. i.
• To run swiftly round, as a small stream flowing among stones or other obstructions; to eddy; also, to make a murmuring sound, as water does in running over or through obstructions.
• To rise in circles, ripples, or undulations; to curl; to mantle.
n.
• A circle made by the notion of a fluid; an eddy; a ripple.
• A gentle murmur, as that produced by the running of a liquid among obstructions; as, the purl of a brook.
• Malt liquor, medicated or spiced; formerly, ale or beer in which wormwood or other bitter herbs had been infused, and which was regarded as tonic; at present, hot beer mixed with gin, sugar, and spices.
(Zool.) A tern.
Purlieu
n.
• Originally, the ground near a royal forest, which, having been unlawfully added to the forest, was afterwards severed from it, and disafforested so as to remit to the former owners their rights.
• Hence, the outer portion of any place; an adjacent district; environs; neighborhood.
Purling
n.
• The motion of a small stream running among obstructions; also, the murmur it makes in so doing.
Purloin
v. t.
• To take or carry away for one's self; hence, to steal; to take by theft; to filch.
v. i.
• To practice theft; to steal.
Purloiner
n.
• One who purloins.
Purocoll
n.
(Chem.) A yellow crystalline substance allied to pyrrol, obtained by the distillation of gelatin.
Purparty
n.
(Law) A share, part, or portion of an estate allotted to a coparcener.
Purple
n.
• A color formed by, or resembling that formed by, a combination of the primary colors red and blue.
• Cloth dyed a purple color, or a garment of such color; especially, a purple robe, worn as an emblem of rank or authority; specifically, the purple rode or mantle worn by Roman emperors as the emblem of imperial dignity; as, to put on the imperial purple.
• Hence: Imperial sovereignty; royal rank, dignity, or favor; loosely and colloquially, any exalted station; great wealth.
• A cardinalate. See Cardinal.
(Zool.) Any species of large butterflies, usually marked with purple or blue, of the genus Basilarchia (formerly Limenitis) as, the banded purple (B. arthemis). See Illust. under Ursula.
(Zool.) Any shell of the genus Purpura.
(Med.) See Purpura.
• A disease of wheat. Same as Earcockle.
a.
• Exhibiting or possessing the color called purple, much esteemed for its richness and beauty; of a deep red, or red and blue color; as, a purple robe.
• Imperial; regal; — so called from the color having been an emblem of imperial authority.
• Blood-red; bloody.
v. t.
• To make purple; to dye of purple or deep red color; as, hands purpled with blood.
Purpleheart
n.
(Bot.) A strong, durable, and elastic wood of a purplish color, obtained from several tropical American leguminous trees of the genus Copaifera (C. pubiflora, bracteata, ∧ officinalis). Used for decorative veneering. See Copaiba.
Purplewood
n.
• Same as Purpleheart.
Purplish
a.
• Somewhat purple.
Purport
n.
• Design or tendency; meaning; import; tenor.
• Disguise; covering.
v. t.
• To intend to show; to intend; to mean; to signify; to import; — often with an object clause or infinitive.
Purportless
a.
• Without purport or meaning.
Purpose
n.
• That which a person sets before himself as an object to be reached or accomplished; the end or aim to which the view is directed in any plan, measure, or exertion; view; aim; design; intention; plan.
• Proposal to another; discourse.
• Instance; example.
v. t.
• To set forth; to bring forward.
• To propose, as an aim, to one's self; to determine upon, as some end or object to be accomplished; to intend; to design; to resolve; — often followed by an infinitive or dependent clause.
v. i.
• To have a purpose or intention; to discourse.
Purposedly
adv.
• In a purposed manner; according to purpose or design; purposely.
Purposeful
a.
• Important; material.
Purposeless
a.
• Having no purpose or result; objectless.
Purposely
adv.
• With purpose or design; intentionally; with predetermination; designedly.
Purposer
n.
• One who brings forward or proposes anything; a proposer.
• One who forms a purpose; one who intends.
Purposive
a.
• Having or indicating purpose or design.
Purpre
n. & a.
• Purple.
Purpresture
n.
(Law) Wrongful encroachment upon another's property; esp., any encroachment upon, or inclosure of, that which should be common or public, as highways, rivers, harbors, forts, etc.
Purprise
n.
• A close or inclosure; the compass of a manor.
Purpura
n.
(Med.) A disease characterized by livid spots on the skin from extravasated blood, with loss of muscular strength, pain in the limbs, and mental dejection; the purples.
(Zool.) A genus of marine gastropods, usually having a rough and thick shell. Some species yield a purple dye.
Purpurate
a.
• Of or pertaining to purpura.
n.
(Chem.) A salt of purpuric acid.
Purpure
n.
(Her.) Purple, — represented in engraving by diagonal lines declining from the right top to the left base of the escutcheon (or from sinister chief to dexter base).
Purpureal
a.
• Of a purple color; purple.
Purpuric
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to purpura.
(Chem.) Pertaining to or designating, a nitrogenous acid contained in uric acid. It is not known in the pure state, but forms well-known purple-red compounds (as murexide), whence its name.
Purpurogenous
a.
(Biol.) Having the power to produce a purple color; as, the purpurogenous membrane, or choroidal epithelium, of the eye. See Visual purple, under Visual.
Purr
v. i. & t.
• To murmur as a cat. See Pur.
n.
• The low murmuring sound made by a cat; pur. See Pur.
Purre
n.
(Zool.) The dunlin.
Purree
n.
(Chem.) A yellow coloring matter. See Euxanthin.
Purrificatory
a.
• Serving or tending to purify; purificative.
Purrock
n.
• See Puddock, and Parrock.
Purse
n.
• A small bag or pouch, the opening of which is made to draw together closely, used to carry money in; by extension, any receptacle for money carried on the person; a wallet; a pocketbook; a portemonnaie.
• Hence, a treasury; finances; as, the public purse.
• A sum of money offered as a prize, or collected as a present; as, to win the purse; to make up a purse.
• A specific sum of money
• In Turkey, the sum of 500 piasters
• In Persia, the sum of 50 tomans.
v. t.
• To put into a purse.
• To draw up or contract into folds or wrinkles, like the mouth of a purse; to pucker; to knit.
v. i.
• To steal purses; to rob.
Purseful
n.
• All that is, or can be, contained in a purse; enough to fill a purse.
Purser
n.
(Naut.) A commissioned officer in the navy who had charge of the provisions, clothing, and public moneys on shipboard; — now called paymaster.
• A clerk on steam passenger vessels whose duty it is to keep the accounts of the vessels, such as the receipt of freight, tickets, etc.
• Colloquially, any paymaster or cashier.
Pursership
n.
• The office of purser.
Purset
n.
• A purse or purse net.
Pursiness
n.
• State of being pursy.
Pursive
a.
• Pursy.
Pursiveness
n.
• Pursiness.
Purslain
n.
• Same as Purslane.
Purslane
n.
(Bot.) An annual plant (Portulaca oleracea), with fleshy, succulent, obovate leaves, sometimes used as a pot herb and for salads, garnishing, and pickling.
Pursuable
a.
• Capable of being, or fit to be, pursued, followed, or prosecuted.
Pursual
n.
• The act of pursuit.
Pursuance
n.
• The act of pursuing or prosecuting; a following out or after.
• The state of being pursuant; consequence.
Pursuant
a.
• Acting in consequence or in prosecution (of anything); hence, agreeable; conformable; following; according; — with to or of.
Pursue
v. t.
• To follow with a view to overtake; to follow eagerly, or with haste; to chase; as, to pursue a hare.
• To seek; to use or adopt measures to obtain; as, to pursue a remedy at law.
• To proceed along, with a view to some and or object; to follow; to go in; as, Captain Cook pursued a new route; the administration pursued a wise course.
• To prosecute; to be engaged in; to continue.
• To follow as an example; to imitate.
• To follow with enmity; to persecute; to call to account.
v. i.
• To go in pursuit; to follow.
• To go on; to proceed, especially in argument or discourse; to continue.
(Law) To follow a matter judicially, as a complaining party; to act as a prosecutor.
Pursuer
n.
• One who pursues or chases; one who follows in haste, with a view to overtake.
(Eccl. & Scots Law) A plaintiff; a prosecutor.
Pursuit
n.
• The act of following or going after; esp., a following with haste, either for sport or in hostility; chase; prosecution; as, the pursuit of game; the pursuit of an enemy.
• A following with a view to reach, accomplish, or obtain; endeavor to attain to or gain; as, the pursuit of knowledge; the pursuit of happiness or pleasure.
• Course of business or occupation; continued employment with a view to same end; as, mercantile pursuits; a literary pursuit.
(Law) Prosecution.
Pursuivant
n.
(Heralds' College) A functionary of lower rank than a herald, but discharging similar duties; — called also pursuivant at arms; an attendant of the heralds. Also used figuratively.
• The king's messenger; a state messenger.
v. t.
• To pursue.
Pursy
a.
• Fat and short-breathed; fat, short, and thick; swelled with pampering; as, pursy insolence.
Purtenance
n.
• That which pertains or belongs to something; esp., the heard, liver, and lungs of an animal.
Purulent
a.
(Med.) Consisting of pus, or matter; partaking of the nature of pus; attended with suppuration; as, purulent inflammation.
Purulently
v.
• In a purulent manner.
Purverable
a.
• Capable of being reduced to fine powder.
Purvey
v. t.
• To furnish or provide, as with a convenience, provisions, or the like.
• To procure; to get.
v. i.
• To purchase provisions; to provide; to make provision.
• To pander; — with to.
Purveyance
n.
• The act or process of providing or procuring; providence; foresight; preparation; management.
• That which is provided; provisions; food.
(Eng. Law) A providing necessaries for the sovereign by buying them at an appraised value in preference to all others, and oven without the owner's consent. This was formerly a royal prerogative, but has long been abolished.
Purveyor
n.
• One who provides victuals, or whose business is to make provision for the table; a victualer; a caterer.
• An officer who formerly provided, or exacted provision, for the king's household.
• a procurer; a pimp; a bawd.
Purview
n.
(Law) The body of a statute, or that part which begins with " Be it enacted, " as distinguished from the preamble.
• The limit or scope of a statute; the whole extent of its intention or provisions.
• Limit or sphere of authority; scope; extent.
Pus
n.
(Med.) The yellowish white opaque creamy matter produced by the process of suppuration. It consists of innumerable white nucleated cells floating in a clear liquid.
Pusane
n.
(Anc. Armor) A piece of armor for the breast; often, an addition to, or reenforcement of. the breastplate; — called also pesane.
Puseyism
n.
(Ch. of Eng.) The principles of Dr. Pusey and others at Oxford, England, as exhibited in various publications, esp. in a series which appeared from 1833 to 1841, designated " Tracts for the Times;" tractarianism. See Tractarianism.
Puseyite
n.
• One who holds the principles of Puseyism; — often used opprobriously.
Push
n.
• A pustule; a pimple.
v. t.
• To press against with force; to drive or impel by pressure; to endeavor to drive by steady pressure, without striking; — opposed to draw.
• To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.
• To press or urge forward; to drive; to push an objection too far.
• To bear hard upon; to perplex; to embarrass.
• To importune; to press with solicitation; to tease.
v. i.
• To make a thrust; to shove; as, to push with the horns or with a sword.
• To make an advance, attack, or effort; to be energetic; as, a man must push in order to succeed.
• To burst pot, as a bud or shoot.
n.
• A thrust with a pointed instrument, or with the end of a thing.
• Any thrust. pressure, impulse, or force, or force applied; a shove; as, to give the ball the first push.
• An assault or attack; an effort; an attempt; hence, the time or occasion for action.
• The faculty of overcoming obstacles; aggressive energy; as, he has push, or he has no push.
Pusher
n.
• One who, or that which, pushes.
Pushing
a.
• Pressing forward in business; enterprising; driving; energetic; also, forward; officious, intrusive.
Pushpin
n.
• A child's game played with pins.
Pusil
a.
• Very small; little; petty.
Pusillanimity
n.
• The quality of being pusillanimous; weakness of spirit; cowardliness.
Pusillanimous
a.
• Destitute of a manly or courageous strength and firmness of mind; of weak spirit; mean-spirited; spiritless; cowardly; — said of persons, as, a pussillanimous prince.
• Evincing, or characterized by, weakness of mind, and want of courage; feeble; as, pusillanimous counsels.
Pusillanimously
adv.
• With pusillanimity.
Pusley
n.
(Bot.) Purslane.
Puss
n.
• A cat; — a fondling appellation.
• A hare; — so called by sportsmen.
Pussy
n.
• A pet name for a cat; also, an endearing name for a girl.
• A catkin of the pussy willow.
• The game of tipcat; — also called pussy cat.
a.
• See Pursy.
Pustulant
a.
(Med.) Producing pustules.
n.
• A medicine that produces pustules, as croton oil.
Pustular
a.
• 1. Of or pertaining to pustules; as, pustular prominences; pustular eruptions.
• Covered with pustulelike prominences; pustulate.
Pustulate
v. t.
• To form into pustules, or blisters.
Pustulation
n.
• The act of producing pustules; the state of being pustulated.
Pustule
n.
(Med.) A vesicle or an elevation of the cuticle with an inflamed base, containing pus.
Pustulous
a.
• Resembling, or covered with, pustules; pustulate; pustular.
Put
n.
• A pit.
• 3d pers. sing. pres. of Put, contracted from putteth.
n.
• A rustic; a clown; an awkward or uncouth person.
v. t.
• To move in any direction; to impel; to thrust; to push; — nearly obsolete, except with adverbs, as with by (to put by = to thrust aside; to divert); or with forth (to put forth = to thrust out).
• To bring to a position or place; to place; to lay; to set; figuratively, to cause to be or exist in a specified relation, condition, or the like; to bring to a stated mental or moral condition; as, to put one in fear; to put a theory in practice; to put an enemy to fight.
• To attach or attribute; to assign; as, to put a wrong construction on an act or expression.
• To lay down; to give up; to surrender.
• To set before one for judgment, acceptance, or rejection; to bring to the attention; to offer; to state; to express; figuratively, to assume; to suppose; — formerly sometimes followed by that introducing a proposition; as, to put a question; to put a case.
• To incite; to entice; to urge; to constrain; to oblige.
• To throw or cast with a pushing motion "overhand," the hand being raised from the shoulder; a practice in athletics; as, to put the shot or weight.
(Mining) To convey coal in the mine, as from the working to the tramway.(Naut.)(Naut.)(Law)(Med.)(Law)(Law)(Med.)
v. i.
• To go or move; as, when the air first puts up.
• To steer; to direct one's course; to go.
• To play a card or a hand in the game called put.
n.
• The act of putting; an action; a movement; a thrust; a push; as, the put of a ball.
• A certain game at cards.
• A privilege which one party buys of another to "put" (deliver) to him a certain amount of stock, grain, etc., at a certain price and date.
n.
• A prostitute.
Putage
n.
• Prostitution or fornication on the part of a woman.
Putamen
n.
(Bot.) The shell of a nut; the stone of a drupe fruit. See Endocarp.
Putanism
n.
• Habitual lewdness or prostitution of a woman; harlotry.
Putative
a.
• Commonly thought or deemed; supposed; reputed; as, the putative father of a child.
Putchuck
n.
(Bot.) Same as Pachak.
Puteal
n.
(Arch.) An inclosure surrounding a well to prevent persons from falling into it; a well curb.
Puteli
n.
• Same as Patela.
Putery
n.
• Putage.
Putid
a.
• Rotten; fetid; stinking; base; worthless. Jer. Taylor.
Putlog
n.
(Arch.) One of the short pieces of timber on which the planks forming the floor of a scaffold are laid, — one end resting on the ledger of the scaffold, and the other in a hole left in the wall temporarily for the purpose.
Putour
n.
• A keeper of a brothel; a procurer.
Putredinous
a.
• Proceeding from putrefaction, or partaking of the putrefactive process; having an offensive smell; stinking; rotten.
Putrefaction
n.
• The act or the process of putrefying; the offensive decay of albuminous or other matter.
• The condition of being putrefied; also, that which putrefied.
Putrefactive
a.
• Of or pertaining to putrefaction; as, the putrefactive smell or process.
• Causing, or tending to promote, putrefaction.
Putrefy
v. t.
• To render putrid; to cause to decay offensively; to cause to be decomposed; to cause to rot.
• To corrupt; to make foul.
• To make morbid, carious, or gangrenous; as, to putrefy an ulcer or wound.
v. i.
• To become putrid; to decay offensively; to rot.
Putrescence
n.
• The state of being putrescent; putrescent matter.
Putrescent
a.
• Becoming putrid or rotten.
• Of or pertaining to the process of putrefaction; as, a putrescent smell.
Putrescible
a.
• Capable of putrefaction; liable to become putrid; as, putrescible substances.
n.
• A substance, usually nitrogenous, which is liable to undergo decomposition when in contact with air and moisture at ordinary temperatures.
Putrescin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A nontoxic diamine, C4H12N2, formed in the putrefaction of the flesh of mammals and some other animals.
Putrid
a.
• Tending to decomposition or decay; decomposed; rotten; — said of animal or vegetable matter; as, putrid flesh. See Putrefaction.
• Indicating or proceeding from a decayed state of animal or vegetable matter; as, a putrid smell.
Putridity
n.
• The quality of being putrid; putrefaction; rottenness.
Putridness
n.
• Putridity.
Putrifacted
a.
• Putrefied.
Putrification
n.
• Putrefaction.
Putrify
v. t. & i.
• To putrefy.
Putrilage
n.
• That which is undergoing putrefaction; the products of putrefaction.
Putry
a.
• Putrid.
n.
• Putage.
Putter
n.
• One who puts or plates.
• Specifically, one who pushes the small wagons in a coal mine, and the like.
v. i.
• To act inefficiently or idly; to trifle; to potter.
Puttier
n.
• One who putties; a glazier.
Putting
n.
• The throwing of a heavy stone, shot, etc., with the hand raised or extended from the shoulder; — originally, a Scottish game.
Puttock
n.
(Zool.) The European kite.
• The buzzard.
• The marsh harrier.
n.
(Naut.) See Futtock.
Putty
n.
• A kind of thick paste or cement compounded of whiting, or soft carbonate of lime, and linseed oil, when applied beaten or kneaded to the consistence of dough, — used in fastening glass in sashes, stopping crevices, and for similar purposes.
v. t.
• To cement, or stop, with putty.
Puttyroot
n.
(Bot.) An American orchidaceous plant (Aplectrum hyemale) which flowers in early summer. Its slender naked rootstock produces each year a solid corm, filled with exceedingly glutinous matter, which sends up later a single large oval evergreen plaited leaf. Called also Adam-and-Eve.
Puy
n.
• See Poy.
Puzzel
n.
• A harlot; a drab; a hussy.
Puzzier
n.
• One who, or that which, puzzles or perplexes.
Puzzle
n.
• Something which perplexes or embarrasses; especially, a toy or a problem contrived for testing ingenuity; also, something exhibiting marvelous skill in making.
• The state of being puzzled; perplexity; as, to be in a puzzle.
v. t.
• To perplex; to confuse; to embarrass; to put to a stand; to nonplus.
• To make intricate; to entangle.
• To solve by ingenuity, as a puzzle; — followed by out; as, to puzzle out a mystery.
v. i.
• To be bewildered, or perplexed.
• To work, as at a puzzle; as, to puzzle over a problem.
Puzzledom
n.
• The domain of puzzles; puzzles, collectively.
Puzzlement
n.
• The state of being puzzled; perplexity.
Puzzlingly
adv.
• In a puzzling manner.
Pyaemia
n.
(Med.) A form of blood poisoning produced by the absorption into the blood of morbid matters usually originating in a wound or local inflammation. It is characterized by the development of multiple abscesses throughout the body, and is attended with irregularly recurring chills, fever, profuse sweating, and exhaustion.
Pyaemic
a.
• Of or pertaining to pyaemia; of the nature of pyaemia.
Pycnaspidean
a.
(Zool.) Having the posterior side of the tarsus covered with small irregular scales; — said of certain birds.
Pycnidium
n.
(Bot.) In certain fungi, a flask-shaped cavity from the surface of the inner walls of which spores are produced.
Pycnite
n.
(Min.) A massive subcolumnar variety of topaz.
Pycnodont
n.
(Paleon.) Any fossil fish belonging to the Pycnodontini. They have numerous round, flat teeth, adapted for crushing.
Pycnodontini
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extinct order of ganoid fishes. They had a compressed body, covered with dermal ribs (pleurolepida) and with enameled rhomboidal scales.
Pycnogonid
n.
(Zool.) One of the Pycnogonida.
Pycnogonida
n. pl.
(Zool.) A class of marine arthropods in which the body is small and thin, and the eight legs usually very long; — called also Pantopoda.
Pycnometer
n.
(Physics) A specific gravity bottle; a standard flask for measuring and comparing the densities of liquids.
Pycnostyle
a.
(Anc. Arch.) See under Intercolumniation.
n.
• A pycnostyle colonnade.
Pye
n.
• See 2d Pie (b).
Pyebald
a.
• See Piebald.
Pyelitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the pelvis of the kidney.
Pyemia
n.
(Med.) See PyAmia.
Pyet
n.
• A magpie; a piet.
Pygal
a.
(Anat.) Situated in the region of the rump, or posterior end of the backbone; — applied especially to the posterior median plates in the carapace of chelonians.
Pygidium
n.
(Zool.) The caudal plate of trilobites, crustacean, and certain insects. See Illust. of Limulus and Trilobite.
Pygmy
n.
(Class. Myth.) One of a fabulous race of dwarfs who waged war with the cranes, and were destroyed.
• Hence, a short, insignificant person; a dwarf.
Pygobranchia
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of opisthobranchiate mollusks having the branchiae in a wreath or group around the anal opening, as in the genus Doris.
Pygopod
n.
(Zool.) One of the Pygopodes.
(Zool.) Any species of serpentiform lizards of the family Pygopodidae, which have rudimentary hind legs near the anal cleft, but lack fore legs.
Pygopodous
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Pygopodes.
Pygostyle
n.
(Anat.) The plate of bone which forms the posterior end of the vertebral column in most birds; the plowshare bone; the vomer. It is formed by the union of a number of the last caudal vertebrae, and supports the uropigium.
Pygotartaric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained as a white crystalline substance by the distillation of tartaric acid.
Pygropodes
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of swimming birds which includes the grebes, divers, auks, etc., in which the legs are placed far back.
Pyin
n.
(Physiol. (Chem.) An albuminoid constituent of pus, related to mucin, possibly a mixture of substances rather than a single body.
Pyjama
n.
• In India and Persia, thin loose trowsers or drawers; in Europe and America, drawers worn at night, or a kind of nightdress with legs.
Pykar
n.
• An ancient English fishing boat.
Pyla
n.
(Anat.) The passage between the iter and optocoele in the brain.
Pylagore
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) a deputy of a State at the Amphictyonic council.
Pylangium
n.
(Anat.) The first and undivided part of the aortic trunk in the amphibian heart.
Pylon
n.
• A low tower, having a truncated pyramidal form, and flanking an ancient Egyptian gateway.
• An Egyptian gateway to a large building (with or without flanking towers)
Pyloric
a.
(Anat.) Of, pertaining to, or in the region of, the pylorus; as, the pyloric end of the stomach.
Pylorus
n.
(Anat.) The opening from the stomach into the intestine.
• A posterior division of the stomach in some invertebrates.
Pyne
n. & v.
• See Pine.
Pynoun
n.
• A pennant.
Pyocyanin
n.
(Physiol. (Chem.) A blue coloring matter found in the pus from old sores, supposed to be formed through the agency of a species of bacterium (Bacillus pyocyaneus).
Pyogenic
a.
(Med.) Producing or generating pus.
Pyoid
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to pus; of the nature of, or like, pus.
Pyopneumothorax
n.
(Med.) Accumulation of air, or other gas, and of pus, in the pleural cavity.
Pyot
n.
(Zool.) The magpie. See Piet.
Pyoxanthose
n.
(Physiol. (Chem.) A greenish yellow crystalline coloring matter found with pyocyanin in pus.
Pyracanth
n.
(Bot.) The evergreen thorn (Crataegus Pyracantha), a shrub native of Europe.
Pyral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a pyre.
Pyralid
n.
(Zool.) Any moth of the family Pyralidae. The species are numerous and mostly small, but some of them are very injurious, as the bee moth, meal moth, hop moth, and clover moth.
Pyramid
n.
• A solid body standing on a triangular, square, or polygonal base, and terminating in a point at the top; especially, a structure or edifice of this shape.
(Geom.) A solid figure contained by a plane rectilineal figure as base and several triangles which have a common vertex and whose bases are sides of the base.
(Billiards) The game of pool in which the balls are placed in the form of a triangle at spot.
Pyramidal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a pyramid; in the form of a a pyramid; pyramidical; as, pyramidal cleavage.
(Crystallog.) Same as Tetragonal.
n.
(Anat.) One of the carpal bones. See Cuneiform, n., 2 (b).
Pyramidally
adv.
• Like a pyramid.
Pyramidion
n.
• The small pyramid which crowns or completes an obelisk.
Pyramidoid
n.
• A solid resembling a pyramid; — called also pyramoid.
Pyramis
n.
• A pyramid.
Pyramoid
n.
• See Pyramidoid.
Pyrargyrite
n.
(Min.) Ruby silver; dark red silver ore. It is a sulphide of antimony and silver, occurring in rhombohedral crystals or massive, and is of a dark red or black color with a metallic adamantine luster.
Pyre
n.
• A funeral pile; a combustible heap on which the dead are burned; hence, any pile to be burnt.
Pyrena
n.
(Bot.) A nutlet resembling a seed, or the kernel of a drupe.
Pyrene
n.
(Chem.) One of the less volatile hydrocarbons of coal tar, obtained as a white crystalline substance, C16H10.
n.
(Bot.) Same as Pyrena.
Pyrenean
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Pyrenees, a range of mountains separating France and Spain.
n.
• The Pyrenees.
Pyrenoid
n.
(Zool.) A transparent body found in the chromatophores of certain Infusoria.
Pyrethrin
n.
(Chem.) A substance resembling, and isomeric with, ordinary camphor, and extracted from the essential oil of feverfew; — called also Pyrethrum camphor.
Pyrethrine
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid extracted from the root of the pellitory of Spain (Anacyclus pyrethrum).
Pyretic
a.
(Med.) Of or pertaining to fever; febrile.
Pyretology
n.
(Med.) A discourse or treatise on fevers; the doctrine of fevers.
Pyrexia
n.
(Med.) The febrile condition.
Pyrgom
n.
(Min.) A variety of pyroxene; — called also fassaite.
Pyrheliometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the direct heating effect of the sun's rays.
Pyridic
a.
(Physiol. Chem.) Related to, or formed from, pyridin or its homologues; as, the pyridic bases.
Pyridine
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A nitrogenous base, C5H5N, obtained from the distillation of bone oil or coal tar, and by the decomposition of certain alkaloids, as a colorless liquid with a peculiar pungent odor. It is the nucleus of a large number of organic substances, among which several vegetable alkaloids, as nicotine and certain of the ptomaines, may be mentioned. See Lutidine.
Pyridyl
n.
(Chem.) A hypothetical radical, C5H4N, regarded as the essential residue of pyridine, and analogous to phenyl.
Pyriform
a.
• Having the form of a pear; pear-shaped.
Pyritaceous
a.
(Min.) Of or pertaining to pyrites. See Pyritic.
Pyrite
n.
(Min.) A common mineral of a pale brass-yellow color and brilliant metallic luster, crystallizing in the isometric system; iron pyrites; iron disulphide.
Pyrites
n.
(Min.) A name given to a number of metallic minerals, sulphides of iron, copper, cobalt, nickel, and tin, of a white or yellowish color.
Pyritiferous
a.
(Min.) Containing or producing pyrites.
Pyritize
v. t.
• To convert into pyrites.
Pyritohedral
a.
(Crystallog.) Like pyrites in hemihedral form.
Pyritohedron
n.
(Crystallog.) The pentagonal dodecahedron, a common form of pyrite.
Pyritoid
n.
(Crystallog.) Pyritohedron.
Pyritology
n.
• The science of blowpipe analysis.
Pyritous
a.
• Pyritic.
Pyro
n.
(Photog.) Abbreviation of pyrogallic acid.
Pyroacetic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, and designating, a substance (acetone) obtained by the distillation of the acetates. It is now called also pyroacetic ether, and formerly was called pyroacetic spirit.
Pyroacid
n.
(Chem.) An acid obtained by sybjecting another acid to the action of heat. Cf. Pyro-.
Pyroantimonate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyroantimonic acid.
Pyroantimonic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid of antimony analogous to pyrophosphoric acid.
Pyroarsenate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyroarsenic acid.
Pyroarsenic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to or designating, an acid of arsenic analogous to pyrophosphoric acid.
Pyroborate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyroboric acid.
Pyroboric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to derived from, or designating, an acid, H2B4O7 (called also tetraboric acid), which is the acid ingredient of ordinary borax, and is obtained by heating boric acid.
Pyrocatechin
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance, C6H4(OH)2, of the phenol series, found in various plants; — so called because first obtained by distillation of gum catechu. Called also catechol, oxyphenol. etc.
Pyrochlore
n.
(Min.) A niobate of calcium, cerium, and other bases, occurring usually in octahedrons of a yellowish or brownish color and resinous luster; — so called from its becoming grass-green on being subjected to heat under the blowpipe.
Pyrocitric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, any one of three acids obtained by the distillation of citric acid, and called respectively citraconic, itaconic, and mesaconic acid.
Pyroelectric
a.
(Physics) Pertaining to, or dependent on, pyroelectricity; receiving electric polarity when heated.
n.
(Physics) A substance which becomes electrically polar when heated, exhibiting opposite charges of statical electricity at two separate parts, especially the two extremities.
Pyroelectricity
n.
(Physics) Electricity developed by means of heat; the science which treats of electricity thus developed.
Pyrogallate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyrogallic acid; an ether of pyrogallol.
Pyrogallic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid called pyrogallol. See Pyrogallol.
Pyrogallol
n.
(Chem.) A phenol metameric with phloroglucin, obtained by the distillation of gallic acid as a poisonous white crystalline substance having acid properties, and hence called also pyrogallic acid. It is a strong reducer, and is used as a developer in photography and in the production of certain dyes.
Pyrogen
n.
• Electricity.
(Physiol. Chem.) A poison separable from decomposed meat infusions, and supposed to be formed from albuminous matter through the agency of bacteria.
Pyrogenic
a.
(Physiol.) Producing heat; — said of substances, as septic poisons, which elevate the temperature of the body and cause fever.
Pyrogenous
a.
• Produced by fire; igneous.
Pyrognostic
a.
(Min.) Of or pertaining to characters developed by the use of heat; pertaining to the characters of minerals when examined before the blowpipe; as, the pyrognostic characters of galena.
Pyrognostics
n. pl.
(Min.) The characters of a mineral observed by the use of the blowpipe, as the degree of fusibility, flame coloration, etc.
Pyrography
n.
• A process of printing, ornamenting, or carving, by burning with heated instruments.
Pyrolator
n.
• A fire worshiper.
Pyrolatry
n.
• The worship of fire.
Pyrolignous
a.
• Same as Pyroligneous.
Pyrolithic
a.
(Old Chem.) Same as Pyrouric, or Cyanuric.
Pyrologist
n.
• One who is versed in, or makes a study of, pyrology.
Pyrology
n.
• That branch of physical science which treats of the properties, phenomena, or effects of heat; also, a treatise on heat.
Pyrolusite
n.
(Min.) Manganese dioxide, a mineral of an iron-black or dark steel-gray color and metallic luster, usually soft. Pyrolusite parts with its oxygen at a red heat, and is extensively used in discharging the brown and green tints of glass (whence its name).
Pyromagnetic
a.
(Physics) Acting by the agency of heat and magnetism; as, a pyromagnetic machine for producing electric currents.
Pyromalate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyromalic acid.
Pyromalic
a.
(Old Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid now called maleic acid.
Pyromancy
n.
• Divination by means of fire.
Pyromania
n.
• An insane disposition to incendiarism.
Pyromantic
a.
• Of or pertaining to pyromancy.
n.
• One who pretends to divine by fire.
Pyrometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument used for measuring the expansion of solid bodies by heat.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring degrees of heat above those indicated by the mercurial thermometer.
Pyrometry
n.
• The art of measuring degrees of heat, or the expansion of bodies by heat.
Pyromorphite
n.
(Min.) Native lead phosphate with lead chloride, occurring in bright green and brown hexagonal crystals and also massive; — so called because a fused globule crystallizes in cooling.
Pyromorphous
a.
(Min.) Having the property of crystallizing by the agency of fire.
Pyromucate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyromucic acid.
Pyromucic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid obtained as a white crystalline substance by the distillation of mucic acid, or by the oxidation of furfurol.
Pyronomics
n.
• The science of heat.
Pyrope
n.
(Min.) A variety of garnet, of a poppy or blood-red color, frequently with a tinge of orange. It is used as a gem. See the Note under Garnet.
Pyrophane
n.
(Min.) A mineral which is opaque in its natural state, but is said to change its color and become transparent by heat.
Pyrophanous
a.
• Rendered transparent by heat.
Pyrophone
n.
• A musical instrument in which the tones are produced by flames of hydrogen, or illuminating gas, burning in tubes of different sizes and lengths.
Pyrophorus
n.
(Old Chem.) Any one of several substances or mixtures which phosphoresce or ignite spontaneously on exposure to air, as a heated mixture of alum, potash, and charcoal, or a mixture of charcoal and finely divided lead.
Pyrophosphate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyrophosphoric acid.
Pyrophosphoric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid, H4P2O7, which is obtained as a white crystalline substance. Its salts are obtained by heating the phosphates.
Pyrophyllite
n.
(Min.) A mineral, usually of a white or greenish color and pearly luster, consisting chiefly of the hydrous silicate of alumina.
Pyroscope
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the intensity of heat radiating from a fire, or the cooling influence of bodies. It is a differential thermometer, having one bulb coated with gold or silver leaf.
Pyrosis
n.
(Med.) See Water brash, under Brash.
Pyrosmalite
n.
(Min.) A mineral, usually of a pale brown or of a gray or grayish green color, consisting chiefly of the hydrous silicate of iron and manganese; — so called from the odor given off before the blowpipe.
Pyrosome
n.
(Zool.) Any compound ascidian of the genus Pyrosoma. The pyrosomes form large hollow cylinders, sometimes two or three feet long, which swim at the surface of the sea and are very phosphorescent.
Pyrosulphate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyrosulphuric acid.
Pyrosulphuric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid called also disulphuric acid) obtained by distillation of certain sulphates, as a colorless, thick, oily liquid, H2S2O7 resembling sulphuric acid. It is used in the solution of indigo, in the manufacture of alizarin, and in dehydration.
Pyrotartrate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of pyrotartaric acid.
Pyrotechnian
n.
• A pyrotechnist.
Pyrotechnician
n.
• A pyrotechnist.
Pyrotechnics
n.
• The art of making fireworks; the manufacture and use of fireworks; pyrotechny.
Pyrotechnist
n.
• One skilled in pyrotechny; one who manufactures fireworks.
Pyrotechny
n.
• The use and application of fire in science and the arts.
• Same as Pyrotechnics.
Pyrothonide
n.
(Med.) A kind of empyreumatic oil produced by the combustion of textures of hemp, linen, or cotton in a copper vessel, — formerly used as a remedial agent.
Pyrotic
a.
• Caustic. See Caustic.
n.
(Med.) A caustic medicine.
Pyrotritartaric
a.
(Chem.) Designating an acid which is more commonly called uric acid.
Pyrotungstic
a.
(Chem.) Polytungstic. See Metatungstic.
Pyrouric
a.
(Old Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid now called cyanuric acid. See Cyanuric.
Pyrovanadic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid of vanadium, analogous to pyrophosphoric acid.
Pyroxanthin
n.
(Chem.) A yellow crystalline hydrocardon extracted from crude wood spirit; — called also eblanin.
Pyroxene
n.
(Min.) A common mineral occurring in monoclinic crystals, with a prismatic angle of nearly 90°, and also in massive forms which are often laminated. It varies in color from white to dark green and black, and includes many varieties differing in color and composition, as diopside, malacolite, salite, coccolite, augite, etc. They are all silicates of lime and magnesia with sometimes alumina and iron. Pyroxene is an essential constituent of many rocks, especially basic igneous rocks, as basalt, gabbro, etc.
Pyroxenic
a.
• Containing pyroxene; composed chiefly of pyroxene.
Pyroxenite
n.
(Min.) A rock consisting essentially of pyroxene.
Pyroxyle
n.
Pyroxylic
a.
(Old Chem.) Derived from wood by distillation; — formerly used in designating crude wood spirit.
Pyroxylin
n.
(Chem.) A substance resembling gun cotton in composition and properties, but distinct in that it is more highly nitrified and is soluble in alcohol, ether, etc.; — called also pyroxyle.
Pyrpurin
n.
(Chem.) A dyestuff resembling alizarin, found in madder root, and extracted as an orange or red crystalline substance.
Pyrpuriparous
a.
(Biol.) Producing, or connected with, a purple-colored secretion; as, the purpuriparous gland of certain gastropods.
Pyrrhic
a.
• Of or pertaining to an ancient Greek martial dance.
(Pros.) Of or pertaining to a pyrrhic, or to pyrrhics; containing pyrrhic; as, a pyrrhic verse.
n.
• An ancient Greek martial dance, to the accompaniment of the flute, its time being very quick.
(Pros.) A foot consisting of two short syllables.
Pyrrhicist
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) One two danced the pyrrhic.
Pyrrhonism
n.
• Skepticism; universal doubt.
Pyrrhonist
n.
• A follower of Pyrrho; a skeptic.
Pyrrol
n.
(Chem.) A nitrogenous base found in coal tar, bone oil, and other distillates of organic substances, and also produced synthetically as a colorless liquid, C4H5N, having on odor like that of chloroform. It is the nucleus and origin of a large number of derivatives. So called because it colors a splinter of wood moistened with hydrochloric acid a deep red.
Pyrroline
n.
(Chem.) A nitrogenous base, C4H7N, obtained as a colorless liquid by the reduction of pyrrol.
Pyrula
n.
(Zool.) A genus of large marine gastropods. having a pear-shaped shell. It includes the fig-shells. See Illust. in Appendix.
Pyruric
a.
• Same as Pyrouric.
Pyrus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of rosaceous trees and shrubs having pomes for fruit. It includes the apple, crab apple, pear, chokeberry, sorb, and mountain ash.
Pyruvic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid (called also pyroracemic acid) obtained, as a liquid having a pungent odor, by the distillation of racemic acid.
Pyruvil
n.
(Chem.) A complex nitrogenous compound obtained by heating together pyruvic acid and urea.
Pythagorean
a.
• Of or pertaining to Pythagoras (a Greek philosopher, born about 582 b. c.), or his philosophy.
n.
• A follower of Pythagoras; one of the school of philosophers founded by Pythagoras.
Pythagoreanism
n.
• The doctrines of Pythagoras or the Pythagoreans.
Pythagorism
n.
• The doctrines taught by Pythagoras.
Pythagorize
v. i.
• To speculate after the manner of Pythagoras.
Pythiad
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The period intervening between one celebration of the Pythian games and the next.
Pythian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Delphi, to the temple of Apollo, or to the priestess of Apollo, who delivered oracles at Delphi.
Pythocenic
a.
• Producing decomposition, as diseases which are supposed to be accompanied or caused by decomposition.
Python
n.
(Zool.) Any species of very large snakes of the genus Python, and allied genera, of the family Pythonidae. They are nearly allied to the boas. Called also rock snake.
• A diviner by spirits.
Pythoness
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The priestess who gave oracular answers at Delphi in Greece.
• Any woman supposed to have a spirit of divination; a sort of witch.
Pythonic
a.
• Prophetic; oracular; pretending to foretell events.
Pythonism
n.
• The art of predicting events after the manner of the priestess of Apollo at Delphi; equivocal prophesying.
Pythonist
n.
• A conjurer; a diviner.
Pythonomorpha
n. pl.
(Paleon.) Same as Mosasauria.
Pyuria
n.
(Med.) A morbid condition in which pus is discharged in the urine.
Pyx
n.
( R. C. Ch.) The box, case, vase, or tabernacle, in which the host is reserved.
• A box used in the British mint as a place of deposit for certain sample coins taken for a trial of the weight and fineness of metal before it is sent from the mint.
(Naut.) The box in which the compass is suspended; the binnacle.
(Anat.) Same as Pyxis.
v. t.
• To test as to weight and fineness, as the coins deposited in the pyx.
Pyxidate
a.
• Having a pyxidium.
Pyxidium
n.
(Bot.) A pod which divides circularly into an upper and lower half, of which the former acts as a kind of lid, as in the pimpernel and purslane.
• The theca of mosses.
Pyxis
n.
• A box; a pyx.
(Bot.) A pyxidium.
(Anat.) The acetabulum. See Acetabulum, 2.
Pyxle
n.
(Bot.) Same as Pixy.

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