Dictionary Of The English Language "Inf"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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Infabricated
a.
• Not fabricated; unwrought; not artificial; natural.
Infallibilist
n.
• One who accepts or maintains the dogma of papal infallibility.
Infallibility
n.
• The quality or state of being infallible, or exempt from error; inerrability.
Infallible
a.
• Not fallible; not capable of erring; entirely exempt from liability to mistake; unerring; inerrable.
• Not liable to fail, deceive, or disappoint; indubitable; sure; certain; as, infallible evidence; infallible success; an infallible remedy.
(R. C. Ch.) Incapable of error in defining doctrines touching faith or morals.
Infallibleness
n.
• The state or quality of being infallible; infallibility.
Infallibly
adv.
• In an infallible manner; certainly; unfailingly; unerringly.
Infame
v. t.
• To defame; to make infamous.
Infamize
v. t.
• To make infamous; to defame.
Infamous
a.
• Of very bad report; having a reputation of the worst kind; held in abhorrence; guilty of something that exposes to infamy; base; notoriously vile; detestable; as, an infamous traitor; an infamous perjurer.
• Causing or producing infamy; deserving detestation; scandalous to the last degree; as, an infamous act; infamous vices; infamous corruption.
(Law) Branded with infamy by conviction of a crime; as, at common law, an infamous person can not be a witness.
• Having a bad name as being the place where an odious crime was committed, or as being associated with something detestable; hence, unlucky; perilous; dangerous.
Infamously
adv.
• In an infamous manner or degree; scandalously; disgracefully; shamefully.
Infamousness
n.
• The state or quality of being infamous; infamy.
Infamy
n.
• Total loss of reputation; public disgrace; dishonor; ignominy; indignity.
• A quality which exposes to disgrace; extreme baseness or vileness; as, the infamy of an action.
(Law) That loss of character, or public disgrace, which a convict incurs, and by which he is at common law rendered incompetent as a witness.
Infancy
n.
• The state or period of being an infant; the first part of life; early childhood.
• The first age of anything; the beginning or early period of existence; as, the infancy of an art.
(Law) The state or condition of one under age, or under the age of twenty-one years; nonage; minority.
Infandous
a.
• Too odious to be expressed or mentioned.
Infangthef
n.
(O. Eng. Law) The privilege granted to lords of certain manors to judge thieves taken within the seigniory of such lords.
Infant
n.
• A child in the first period of life, beginning at his birth; a young babe; sometimes, a child several years of age.
(Law) A person who is not of full age, or who has not attained the age of legal capacity; a person under the age of twenty-one years; a minor.
• Same as Infante.
a.
• Of or pertaining to infancy, or the first period of life; tender; not mature; as, infant strength.
• Intended for young children; as, an infant school.
v. t.
• To bear or bring forth, as a child; hence, to produce, in general.
Infanta
n.
• A title borne by every one of the daughters of the kings of Spain and Portugal, except the eldest.
Infante
n.
• A title given to every one of sons of the kings of Spain and Portugal, except the eldest or heir apparent.
Infanthood
n.
• Infancy.
Infanticidal
a.
• Of or pertaining to infanticide; engaged in, or guilty of, child murder.
Infanticide
n.
• The murder of an infant born alive; the murder or killing of a newly born or young child; child murder.
n.
• One who commits the crime of infanticide; one who kills an infant.
Infantile
a.
• Of or pertaining to infancy, or to an infant; similar to, or characteristic of, an infant; childish; as, infantile behavior.
Infantine
a.
• Infantile; childish.
Infantlike
a.
• Like an infant.
Infantly
a.
• Like an infant.
Infantry
n.
• A body of children.
(Mil.) A body of soldiers serving on foot; foot soldiers, in distinction from cavalry.
Infarce
v. t.
• To stuff; to swell.
Infarction
n.
• The act of stuffing or filling; an overloading and obstruction of any organ or vessel of the body; constipation.
Infare
n.
• A house-warming; especially, a reception, party, or entertainment given by a newly married couple, or by the husband upon receiving the wife to his house.
Infashionable
a.
• Unfashionable.
Infatigable
a.
• Indefatigable.
Infatuate
a.
• Infatuated.
v. t.
• To make foolish; to affect with folly; to weaken the intellectual powers of, or to deprive of sound judgment.
• To inspire with a foolish and extravagant passion; as, to be infatuated with gaming.
Infatuated
a.
• Overcome by some foolish passion or desire; affected by infatuation.
Infatuation
n.
• The act of infatuating; the state of being infatuated; folly; that which infatuates.
Infaust
a.
• Not favorable; unlucky; unpropitious; sinister.
Infausting
n.
• The act of making unlucky; misfortune; bad luck.
Infeasibility
n.
• The state of being infeasible; impracticability.
Infeasible
a.
• Not capable of being done or accomplished; impracticable.
Infeasibleness
n.
• The state of quality of being infeasible; infeasibility.
Infect
a.
• Infected. Cf. Enfect.
v. t.
• To taint with morbid matter or any pestilential or noxious substance or effluvium by which disease is produced; as, to infect a lancet; to infect an apartment.
• To affect with infectious disease; to communicate infection to; as, infected with the plague.
• To communicate to or affect with, as qualities or emotions, esp. bad qualities; to corrupt; to contaminate; to taint by the communication of anything noxious or pernicious.
(Law) To contaminate with illegality or to expo to penalty.
Infecter
n.
• One who, or that which, infects.
Infectible
a.
• Capable of being infected.
Infection
n.
• The act or process of infecting.
• That which infects, or causes the communicated disease; any effluvium, miasm, or pestilential matter by which an infectious disease is caused.
• The state of being infected; contamination by morbific particles; the result of infecting influence; a prevailing disease; epidemic.
• That which taints or corrupts morally; as, the infection of vicious principles.
(Law) Contamination by illegality, as in cases of contraband goods; implication.
• Sympathetic communication of like qualities or emotions; influence.
Infectious
a.
• Having qualities that may infect; communicable or caused by infection; pestilential; epidemic; as, an infectious fever; infectious clothing; infectious air; infectious vices.
• Corrupting, or tending to corrupt or contaminate; vitiating; demoralizing.
(Law) Contaminating with illegality; exposing to seizure and forfeiture.
• Capable of being easily diffused or spread; sympathetic; readily communicated; as, infectious mirth.
Infectiously
adv.
• In an infectious manner.
Infectiousness
n.
• The quality of being infectious.
Infective
a.
• Infectious.
Infecund
a.
• Unfruitful; not producing young; barren; infertile.
Infecundity
n.
• Want of fecundity or fruitfulness; barrenness; sterility; unproductiveness.
Infecundous
a.
• Infertile; barren; unprofitable; unproductive.
Infelicitous
a.
• Not felicitous; unhappy; unfortunate; not fortunate or appropriate in application; not well said, expressed, or done; as, an infelicitous condition; an infelicitous remark; an infelicitous description; infelicitous words.
Infelicity
n.
• The state or quality of being infelicitous; unhappiness; misery; wretchedness; misfortune; want of suitableness or appropriateness.
• That (as an act, word, expression, etc.) which is infelicitous; as, infelicities of speech.
Infelonious
a.
• Not felonious, malignant, or criminal.
Infelt
a.
• Felt inwardly; heartfelt.
Infer
v. t.
• To bring on; to induce; to occasion.
• To offer, as violence.
• To bring forward, or employ as an argument; to adduce; to allege; to offer.
• To derive by deduction or by induction; to conclude or surmise from facts or premises; to accept or derive, as a consequence, conclusion, or probability; to imply; as, I inferred his determination from his silence.
• To show; to manifest; to prove.
Inferable
a.
• Capable of being inferred or deduced from premises.
Inference
n.
• The act or process of inferring by deduction or induction.
• That which inferred; a truth or proposition drawn from another which is admitted or supposed to be true; a conclusion; a deduction.
Inferential
a.
• Deduced or deducible by inference.
Inferentially
adv.
• By way of inference.
Inferiae
n. pl.
(Rom. Antiq.) Sacrifices offered to the souls of deceased heroes or friends.
Inferior
a.
• Lower in place, rank, excellence, etc.; less important or valuable; subordinate; underneath; beneath.
• Poor or mediocre; as, an inferior quality of goods.
(Astron.) Nearer the sun than the earth is; as, the inferior or interior planets; an inferior conjunction of Mercury or Venus.
• Below the horizon; as, the inferior part of a meridian,
(Bot.) Situated below some other organ; — said of a calyx when free from the ovary, and therefore below it, or of an ovary with an adherent and therefore inferior calyx.
• On the side of a flower which is next the bract; anterior.
(Min.) Junior or subordinate in rank; as, an inferior officer.
n.
• A person lower in station, rank, intellect, etc., than another.
Inferiority
• The state of being inferior; a lower state or condition; as, inferiority of rank, of talents, of age, of worth.
Inferiorly
adv.
• In an inferior manner, or on the inferior part.
Infernal
a.
• Of or pertaining to or suitable for the lower regions, inhabited, according to the ancients, by the dead; pertaining to Pluto's realm of the dead, the Tartarus of the ancients.
• Of or pertaining to, resembling, or inhabiting, hell; suitable for hell, or to the character of the inhabitants of hell; hellish; diabolical; as, infernal spirits, or conduct.
n.
• An inhabitant of the infernal regions; also, the place itself.
Infernally
adv.
• In an infernal manner; diabolically.
Inferobranchian
n.
(Zool.) One of the Inferobranchiata.
Inferobranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of marine gastropod mollusks, in which the gills are between the foot and the mantle.
Inferobranchiate
a.
(Zool.) Having the gills on the sides of the body, under the margin of the mantle; belonging to the Inferobranchiata.
Inferrible
a.
• Inferable.
Infertile
a.
• Not fertile; not productive; barren; sterile; as, an infertile soil.
Infertilely
adv.
• In an infertile manner.
Infertility
n.
• The state or quality of being infertile; unproductiveness; barrenness.
Infest
a.
• Mischievous; hurtful; harassing.
v. t.
• To trouble greatly by numbers or by frequency of presence; to disturb; to annoy; to frequent and molest or harass; as, fleas infest dogs and cats; a sea infested with pirates.
Infester
n.
• One who, or that which, infests.
Infestive
a.
• Having no mirth; not festive or merry; dull; cheerless; gloomy; forlorn.
Infestivity
n.
• Want of festivity, cheerfulness, or mirth; dullness; cheerlessness.
Infesttation
n.
• The act of infesting or state of being infested; molestation; vexation; annoyance.
Infestuous
a.
• Mischievous; harmful; dangerous.
Infeudation
n.
(Law) The act of putting one in possession of an estate in fee.
• The granting of tithes to laymen.
Infibulation
n.
• The act of clasping, or fastening, as with a buckle or padlock.
• The act of attaching a ring, clasp, or frame, to the genital organs in such a manner as to prevent copulation.
Infidel
a.
• Not holding the faith; — applied esp. to one who does not believe in the inspiration of the Scriptures, and the supernatural origin of Christianity.
n.
• One who does not believe in the prevailing religious faith; especially, one who does not believe in the divine origin and authority of Christianity; a Mohammedan; a heathen; a freethinker.
Infidelity
n.
• Want of faith or belief in some religious system; especially, a want of faith in, or disbelief of, the inspiration of the Scriptures, of the divine origin of Christianity.
• Unfaithfulness to the marriage vow or contract; violation of the marriage covenant by adultery.
• Breach of trust; unfaithfulness to a charge, or to moral obligation; treachery; deceit; as, the infidelity of a servant.
Infield
v. t.
• To inclose, as a field.
n.
• Arable and manured land kept continually under crop; — distinguished from outfield.
(Baseball) The diamond; — opposed to outfield.
Infile
v. t.
• To arrange in a file or rank; to place in order.
Infilm
v. t.
• To cover with a film; to coat thinly; as, to infilm one metal with another in the process of gilding; to infilm the glass of a mirror.
Infilter
v. t. & i.
• To filter or sift in.
Infiltrate
v. i.
• To enter by penetrating the pores or interstices of a substance; to filter into or through something.
v. t.
• To penetrate gradually; — sometimes used reflexively.
Infiltration
n.
• The act or process of infiltrating, as if water into a porous substance, or of a fluid into the cells of an organ or part of the body.
• The substance which has entered the pores or cavities of a body.
Infiltrative
a.
• Of or pertaining to infiltration.
Infinite
a.
• Unlimited or boundless, in time or space; as, infinite duration or distance.
• Without limit in power, capacity, knowledge, or excellence; boundless; immeasurably or inconceivably great; perfect; as, the infinite wisdom and goodness of God; — opposed to finite.
• Indefinitely large or extensive; great; vast; immense; gigantic; prodigious.
(Math.) Greater than any assignable quantity of the same kind; — said of certain quantities.
(Mus.) Capable of endless repetition; — said of certain forms of the canon, called also perpetual fugues, so constructed that their ends lead to their beginnings, and the performance may be incessantly repeated.
n.
• That which is infinite; boundless space or duration; infinity; boundlessness.
(Math.) An infinite quantity or magnitude.
• An infinity; an incalculable or very great number.
• The Infinite Being; God; the Almighty.
Infinitely
adv.
• Without bounds or limits; beyond or below assignable limits; as, an infinitely large or infinitely small quantity.
• Very; exceedingly; vastly; highly; extremely.
Infiniteness
n.
• The state or quality of being infinite; infinity; greatness; immensity.
Infinitesimal
a.
• Infinitely or indefinitely small; less than any assignable quantity or value; very small.
n.
(Math.) An infinitely small quantity; that which is less than any assignable quantity.
Infinitesimally
adv.
• By infinitesimals; in infinitely small quantities; in an infinitesimal degree.
Infinitival
a.
• Pertaining to the infinite mood.
Infinitive
n.
• Unlimited; not bounded or restricted; undefined.
n.
(Gram.) An infinitive form of the verb; a verb in the infinitive mood; the infinitive mood.
adv.
(Gram.) In the manner of an infinitive mood.
Infinito
a.
(Mus.) Infinite; perpetual, as a canon whose end leads back to the beginning.
Infinitude
n.
• The quality or state of being infinite, or without limits; infiniteness.
• Infinite extent; unlimited space; immensity; infinity.
• Boundless number; countless multitude.
Infinituple
a.
• Multipied an infinite number of times.
Infinity
n.
• Unlimited extent of time, space, or quantity; eternity; boundlessness; immensity.
• Unlimited capacity, energy, excellence, or knowledge; as, the infinity of God and his perfections.
• Endless or indefinite number; great multitude; as an infinity of beauties.
(Math.) A quantity greater than any assignable quantity of the same kind.
(Geom.) That part of a line, or of a plane, or of space, which is infinitely distant. In modern geometry, parallel lines or planes are sometimes treated as lines or planes meeting at infinity.
Infirm
a.
• Not firm or sound; weak; feeble; as, an infirm body; an infirm constitution.
• Weak of mind or will; irresolute; vacillating.
• Not solid or stable; insecure; precarious.
v. t.
• To weaken; to enfeeble.
Infirmarian
n.
• A person dwelling in, or having charge of, an infirmary, esp. in a monastic institution.
Infirmary
n.
• A hospital, or place where the infirm or sick are lodged and nursed gratuitously, or where out-patients are treated.
Infirmative
a.
• Weakening; annulling, or tending to make void.
Infirmatory
n.
• An infirmary.
Infirmity
n.
• The state of being infirm; feebleness; an imperfection or weakness; esp., an unsound, unhealthy, or debilitated state; a disease; a malady; as, infirmity of body or mind.
• A personal frailty or failing; foible; eccentricity; a weakness or defect.
Infirmly
adv.
• In an infirm manner.
Infirmness
n.
• Infirmity; feebleness.
Infix
v. t.
• To set; to fasten or fix by piercing or thrusting in; as, to infix a sting, spear, or dart.
• To implant or fix; to instill; to inculcate, as principles, thoughts, or instructions; as, to infix good principles in the mind, or ideas in the memory.
n.
• Something infixed.
Inflame
v. t.
• To set on fire; to kindle; to cause to burn, flame, or glow.
• Fig.: To kindle or intensify, as passion or appetite; to excite to an excessive or unnatural action or heat; as, to inflame desire.
• To provoke to anger or rage; to exasperate; to irritate; to incense; to enrage.
(Med.) To put in a state of inflammation; to produce morbid heat, congestion, or swelling, of; as, to inflame the eyes by overwork.
• To exaggerate; to enlarge upon.
v. i.
• To grow morbidly hot, congested, or painful; to become angry or incensed.
Inflamed
p. a.
• Set on fire; enkindled; heated; congested; provoked; exasperated.
(Her.) Represented as burning, or as adorned with tongues of flame.
Inflamer
n.
• The person or thing that inflames.
Inflammabillty
n.
• Susceptibility of taking fire readily; the state or quality of being inflammable.
Inflammable
a.
• Capable of being easily set fire; easily enkindled; combustible; as, inflammable oils or spirits.
• Excitable; irritable; irascible; easily provoked; as, an inflammable temper.
Inflammableness
n.
• The quality or state of being inflammable; inflammability.
Inflammation
n.
• The act of inflaming, kindling, or setting on fire; also, the state of being inflamed.
(Med.) A morbid condition of any part of the body, consisting in congestion of the blood vessels, with obstruction of the blood current, and growth of morbid tissue. It is manifested outwardly by redness and swelling, attended with heat and pain.
• Violent excitement; heat; passion; animosity; turbulence; as, an inflammation of the mind, of the body politic, or of parties.
Inflammative
a.
• Inflammatory.
Inflammatory
a.
• Tending to inflame, kindle, or irritate.
• Tending to excite anger, animosity, tumult, or sedition; seditious; as, inflammatory libels, writings, speeches, or publications.
(Med.) Accompanied with, or tending to cause, preternatural heat and excitement of arterial action; as, an inflammatory disease.
Inflammbly
adv.
• In an inflammable manner.
Inflatable
a.
• That may be inflated.
Inflate
p. a.
• Blown in; inflated.
v. t.
• To swell or distend with air or gas; to dilate; to expand; to enlarge; as, to inflate a bladder; to inflate the lungs.
• Fig.: To swell; to puff up; to elate; as, to inflate one with pride or vanity.
• To cause to become unduly expanded or increased; as, to inflate the currency.
v. i.
• To expand; to fill; to distend.
Inflated
a.
• Filled, as with air or gas; blown up; distended; as, a balloon inflated with gas.
• Turgid; swelling; puffed up; bombastic; pompous; as, an inflated style.
(Bot.) Hollow and distended, as a perianth, corolla, nectary, or pericarp.
• Distended or enlarged fictitiously; as, inflated prices, etc.
Inflater
n.
• One who, or that which, inflates; as, the inflaters of the stock exchange.
Inflatingly
adv.
• In a manner tending to inflate.
Inflation
n.
• The act or process of inflating, or the state of being inflated, as with air or gas; distention; expansion; enlargement.
• The state of being puffed up, as with pride; conceit; vanity.
• Undue expansion or increase, from overissue; — said of currency.
Inflationist
n.
• One who favors an increased or very large issue of paper money.
Inflatus
n.
• A blowing or breathing into; inflation; inspiration.
Inflect
v. t.
• To turn from a direct line or course; to bend; to incline, to deflect; to curve; to bow.
(Gram.) To vary, as a noun or a verb in its terminations; to decline, as a noun or adjective, or to conjugate, as a verb.
• To modulate, as the voice.
Inflected
a.
• Bent; turned; deflected.
(Gram.) Having inflections; capable of, or subject to, inflection; inflective.
Inflection
n.
• The act of inflecting, or the state of being inflected.
• A bend; a fold; a curve; a turn; a twist.
• A slide, modulation, or accent of the voice; as, the rising and the falling inflection.
(Gram.) The variation or change which words undergo to mark case, gender, number, comparison, tense, person, mood, voice, etc.
(Mus.) Any change or modification in the pitch or tone of the voice.
• A departure from the monotone, or reciting note, in chanting.
(Opt.) Same as Diffraction.
Inflectional
a.
• Of or pertaining to inflection; having, or characterized by, inflection.
Inflective
a.
• Capable of, or pertaining to, inflection; deflecting; as, the inflective quality of the air.
(Gram.) Inflectional; characterized by variation, or change in form, to mark case, tense, etc.; subject to inflection.
Inflential
a.
• Exerting or possessing influence or power; potent; efficacious; effective; strong; having authority or ascendency; as, an influential man, station, argument, etc.
Inflesh
v. t.
• To incarnate.
Inflex
v. t.
• To bend; to cause to become curved; to make crooked; to deflect.
Inflexed
a.
• Turned; bent.
(Bot.) Bent or turned abruptly inwards, or toward the axis, as the petals of a flower.
Inflexibility
n.
• The quality or state of being inflexible, or not capable of being bent or changed; unyielding stiffness; inflexibleness; rigidity; firmness of will or purpose; unbending pertinacity; steadfastness; resoluteness; unchangeableness; obstinacy.
Inflexible
a.
• Not capable of being bent; stiff; rigid; firm; unyielding.
• Firm in will or purpose; not to be turned, changed, or altered; resolute; determined; unyieding; inexorable; stubborn.
• Incapable of change; unalterable; immutable.
Inflexibleness
n.
• The quality or state of being inflexible; inflexibility; rigidity; firmness.
Inflexibly
adv.
• In an inflexible manner.
Inflexion
n.
• Inflection.
Inflexive
a.
• Inflective.
• Inflexible.
Inflexure
n.
• An inflection; a bend or fold.
Inflict
v. t.
• To give, cause, or produce by striking, or as if by striking; to apply forcibly; to lay or impose; to send; to cause to bear, feel, or suffer; as, to inflict blows; to inflict a wound with a dagger; to inflict severe pain by ingratitude; to inflict punishment on an offender; to inflict the penalty of death on a criminal.
Inflicter
n.
• One who inflicts.
Infliction
n.
• The act of inflicting or imposing; as, the infliction of torment, or of punishment.
• That which is inflicted or imposed, as punishment, disgrace, calamity, etc.
Inflictive
a.
• Causing infliction; acting as an infliction.
Inflorescence
n.
• A flowering; the putting forth and unfolding of blossoms.
(Bot.) The mode of flowering, or the general arrangement and disposition of the flowers with reference to the axis, and to each other.
• An axis on which all the flower buds.
Inflow
v. i.
• To flow in.
Influence
n.
• A flowing in or upon; influx.
• Hence, in general, the bringing about of an effect, phusical or moral, by a gradual process; controlling power quietly exerted; agency, force, or tendency of any kind which the sun exerts on animal and vegetable life; the influence of education on the mind; the influence, according to astrologers,of the stars over affairs.
• Power or authority arising from elevated station, excelence of character or intellect, wealth, etc.; reputation; acknowledged ascendency; as, he is a man of influence in the community.
(Elec.) Induction.
v. t.
• To control or move by power, physical or moral; to affect by gentle action; to exert an influence upon; to modify, bias, or sway; to move; to persuade; to induce.
Influencer
n.
• One who, or that which, influences.
Influencive
a.
• Tending toinfluence; influential.
Influent
a.
• Flowing in.
• Exerting influence; influential.
Influentially
adv.
• In an influential manner.
Influenza
n.
(Med.) An epidemic affection characterized by acute nasal catarrh, or by inflammation of the throat or the bronchi, and usually accompanied by fever.
Influx
n.
• The act of flowing in; as, an influx of light.
• A coming in; infusion; intromission; introduction; importation in abundance; also, that which flows or comes in; as, a great influx of goods into a country, or an influx of gold and silver.
• Influence; power.
Influxion
n.
• A flowing in; infusion.
Influxious
a.
• Influential.
Influxive
a.
• Having a tendency to flow in; having influence; influential.
Influxively
adv.
• By influxion.
Infold
v. t.
• To wrap up or cover with folds; to envelop; to inwrap; to inclose; to involve.
• To clasp with the arms; to embrace.
Infoldment
n.
• The act of infolding; the state of being infolded.
Infoliate
v. t.
• To cover or overspread with, or as with, leaves.
Inform
a.
• Without regular form; shapeless; ugly; deformed.
v. t.
• To give form or share to; to give vital ororganizing power to; to give life to; to imbue and actuate with vitality; to animate; to mold; to figure; to fashion.
• To communicate knowledge to; to make known to; to acquaint; to advise; to instruct; to tell; to notify; to enlighten; — usually followed by of.
• To communicate a knowledge of facts to,by way of accusation; to warn against anybody.
v. t.
• To take form; to become visible or manifest; to appear.
• To give intelligence or information; to tell.
Informal
a.
• Not in the regular, usual, or established form; not according to official, conventional, prescribed, or customary forms or rules; irregular; hence, without ceremony; as, an informal writting, proceeding, or visit.
• Deranged in mind; out of one's senses.
Informality
n.
• The state of being informal; want of regular, prescribed, or customary form; as, the informality of legal proceedings.
• An informal, unconventional, or unofficial act or proceeding; something which is not in proper or prescribed form or does not conform to the established rule.
Informally
adv.
• In an informal manner.
Informant
n.
• One who, or that which, informs, animates, or vivifies.
• One who imparts information or instruction.
• One who offers an accusation; an informer.
Information
n.
• The act of informing, or communicating knowledge or intelligence.
• News, advice, or knowledge, communicated by others or obtained by personal study and investigation; intelligence; knowledge derived from reading, observation, or instruction.
(Law) A proceeding in the nature of a prosecution for some offens against the government, instituted and prosecuted, really or nominally, by some authorized public officer on behalt of the government. It differs from an indictment in criminal cases chiefly in not being based on the finding of a grand juri.
Informative
a.
• Having power to inform, animate, or vivify.
Informatory
a.
• Full of, or conveying, information; instructive.
Informed
a.
• Unformed or ill-formed; deformed; shapeless.
Informer
n.
• One who informs, animates, or inspires.
• One who informs, or imparts knowledge or news.
(Law) One who informs a magistrate of violations of law; one who informs against another for violation of some law or penal statute.
Informidable
a.
• Not formidable; not to be feared or dreaded.
Informity
n.
• Want of regular form; shapelessness.
Informous
a.
• Of irregular form; shapeless.
Infortunate
a.
• Unlucky; unfortunate.
Infortune
n.
• Misfortune.
Infortuned
a.
• Unfortunate.
Infound
v. t.
• To pour in; to infuse.
Infra
adv.
• Below; beneath; under; after; — often used as a prefix.
Infrabranchial
a.
(Zool.) Below the gills; — applied to the ventral portion of the pallial chamber in the lamellibranchs.
Infraclavicular
a.
(Anat.) Below the clavicle; as, the infraclavicular fossa.
Infract
a.
• Not broken or fractured; unharmed; whole.
v. t.
• To break; to infringe.
Infractible
a.
• Capable of being broken.
Infraction
n.
• The act of infracting or breaking; breach; violation; nonobservance; infringement; as, an infraction of a treaty, compact, rule, or law.
Infractor
n.
• One who infracts or infringes; a violator; a breaker.
Infragrant
a.
• Not fragrant.
Infrahyoid
a.
(Anat.) Same as Hyosternal (a).
Infralabial
a.
(Zool.) Below the lower lip; — said of certain scales of reptiles and fishes.
Infralapsarian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of that class of Calvinists who consider the decree of election as contemplating the apostasy as past and the elect as being at the time of election in a fallen and guilty state; — opposed to Supralapsarian. The former considered the election of grace as a remedy for an existing evil; the latter regarded the fall as a part of God's original purpose in regard to men.
a.
(Theor.) Of or pertaining to the Infralapsarians, or to their doctrine.
Infralapsarianism
n.
(Theor.) The doctrine, belief, or principles of the Inralapsarians.
Inframarginal
a.
• Below the margin; submarginal; as, an inframarginal convolution of the brain.
Inframaxillary
a.
(Anat.) Under the lower jaw; submaxillary; as, the inframaxillary nerve.
• Of or pertaining to the lower iaw.
Inframedian
a.
(Zoological Geog.) Of or pertaining to the interval or zone along the sea bottom, at the depth of between fifty and one hundred fathoms.
Inframundane
a.
• Lying or situated beneath the world.
Infrangibility
n.
• The quality or state of being infrangible; infrangibleness.
Infrangible
a.
• Not capable of being broken or separated into parts; as, infrangible atoms.
• Not to be infringed or violated.
Infrangibleness
n.
• The state or quality of being infrangible; infrangibility.
Infraocular
a.
(Zool.) Situated below the eyes, as the antenna of certain insects.
Infraorbital
a.
(Anat.) Below the orbit; as, the infraorbital foramen; the infraorbital nerve.
Infrapose
v. t.
• To place under or beneath.
Infraposition
n.
• A situation or position beneath.
Infrascapular
a.
(Anat.) Beneath the scapula, or shoulder blade; subscapular.
Infraspinal
a.
(Anat.) Below the vertebral column, subvertebral.
• Below the spine; infraspinate; infraspinous.
Infrastapedial
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to a part of the columella of the ear, which in many animals projects below the connection with the stapes.
n.
• The infrastapedial part of the columella.
Infrasternal
a.
(Anat.) Below the sternum; as, the infrasternal depression, or pit of the stomach.
Infratemporal
a.
(Anat.) Below the temple; below the temporal bone.
Infraterritorial
a.
• Within the territory of a state.
Infratrochlear
a.
(Anat.) Below a trochlea, or pulley; — applied esp. to one of the subdivisions of the trigeminal nerve.
Infrequent
a.
• Seldom happening or occurring; rare; uncommon; unusual.
Infrequently
adv.
• Not frequently; rarely.
Infrigidate
v. t.
• To chill; to make cold; to cool.
Infrigidation
n.
• The act of chilling or causing to become cold; a chilling; coldness; congelation.
Infringe
v. t.
• To break; to violate; to transgress; to neglect to fulfill or obey; as, to infringe a law or contract.
• To hinder; to destroy; as, to infringe efficacy; to infringe delight or power.
v. i.
• To break, violate, or transgress some contract, rule, or law; to injure; to offend.
• To encroach; to trespass; — followed by on or upon; as, to infringe upon the rights of another.
Infringement
n.
• The act of infringing; breach; violation; nonfulfillment; as, the infringement of a treaty, compact, law, or constitution.
• An encroachment on a patent, copyright, or other special privilege; a trespass.
Infringer
n.
• One who infringes or violates; a violator.
Infructuose
a.
• Not producing fruit; unfruitful; unprofitable.
Infrugal
a.
• Not frugal; wasteful; as, an infrugal expense of time.
Infrugiferous
a.
• Not bearing fruit; not fructiferous.
Infucate
v. t.
• To stain; to paint; to daub.
Infucation
n.
• The act of painting or staining, especially of painting the face.
Infula
n.
• A sort of fillet worn by dignitaries, priests, and others among the ancient Romans. It was generally white.
Infumate
v. t.
• To dry by exposing to smoke; to expose to smoke.
Infumated
a.
(Zool.) Clouded; having a cloudy appearance.
Infumation
n.
• Act of drying in smoke.
Infumed
a.
• Dried in smoke; smoked.
Infundibuliform
a.
• Having the form of a funnel or cone; funnel-shaped.
(Bot.) Same as Funnelform.
Infundibulum
n.
(Anat.) A funnel-shaped or dilated organ or part; as, the infundibulum of the brain, a hollow, conical process, connecting the floor of the third ventricle with the pituitary body; the infundibula of the lungs, the enlarged terminations of the bronchial tubes.
(Zool.) A central cavity in the Ctenophora, into which the gastric sac leads.
• The siphon of Cephalopoda.
Infuneral
v. t.
• To inter with funeral rites; to bury.
Infurcation
n.
• A forked exlpansion or divergence; a bifurcation; a branching.
Infuriate
a.
• Enraged; rading; furiously angry; infuriated.
v. t.
• To render furious; to enrage; to exasperate.
Infuriated
a.
• Enraged; furious.
Infuscate
v. t.
• To darken; to make black; to obscure.
Infuscated
a.
(Zool.) Darkened with a blackish tinge.
Infuscation
n.
• The act of darkening, or state of being dark; darkness; obscurity.
Infuse
v. t.
• To pour in, as a liquid; to pour (into or upon); to shed.
• To instill, as principles or qualities; to introduce.
• To inspire; to inspirit or animate; to fill; — followed by with.
• To steep in water or other fluid without boiling, for the propose of extracting medicinal qualities; to soak.
• To make an infusion with, as an ingredient; to tincture; to saturate.
n.
• Infusion.
Infuser
n.
• One who, or that which, infuses.
Infusibility
n.
• Capability of being infused, pouredin, or instilled.
n.
• Incapability or difficulty of being fused, melted, or dissolved; as, the infusibility of carbon.
Infusible
a.
• Capable of being infused.
a.
• Not fusible; incapble or difficalt of fusion, or of being dissolved or melted.
Infusibleness
n.
• Infusibility.
Infusion
n.
• The act of infusing, pouring in, or instilling; instillation; as, the infusion of good principles into the mind; the infusion of ardor or zeal.
• That which is infused; suggestion; inspiration.
• The act of plunging or dipping into a fluid; immersion.
(Pharmacy) The act or process of steeping or soaking any substance in water in order to extract its virtues.
• The liquid extract obtained by this process.
Infusionism
n.
• The doctrine that the soul is preexistent to the body, and is infused into it at conception or birth; — opposed to tradicianism and creationism.
Infusive
a.
• Having the power of infusion; inspiring; influencing.
Infusoria
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the classes of Protozoa, including a large number of species, all of minute size.
Infusorial
a.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Infusoria; composed of, or containing, Infusoria; as, infusorial earth.
Infusorian
n.
(Zool.) One of the Infusoria.
Infusory
a.
(Zool.) Infusorial.
n.
(Zool.) One of the Infusoria; — usually in the pl.
Ing
n.
• A pasture or meadow; generally one lying low, near a river.
Ingannation
n.
• Cheat; deception.
Ingate
n.
• Entrance; ingress.
(Fonding) The aperture in a mold for pouring in the metal; the gate.
Ingathering
n.
• The act or business of gathering or collecting anything; especially, the gathering of the fruits of the earth; harvest.
Ingelable
a.
• Not congealable.
Ingeminate
a.
• Redoubled; repeated.
v. t.
• To redouble or repeat; to reiterate.
Ingemination
n.
• Repetition; reduplication; reiteration.
Ingena
n.
(Zool.) The gorilla.
Ingenerabillty
n.
• Incapacity of being engendered or produced.
Ingenerable
a.
• Incapble of being engendered or produced; original.
Ingenerably
adv.
• In an ingenerable manner.
Ingenerate
a.
• Generated within; inborn; innate; as, ingenerate powers of body.
v. t.
• To generate or produce within; to begete; to engener; to occasion; to cause.
Ingeneration
n.
• Act of ingenerating.
Ingeniate
v. t. & i.
• To invent; to contrive.
Ingeniosity
n.
• Ingenuity; skill; cunning.
Ingenious
a.
• Possessed of genius, or the faculty of invention; skillful or promp to invent; having an aptitude to contrive, or to form new combinations; as, an ingenious author, mechanic.
• Proseeding from, pertaining to, or characterized by, genius or ingenuity; of curious design, structure, or mechanism; as, an ingenious model, or machine; an ingenious scheme, contrivance, etc.
• Witty; shrewd; adroit; keen; sagacious; as, an ingenious reply.
• Mental; intellectual.
Ingeniously
adv.
• In an ingenious manner; with ingenuity; skillfully; wittily; cleverly.
Ingeniousness
n.
• The quality or state of being ingenious; ingenuity.
Ingenuity
n.
• The quality or power of ready invention; quickness or acuteness in forming new combinations; ingeniousness; skill in devising or combining.
• Curiousness, or cleverness in design or contrivance; as, the ingenuity of a plan, or of mechanism.
• Openness of heat; ingeniuousness.
Ingenuous
a.
• Of honorable extraction; freeborn; noble; as, ingenuous blood of birth.
• Noble; generous; magnanimous; honorable; uprigth; high-minded; as, an ingenuous ardor or zeal.
• Free from reserve, disguise, equivocation, or dissimulation; open; frank; sa, an ingenuous man; an ingenuous declaration, confession, etc.
• Ingenious.
Ingenuously
adv.
• In an ingenuous manner; openly; fairly; candidly; artlessly.
Ingenuousness
n.
• The state or quality of being ingenuous; openness of heart; frankness.
• Ingenuity.
Ingeny
n.
• Natural gift or talent; ability; wit; ingenuity.
Ingerminate
v. t.
• To cause to germinate.
Ingest
v. t.
• To take into, or as into, the stomach or alimentary canal.
Ingesta
n. pl.
(Physiol.) That which is introduced into the body by the stomach or alimentary canal; — opposed to egesta.
Ingestion
n.
(Physiol.) The act of taking or putting into the stomach; as, the ingestion of milk or other food.
Inghalla
n.
(Zool.) The reedbuck of South Africa.
Ingirt
v. t.
• To encircle to gird; to engirt.
a.
• Surrounded; encircled.
Ingle
n.
• Flame; blaze; a fire; a fireplace.
n.
• A paramour; a favourite; a sweetheart; an engle.
v. t.
• To cajole or coax; to wheedle.
Inglobate
a.
• In the form of a globe or sphere; — applied to nebulous matter collected into a sphere by the force of gravitation.
Inglobe
v. t.
• To infix, as in a globe; to fix or secure firmly.
Inglorious
a.
• Not glorious; not bringing honor or glory; not accompanied with fame, honor, or celebrity; obscure; humble; as, an inglorious life of ease.
• Shameful; disgraceful; ignominious; as, inglorious flight, defeat, etc.
Ingloriously
adv.
• In an inglorious manner; dishonorably; with shame; ignominiously; obscurely.
Ingloriousness
n.
• The state of being inglorious.
Inglut
v. t.
• To glut.
Ingluvial
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the indulges or crop of birds.
Ingluvies
n.
(Anat.) The crop, or craw, of birds.
Ingluvious
a.
• Gluttonous.
Ingot
n.
• That in which metal is cast; a mold.
• A bar or wedge of steel, gold, or other malleable metal, cast in a mold; a mass of unwrought cast metal.
Ingrace
v. t.
• To ingratiate.
Ingracious
a.
• Ungracious; unkind.
Ingraft
v. t.
• To insert, as a scion of one tree, shrub, or plant in another for propagation; as, to ingraft a peach scion on a plum tree; figuratively, to insert or introduce in such a way as to make a part of something.
• To subject to the process of grafting; to furnish with grafts or scions; to graft; as, to ingraft a tree.
Ingrafter
n.
• A person who ingrafts.
Ingraftment
n.
• The act of ingrafting.
• The thing ingrafted; a scion.
Ingrain
a.
• Dyed with grain, or kermes.
• Dyed before manufacture, — said of the material of a textile fabric; hence, in general, thoroughly inwrought; forming an essential part of the substance.
n.
• An ingrain fabric, as a carpet.
v. t.
• To dye with or in grain or kermes.
• To dye in the grain, or before manufacture.
• To work into the natural texture or into the mental or moral constitution of; to stain; to saturate; to imbue; to infix deeply.
Ingrapple
v. t. & i.
• To seize; to clutch; to grapple.
Ingrate
a.
• Ingrateful.
n.
• An ungrateful person.
Ingrateful
a.
• Ungrateful; thankless; unappreciative.
• Unpleasing to the sense; distasteful; offensive.
Ingrately
adv.
• Ungratefully.
Ingratiate
v. t.
• To introduce or commend to the favor of another; to bring into favor; to insinuate; — used reflexively, and followed by with before the person whose favor is sought.
• To recommend; to render easy or agreeable; — followed by to.
v. i.
• To gain favor.
Ingratitude
n.
• Want of gratitude; insensibility to, forgetfulness of, or ill return for, kindness or favors received; unthankfulness; ungratefulness.
Ingrave
v. t.
• To engrave.
v. t.
• To bury.
Ingravidate
v. t.
• To impregnate.
Ingravidation
n.
• The state of being pregnant or impregnated.
Ingreat
v. t.
• To make great; to enlarge; to magnify.
Ingredient
n.
• That which enters into a compound, or is a component part of any combination or mixture; an element; a constituent.
a.
• Entering as, or forming, an ingredient or component part.
Ingress
n.
• The act of entering; entrance; as, the ingress of air into the lungs.
• Power or liberty of entrance or access; means of entering; as, all ingress was prohibited.
(Astron.) The entrance of the moon into the shadow of the earth in eclipses, the sun's entrance into a sign, etc.
v. i.
• To go in; to enter.
Ingression
n.
• Act of entering; entrance.
Ingrieve
v. t.
• To render more grievous; to aggravate.
Ingroove
v. t.
• To groove in; to join in or with a groove.
Ingrowing
a.
• Growing or appearing to grow into some other substance.
Ingrowth
n.
• A growth or development inward.
Inguen
n.
(Anat.) The groin.
Inguilty
a.
• Not guilty.
Inguinal
a.
(Astron. & Med.) Of or pertaining to, or in the region of, the inguen or groin; as, an inguinal canal or ligament; inguinal hernia.
Ingulf
v. t.
• To swallow up or overwhelm in, or as in, a gulf; to cast into a gulf.
Ingulfment
n.
• The act of ingulfing, or the state of being ingulfed.
Ingurgitate
v. t.
• To swallow, devour, or drink greedily or in large quantity; to guzzle.
• To swallow up, as in a gulf.
v. i.
• To guzzle; to swill.
Ingurgitation
n.
• The act of swallowing greedily or immoderately; that which is so swallowed.
Ingustable
a.
• Tasteless; insipid.
Inhabile
a.
• Not apt or fit; unfit; not convenient; inappropriate; unsuitable; as, inhabile matter.
• Unskilled; unready; awkward; incompetent; unqualified; — said of person.
Inhability
n.
• Unsuitableness; unaptness; unfitness; inability.
Inhabit
v. t.
• To live or dwell in; to occupy, as a place of settled residence; as, wild beasts inhabit the forest; men inhabit cities and houses.
v. i.
• To have residence in a place; to dwell; to live; to abide.
Inhabitable
a.
• Capable of being inhabited; habitable.
a.
• Not habitable; not suitable to be inhabited.
Inhabitant
n.
• One who dwells or resides permanently in a place, as distinguished from a transient lodger or visitor; as, an inhabitant of a house, a town, a city, county, or state.
(Law) One who has a legal settlement in a town, city, or parish; a permanent resident.
Inhabitate
v. t.
• To inhabit.
Inhabitation
n.
• The act of inhabiting, or the state of being inhabited; indwelling.
• Abode; place of dwelling; residence.
• Population; inhabitants.
Inhabitativeness
n.
(Phrenol.) A tendency or propensity to permanent residence in a place or abode; love of home and country.
Inhabited
a.
• Uninhabited.
Inhabiter
n.
• An inhabitant.
Inhabitress
n.
• A female inhabitant.
Inhalant
a.
• Inhaling; used for inhaling.
n.
• An apparatus also called an inhaler (which see); that which is to be inhaled.
Inhalation
n.
• The act of inhaling; also, that which is inhaled.
Inhale
v. t.
• To breathe or draw into the lungs; to inspire; as, to inhale air; — opposed to exhale.
Inhalent
a.
• Used for inhaling; as, the inhalent end of a duct.
Inhaler
n.
• One who inhales.
• An apparatus for inhaling any vapor or volatile substance, as ether or chloroform, for medicinal purposes.
• A contrivance to filter, as air, in order to protect the lungs from inhaling damp or cold air, noxious gases, dust, etc.; also, the respiratory apparatus for divers.
Inharmonious
a.
• Not harmonious; unmusical; discordant; dissonant.
• Conflicting; jarring; not in harmony.
Inharmoniously
adv.
• Without harmony.
Inharmoniousness
n.
• The quality of being inharmonious; want of harmony; discord.
Inharmony
n.
• Want of harmony.
Inhearse
v. t.
• To put in, or as in, a hearse or coffin.
Inhere
v. i.
• To be inherent; to stick (in); to be fixed or permanently incorporated with something; to cleave (to); to belong, as attributes or qualities.
Inherent
a.
• Permanently existing in something; inseparably attached or connected; naturally pertaining to; innate; inalienable; as, polarity is an inherent quality of the magnet; the inherent right of men to life, liberty, and protection.
Inherently
adv.
• By inherence; inseparably.
Inherit
v. t.
(Law) To take by descent from an ancestor; to take by inheritance; to take as heir on the death of an ancestor or other person to whose estate one succeeds; to receive as a right or title descendible by law from an ancestor at his decease; as, the heir inherits the land or real estate of his father; the eldest son of a nobleman inherits his father's title; the eldest son of a king inherits the crown.
• To receive or take by birth; to have by nature; to derive or acquire from ancestors, as mental or physical qualities; as, he inherits a strong constitution, a tendency to disease, etc.
• To come into possession of; to possess; to own; to enjoy as a possession.
• To put in possession of.
v. i.
• To take or hold a possession, property, estate, or rights by inheritance.
Inheritability
n.
• The quality of being inheritable or descendible to heirs.
Inheritable
a.
• Capable of being inherited; transmissible or descendible; as, an inheritable estate or title.
• Capable of being transmitted from parent to child; as, inheritable qualities or infirmities.
• Capable of taking by inheritance, or of receiving by descent; capable of succeeding to, as an heir.
Inheritably
adv.
• By inheritance.
Inheritance
n.
• The act or state of inheriting; as, the inheritance of an estate; the inheritance of mental or physical qualities.
• That which is or may be inherited; that which is derived by an heir from an ancestor or other person; a heritage; a possession which passes by descent.
• A permanent or valuable possession or blessing, esp. one received by gift or without purchase; a benefaction.
• Possession; ownership; acquisition.
(Biol.) Transmission and reception by animal or plant generation.
(Law) A perpetual or continuing right which a man and his heirs have to an estate; an estate which a man has by descent as heir to another, or which he may transmit to another as his heir; an estate derived from an ancestor to an heir in course of law.
Inheritor
n.
• One who inherits; an heir.
Inheritress
n.
• A heiress.
Inheritrix
n.
• Same as Inheritress.
Inhesion
n.
• The state of existing, of being inherent, in something; inherence.
Inhiation
n.
• A gaping after; eager desire; craving.
Inhibit
v. t.
• To check; to hold back; to restrain; to hinder.
• To forbid; to prohibit; to interdict.
Inhibition
n.
• The act of inhibiting, or the state of being inhibited; restraint; prohibition; embargo.
(Physiol.) A stopping or checking of an already present action; a restraining of the function of an organ, or an agent, as a digestive fluid or ferment, etc.; as, the inhibition of the respiratory center by the pneumogastric nerve; the inhibition of reflexes, etc.
(Law) A writ from a higher court forbidding an inferior judge from further proceedings in a cause before; esp., a writ issuing from a higher ecclesiastical court to an inferior one, on appeal.
Inhibitor
n.
• That which causes inhibitory action; esp., an inhibitory nerve.
Inhibitory
a.
• Of or pertaining to, or producing, inhibition; consisting in inhibition; tending or serving to inhibit; as, the inhibitory action of the pneumogastric on the respiratory center.
Inhive
v. t.
• To place in a hive; to hive.
Inhold
v. t.
• To have inherent; to contain in itself; to possess.
Inholder
n.
• An inhabitant.
Inhoop
v. t.
• To inclose in a hoop, or as in a hoop.
Inhospitable
a.
• Not hospitable; not disposed to show hospitality to strangers or guests; as, an inhospitable person or people.
• Affording no shelter or sustenance; barren; desert; bleak; cheerless; wild.
Inhospitality
n.
• The quality or state of being inhospitable; inhospitableness; lack of hospitality.
Inhuman
a.
• Destitute of the kindness and tenderness that belong to a human being; cruel; barbarous; savage; unfeeling; as, an inhuman person or people.
• Characterized by, or attended with, cruelty; as, an inhuman act or punishment.
Inhumanity
n.
• The quality or state of being inhuman; cruelty; barbarity.
Inhumanly
adv.
• In an inhuman manner; cruelly; barbarously.
Inhumate
v. t.
• To inhume; to bury; to inter.
Inhumation
n.
• The act of inhuming or burying; interment.
(Old Chem.) The act of burying vessels in warm earth in order to expose their contents to a steady moderate heat; the state of being thus exposed.
(Med.) Arenation.
Inhume
v. t.
• To deposit, as a dead body, in the earth; to bury; to inter.
• To bury or place in warm earth for chemical or medicinal purposes.
Inia
n.
(Zool.) A South American freshwater dolphin (Inia Boliviensis). It is ten or twelve feet long, and has a hairy snout.
Inial
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the inion.
Inimaginable
a.
• Unimaginable; inconceivable.
Inimical
a.
• Having the disposition or temper of an enemy; unfriendly; unfavorable; — chiefly applied to private, as hostile is to public, enmity.
• Opposed in tendency, influence, or effects; antagonistic; inconsistent; incompatible; adverse; repugnant.
Inimicality
n.
• The state or quality of being inimical or hostile; hostility; unfriendliness.
Inimically
adv.
• In an inimical manner.
Inimicitious
a.
• Inimical; unfriendly.
Inimicous
a.
• Inimical; hurtful.
Inimitability
n.
• The quality or state of being inimitable; inimitableness.
Inimitable
a.
• Not capable of being imitated, copied, or counterfeited; beyond imitation; surpassingly excellent; matchless; unrivaled; exceptional; unique; as, an inimitable style; inimitable eloquence.
Inion
n.
(Anat.) The external occipital protuberance of the skull.
Iniquitous
a.
• Characterized by iniquity; unjust; wicked; as, an iniquitous bargain; an iniquitous proceeding.
Iniquitously
adv.
• In an iniquitous manner; unjustly; wickedly.
Iniquity
n.
• Absence of, or deviation from, just dealing; want of rectitude or uprightness; gross injustice; unrighteousness; wickedness; as, the iniquity of bribery; the iniquity of an unjust judge.
• An iniquitous act or thing; a deed of injustice o unrighteousness; a sin; a crime.
• A character or personification in the old English moralities, or moral dramas, having the name sometimes of one vice and sometimes of another.
Iniquous
a.
• Iniquitous.
Inirritable
a.
• Not irritable; esp. (Physiol.), incapable of being stimulated to action, as a muscle.
Inirritative
a.
• Not accompanied with excitement; as, an inirritative fever.
Inisle
v. t.
• To form into an island; to surround.
Initial
a.
• Of or pertaining to the beginning; marking the commencement; incipient; commencing; as, the initial symptoms of a disease.
• Placed at the beginning; standing at the head, as of a list or series; as, the initial letters of a name.
n.
• The first letter of a word or a name.
v. t.
• To put an initial to; to mark with an initial of initials.
Initially
adv.
• In an initial or incipient manner or degree; at the beginning.
Initiate
v. t.
• To introduce by a first act; to make a beginning with; to set afoot; to originate; to commence; to begin or enter upon.
• To acquaint with the beginnings; to instruct in the rudiments or principles; to introduce.
• To introduce into a society or organization; to confer membership on; especially, to admit to a secret order with mysterious rites or ceremonies.
v. i.
• To do the first act; to perform the first rite; to take the initiative.
a.
• Unpracticed; untried; new.
• Begun; commenced; introduced to, or instructed in, the rudiments; newly admitted.
n.
• One who is, or is to be, initiated.
Initiation
n.
• The act of initiating, or the process of being initiated or introduced; as, initiation into a society, into business, literature, etc.
• The form or ceremony by which a person is introduced into any society; mode of entrance into an organized body; especially, the rite of admission into a secret society or order.
Initiative
a.
• Serving to initiate; inceptive; initiatory; introductory; preliminary.
n.
• An introductory step or movement; an act which originates or begins.
• The right or power to introduce a new measure or course of action, as in legislation; as, the initiative in respect to revenue bills is in the House of Representatives.
Initiator
n.
• One who initiates.
Initiatory
a.
• Suitable for an introduction or beginning; introductory; prefatory; as, an initiatory step.
• Tending or serving to initiate; introducing by instruction, or by the use and application of symbols or ceremonies; elementary; rudimentary.
n.
• An introductory act or rite.
Inition
n.
• Initiation; beginning.
Inject
v. t.
• To throw in; to dart in; to force in; as, to inject cold water into a condenser; to inject a medicinal liquid into a cavity of the body; to inject morphine with a hypodermic syringe.
• Fig.: To throw; to offer; to propose; to instill.
• To cast or throw; — with on.
(Anat.) To fill (a vessel, cavity, or tissue) with a fluid or other substance; as, to inject the blood vessels.
Injection
n.
• The act of injecting or throwing in; — applied particularly to the forcible throwing in of a liquid, or aeriform body, by means of a syringe, pump, etc.
• That which is injected; especially, a liquid medicine thrown into a cavity of the body by a syringe or pipe; a clyster; an enema.
(Anat.) The act or process of filling vessels, cavities, or tissues with a fluid or other substance.
• A specimen prepared by injection.
(Steam Eng.) The act of throwing cold water into a condenser to produce a vacuum.
• The cold water thrown into a condenser.
Injector
n.
• One who, or that which, injects.
(Mach.) A contrivance for forcing feed water into a steam boiler by the direct action of the steam upon the water. The water is driven into the boiler by the impulse of a jet of the steam which becomes condensed as soon as it strikes the stream of cold water it impels; — also called Giffard's injector, from the inventor.
Injelly
v. t.
• To place in jelly.
Injoint
v. t.
• To join; to unite.
v. t.
• To disjoint; to separate.
Injucundity
n.
• Unpleassantness; disagreeableness.
Injudicable
a.
• Not cognizable by a judge.
Injudicial
a.
• Not according to the forms of law; not judicial.
Injudicious
a.
• Not judicious; wanting in sound judgment; undiscerning; indiscreet; unwise; as, an injudicious adviser.
• Not according to sound judgment or discretion; unwise; as, an injudicious measure.
Injudiciously
adv.
• In an injudicious manner.
Injudiciousness
n.
• The quality of being injudicious; want of sound judgment; indiscretion.
Injunction
n.
• The act of enjoining; the act of directing, commanding, or prohibiting.
• That which is enjoined; an order; a mandate; a decree; a command; a precept; a direction.
(Law) A writ or process, granted by a court of equity, and, insome cases, under statutes, by a court of law,whereby a party is required to do or to refrain from doing certain acts, according to the exigency of the writ.
Injure
v. t.
• To do harm to; to impair the excellence and value of; to hurt; to damage; — used in a variety of senses; as: (a) To hurt or wound, as the person; to impair soundness, as of health. (b) To damage or lessen the value of, as goods or estate. (c) To slander, tarnish, or impair, as reputation or character. (d) To impair or diminish, as happiness or virtue. (e) To give pain to, as the sensibilities or the feelings; to grieve; to annoy. (f) To impair, as the intellect or mind.
Injurer
n.
• One who injures or wrongs.
Injuria
n.
(Law) Injury; invasion of another's rights.
Injurious
a.
• Not just; wrongful; iniquitous; culpable.
• Causing injury or harm; hurtful; harmful; detrimental; mischievous; as, acts injurious to health, credit, reputation, property, etc.
Injuriously
adv.
• In an injurious or hurtful manner; wrongfully; hurtfully; mischievously.
Injuriousness
n.
• The quality of being injurious or hurtful; harmfulness; injury.
Injury
n.
• Any damage or violation of, the person, character, feelings, rights, property, or interests of an individual; that which injures, or occasions wrong, loss, damage, or detriment; harm; hurt; loss; mischief; wrong; evil; as, his health was impaired by a severe injury; slander is an injury to the character.
Injustice
n.
• Want of justice and equity; violation of the rights of another or others; iniquity; wrong; unfairness; imposition.
• An unjust act or deed; a sin; a crime; a wrong.
Ink
n.
(Mach.) The step, or socket, in which the lower end of a millstone spindle runs.
n.
• A fluid, or a viscous material or preparation of various kinds (commonly black or colored), used in writing or printing.
• A pigment.
v. t.
• To put ink upon; to supply with ink; to blacken, color, or daub with ink.
Inker
n.
• One who, or that which, inks; especially, in printing, the pad or roller which inks the type.
Inkfish
n.
• A cuttlefish.
Inkhorn
n.
• A small bottle of horn or other material formerly used for holding ink; an inkstand; a portable case for writing materials.
a.
• Learned; pedantic; affected.
Inkhornism
n.
• Pedantry.
Inkiness
n.
• The state or quality of being inky; blackness.
Inking
a.
• Supplying or covering with ink.
Inkle
n.
• A kind of tape or braid.
v. t.
• To guess.
Inkling
n.
• A hint; an intimation.
Inknee
n.
• Same as Knock-knee.
Inknot
v. t.
• To fasten or bind, as with a knot; to knot together.
Inkstand
n.
• A small vessel for holding ink, to dip the pen into; also, a device for holding ink and writing materials.
Inkstone
n.
• A kind of stone containing native vitriol or subphate of iron, used in making ink.
Inky
a.
• Consisting of, or resembling, ink; soiled with ink; black.
Inlace
v. t.
• To work in, as lace; to embellish with work resembling lace; also, to lace or enlace.
Inlagation
n.
(Old Eng. Law) The restitution of an outlawed person to the protection of the law; inlawing.
Inlaid
p. p.
• of Inlay.
Inland
a.
• Within the land; more or less remote from the ocean or from open water; interior; as, an inland town.
• Limited to the land, or to inland routes; within the seashore boundary; not passing on, or over, the sea; as, inland transportation, commerce, navigation, etc.
• Confined to a country or state; domestic; not foreing; as, an inland bill of exchange.
n.
• The interior part of a country.
adv.
• Into, or towards, the interior, away from the coast.
Inlander
n.
• One who lives in the interior of a country, or at a distance from the sea.
Inlandish
a.
• Inland.
Inlapidate
v. t.
• To convert into a stony substance; to petrity.
Inlaw
v. t.
(Old Eng. Law) To clear of outlawry or attainder; to place under the protection of the law.
Inlay
v. t.
• To lay within; hence, to insert, as pieces of pearl, iviry, choice woods, or the like, in a groundwork of some other material; to form an ornamental surface; to diversify or adorn with insertions.
n.
• Matter or pieces of wood, ivory, etc., inlaid, or prepared for inlaying; that which is inserted or inlaid for ornament or variety.
Inlayer
n.
• One who inlays, or whose occupation it is to inlay.
Inleague
v. t.
• To ally, or form an alliance witgh; to unite; to combine.
Inleaguer
v. t.
• To beleaguer.
Inlet
n.
• A passage by which an inclosed place may be entered; a place of ingress; entrance.
• A bay or recess,as in the shore of a sea, lake, or large river; a narrow strip of water running into the land or between islands.
• That which is let in or inland; an inserted material.
Inlive
v. t.
• To animate.
Inlock
v. t.
• To lock in, or inclose.
Inly
a.
• Internal; interior; secret.
adv.
• Internally; within; in the heart.
Inmacy
n.
• The state of being an inmate.
Inmate
n.
• One who lives in the same house or apartment with another; a fellow lodger; esp.,one of the occupants of an asylum, hospital, or prison; by extension, one who occupies or lodges in any place or dwelling.
a.
• Admitted as a dweller; resident; internal.
Inmeats
n.pl.
• The edible viscera of animals, as the heart, liver, etc.
Inmesh
v. t.
• To bring within meshes, as of a net; to enmesh.
Inmew
v. t.
• To inclose, as in a mew or cage.
Inmost
a.
• Deepest within; farthest from the surface or external part; innermost.
Inn
n.
• A place of shelter; hence, dwelling; habitation; residence; abode.
• A house for the lodging and entertainment of travelers or wayfarers; a tavern; a public house; a hotel.
• The town residence of a nobleman or distinguished person; as, Leicester Inn.
• One of the colleges (societies or buildings) in London, for students of the law barristers; as, the Inns of Court; the Inns of Chancery; Serjeants' Inns.
v. i.
• To take lodging; to lodge.
v. t.
• To house; to lodge.
• To get in; to in.
Innate
a.
• Inborn; native; natural; as, innate vigor; innate eloquence.
(Metaph.) Originating in, or derived from, the constitution of the intellect, as opposed to acquired from experience; as, innate ideas.
(Bot.) Joined by the base to the very tip of a filament; as, an innate anther.
v. t.
• To cause to exit; to call into being.
Innately
adv.
• Naturally.
Innateness
n.
• The quality of being innate.
Innative
a.
• Native.
Innavigable
a.
• Incapable of being navigated; impassable by ships or vessels.
Inne
adv. & prep.
• In.
Inner
a.
• Further in; interior; internal; not outward; as, an spirit or its phenomena.
• Not obvious or easily discovered; obscure.
Innerly
adv.
• More within.
Innermost
a.
• Farthest inward; most remote from the outward part; inmost; deepest within.
Innermostly
adv.
• In the innermost place.
Innervate
v. t.
(Anat.) To supply with nerves; as, the heart is innervated by pneumogastric and sympathetic branches.
Innervation
n.
• The act of innerving or stimulating.
(Physiol.) Special activity excited in any part of the nervous system or in any organ of sense or motion; the nervous influence necessary for the maintenance of life,and the functions of the various organs.
(Anat.) The distribution of nerves in an animal, or to any of its parts.
Innerve
v. t.
• To give nervous energy or power to; to give increased energy,force,or courage to; to invigorate; to stimulate.
Innholder
n.
• One who keeps an inn.
Inning
n.
• Ingathering; harvesting.
• The state or turn of being in; specifically, in cricket, baseball, etc.,the turn or time of a player or of a side at the bat; — often in the pl. Hence: The turn or time of a person, or a party, in power; as, the Whigs went out, and the Democrats had their innings.
• Lands recovered from the sea.
Innitency
n.
• A leaning; pressure; weight.
Innixion
n.
• Act of leaning upon something; incumbency.
Innkeeper
n.
• An innholder.
Innocence
n.
• The state or quality of being innocent; freedom from that which is harmful or infurious; harmlessness.
• The state or quality of being morally free from guilt or sin; purity of heart; blamelessness.
• The state or quality of being not chargeable for, or guilty of, a particular crime or offense; as, the innocence of the prisoner was clearly shown.
• Simplicity or plainness, bordering on weakness or silliness; artlessness; ingenuousness.
Innocency
n.
• Innocence.
Innocent
a.
• Not harmful; free from that which can injure; innoxious; innocuous; harmless; as, an innocent medicine or remedy.
• Morally free from guilt; guiltless; not tainted with sin; pure; upright.
• Free from the guilt of a particular crime or offense; as, a man is innocent of the crime charged.
• Simple; artless; foolish.
• Lawful; permitted; as, an innocent trade.
• Not contraband; not subject to forfeiture; as, innocent goods carried to a belligerent nation.
n.
• An innocent person; one free from, or unacquainted with, guilt or sin.
• An unsophisticated person; hence, a child; a simpleton; an idiot.
Innocently
adv.
• In an innocent manner.
Innocuity
n.
• Innocuousness.
Innocuous
a.
• Harmless; producing no ill effect; innocent.
Innodate
v. t.
• To bind up,as in a knot; to include.
Innominable
a.
• Not to be named.
Innominate
a.
• Having no name; unnamed; as, an innominate person or place.
(Anat.) A term used in designating many parts otherwise unnamed; as, the innominate artery, a great branch of the arch of the aorta; the innominate vein, a great branch of the superior vena cava.
Innovate
v. t.
• To bring in as new; to introduce as a novelty; as, to innovate a word or an act.
• To change or alter by introducing something new; to remodel; to revolutionize.
v. i.
• To introduce novelties or changes; — sometimes with in or on.
Innovation
n.
• The act of innovating; introduction of something new, in customs, rites, etc.
• A change effected by innovating; a change in customs; something new, and contrary to established customs, manners, or rites.
(Bot.) A newly formed shoot, or the annually produced addition to the stems of many mosses.
Innovationist
n.
• One who favors innovation.
Innovative
a.
• Characterized by, or introducing, innovations.
Innovator
n.
• One who innovates.
Innoxious
a.
• Free from hurtful qualities or effects; harmless.
• Free from crime; pure; innocent.
Innubilous
a.
• Cloudless.
Innuendo
n.
• An oblique hint; a remote allusion or reference, usually derogatory to a person or thing not named; an insinuation.
(Law) An averment employed in pleading, to point the application of matter otherwise unintelligible; an interpretative parenthesis thrown into quoted matter to explain an obscure word or words; — as, the plaintiff avers that the defendant said that he (innuendo the plaintiff) was a thief.
Innuent
a.
• Conveying a hint; significant.
Innuit
n.
(Ethnol.) An Eskimo.
Innumerability
n.
• State of being innumerable.
Innumerable
a.
• Not capable of being counted, enumerated, or numbered, for multitude; countless; numberless; unnumbered, hence, indefinitely numerous; of great number.
Innumerous
a.
• Innumerable.
Innutrition
n.
• Want of nutrition; failure of nourishment.
Innutritious
a.
• Not nutritious; not furnishing nourishment.
Innutritive
a.
• Innutritious.
Innyard
n.
• The yard adjoining an inn.
Inobedience
n.
• Disobedience.
Inobedient
a.
• Not obedient; disobedient.
Inobservable
a.
• Not observable.
Inobservance
a.
• Want or neglect of observance.
Inobservant
a.
• Not observant; regardless; heedless.
Inobservation
n.
• Neglect or want of observation.
Inobtrusive
a.
• Not obtrusive; unobtrusive.
Inocarpin
n.
(Chem.) A red, gummy, coloring matter, extracted from the colorless juice of the Otaheite chestnut (Inocarpus edulis).
Inoccupation
n.
• Want of occupation.
Inoceramus
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct genus of large, fossil, bivalve shells,allied to the mussels. The genus is characteristic of the Cretaceous period.
Inoculability
n.
• The qual ity or state of being inoculable.
Inoculable
a.
• Capable of being inoculated; capable of communicating disease, or of being communicated, by inoculation.
Inocular
a.
(Zool) Inserted in the corner of the eye; — said of the antenn of certain insects.
Inoculate
v. t.
• To bud; to insert, or graft, as the bud of a tree or plant in another tree or plant.
• To insert a foreign bud into; as, to inoculate a tree.
(Med.) To communicate a disease to ( a person ) by inserting infectious matter in the skin or flesh; as, to inoculate a person with the virus of smallpox,rabies, etc.
• Fig.: To introduce into the mind; — used especially of harmful ideas or principles; to imbue; as, to inoculate one with treason or infidelity.
v. i.
• To graft by inserting buds.
• To communicate disease by inoculation.
Inoculation
n.
• The act or art of inoculating trees or plants.
(Med.) The act or practice of communicating a disease to a person in health, by inserting contagious matter in his skin or flesh.
• Fig.: The communication of principles, especially false principles, to the mind.
Inoculator
n.
• One who inoculates; one who propagates plants or diseases by inoculation.
Inodiate
v. t.
• To make odious or hateful.
Inodorate
a.
• Inodorous.
Inodorous
a.
• Emitting no odor; wthout smell; scentless; odorless.
Inoffensive
a.
• Giving no offense, or provocation; causing no uneasiness, annoyance, or disturbance; as, an inoffensive man, answer, appearance.
• Harmless; doing no injury or mischief.
• Not obstructing; presenting no interruption bindrance.
Inofficial
a.
• Not official; not having official sanction or authoriy; not according to the forms or ceremony of official business; as, inofficial intelligence.
Inofficially
adv.
• Without the usual forms, or not in the official character.
Inofficious
a.
• Indifferent to obligation or duty.
• Not officious; not civil or attentive.
(Law) Regardless of natural obligation; contrary to natural duty; unkind; — commonly said of a testament made without regard to natural obligation, or by which a child is unjustly deprived of inheritance.
Inofficiously
adv.
• Not-officiously.
Inogen
n.
(Physiol.) A complex nitrogenous substance, which, by Hermann's hypothesis, is continually decomposed and reproduced in the muscles, during their life.
Inoperation
n.
• Agency; influence; production of effects.
Inoperative
a.
• Not operative; not active; producing no effects; as, laws renderd inoperative by neglect; inoperative remedies or processes.
Inopinable
a.
• Not to be expected; inconceivable.
Inopinate
a.
• Not expected or looked for.
Inopportune
a.
• Not opportune; inconvenient; unseasonable; as, an inopportune occurrence, remark, etc.
Inopportunely
adv.
• Not opportunely; unseasonably; inconveniently.
Inopportunity
n.
• Want of opportunity; unseasonableness; inconvenience.
Inoppressive
a.
• Not oppressive or burdensome.
Inopulent
a.
• Not opulent; not affluent or rich.
Inordinacy
n.
• The state or quality of being inordinate; excessiveness; immoderateness; as, the inordinacy of love or desire.
Inordinate
a.
• Not limited to rules prescribed, or to usual bounds; irregular; excessive; immoderate; as, an inordinate love of the world.
Inordination
n.
• Deviation from custom, rule, or right; irregularity; inordinacy.
Inorganic
a.
• Not organic; without the organs necessary for life; devoid of an organized structure; unorganized; lifeness; inanimate; as, all chemical compounds are inorganic substances.
Inorganical
a.
• Inorganic.
Inorganically
adv.
• In an inorganic manner.
Inorganity
n.
• Quality of being inorganic.
Inorganization
n.
• The state of being without organization.
Inorganized
a.
• Not having organic structure; devoid of organs; inorganic.
Inorthography
n.
• Deviation from correct orthography; bad spelling.
Inosculate
v. i.
• To unite by apposition or contact, as two tubular vessels at their extremities; to anastomose.
• To intercommunicate; to interjoin.
v. t.
• To unite by apposition or contact, as two vessels in an animal body.
• To unite intimately; to cause to become as one.
Inosculation
n.
• The junction or connection of vessels, channels, or passages, so that their contents pass from one to the other; union by mouths or ducts; anastomosis; intercommunication; as, inosculation of veins, etc.
Inosinic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, inosite; as, inosinic acid.
Inosite
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A white crystalline substance with a sweet taste, found in certain animal tissues and fluids, particularly in the muscles of the heart and lungs, also in some plants, as in unripe pease, beans, potato sprouts, etc. Called also phaseomannite.
Inoxidizable
a.
(Chem.) Incapable of being oxidized; as, gold and platinum are inoxidizable in the air.
Inoxidize
v. i.
• To prevent or hinder oxidation, rust, or decay; as, inoxidizing oils or varnishes.
Inputability
n.
• The quality of being imputable; imputableness.
Inquartation
n.
• Quartation.
Inquest
n.
• Inquiry; quest; search.
(Law) Judicial inquiry; official examination, esp. before a jury; as, a coroner's inquest in case of a sudden death.
• A body of men assembled under authority of law to inquire into any matterm civil or criminal, particularly any case of violent or sudden death; a jury, particularly a coroner's jury. The grand jury is sometimes called the grand inquest.
• The finding of the jury upon such inquiry.
Inquiet
v. t.
• To disquiet.
Inquietation
n.
• Disturbance.
Inquietness
n.
• Unquietness.
Inquietude
n.
• Disturbed state; uneasiness either of body or mind; restlessness; disquietude.
Inquiline
n.
(Zool.) A gallfly which deposits its eggs in galls formed by other insects.
Inquinate
v. t.
• To defile; to pollute; to contaminate; to befoul.
Inquination
n.
• A defiling; pollution; stain.
Inquirable
a.
• Capable of being inquired into; subject or liable to inquisition or inquest.
Inquirance
n.
• Inquiry.
Inquire
v. i.
• To ask a question; to seek for truth or information by putting queries.
• To seek to learn anything by recourse to the proper means of knoledge; to make examination.
v. t.
• To ask about; to seek to know by asking; to make examination or inquiry respecting.
• To call or name.
Inquirent
a.
• Making inquiry; inquiring; questioning.
Inquirer
n.
• One who inquires or examines; questioner; investigator.
Inquiring
a.
• Given to inquiry; disposed to investigate causes; curious; as, an inquiring mind.
Inquiringly
adv.
• In an inquiring manner.
Inquiry
n.
• The act of inquiring; a seeking for information by asking questions; interrogation; a question or questioning.
• Search for truth, information, or knoledge; examination into facts or principles; research; invextigation; as, physical inquiries.
Inquisible
a.
• Admitting judicial inquiry.
Inquisition
n.
• The act of inquiring; inquiry; search; examination; inspection; investigation.
(Law) Judicial inquiry; official examination; inquest.
• The finding of a jury, especially such a finding under a writ of inquiry.
(R. C. Ch.) A court or tribunal for the examination and punishment of heretics, fully established by Pope Gregory IX. in 1235. Its operations were chiefly confined to Spain, Portugal, and their dependencies, and a part of Italy.
v. t.
• To make inquisistion concerning; to inquire into.
Inquisitional
a.
• Relating to inquiry or inquisition; inquisitorial; also, of or pertaining to, or characteristic of, the Inquisition.
Inquisitionary
a.
• Inquisitional.
Inquisitive
a.
• Disposed to ask questions, especially in matters which do not concern the inquirer.
• Given to examination, investigation, or research; searching; curious.
n.
• A person who is inquisitive; one curious in research.
Inquisitively
adv.
• In an inquisitive manner.
Inquisitiveness
n.
• The quality or state of being inquisitive; the disposition to seek explanation and information; curiosity to learn what is unknown; esp., uncontrolled and impertinent curiosity.
Inquisitor
n.
• An inquisitive person; one fond of asking questions.
(Law) One whose official duty it is to examine and inquire, as coroners, sheriffs, etc.
(R.C.Ch.) A member of the Court of Inquisition.
Inquisitorial
a.
• Pertaining to inquisition; making rigorous and unfriendly inquiry; searching; as, inquisitorial power.
• Pertaining to the Court of Inquisition or resembling its practices.
Inquisitorially
adv.
• In an inquisitorial manner.
Inquisitorious
a.
• Making strict inquiry; inquisitorial.
Inquisiturient
a.
• Inquisitorial.
Inracinate
v. t.
• To enroot or implant.
Inrail
v. t.
• To rail in; to inclose or surround, as with rails.
Inrecision
n.
• A cutting off, through, or asunder; interruption.
Inregister
v. t.
• To register; to enter, as in a register.
Inroad
n.
• The entrance of an enemy into a country with purposes of hostility; a sudden or desultory incursion or invasion; raid; encroachment.
v.t
• To make an inroad into; to invade.
Inrunning
n.
• The act or the place of entrance; an inlet.
Inrush
n.
• A rush inwards; as, the inrush of the tide.
v. i.
• To rush in.
Insabbatati
n. pl.
• The Waldenses; — so called from their peculiary cut or marked sabots, or shoes.
Insafety
n.
• Insecurity; danger.
Insalivation
n.
(Physiol.) The mixing of the food with the saliva and other secretions of the mouth in eating.
Insalubrious
a.
• Not salubrious or healthful; unwholesome; as, an insalubrious air or climate.
Insalubrity
n.
• Unhealthfulness; unwholesomeness; as, the insalubrity of air, water, or climate.
Insalutary
a.
• Not salutary or wholesome; unfavorable to health.
• Not tending to safety; productive of evil.
Insanability
n.
• The state of being insanable or incurable; insanableness.
Insanable
a.
• Not capable of being healed; incurable; irremediable.
Insanableness
n.
• The state of being insanable; insanability; incurableness.
Insanably
adv.
• In an incurable manner.
Insane
a.
• Exhibiting unsoundness or disorded of mind; not sane; mad; deranged in mind; delirious; distracted.
• Used by, or appropriated to, insane persons; as, an insane hospital.
• Causing insanity or madness.
• Characterized by insanity or the utmost folly; chimerical; unpractical; as, an insane plan, attempt, etc.
Insanely
adv.
• Without reason; madly; foolishly.
Insaneness
n.
• Insanity; madness.
Insaniate
v. t.
• To render unsound; to make mad.
Insanie
n.
• Insanity.
Insanitary
a.
• Not sanitary; unhealthy; as, insanitary conditions of drainage.
Insanitation
n.
• Lack of sanitation; careless or dangerous hygienic conditions.
Insanity
n.
• The state of being insane; unsoundness or derangement of mind; madness; lunacy.
(Law) Such a mental condition, as, either from the existence of delusions, or from incapacity to distinguish between right and wrong, with regard to any matter under action, does away with individual responsibility.
Insapory
a.
• Tasteless; unsavory.
Insatiability
n.
• The state or quality of being insatiable; insatiableness.
Insatiable
a.
• Not satiable; incapable of being satisfied or appeased; very greedy; as, an insatiable appetite, thirst, or desire.
Insatiableness
n.
• Greediness of appetite that can not be satisfied or appeased; insatiability.
Insatiably
adv.
• In an insatiable manner or degree; unappeasably.
Insatiate
a.
• Insatiable; as, insatiate thirst.
Insatiately
adv.
• Insatiably.
Insatiateness
n.
• The state of being insatiate.
Insatiety
n.
• Insatiableness.
Insatisfaction
n.
• Insufficiency; emptiness.
• Dissatisfaction.
Insaturable
a.
• Not capable of being saturated or satisfied.
Inscience
n.
• Want of knowledge; ignorance.
Inscient
a.
• Having little or no knowledge; ignorant; stupid; silly.
a.
• Having knowledge or insight; intelligent.
Inscribable
a.
• Capable of being inscribed, — used specif. (Math.) of solids or plane figures capable of being inscribed in other solids or figures.
Inscribableness
n.
• Quality of being inscribable.
Inscribe
v. t.
• To write or engrave; to mark down as something to be read; to imprint.
• To mark with letters, charakters, or words.
• To assign or address to; to commend to by a shot address; to dedicate informally; as, to inscribe an ode to a friend.
• To imprint deeply; to impress; to stamp; as, to inscribe a sentence on the memory.
(Geom.) To draw within so as to meet yet not cut the boundaries.
Inscriber
n.
• One who inscribes.
Inscriptible
a.
• Capable of being inscribed; inscribable.
Inscription
n.
• The act or process of inscribing.
• That which is inscribed; something written or engraved; especially, a word or words written or engraved on a solid substance for preservation or public inspection; as, inscriptions on monuments, pillars, coins, medals, etc.
(Anat.) A line of division or intersection; as, the tendinous inscriptions, or intersections, of a muscle.
• An address, consignment, or informal dedication, as of a book to a person, as a mark of respect or an invitation of patronage.
Inscriptive
a.
• Bearing inscription; of the character or nature of an inscription.
Inscroll
v. t.
• To write on a scroll; to record.
Inscrutability
n.
• The quality or state of being inscrutable; inscrutableness.
Inscrutable
a.
• Unsearchable; incapable of being searched into and understood by inquiry or study; impossible or difficult to be explained or accounted for satisfactorily; obscure; incomprehensible; as, an inscrutable design or event.
Inscrutableness
n.
• The quality or state of being inscrutable; inscrutability.
Inscrutably
adv.
• In an inscrutable manner.
Insculp
v. t.
• To engrave; to carve; to sculpture.
Insculption
n.
• Inscription.
Insculpture
n.
• An engraving, carving, or inscription.
Insculptured
p. a.
• Engraved.
Inseam
v. t.
• To impress or mark with a seam or cicatrix.
Insearch
v. t.
• To make search after; to investigate or examine; to ensearch.
Insecable
a.
• Incapable of being divided by cutting; indivisible.
Insect
n.
(Zool.) One of the Insecta; esp., one of the Hexapoda.
(Zool.) Any air-breathing arthropod, as a spider or scorpion.
(Zool.) Any small crustacean. In a wider sense, the word is often loosely applied to various small invertebrates.
• Fig.: Any small, trivial, or contemptible person or thing.
a.
• Of or pertaining to an insect or insects.
• Like an insect; small; mean; ephemeral.
Insecta
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the classes of Arthropoda, including those that have one pair of antennae, three pairs of mouth organs, and breathe air by means of tracheae, opening by spiracles along the sides of the body. In this sense it includes the Hexapoda, or six-legged insects and the Myriapoda, with numerous legs.
(Zool.) In a more restricted sense, the Hexapoda alone.
(Zool.) In the most general sense, the Hexapoda, Myriapoda, and Arachnoidea, combined.
Insectary
n.
• A place for keeping living insects.
Insectation
n.
• The act of pursuing; pursuit; harassment; persecution.
Insectator
n.
• A pursuer; a persecutor; a censorious critic.
Insected
a.
• Pertaining to, having the nature of, or resembling, an insect.
Insecticide
n.
• An agent or preparation for destroying insects; an insect powder.
Insectile
a.
• Pertaining to, or having the nature of, insects.
Insection
n.
• A cutting in; incisure; incision.
Insectivora
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of mammals which feed principally upon insects.
• A division of the Cheiroptera, including the common or insect-eating bats.
Insectivore
n.
(Zool.) One of the Insectivora.
Insectivorous
a.
• Feeding or subsisting on insects; carnivorous
• plants which have some special adaptation for catching and digesting insects, as the sundew, Venus's flytrap, Sarracenia, etc.
• the Insectivora, and to many bats, birds, and reptiles.
Insectologer
n.
• An entomologist.
Insectology
n.
• Entomology.
Insecure
a.
• Not secure; not confident of safety or permanence; distrustful; suspicious; apprehensive of danger or loss.
• Not effectually guarded, protected, or sustained; unsafe; unstable; exposed to danger or loss.
Insecurely
adv.
• In an insecure manner.
Insecureness
n.
• Insecurity.
Insecurity
n.
• The condition or quality of being insecure; want of safety; danger; hazard; as, the insecurity of a building liable to fire; insecurity of a debt.
• The state of feeling insecure; uncertainty; want of confidence.
Insecution
n.
• A following after; close pursuit. Chapman. Page 769
Inseminate
v. t.
• To sow; to impregnate.
Insemination
n.
• A sowing.
Insensate
a.
• Wanting sensibility; destitute of sense; stupid; foolish.
Insense
v. t.
• To make to understand; to instruct.
Insensibility
n.
• The state or quality of being insensible; want of sensibility; torpor; unconsciousness; as, the insensibility produced by a fall, or by opiates.
• Want of tenderness or susceptibility of emotion or passion; dullness; stupidity.
Insensible
a.
• Destitute of the power of feeling or perceiving; wanting bodily sensibility.
• Not susceptible of emotion or passion; void of feeling; apathetic; unconcerned; indifferent; as, insensible to danger, fear, love, etc.; — often used with of or to.
• Incapable of being perceived by the senses; imperceptible. Hence: Progressing by imperceptible degrees; slow; gradual; as, insensible motion.
• Not sensible or reasonable; meaningless.
Insensibleness
n.
• Insensibility.
Insensibly
adv.
• In a manner not to be felt or perceived; imperceptibly; gradually.
Insensitive
a.
• Not sensitive; wanting sensation, or wanting acute sensibility.
Insensuous
a.
• Not sensuous; not pertaining to, affecting, or addressing, the senses.
Insentiment
a.
• Not sentient; not having perception, or the power of perception.
Inseparability
n.
• The quality or state of being inseparable; inseparableness.
Inseparable
a.
• Not separable; incapable of being separated or disjoined.
(Gram.) Invariably attached to some word, stem, or root; as, the inseparable particle un-.
Inseparableness
n.
• The quality or state of being inseparable; inseparability.
Inseparably
adv.
• In an inseparable manner or condition; so as not to be separable.
Inseparate
a.
• Not separate; together; united.
Inseparately
adv.
• Inseparably.
Insert
v. t.
• To set within something; to put or thrust in; to introduce; to cause to enter, or be included, or contained; as, to insert a scion in a stock; to insert a letter, word, or passage in a composition; to insert an advertisement in a newspaper.
Inserted
a.
(Bot.) Situated upon, attached to, or growing out of, some part; — said especially of the parts of the flower; as, the calyx, corolla, and stamens of many flowers are inserted upon the receptacle.
Inserting
n.
• A setting in.
• Something inserted or set in, as lace, etc., in garments.
Insertion
n.
• The act of inserting; as, the insertion of scions in stocks; the insertion of words or passages in writings.
• The condition or mode of being inserted or attached; as, the insertion of stamens in a calyx.
• That which is set in or inserted, especially a narrow strip of embroidered lace, muslin, or cambric.
(Anat.) The point or part by which a muscle or tendon is attached to the part to be moved; — in contradistinction to its origin.
Inserve
v. i.
• To be of use to an end; to serve.
Inservient
a.
• Conducive; instrumental.
Insession
n.
• The act of sitting, as in a tub or bath.
• That in which one sits, as a bathing tub.
Insessor
n.
(Zool.) One of the Insessores. The group includes most of the common singing birds.
Insessores
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of birds, formerly established to include the perching birds, but now generally regarded as an artificial group.
Insessorial
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to, or having the character of, perching birds.
• Belonging or pertaining to the Insessores.
Inset
v. t.
• To infix.
n.
• That which is inserted or set in; an insertion.
(Bookbinding) One or more separate leaves inserted in a volume before binding; as: (a) A portion of the printed sheet in certain sizes of books which is cut off before folding, and set into the middle of the folded sheet to complete the succession of paging; — also called offcut. (b) A page or pages of advertisements inserted.
Inseverable
a.
• Incapable of being severed; indivisible; inseparable.
Inshaded
a.
• Marked with different shades.
Inshave
n.
(Mech.) A plane for shaving or dressing the concave or inside faces of barrel staves.
Insheathe
v. t.
• To insert as in a sheath; to sheathe.
Inshell
v. t.
• To hide in a shell.
Inship
v. t.
• To embark.
Inshore
a.
• Being near or moving towards the shore; as, inshore fisheries; inshore currents.
adv.
• Towards the shore; as, the boat was headed inshore.
Insiccation
n.
• The act or process of drying in.
Inside
prep.
adv.
• Within the sides of; in the interior; contained within; as, inside a house, book, bottle, etc.
a
• Being within; included or inclosed in anything; contained; interior; internal; as, the inside passengers of a stagecoach; inside decoration.
• Adapted to the interior.
n.
• The part within; interior or internal portion; content.
• The inward parts; entrails; bowels; hence, that which is within; private thoughts and feelings.
• An inside passenger of a coach or carriage, as distinguished from one upon the outside.
Insidiate
v. t.
• To lie in ambush for.
Insidiator
n.
• One who lies in ambush.
Insidious
a.
• Lying in wait; watching an opportunity to insnare or entrap; deceitful; sly; treacherous; — said of persons; as, the insidious foe.
• Intended to entrap; characterized by treachery and deceit; as, insidious arts.
Insight
n.
• A sight or view of the interior of anything; a deep inspection or view; introspection; — frequently used with into.
• Power of acute observation and deduction; penetration; discernment; perception.
Insignia
n. pl.
• Distinguishing marks of authority, office, or honor; badges; tokens; decorations; as, the insignia of royalty or of an order.
• Typical and characteristic marks or signs, by which anything is known or distinguished; as, the insignia of a trade.
Insignificance
n.
• The condition or quality of being insignificant; want of significance, sense, or meaning; as, the insignificance of words or phrases.
• Want of force or effect; unimportance; pettiness; inefficacy; as, the insignificance of human art.
• Want of claim to consideration or notice; want of influence or standing; meanness.
Insignificancy
n.
• Insignificance.
Insignificant
a.
• Not significant; void of signification, sense, or import; meaningless; as, insignificant words.
• Having no weight or effect; answering no purpose; unimportant; valueless; futile.
• Without weight of character or social standing; mean; contemptible; as, an insignificant person.
Insignificantly
adv.
• without significance, importance, or effect; to no purpose.
Insignificative
a.
• Not expressing meaning; not significant.
Insignment
n.
• A token, mark, or explanation.
Insimulate
v. t.
• To accuse.
Insincere
a.
• Not being in truth what one appears to be; not sincere; dissembling; hypocritical; disingenuous; deceitful; false; — said of persons; also of speech, thought; etc.; as, insincere declarations.
• Disappointing; imperfect; unsound.
Insincerely
adv.
• Without sincerity.
Insincerity
n.
• The quality of being insincere; want of sincerity, or of being in reality what one appears to be; dissimulation; hypocritical; deceitfulness; hollowness; untrustworthiness; as, the insincerity of a professed friend; the insincerity of professions of regard.
Insinew
v. t.
• To strengthen, as with sinews; to invigorate.
Insinuant
a.
• Insinuating; insinuative.
Insinuate
v. t.
• To introduce gently or slowly, as by a winding or narrow passage, or a gentle, persistent movement.
• To introduce artfully; to infuse gently; to instill.
• To hint; to suggest by remote allusion; — often used derogatorily; as, did you mean to insinuate anything?
• To push or work (one's self), as into favor; to introduce by slow, gentle, or artful means; to ingratiate; — used reflexively.
v. i.
• To creep, wind, or flow in; to enter gently, slowly, or imperceptibly, as into crevices.
• To ingratiate one's self; to obtain access or favor by flattery or cunning.
Insinuating
a.
• Winding, creeping, or flowing in, quietly or stealthily; suggesting; winning favor and confidence insensibly.
Insinuatingly
adv.
• By insinuation.
Insinuation
n.
• The act or process of insinuating; a creeping, winding, or flowing in.
• The act of gaining favor, affection, or influence, by gentle or artful means; — formerly used in a good sense, as of friendly influence or interposition.
• The art or power of gaining good will by a prepossessing manner.
• That which is insinuated; a hint; a suggestion or intimation by distant allusion; as, slander may be conveyed by insinuations.
Insinuative
a.
• Stealing on or into the confidence or affections; having power to gain favor.
• Using insinuations; giving hints; insinuating; as, insinuative remark.
Insinuator
n.
• One who, or that which, insinuates.
Insinuatory
a.
• Insinuative.
Insipid
a.
• Wanting in the qualities which affect the organs of taste; without taste or savor; vapid; tasteless; as, insipid drink or food.
• Wanting in spirit, life, or animation; uninteresting; weak; vapid; flat; dull; heavy; as, an insipid woman; an insipid composition.
Insipidly
adv.
• In an insipid manner; without taste, life, or spirit; flatly.
Insipience
n.
• Want of intelligence; stupidity; folly.
Insipient
a.
• Wanting wisdom; stupid; foolish.
n.
• An insipient person.
Insist
v. i.
• To stand or rest; to find support; — with in, on, or upon.
• To take a stand and refuse to give way; to hold to something firmly or determinedly; to be persistent, urgent, or pressing; to persist in demanding; — followed by on, upon, or that; as, he insisted on these conditions; he insisted on going at once; he insists that he must have money.
Insistence
n.
• The quality of insisting, or being urgent or pressing; the act of dwelling upon as of special importance; persistence; urgency.
Insistent
a.
• Standing or resting on something; as, an insistent wall.
• Insisting; persistent; persevering.
Insistently
adv.
• In an insistent manner.
Insisture
n.
• A dwelling or standing on something; fixedness; persistence.
Insitency
n.
• Freedom from thirst.
Insition
n.
• The insertion of a scion in a stock; ingraftment.
Insnare
v. t.
• To catch in a snare; to entrap; to take by artificial means.
• To take by wiles, stratagem, or deceit; to involve in difficulties or perplexities; to seduce by artifice; to inveigle; to allure; to entangle.
Insnarer
n.
• One who insnares.
Insnarl
v. t.
• To make into a snarl or knot; to entangle; to snarl.
Insobriety
n.
• Want of sobriety, moderation, or calmness; intemperance; drunkenness.
Insociability
n.
• The quality of being insociable; want of sociability; unsociability.
Insociable
a.
• Incapable of being associated, joined, or connected.
• Not sociable or companionable; disinclined to social intercourse or conversation; unsociable; taciturn.
Insociably
adv.
• Unsociably.
Insociate
a.
• Not associate; without a companion; single; solitary; recluse.
Insolate
v. t.
• To dry in, or to expose to, the sun's rays; to ripen or prepare by such exposure.
Insolation
n.
• The act or process to exposing to the rays of the sun fro the purpose of drying or maturing, as fruits, drugs, etc., or of rendering acid, as vinegar.
(Med.) A sunstroke.
• Exposure of a patient to the sun's rays; a sun bath.
Insole
n.
• The inside sole of a boot or shoe; also, a loose, thin strip of leather, felt, etc., placed cide the shoe for warmth or ease.
Insolence
n.
• The quality of being unusual or novel.
• The quality of being insolent; pride or haughtiness manifested in contemptuous and overbearing treatment of others; arrogant contempt; brutal imprudence.
• Insolent conduct or treatment; insult.
v. t.
• To insult.
Insolency
n.
• Insolence.
Insolent
a.
• Deviating from that which is customary; novel; strange; unusual.
• Haughty and contemptuous or brutal in behavior or language; overbearing; domineering; grossly rude or disrespectful; saucy; as, an insolent master; an insolent servant.
• Proceeding from or characterized by insolence; insulting; as, insolent words or behavior.
Insolently
adv.
• In an insolent manner.
Insolidity
n.
• Want of solidity; weakness; as, the insolidity of an argument.
Insolubility
n.
• The quality or state of being insoluble or not dissolvable, as in a fluid.
• The quality of being inexplicable or insolvable.
Insoluble
a.
• Not soluble; in capable or difficult of being dissolved, as by a liquid; as, chalk is insoluble in water.
• Not to be solved or explained; insolvable; as, an insoluble doubt, question, or difficulty.
• Strong.
Insolubleness
n.
• The quality or state of being insoluble; insolubility
Insolvable
a.
• Not solvable; insoluble; admitting no solution or explanation; as, an insolvable problem or difficulty.
• Incapable of being paid or discharged, as debts.
• Not capable of being loosed or disentangled; inextricable.
Insolvency
n.
(Law) The condition of being insolvent; the state or condition of a person who is insolvent; the condition of one who is unable to pay his debts as they fall due, or in the usual course of trade and business; as, a merchant's insolvency.
• Insufficiency to discharge all debts of the owner; as, the insolvency of an estate.
Insolvent
a.
(Law) Not solvent; not having sufficient estate to pay one's debts; unable to pay one's debts as they fall due, in the ordinary course of trade and business; as, in insolvent debtor.
• Not sufficient to pay all the debts of the owner; as, an insolvent estate.
• Relating to persons unable to pay their debts.
n.
(Law) One who is insolvent; as insolvent debtor; — in England, before 1861, especially applied to persons not traders.
Insomnia
n.
• Want of sleep; inability to sleep; wakefulness; sleeplessness.
Insomnious
a.
• Restless; sleepless.
Insomnolence
n.
• Sleeplessness.
Insomuch
adv.
• So; to such a degree; in such wise; — followed by that or as, and formerly sometimes by both. Cf. Inasmuch.
Insonorous
a.
• Not clear or melodious.
Insooth
adv.
• In sooth; truly.
Insouciance
n.
• Carelessness; heedlessness; thoughtlessness; unconcern.
Insouciant
a.
• Careless; heedless; indifferent; unconcerned.
Insoul
v. t.
• To set a soul in; reflexively, to fix one's strongest affections on.
Inspan
v. t. & i.
• To yoke or harness, as oxen to a vehicle.
Inspect
v. t.
• To look upon; to view closely and critically, esp. in order to ascertain quality or condition, to detect errors, etc., to examine; to scrutinize; to investigate; as, to inspect conduct.
• To view and examine officially, as troops, arms, goods offered, work done for the public, etc.; to oversee; to superintend.
n.
• Inspection.
Inspective
a.
• Engaged in inspection; inspecting; involving inspection.
Inspector
n.
• One who inspects, views, or oversees; one to whom the supervision of any work is committed; one who makes an official view or examination, as a military or civil officer; a superintendent; a supervisor; an overseer.
Inspectorate
n.
• Inspectorship.
Inspectorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to an inspector or to inspection.
Inspectorship
n.
• The office of an inspector.
• The district embraced by an inspector's jurisdiction.
Inspectress
n.
• A female inspector.
Inspecttion
n.
• The act or process of inspecting or looking at carefully; a strict or prying examination; close or careful scrutiny; investigation.
• The act of overseeing; official examination or superintendence.
Insperse
v. t.
• To sprinkle; to scatter.
Inspersion
n.
• The act of sprinkling.
Inspeximus
n.
• The first word of ancient charters in England, confirming a grant made by a former king; hence, a royal grant.
Insphere
v. t.
• To place in, or as in, an orb a sphere. Cf. Ensphere.
Inspirable
a.
• Capable of being inspired or drawn into the lungs; inhalable; respirable; admitting inspiration.
Inspiration
n.
• The act of inspiring or breathing in; breath; specif. (Physiol.), the drawing of air into the lungs, accomplished in mammals by elevation of the chest walls and flattening of the diaphragm; — the opposite of expiration.
• The act or power of exercising an elevating or stimulating influence upon the intellect or emotions; the result of such influence which quickens or stimulates; as, the inspiration of occasion, of art, etc.
(Theol.) A supernatural divine influence on the prophets, apostles, or sacred writers, by which they were qualified to communicate moral or religious truth with authority; a supernatural influence which qualifies men to receive and communicate divine truth; also, the truth communicated.
Inspirational
a.
• Pertaining to inspiration.
Inspirationist
n.
• One who holds to inspiration.
Inspirator
n.
(Mach.) A kind of injector for forcing water by steam.
Inspire
v. t.
• To breathe into; to fill with the breath; to animate.
• To infuse by breathing, or as if by breathing.
• To draw in by the operation of breathing; to inhale; — opposed to expire.
• To infuse into the mind; to communicate to the spirit; to convey, as by a divine or supernatural influence; to disclose preternaturally; to produce in, as by inspiration.
• To infuse into; to affect, as with a superior or supernatural influence; to fill with what animates, enlivens, or exalts; to communicate inspiration to; as, to inspire a child with sentiments of virtue.
v. i.
• To draw in breath; to inhale air into the lungs; — opposed to expire.
• To breathe; to blow gently.
Inspired
a.
• Breathed in; inhaled.
• Moved or animated by, or as by, a supernatural influence; affected by divine inspiration; as, the inspired prophets; the inspired writers.
• Communicated or given as by supernatural or divine inspiration; having divine authority; hence, sacred, holy; — opposed to uninspired, profane, or secular; as, the inspired writings, that is, the Scriptures.
Inspirer
n.
• One who, or that which, inspirer.
Inspiring
a.
• Animating; cheering; moving; exhilarating; as, an inspiring or scene.
Inspirit
v. t.
• To infuse new life or spirit into; to animate; to encourage; to invigorate.
Inspirtory
a.
• Pertaining to, or aiding, inspiration; as, the inspiratory muscles.
Inspissate
v. t.
• To thicken or bring to greater consistence, as fluids by evaporation.
a.
• Thick or thickened; inspissated.
Inspissation
n.
• The act or the process of inspissating, or thickening a fluid substance, as by evaporation; also, the state of being so thickened.
Instability
n.
• The quality or condition of being unstable; want of stability, firmness, or steadiness; liability to give way or to fail; insecurity; precariousness; as, the instability of a building.
• Lack of determination of fixedness; inconstancy; fickleness; mutability; changeableness; as, instability of character, temper, custom, etc.
Instable
a.
• Not stable; not standing fast or firm; unstable; prone to change or recede from a purpose; mutable; inconstant.
Instableness
n.
• Instability; unstableness.
Install
v. t.
• To set in a seat; to give a place to; establish (one) in a place.
• To place in an office, rank, or order; to invest with any charge by the usual ceremonies; to instate; to induct; as, to install an ordained minister as pastor of a church; to install a college president.
Installation
n.
• The act of installing or giving possession of an office, rank, or order, with the usual rites or ceremonies; as, the installation of an ordained minister in a parish.
(Mech.) The whole of a system of machines, apparatus, and accessories, when set up and arranged for practical working, as in electric lighting, transmission of power, etc.
Installment
n.
• The act of installing; installation.
• The seat in which one is placed.
• A portion of a debt, or sum of money, which is divided into portions that are made payable at different times. Payment by installment is payment by parts at different times, the amounts and times being often definitely stipulated.
Instance
n.
• The act or quality of being instant or pressing; urgency; solicitation; application; suggestion; motion.
• That which is instant or urgent; motive.
• Occasion; order of occurrence.
• That which offers itself or is offered as an illustrative case; something cited in proof or exemplification; a case occurring; an example.
• A token; a sign; a symptom or indication.
v. t.
• To mention as a case or example; to refer to; to cite; as, to instance a fact.
v. i.
• To give an example.
Instancy
n.
• Instance; urgency.
Instant
a.
• Pressing; urgent; importunate; earnest.
• Closely pressing or impending in respect to time; not deferred; immediate; without delay.
• Present; current.
adv.
• Instantly.
n.
• A point in duration; a moment; a portion of time too short to be estimated; also, any particular moment.
• A day of the present or current month; as, the sixth instant; — an elliptical expression equivalent to the sixth of the month instant, i. e., the current month.
Instantaneity
n.
• Quality of being instantaneous.
Instantaneous
a.
• Done or occurring in an instant, or without any perceptible duration of time; as, the passage of electricity appears to be instantaneous.
• At or during a given instant; as, instantaneous acceleration, velocity, etc.
Instanter
adv.
• Immediately; instantly; at once; as, he left instanter.
Instantly
adv.
• Without the least delay or interval; at once; immediately.
• With urgency or importunity; earnestly; pressingly.
Instar
v. t.
• To stud as with stars.
Instate
v. t.
• To set, place, or establish, as in a rank, office, or condition; to install; to invest; as, to instate a person in greatness or in favor.
Instaurate
v. t.
• To renew or renovate.
Instauration
n.
• Restoration after decay, lapse, or dilapidation; renewal; repair; renovation; renaissance.
Instaurator
n.
• One who renews or restores to a former condition.
Instaure
v. t.
• To renew or renovate; to instaurate.
Instead
adv.
• In the place or room; — usually followed by of.
• Equivalent; equal to; — usually with of.
Insteep
v. t.
• To steep or soak; to drench.
Instep
n.
• The arched middle portion of the human foot next in front of the ankle joint.
• That part of the hind leg of the horse and allied animals, between the hock, or ham, and the pastern joint.
Instigate
v. t.
• To goad or urge forward; to set on; to provoke; to incite; — used chiefly with reference to evil actions; as to instigate one to a crime.
Instigatingly
adv.
• Incitingly; temptingly.
Instigation
n.
• The act of instigating, or the state of being instigated; incitement; esp. to evil or wickedness.
Instigator
n.
• One who instigates or incites.
Instill
v. t.
• To drop in; to pour in drop by drop; hence, to impart gradually; to infuse slowly; to cause to be imbibed.
Instillation
n.
• The of instilling; also, that which is instilled.
Instiller
n.
• One who instills.
Instilllator
n.
• An instiller.
Instilllatory
a.
• Belonging to instillation.
Instillment
n.
• The act of instilling; also, that which is instilled.
Instimulate
v. t.
• Not to stimulate; to soothe; to quiet.
v. t.
• To stimulate; to excite.
Instimulation
n.
• Stimulation.
Instinct
a.
• Urged or smulated from within; naturally moved or impelled; imbued; animated; alive; quick; as, birds instinct with life.
n.
• Natural inward impulse; unconscious, involuntary, or unreasoning prompting to any mode of action, whether bodily, or mental, without a distinct apprehension of the end or object to be accomplished.
(Zool.) Specif., the natural, unreasoning, impulse by which an animal is guided to the performance of any action, without of improvement in the method.
• A natural aptitude or knack; a predilection; as, an instinct for order; to be modest by instinct.
v. t.
• To impress, as an animating power, or instinct.
Instinction
n.
• Instinct; incitement; inspiration.
Instinctive
a.
• Of or pertaining to instinct; derived from, or prompted by, instinct; of the nature of instinct; determined by natural impulse or propensity; acting or produced without reasoning, deliberation, instruction, or experience; spontaneous.
Instinctively
adv.
• In an instinctive manner; by force of instinct; by natural impulse.
Instinctivity
n.
• The quality of being instinctive, or prompted by instinct.
Institute
p. a.
• Established; organized; founded.
v. t.
• To set up; to establish; to ordain; as, to institute laws, rules, etc.
• To originate and establish; to found; to organize; as, to institute a court, or a society.
• To nominate; to appoint.
• To begin; to commence; to set on foot; as, to institute an inquiry; to institute a suit.
• To ground or establish in principles and rudiments; to educate; to instruct.
(Eccl. Law) To invest with the spiritual charge of a benefice, or the care of souls.
n.
• The act of instituting; institution.
• That which is instituted, established, or fixed, as a law, habit, or custom.
• Hence: An elementary and necessary principle; a precept, maxim, or rule, recognized as established and authoritative; usually in the plural, a collection of such principles and precepts; esp., a comprehensive summary of legal principles and decisions; as, the Institutes of Justinian; Coke's Institutes of the Laws of England. Cf. Digest, n.
• An institution; a society established for the promotion of learning, art, science, etc.; a college; as, the Institute of Technology; also, a building owned or occupied by such an institute; as, the Cooper Institute.
(Scots Law) The person to whom an estate is first given by destination or limitation.
Instituter
n.
• An institutor.
Institution
n.
• The act or process of instituting; as: (a) Establishment; foundation; enactment; as, the institution of a school.
• Instruction; education
(Eccl. Law) The act or ceremony of investing a clergyman with the spiritual part of a benefice, by which the care of souls is committed to his charge
• That which instituted or established
• Established order, method, or custom; enactment; ordinance; permanent form of law or polity.
• An established or organized society or corporation; an establishment, especially of a public character, or affecting a community; a foundation; as, a literary institution; a charitable institution; also, a building or the buildings occupied or used by such organization; as, the Smithsonian Institution
• Anything forming a characteristic and persistent feature in social or national life or habits
• That which institutes or instructs; a textbook; a system of elements or rules; an institute.
Institutional
a.
• Pertaining to, or treating of, institutions; as, institutional legends.
• Instituted by authority.
• Elementary; rudimental.
Institutionary
a.
• Relating to an institution, or institutions.
• Containing the first principles or doctrines; elemental; rudimentary.
Institutist
n.
• A writer or compiler of, or a commentator on, institutes.
Institutive
a.
• Tending or intended to institute; having the power to establish.
• Established; depending on, or characterized by, institution or order.
Institutively
adv.
• In conformity with an institution.
Institutor
n.
• One who institutes, founds, ordains, or establishes.
• One who educates; an instructor.
(Episcopal Church) A presbyter appointed by the bishop to institute a rector or assistant minister over a parish church.
Instop
v. t.
• To stop; to close; to make fast; as, to instop the seams.
Instore
v. t.
• To store up; to inclose; to contain.
Instratified
a.
• Interstratified.
Instruct
a.
• Arranged; furnished; provided.
• Instructed; taught; enlightened.
v. t.
• To put in order; to form; to prepare.
• To form by communication of knowledge; to inform the mind of; to impart knowledge or information to; to enlighten; to teach; to discipline.
• To furnish with directions; to advise; to direct; to command; as, the judge instructs the jury.
Instructible
a.
• Capable of being instructed; teachable; docible.
Instruction
n.
• The act of instructing, teaching, or furnishing with knowledge; information.
• That which instructs, or with which one is instructed; the intelligence or information imparted; as: (a) Precept; information; teachings. (b) Direction; order; command.
Instructional
a.
• Pertaining to, or promoting, instruction; educational.
Instructive
a.
• Conveying knowledge; serving to instruct or inform; as, experience furnishes very instructive lessons.
Instructor
n.
• One who instructs; one who imparts knowledge to another; a teacher.
Instructress
n.
• A woman who instructs; a preceptress; a governess.
Instrument
n.
• That by means of which any work is performed, or result is effected; a tool; a utensil; an implement; as, the instruments of a mechanic; astronomical instruments.
• A contrivance or implement, by which musical sounds are produced; as, a musical instrument.
(Law) A writing, as the means of giving formal expression to some act; a writing expressive of some act, contract, process, as a deed, contract, writ, etc.
• One who, or that which, is made a means, or is caused to serve a purpose; a medium, means, or agent.
v. t.
• To perform upon an instrument; to prepare for an instrument; as, a sonata instrumented for orchestra.
Instrumental
a.
• Acting as an instrument; serving as a means; contributing to promote; conductive; helpful; serviceable; as, he was instrumental in conducting the business.
(Mus.) Pertaining to, made by, or prepared for, an instrument, esp. a musical instrument; as, instrumental music, distinguished from vocal music.
(Gram.) Applied to a case expressing means or agency; as, the instrumental case. This is found in Sanskrit as a separate case, but in Greek it was merged into the dative, and in Latin into the ablative. In Old English it was a separate case, but has disappeared, leaving only a few anomalous forms.
Instrumentalist
n.
• One who plays upon an instrument of music, as distinguished from a vocalist.
Instrumentality
n.
• The quality or condition of being instrumental; that which is instrumental; anything used as a means; medium; agency.
Instrumentally
adv.
• By means of an instrument or agency; as means to an end.
• With instruments of music; as, a song instrumentally accompanied.
Instrumentalness
n.
• Usefulness or agency, as means to an end; instrumentality.
Instrumentary
a.
• Instrumental.
Instrumentation
n.
• The act of using or adapting as an instrument; a series or combination of instruments; means; agency.
(Mus.) The arrangement of a musical composition for performance by a number of different instruments; orchestration; instrumental composition; composition for an orchestra or military band.
• The act or manner of playing upon musical instruments; performance; as, his instrumentation is perfect.
Instrumentist
n.
• A performer on a musical instrument; an instrumentalist.
Instyle
v. t.
• To style.
Insuavity
n.
• Want of suavity; unpleasantness.
Insubjection
n.
• Want of subjection or obedience; a state of disobedience, as to government.
Insubmergible
a.
• Not capable of being submerged; buoyant.
Insubmission
n.
• Want of submission; disobedience; noncompliance.
Insubordinate
a.
• Not submitting to authority; disobedient; rebellious; mutinous
Insubordination
n.
• The quality of being insubordinate; disobedience to lawful authority.
Insubstantial
a.
• Unsubstantial; not real or strong.
Insubstantiality
n.
• Unsubstantiality; unreality.
Insuccation
n.
• The act of soaking or moistening; maceration; solution in the juice of herbs.
Insuccess
n.
• Want of success.
Insuetude
n.
• The state or quality of being unaccustomed; absence of use or habit.
Insufferable
a.
• Incapable of being suffered, borne, or endured; insupportable; unendurable; intolerable; as, insufferable heat, cold, or pain; insufferable wrongs.
• Offensive beyond endurance; detestable.
Insufferably
adv.
• In a manner or to a degree beyond endurance; intolerably; as, a blaze insufferably bright; a person insufferably proud.
Insufficience
n.
• Insufficiency.
Insufficiency
n.
• The quality or state of being insufficient; want of sufficiency; deficiency; inadequateness; as, the insufficiency of provisions, of an excuse, etc.
• Want of power or skill; inability; incapacity; incompetency; as, the insufficiency of a man for an office.
Insufficient
a.
• Not sufficient; not enough; inadequate to any need, use, or purpose; as, the provisions are insufficient in quantity, and defective in quality.
• Wanting in strength, power, ability, capacity, or skill; incompetent; incapable; unfit; as, a person insufficient to discharge the duties of an office.
Insufficiently
adv.
• In an insufficient manner or degree; unadequately.
Insufflation
n.
• The act of breathing on or into anything
(R. C. Ch.) The breathing upon a person in the sacrament of baptism to symbolize the inspiration of a new spiritual life
(Med.) The act of blowing (a gas, powder, or vapor) into any cavity of the body.
Insuitable
a.
• Unsuitable.
Insular
a.
• Of or pertaining to an island; of the nature, or possessing the characteristics, of an island; as, an insular climate, fauna, etc.
• Of or pertaining to the people of an island; narrow; circumscribed; illiberal; contracted; as, insular habits, opinions, or prejudices.
n.
• An islander.
Insularity
n.
• The state or quality of being an island or consisting of islands; insulation.
• Narrowness or illiberality of opinion; prejudice; exclusiveness; as, the insularity of the Chinese or of the aristocracy.
Insularly
adv.
• In an insular manner.
Insulary
a.
• Insular.
Insulate
v. t.
• To make an island of.
• To place in a detached situation, or in a state having no communication with surrounding objects; to isolate; to separate.
(Elec. & Thermotics) To prevent the transfer o electricity or heat to or from (bodies) by the interposition of nonconductors.
Insulated
p. a.
• Standing by itself; not being contiguous to other bodies; separated; unconnected; isolated; as, an insulated house or column.
(Elect. & Thermotics) Separated from other bodies by means of nonconductors of heat or electricity.
(Astron.) Situated at so great a distance as to be beyond the effect of gravitation; — said of stars supposed to be so far apart that the affect of their mutual attraction is insensible.
Insulation
n.
• The act of insulating, or the state of being insulated; detachment from other objects; isolation.
(Elec. & Thermotics) The act of separating a body from others by nonconductors, so as to prevent the transfer of electricity or of heat; also, the state of a body so separated.
Insulator
n.
• One who, or that which, insulates.
(Elec. & Thermotics) The substance or body that insulates; a nonconductor.
Insulite
n.
(Elec.) An insulating material, usually some variety of compressed cellulose, made of sawdust, paper pulp, cotton waste, etc.
Insulous
a.
• Abounding in islands.
Insulse
a.
• Insipid; dull; stupid.
Insulsity
n.
• Insipidity; stupidity; dullness.
Insult
n.
• The act of leaping on; onset; attack.
• Gross abuse offered to another, either by word or act; an act or speech of insolence or contempt; an affront; an indignity.
v. t.
• To leap or trample upon; to make a sudden onset upon.
• To treat with abuse, insolence, indignity, or contempt, by word or action; to abuse; as, to call a man a coward or a liar, or to sneer at him, is to insult him.
v. i.
• To leap or jump.
• To behave with insolence; to exult.
Insultable
a.
• Capable of being insulted or affronted.
Insultation
n.
• The act of insulting; abusive or insolent treatment; insult.
• Exultation.
Insulter
n.
• One who insults.
Insulting
a.
• Containing, or characterized by, insult or abuse; tending to insult or affront; as, insulting language, treatment, etc.
Insultment
n.
• Insolent treatment; insult.
Insume
v. t.
• To take in; to absorb.
Insuperability
n.
• The quality or state of being insuperable; insuperableness.
Insuperable
a.
• Incapable of being passed over or surmounted; insurmountable; as, insuperable difficulties.
Insupportable
a.
• Incapable of being supported or borne; unendurable; insufferable; intolerable; as, insupportable burdens; insupportable pain.
Insupposable
a.
• Incapable of being supposed; not supposable; inconceivable.
Insuppressible
a.
• That can not be suppressed or concealed; irrepressible.
Insuppressive
a.
• Insuppressible.
Insurable
a.
• Capable of being insured against loss, damage, death, etc.; proper to be insured.
Insurance
n.
• The act of insuring, or assuring, against loss or damage by a contingent event; a contract whereby, for a stipulated consideration, called premium, one party undertakes to indemnify or guarantee another against loss by certain specified risks. Cf. Assurance, n., 6.
• The premium paid for insuring property or life.
• The sum for which life or property is insured.
• A guaranty, security, or pledge; assurance.
Insurancer
n.
• One who effects insurance; an insurer; an underwriter.
Insurant
n.
• The person insured.
Insure
v. t.
• To make sure or secure; as, to insure safety to any one.
• Specifically, to secure against a loss by a contingent event, on certain stipulated conditions, or at a given rate or premium; to give or to take an insurance on or for; as, a merchant insures his ship or its cargo, or both, against the dangers of the sea; goods and buildings are insured against fire or water; persons are insured against sickness, accident, or death; and sometimes hazardous debts are insured.
v. i.
• To underwrite; to make insurance; as, a company insures at three per cent.
Insurer
n.
• One who, or that which, insures; the person or company that contracts to indemnify losses for a premium; an underwriter.
Insurgent
a.
• Rising in opposition to civil or political authority, or against an established government; insubordinate; rebellious.
n.
• A person who rises in revolt against civil authority or an established government; one who openly and actively resists the execution of laws; a rebel.
Insurmountability
n.
• The state or quality of being insurmountable.
Insurmountable
a.
• Incapable of being passed over, surmounted, or overcome; insuperable; as, insurmountable difficulty or obstacle.
Insurmountableness
n.
• The state or quality of being insurmountable; insurmountability.
Insurmountably
adv.
• In a manner or to a degree not to be overcome.
Insurrection
n.
• A rising against civil or political authority, or the established government; open and active opposition to the execution of law in a city or state.
• A rising in mass to oppose an enemy.
Insurrectional
a.
• Pertaining to insurrection; consisting in insurrection.
Insurrectionary
a.
• Pertaining to, or characterized by, insurrection; rebellious; seditious.
Insurrectionist
n.
• One who favors, or takes part in, insurrection; an insurgent.
Insusceptibility
n.
• Want of susceptibility, or of capacity to feel or perceive.
Insusceptible
a.
• Not susceptible; not capable of being moved, affected, or impressed; that can not feel, receive, or admit; as, a limb insusceptible of pain; a heart insusceptible of pity; a mind insusceptible to flattery.
Insusceptive
a.
• Not susceptive or susceptible.
Insusurration
n.
• The act of whispering into something.
Inswathe
v. t.
• To wrap up; to infold; to swathe.
Intact
a.
• Untouched, especially by anything that harms, defiles, or the like; uninjured; undefiled; left complete or entire.
Intagliated
a.
• Engraved in intaglio; as, an intagliated stone.
Intaglio
n.
• A cutting or engraving; a figure cut into something, as a gem, so as to make a design depressed below the surface of the material; hence, anything so carved or impressed, as a gem, matrix, etc.; — opposed to cameo. Also used adjectively.
Intake
n.
• The place where water or air is taken into a pipe or conduit; — opposed to outlet.
• the beginning of a contraction or narrowing in a tube or cylinder.
• The quantity taken in; as, the intake of air.
Intaminated
a.
• Uncontaminated.
Intangibility
n.
• The quality or state of being intangible; intangibleness.
Intangible
a.
• Not tangible; incapable of being touched; not perceptible to the touch; impalpable; imperceptible.
Intastable
a.
• Incapable of being tasted; tasteless; unsavory.
Integer
n.
• A complete entity; a whole number, in contradistinction to a fraction or a mixed number.
Integrability
n.
(Math.) The quality of being integrable.
Integrable
a.
(Math.) Capable of being integrated.
Integral
a.
• Lacking nothing of completeness; complete; perfect; uninjured; whole; entire.
• Essential to completeness; constituent, as a part; pertaining to, or serving to form, an integer; integrant.
(Math.) Of, pertaining to, or being, a whole number or undivided quantity; not fractional.
• Pertaining to, or proceeding by, integration; as, the integral calculus.
n.
• A whole; an entire thing; a whole number; an individual.
(Math.) An expression which, being differentiated, will produce a given differential.
Integrality
n.
• Entireness.
Integrally
adv.
• In an integral manner; wholly; completely; also, by integration.
Integrant
a.
• Making part of a whole; necessary to constitute an entire thing; integral.
Integrate
v. t.
• To form into one whole; to make entire; to complete; to renew; to restore; to perfect.
• To indicate the whole of; to give the sum or total of; as, an integrating anemometer, one that indicates or registers the entire action of the wind in a given time.
(Math.) To subject to the operation of integration; to find the integral of.
Integration
n.
• The act or process of making whole or entire.
(Math.) The operation of finding the primitive function which has a given function for its differential coefficient.
• In the theory of evolution: The process by which the manifold is compacted into the relatively simple and permanent. It is supposed to alternate with differentiation as an agent in development.
Integrator
n.
(Math. & Mech.) That which integrates; esp., an instrument by means of which the area of a figure can be measured directly, or its moment of inertia, or statical moment, etc., be determined.
Integrity
n.
• The state or quality of being entire or complete; wholeness; entireness; unbroken state; as, the integrity of an empire or territory.
• Moral soundness; honesty; freedom from corrupting influence or motive; — used especially with reference to the fulfillment of contracts, the discharge of agencies, trusts, and the like; uprightness; rectitude.
• Unimpaired, unadulterated, or genuine state; entire correspondence with an original condition; purity.
Integropallial
a.
(Zool.) Having the pallial line entire, or without a sinus, as certain bivalve shells.
Integumation
n.
• That part of physiology which treats of the integuments of animals and plants.
Integument
n.
• That which naturally invests or covers another thing, as the testa or the tegmen of a seed; specifically (Anat.), a covering which invests the body, as the skin, or a membrane that invests a particular.
Integumentary
n.
• Belonging to, or composed of, integuments.
Integumentation
n.
• The act or process of covering with integuments; the state or manner of being thus covered.
Intellect
n.
(Metaph.) The part or faculty of the human soul by which it knows, as distinguished from the power to feel and to will; sometimes, the capacity for higher forms of knowledge, as distinguished from the power to perceive objects in their relations; the power to judge and comprehend; the thinking faculty; the understanding.
Intellected
a.
• Endowed with intellect; having intellectual powers or capacities.
Intellection
n.
• A mental act or process; especially: (a) The act of understanding; simple apprehension of ideas; intuition. Bentley. (b) A creation of the mind itself.
Intellective
a.
• Pertaining to, or produced by, the intellect or understanding; intellectual.
• Having power to understand, know, or comprehend; intelligent; rational.
• Capable of being perceived by the understanding only, not by the senses.
Intellectively
adv.
• In an intellective manner.
Intellectual
a.
• Belonging to, or performed by, the intellect; mental; as, intellectual powers, activities, etc.
• Endowed with intellect; having the power of understanding; having capacity for the higher forms of knowledge or thought; characterized by intelligence or mental capacity; as, an intellectual person.
• Suitable for exercising the intellect; formed by, and existing for, the intellect alone; perceived by the intellect; as, intellectual employments.
• Relating to the understanding; treating of the mind; as, intellectual philosophy, sometimes called "mental" philosophy.
n.
• The intellect or understanding; mental powers or faculties.
Intellectualism
n.
• Intellectual power; intellectuality.
• The doctrine that knowledge is derived from pure reason.
Intellectualist
n.
• One who overrates the importance of the understanding.
• One who accepts the doctrine of intellectualism.
Intellectuality
n.
• Intellectual powers; possession of intellect; quality of being intellectual.
Intellectualize
v. t.
• To treat in an intellectual manner; to discuss intellectually; to reduce to intellectual form; to express intellectually; to idealize.
• To endow with intellect; to bestow intellectual qualities upon; to cause to become intellectual.
Intellectually
adv.
• In an intellectual manner.
Intelligence
n.
• The act or state of knowing; the exercise of the understanding.
• The capacity to know or understand; readiness of comprehension; the intellect, as a gift or an endowment.
• Information communicated; news; notice; advice.
• Acquaintance; intercourse; familiarity.
• Knowledge imparted or acquired, whether by study, research, or experience; general information.
• An intelligent being or spirit; — generally applied to pure spirits; as, a created intelligence.
Intelligencer
n.
• One who, or that which, sends or conveys intelligence or news; a messenger.
Intelligencing
a.
• Informing; giving information; talebearing.
Intelligency
n.
• Intelligence.
Intelligent
a.
• Endowed with the faculty of understanding or reason; as, man is an intelligent being.
• Possessed of intelligence, education, or judgment; knowing; sensible; skilled; marked by intelligence; as, an intelligent young man; an intelligent architect; an intelligent answer.
• Gognizant; aware; communicate.
Intelligential
a.
• Of or pertaining to the intelligence; exercising or implying understanding; intellectual.
• Consisting of unembodied mind; incorporeal.
Intelligentiary
n.
• One who gives information; an intelligencer.
Intelligently
adv.
• In an intelligent manner; with intelligence.
Intelligibility
• The quality or state of being intelligible; clearness; perspicuity; definiteness.
Intelligible
• Capable of being understood or comprehended; as, an intelligible account or description; intelligible pronunciation, writing, etc.
Intelligibleness
n.
• The quality or state of being intelligible; intelligibility.
Intelligibly
adv.
• In an intelligible manner; so as to be understood; clearly; plainly; as, to write or speak intelligibly.
Intemerament
n.
• A bad state; as, the intemperament of an ulcerated part.
Intemerateness
n.
• The state of being unpolluted; purity.
Intemperance
n.
• The act of becoming, or state of being, intemperate; excess in any kind of action or indulgence; any immoderate indulgence of the appetites or passions.
• Specifically: Habitual or excessive indulgence in alcoholic liquors.
Intemperancy
n.
• Intemperance.
Intemperant
a.
• Intemperate.
Intemperate
a.
• Indulging any appetite or passion to excess; immoderate to enjoyments or exertion.
• Specifically, addicted to an excessive or habitual use of alcoholic liquors.
• Excessive; ungovernable; inordinate; violent; immoderate; as, intemperate language, zeal, etc.; intemperate weather.
v. t.
• To disorder.
Intemperately
adv.
• In an intemperate manner; immoderately; excessively; without restraint.
Intemperateness
n.
• The state of being intemperate; excessive indulgence of any appetite or passion; as, intemperateness in eating or drinking.
• Severity of weather; inclemency.
Intemperature
n.
• Intemperateness.
Intempestive
a.
• Out of season; untimely.
Intempestively
adv.
• Unseasonably.
Intempestivity
n.
• Unseasonableness; untimeliness.
Intenable
a.
• Incapable of being held; untenable; not defensible; as, an intenable opinion; an intenable fortress.
Intend
v. t.
• To stretch' to extend; to distend.
• To strain; to make tense.
• To intensify; to strengthen.
• To apply with energy.
• To bend or turn; to direct, as one's course or journey.
• To fix the mind on; to attend to; to take care of; to superintend; to regard.
• To fix the mind upon (something to be accomplished); to be intent upon; to mean; to design; to plan; to purpose; — often followed by an infinitely with to, or a dependent clause with that; as, he intends to go; he intends that she shall remain.
• To design mechanically or artistically; to fashion; to mold.
• To pretend; to counterfeit; to simulate.
Intendancy
n.
• The office or employment of an intendant.
• A territorial district committed to the charge of an intendant.
Intendant
n.
• One who has the charge, direction, or management of some public business; a superintendent; as, an intendant of marine; an intendant of finance.
a.
• Attentive.
Intended
a.
• Made tense; stretched out; extended; forcible; violent.
• Purposed; designed; as, intended harm or help.
• Betrothed; affianced; as, an intended husband.
n.
• One with whom marriage is designed; one who is betrothed; an affianced lover.
Intendedly
adv.
• Intentionally.
Intender
n.
• One who intends.
Intendiment
n.
• Attention; consideration; knowledge; understanding.
Intendment
n.
• Charge; oversight.
• Intention; design; purpose.
(Law) The true meaning, understanding, or intention of a law, or of any legal instrument.
Intenerate
v. t.
• To make tender or sensitive; to soften.
a.
• Made tender or soft; softened.
Inteneration
n.
• The act or process of intenerating, or the state of being intenerated; softening.
Intenible
a.
• Incapable of holding or containing.
Intensate
v. t.
• To intensify.
Intensation
n.
• The act or process of intensifying; intensification; climax.
Intensative
a.
• Adding intensity; intensifying.
Intense
a.
• Strained; tightly drawn; kept on the stretch; strict; very close or earnest; as, intense study or application; intense thought.
• Extreme in degree; excessive; immoderate; as: (a) Ardent; fervent; as, intense heat. (b) Keen; biting; as, intense cold. (c) Vehement; earnest; exceedingly strong; as, intense passion or hate. (d) Very severe; violent; as, intense pain or anguish. (e) Deep; strong; brilliant; as, intense color or light.
Intensely
adv.
• Intently.
• To an extreme degree; as, weather intensely cold.
Intenseness
n.
• The state or quality of being intense; intensity; as, the intenseness of heat or cold; the intenseness of study or thought.
Intensification
n.
• The act or process of intensifying, or of making more intense.
Intensifier
n.
• One who or that which intensifies or strengthens; in photography, an agent used to intensify the lights or shadows of a picture.
Intensify
v. t.
• To render more intense; as, to intensify heat or cold; to intensify colors; to intensify a photographic negative; to intensify animosity.
v. i.
• To become intense, or more intense; to act with increasing power or energy.
Intension
n.
• A straining, stretching, or bending; the state of being strained; as, the intension of a musical string.
• Increase of power or energy of any quality or thing; intenseness; fervency.
(Logic & Metaph.) The collective attributes, qualities, or marks that make up a complex general notion; the comprehension, content, or connotation; — opposed to extension, extent, or sphere.
Intensitive
a.
• Increasing the force or intensity of; intensive; as, the intensitive words of a sentence.
Intensity
n.
• The state or quality of being intense; intenseness; extreme degree; as, intensity of heat, cold, mental application, passion, etc.
(Physics) The amount or degree of energy with which a force operates or a cause acts; effectiveness, as estimated by results produced.
(Mech.) The magnitude of a distributed force, as pressure, stress, weight, etc., per unit of surface, or of volume, as the case may be; as, the measure of the intensity of a total stress of forty pounds which is distributed uniformly over a surface of four square inches area is ten pounds per square inch.
(Photog.) The degree or depth of shade in a picture.
Intensive
a.
• Stretched; admitting of intension, or increase of degree; that can be intensified.
• Characterized by persistence; intent; unremitted; assiduous; intense.
(Gram.) Serving to give force or emphasis; as, an intensive verb or preposition.
n.
• That which intensifies or emphasizes; an intensive verb or word.
Intensively
adv.
• In an intensive manner; by increase of degree.
Intensiveness
n.
• The quality or state of being intensive; intensity.
Intent
a.
• Closely directed; strictly attentive; bent; — said of the mind, thoughts, etc.; as, a mind intent on self-improvement.
• Having the mind closely directed to or bent on an object; sedulous; eager in pursuit of an object; — formerly with to, but now with on; as, intent on business or pleasure.
n.
• The act of turning the mind toward an object; hence, a design; a purpose; intention; meaning; drift; aim.
Intentation
n.
• Intention.
Intention
n.
• A stretching or bending of the mind toward of the mind toward an object; closeness of application; fixedness of attention; earnestness.
• A determination to act in a certain way or to do a certain thing; purpose; design; as, an intention to go to New York.
• The object toward which the thoughts are directed; end; aim.
• The state of being strained.
(Logic) Any mental apprehension of an object.
Intentional
a.
• Done by intention or design; intended; designed; as, the act was intentional, not accidental.
Intentionality
n.
• The quality or state of being intentional; purpose; design.
Intentionally
adv.
• In an intentional manner; with intention; by design; of purpose.
Intentioned
a.
• Having designs; — chiefly used in composition; as, well-intentioned, having good designs; ill-intentioned, having ill designs.
Intentive
a.
• Attentive; intent.
Intentively
adv.
• Attentively; closely.
Intentiveness
n.
• Closeness of attention or application of mind; attentiveness.
Intently
adv.
• In an intent manner; as, the eyes intently fixed.
Intentness
n.
• The state or quality of being intent; close application; attention.
Inter
v. t.
• To deposit and cover in the earth; to bury; to inhume; as, to inter a dead body.
Interact
n.
• A short act or piece between others, as in a play; an interlude; hence, intermediate employment or time.
v. i.
• To act upon each other; as, two agents mutually interact.
Interaction
n.
• Intermediate action.
• Mutual or reciprocal action or influence; as, the interaction of the heart and lungs on each other.
Interadditive
a.
• Added or placed between the parts of another thing, as a clause inserted parenthetically in a sentence.
Interagency
n.
• Intermediate agency.
Interagent
n.
• An intermediate agent.
Interall
n.
• Entrail or inside.
Interalveolar
a.
(Anat.) Between alveoli; as, the interalveolar septa between adjacent air cells in the lungs.
Interambulacral
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the interambulacra.
Interambulacrum
n.
(Zool.) In echinoderms, one of the areas or zones intervening between two ambulacra.
Interamnian
a.
• Situated between rivers.
Interanimate
v. t.
• To animate or inspire mutually.
Interarboration
n.
• The interweaving of branches of trees.
Interarticular
a.
(Anat.) Situated between joints or articulations; as, interarticular cartilages and ligaments.
Interatomic
a.
(Chem. & Physics) Between atoms; situated, or acting, between the atoms of bodies; as, interatomic forces.
Interaulic
a.
• Existing between royal courts.
Interauricular
a.
(Anat.) Between the auricles; as, the interauricular partition of the heart.
Interaxal
a.
(Arch.) Situated in an interaxis.
Interaxillary
a.
(Bot.) Situated within or between the axils of leaves.
Interaxis
n.
(Arch.) The space between two axes.
Interbastation
n.
• Patchwork.
Interbrachial
a.
(Zool.) Between the arms.
Interbranchial
a.
(Zool.) Between the branchiae.
Interbreed
v. t. & i.
• To breed by crossing different stocks of animals or plants.
Intercalar
a.
• Intercalary.
Intercalary
a.
(Chron.) Inserted or introduced among others in the calendar; as, an intercalary month, day, etc.; — now applied particularly to the odd day (Feb. 29) inserted in the calendar of leap year.
• Introduced or inserted among others; additional; supernumerary.
Intercalate
v. t.
(Chron.) To insert, as a day or other portion of time, in a calendar.
• To insert among others, as a verse in a stanza; specif. (Geol.), to introduce as a bed or stratum, between the layers of a regular series of rocks.
Intercalation
n.
(Chron.) The insertion of a day, or other portion of time, in a calendar.
• The insertion or introduction of anything among others, as the insertion of a phrase, line, or verse in a metrical composition; specif. (Geol.), the intrusion of a bed or layer between other layers.
Intercarotid
a.
(Anat.) Situated between the external and internal carotid arteries; as, an intercarotid ganglion.
Intercarpal
a.
(Anat.) Between the carpal bone; as, intercarpal articulations, ligaments.
Intercartilaginous
a.
(Anat.) Within cartilage; endochondral; as, intercartilaginous ossification.
Intercavernous
a.
(Anat.) Between the cavernous sinuses; as, the intercavernous sinuses connecting the cavernous sinuses at the base of the brain.
Intercede
v. i.
• To pass between; to intervene.
• To act between parties with a view to reconcile differences; to make intercession; to beg or plead in behalf of another; to mediate; — usually followed by with and for; as, I will intercede with him for you.
v. t.
• To be, to come, or to pass, between; to separate.
Intercedence
n.
• The act of interceding; intercession; intervention.
Intercedent
a.
• Passing between; mediating; pleading.
Interceder
n.
• One who intercedes; an intercessor; a mediator.
Intercellular
a.
• Lying between cells or cellules; as, intercellular substance, space, or fluids; intercellular blood channels.
Intercentral
a.
• Between centers.
Intercentrum
n.
(Anat.) The median of the three elements composing the centra of the vertebrae in some fossil batrachians.
Intercept
v. t.
• To take or seize by the way, or before arrival at the destined place; to cause to stop on the passage; as, to intercept a letter; a telegram will intercept him at Paris.
• To obstruct or interrupt the progress of; to stop; to hinder or oppose; as, to intercept the current of a river.
• To interrupt communication with, or progress toward; to cut off, as the destination; to blockade.
(Math.) To include between; as, that part of the ine which is intercepted between the points A and B.
n.
(Math.) A part cut off or intercepted, as a portion of a line included between two points, or cut off two straight lines or curves.
Intercepter
n.
• One who, or that which, intercepts.
Interception
n.
• The act of intercepting; as, interception of a letter; interception of the enemy.
Interceptive
a.
• Intercepting or tending to intercept.
Intercession
n.
• The act of interceding; mediation; interposition between parties at variance, with a view to reconcilation; prayer, petition, or entreaty in favor of, or (less often) against, another or others.
Intercessional
a.
• Pertaining to, of the nature of, or characterized by, intercession or entreaty.
Intercessionate
v. t.
• To entreat.
Intercessor
n.
• One who goes between, or intercedes; a mediator. (a) One who interposes between parties at variance, with a view to reconcile them. (b) One who pleads in behalf of another.
(Eccl.) A bishop, who, during a vacancy of the see, administers the bishopric till a successor is installed.
Intercessorial
a.
• Intercessory.
Intercessory
a.
• Pertaining to, of the nature of, or characterized by, intercession; interceding; as, intercessory prayer.
Interchain
v. t.
• To link together; to unite closely or firmly, as by a chain.
Interchange
v. t.
• To put each in the place of the other; to give and take mutually; to exchange; to reciprocate; as, to interchange places; they interchanged friendly offices and services.
• To cause to follow alternately; to intermingle; to vary; as, to interchange cares with pleasures.
v. i.
• To make an interchange; to alternate.
n.
• The act of mutually changing; the act of mutually giving and receiving; exchange; as, the interchange of civilities between two persons.
• The mutual exchange of commodities between two persons or countries; barter; commerce.
• Alternate succession; alternation; a mingling.
Interchangeability
n.
• The state or quality of being interchangeable; interchangeableness.
Interchangeable
a.
• Admitting of exchange or mutual substitution.
• Following each other in alternate succession; as, the four interchangeable seasons.
Interchangement
n.
• Mutual transfer; exchange.
Interchapter
n.
• An intervening or inserted chapter.
Intercidence
n.
• The act or state of coming or falling between; occurrence; incident.
Intercident
a.
• Falling or coming between; happening accidentally.
Intercipient
a.
• Intercepting; stopping.
n.
• One who, or that which, intercepts or stops anything on the passage.
Intercitizenship
n.
• The mutual right to civic privileges, in the different States.
Interclavicular
a.
(Anat.) Between the clavicles; as, the interclavicular notch of the sternum.
• Of or pertaining to the interclavicle.
Interclose
v. t.
• To shut in; to inclose.
Intercloud
v. t.
• To cloud.
Interclude
v. t.
• To shut off or out from a place or course, by something intervening; to intercept; to cut off; to interrupt.
Interclusion
n.
• Interception; a stopping obstruction.
Intercollegiate
a.
• Existing or carried on between colleges or universities; as, intercollegiate relations, rivalry, games, etc.
Intercolline
a.
(Geol.) Situated between hills; — applied especially to valleys lying between volcanic cones.
Intercolonial
a.
• Between or among colonies; pertaining to the intercourse or mutual relations of colonies; as, intercolonial trade.
Intercolumnar
a.
• Between columns or pillars; as, the intercolumnar fibers of Poupart's ligament; an intercolumnar statue.
Intercolumniation
n.
(Arch.) The clear space between two columns, measured at the bottom of their shafts.
Intercombat
n.
• Combat.
Intercoming
n.
• The act of coming between; intervention; interference.
Intercommon
v. t.
• To share with others; to participate; especially, to eat at the same table.
(O. Eng. Law) To graze cattle promiscuously in the commons of each other, as the inhabitants of adjoining townships, manors, etc.
Intercommonage
n.
(O. Eng. Law) The right or privilege of intercommoning.
Intercommune
v. i.
• To intercommunicate.
• To have mutual communication or intercourse by conservation.
Intercommunicable
a.
• Capable of being mutually communicated.
Intercommunicate
v. i.
• To communicate mutually; to hold mutual communication.
v. t.
• To communicate mutually; to interchange.
Intercommunication
n.
• Mutual communication.
Intercommunion
n.
• Mutual communion; as, an intercommunion of deities.
Intercommunity
n.
• Intercommunication; community of possessions, religion, etc.
Intercomparison
n.
• Mutual comparison of corresponding parts.
Interconnect
v. t.
• To join together.
Interconnection
n.
• Connection between; mutual connection.
Intercontinental
a.
• Between or among continents; subsisting or carried on between continents; as, intercontinental relations or commerce.
Interconvertible
a.
• Convertible the one into the other; as, coin and bank notes are interconvertible.
Intercostal
a.
(Anat. & Physiol.) Between the ribs; pertaining to, or produced by, the parts between the ribs; as, intercostal respiration, in which the chest is alternately enlarged and contracted by the intercostal muscles.
Intercourse
n.
• A mmingling; intimate connection or dealings between persons or nations, as in common affairs and civilities, in correspondence or trade; communication; commerce; especially, interchange of thought and feeling; association; communion.
Intercross
v. t. & i.
• To cross each other, as lines.
(Biol.) To fertilize by the impregnation of one species or variety by another; to impregnate by a different species or variety.
n.
• The process or result of cross fertilization between different kinds of animals, or different varieties of plants.
Intercrural
a.
(Anat.) Between crura; — applied especially to the interneural plates in the vertebral column of many cartilaginous fishes.
Intercur
v. i.
• To intervene; to come or occur in the meantime.
Intercurrence
n.
• A passing or running between; occurrence.
Intercurrent
a.
• Running between or among; intervening.
(Med.) Not belonging to any particular season.
• Said of diseases occurring in the course of another disease.
n.
• Something intervening.
Intercutaneous
a.
• Subcutaneous.
Interdash
v. t.
• To dash between or among; to intersperse.
Interdeal
v. i.
• To intrigue.
Interdental
a.
• Situated between teeth; as, an interdental space, the space between two teeth in a gear wheel.
(Phon.) Formed between the upper and lower teeth; as, interdental consonants.
Interdentil
n.
(Arch.) The space between two dentils.
Interdependence
n.
• Mutual dependence.
Interdependency
n.
• Mutual dependence; as, interdependency of interests.
Interdependent
a.
• Mutually dependent.
Interdict
v. t.
• To forbid; to prohibit or debar; as, to interdict intercourse with foreign nations.
(Eccl.) To lay under an interdict; to cut off from the enjoyment of religious privileges, as a city, a church, an individual.
n.
• A prohibitory order or decree; a prohibition.
(R. C. Ch.) A prohibition of the pope, by which the clergy or laymen are restrained from performing, or from attending, divine service, or from administering the offices or enjoying the privileges of the church.
(Scots Law) An order of the court of session, having the like purpose and effect with a writ of injunction out of chancery in England and America.
Interdiction
n.
• The act of interdicting; prohibition; prohibiting decree; curse; interdict.
Interdictive
a.
• Having the power to prohibit; as, an interdictive sentence.
Interdictory
a.
• Belonging to an interdiction; prohibitory.
Interdigital
a.
(Anat.) Between the fingers or toes; as, interdigital space.
Interdigitate
v. t.
• To interweave.
v. i.
• To interlock, as the fingers of two hands that are joined; to be interwoven; to commingle.
Interdigitation
n.
(Anat.) The state of interdigitating; interdigital space.
Interdome
n.
(Arch.) The open space between the inner and outer shells of a dome or cupola of masonry.
Interduce
n.
(Carp.) An intertie.
Interepimeral
a.
(Zool.) Between the epimeral plates of insects and crustaceans.
Interequinoctial
a.
• Coming between the equinoxes.
Interess
v. t.
• To interest or affect.
Interesse
n.
• Interest.
Interest
v. t.
• To engage the attention of; to awaken interest in; to excite emotion or passion in, in behalf of a person or thing; as, the subject did not interest him; to interest one in charitable work.
• To be concerned with or engaged in; to affect; to concern; to excite; — often used impersonally.
• To cause or permit to share.
n.
• Excitement of feeling, whether pleasant or painful, accompanying special attention to some object; concern.
• Participation in advantage, profit, and responsibility; share; portion; part; as, an interest in a brewery; he has parted with his interest in the stocks.
• Advantage, personal or general; good, regarded as a selfish benefit; profit; benefit.
• Premium paid for the use of money, — usually reckoned as a percentage; as, interest at five per cent per annum on ten thousand dollars.
• Any excess of advantage over and above an exact equivalent for what is given or rendered.
• The persons interested in any particular business or measure, taken collectively; as, the iron interest; the cotton interest.
Interested
a.
• Having the attention engaged; having emotion or passion excited; as, an interested listener.
• Having an interest; concerned in a cause or in consequences; liable to be affected or prejudiced; as, an interested witness.
Interestedness
n.
• The state or quality of being interested; selfishness.
Interesting
a.
• Engaging the attention; exciting, or adapted to excite, interest, curiosity, or emotion; as, an interesting story; interesting news.
Interestingly
adv.
• In an interesting manner.
Interestingness
n.
• The condition or quality of being interesting.
Interfacial
a.
(Geom.) Included between two plane surfaces or faces; as, an interfacial angle.
Interfascicular
a.
(Anat.) Between fascicles or bundles; as, the interfascicular spaces of connective tissue.
Interferant
n.
(Law) One of the contestants in interference before the Patent Office.
Interfere
v. i.
• To come in collision; to be in opposition; to clash; as, interfering claims, or commands.
• To enter into, or take a part in, the concerns of others; to intermeddle; to interpose.
• To strike one foot against the opposite foot or ankle in using the legs; — sometimes said of a human being, but usually of a horse; as, the horse interferes.
(Physics) To act reciprocally, so as to augment, diminish, or otherwise affect one another; — said of waves, rays of light, heat, etc.
(Patent Law) To cover the same ground; to claim the same invention.
Interference
n.
• The act or state of interfering; as, the stoppage of a machine by the interference of some of its parts; a meddlesome interference in the business of others.
(Physics) The mutual influence, under certain conditions, of two streams of light, or series of pulsations of sound, or, generally, two waves or vibrations of any kind, producing certain characteristic phenomena, as colored fringes, dark bands, or darkness, in the case of light, silence or increased intensity in sounds; neutralization or superposition of waves generally.
(Patent Law) The act or state of interfering, or of claiming a right to the same invention.
Interferer
n.
• One who interferes.
Interferingly
adv.
• By or with interference.
Interflow
v. i.
• To flow in.
Interfolded
p. a.
• Intertwined; interlocked; clasped together.
Interfoliaceous
a.
(Bot.) At the same node with opposite or whorled leaves, but occupying a position between their places of attachment.
Interfoliate
v. t.
• To interleave.
Interfollicular
a.
(Anat.) Between follicles; as, the interfollicular septa in a lymphatic gland.
Interfretted
a.
(Her.) Interlaced; linked together; — said of charges or bearings.
Interfulgent
a.
• Shining between.
Interfuse
v. t.
• To pour or spread between or among; to diffuse; to scatter.
• To spread through; to permeate; to pervade.
• To mix up together; to associate.
Interfusion
n.
• The act of interfusing, or the state of being interfused.
Interganglionic
a.
(Anat.) Between and uniting the nervous ganglions; as, interganglionic cords.
Interglobular
a.
(Anat.) Between globules; — applied esp. to certain small spaces, surrounded by minute globules, in dentine.
Intergrave
v. t.
• To grave or carve between; to engrave in the alternate sections.
Interhyal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to a segment sometimes present at the proximal end of the hyoidean arch.
n.
• An interhyal ligament or cartilage.
Interim
n.
• The meantime; time intervening; interval between events, etc.
(Hist.) A name given to each of three compromises made by the emperor Charles V. of Germany for the sake of harmonizing the connecting opinions of Protestants and Catholics.
Interior
a.
• Being within any limits, inclosure, or substance; inside; internal; inner; — opposed to exterior, or superficial; as, the interior apartments of a house; the interior surface of a hollow ball.
• Remote from the limits, frontier, or shore; inland; as, the interior parts of a region or country.
n.
• That which is within; the internal or inner part of a thing; the inside.
• The inland part of a country, state, or kingdom.
Interiority
n.
• State of being interior.
Interiorly
adv.
• Internally; inwardly.
Interjacent
a.
• Lying or being between or among; intervening; as, interjacent isles.
Interjaculate
v. t.
• To ejaculate parenthetically.
Interjangle
v. i.
• To make a dissonant, discordant noise one with another; to talk or chatter noisily.
Interject
v. t.
• To throw in between; to insert; to interpose.
v. i.
• To throw one's self between or among; to come between; to interpose.
Interjection
n.
• The act of interjecting or throwing between; also, that which is interjected.
(Gram.) A word or form of speech thrown in to express emotion or feeling, as O! Alas! Ha ha! Begone! etc. Compare Exclamation.
Interjectional
a.
• Thrown in between other words or phrases; parenthetical; ejaculatory; as, an interjectional remark.
• Pertaining to, or having the nature of, an interjection; consisting of natural and spontaneous exclamations.
Interjectionalize
v. t.
• To convert into, or to use as, an interjection.
Interjectionally
adv.
• In an interjectional manner.
Interjectionary
a.
• Interjectional.
Interjoin
v. t.
• To join mutually; to unite.
Interjoist
n.
(Carp.) The space or interval between two joists.
• A middle joist or crossbeam.
Interjunction
n.
• A mutual joining.
Interknit
v. t.
• To knit together; to unite closely; to intertwine.
Interknow
v. t.
• To know mutually.
Interknowledge
n.
• Mutual knowledge or acquaintance.
Interlace
v. t. & i.
• To unite, as by lacing together; to insert or interpose one thing within another; to intertwine; to interweave.
Interlacement
n.
• The act of interlacing, or the state of being interlaced; also, that which is interlaced.
Interlaminated
a.
• Placed between, or containing, laminae or plates.
Interlamination
n.
• The state of being interlaminated.
Interlapse
n.
• The lapse or interval of time between two events.
Interlard
v. t.
• To place lard or bacon amongst; to mix, as fat meat with lean.
• Hence: To insert between; to mix or mingle; especially, to introduce that which is foreign or irrelevant; as, to interlard a conservation with oaths or allusions.
Interlay
v. t.
• To lay or place among or between.
Interleaf
n.
• A leaf inserted between other leaves; a blank leaf inserted, as in a book.
Interleave
v. t.
• To insert a leaf or leaves in; to bind with blank leaves inserted between the others; as, to interleave a book.
Interlibel
v. t.
• To libel mutually.
Interline
v. t.
• To write or insert between lines already written or printed, as for correction or addition; to write or print something between the lines of; as, to interline a page or a book.
• To arrange in alternate lines; as, to interline Latin and English.
• To mark or imprint with lines.
Interlineary
a.
• Interlinear.
n.
• A book containing interlineations.
Interlineation
n.
• The act of interlining.
• That which is interlined; a passage, word, or line inserted between lines already written or printed.
Interlining
n.
• Correction or alteration by writing between the lines; interlineation.
Interlink
v. t.
• To link together; to join, as one chain to another.
n.
• An intermediate or connecting link.
Interlobar
a.
(Anat.) Between lobes; as, the interlobar notch of the liver; the interlobar ducts of a gland.
Interlobular
a.
(Anat.) Between lobules; as, the interlobular branches of the portal vein.
Interlocation
n.
• A placing or coming between; interposition.
Interlock
v. i.
• To unite, embrace, communicate with, or flow into, one another; to be connected in one system; to lock into one another; to interlace firmly.
v. t.
• To unite by locking or linking together; to secure in place by mutual fastening.
Interlocution
n.
• Interchange of speech; dialogue; conversation; conference.
(Law) An intermediate act or decree before final decision.
• Hence, intermediate argument or discussion.
Interlocutor
n.
• One who takes part in dialogue or conversation; a talker, interpreter, or questioner.
(Law) An interlocutory judgment or sentence.
Interlocutory
a.
• Consisting of, or having the nature of, dialogue; conversational.
(Law) Intermediate; not final or definitive; made or done during the progress of an action.
n.
• Interpolated discussion or dialogue.
Interlocutrice
n.
• A female interlocutor.
Interlope
v. i.
• To run between parties and intercept without right the advantage that one should gain from the other; to traffic without a proper license; to intrude; to forestall others; to intermeddle.
Interloper
n.
• One who interlopes; one who interlopes; one who unlawfully intrudes upon a property, a station, or an office; one who interferes wrongfully or officiously.
Interlucate
v. t.
• To let in light upon, as by cutting away branches.
Interlucation
n.
• Act of thinning a wood to let in light.
Interlucent
a.
• Shining between.
Interlude
n.
• A short entertainment exhibited on the stage between the acts of a play, or between the play and the afterpiece, to relieve the tedium of waiting.
• A form of English drama or play, usually short, merry, and farcical, which succeeded the Moralities or Moral Plays in the transition to the romantic or Elizabethan drama.
(Mus.) A short piece of instrumental music played between the parts of a song or cantata, or the acts of a drama; especially, in church music, a short passage played by the organist between the stanzas of a hymn, or in German chorals after each line.
Interluded
a.
• Inserted in the manner of an interlude; having or containing interludes.
Interluder
n.
• An actor who performs in an interlude.
Interluency
n.
• A flowing between; intervening water.
Intermandibular
a.
(Anat.) Between the mandibles; interramal; as, the intermandibular space.
Intermarriage
n.
• Connection by marriage; reciprocal marriage; giving and taking in marriage, as between two families, tribes, castes, or nations.
Intermarry
v. i.
• To become connected by marriage between their members; to give and take mutually in marriage; — said of families, ranks, castes, etc.
Intermaxillary
a.(Anat.)
n.
• An intermaxilla.
Intermean
n.
• Something done in the meantime; interlude.
Intermeation
n.
• A flowing between.
Intermeddle
v. i.
• To meddle with the affairs of others; to meddle officiously; to interpose or interfere improperly; to mix or meddle with.
v. t.
• To intermix; to mingle.
Intermeddler
n.
• One who meddles with, or intrudes into, the affairs of others.
Intermeddlesome
a.
• Inclined or disposed to intermeddle.
Intermeddling
n.
• The act of improperly interfering.
Intermede
n.
• A short musical dramatic piece, of a light and pleasing, sometimes a burlesque, character; an interlude introduced between the acts of a play or an opera.
Intermediacy
n.
• Interposition; intervention.
Intermediae
n. pl.
(Zool.) The middle pair of tail feathers, or middle rectrices.
Intermedial
a.
• Lying between; intervening; intermediate.
Intermedian
a.
• Intermediate.
Intermediary
a.
• Lying, coming, or done, between; intermediate; as, an intermediary project.
n.
• One who, or that which, is intermediate; an interagent; a go-between.
Intermediate
a.
• Lying or being in the middle place or degree, or between two extremes; coming or done between; intervening; interposed; interjacent; as, an intermediate space or time; intermediate colors.
v. i.
• To come between; to intervene; to interpose.
Intermediately
adv.
• In an intermediate manner; by way of intervention.
Intermediation
n.
• The act of coming between; intervention; interposition.
Intermediator
n.
• A mediator.
Intermedious
a.
• Intermediate.
Intermedium
n.
• Intermediate space.
• An intervening agent or instrument.
(Anat.) The bone or cartilage between the radiale and ulnare in the carpus, and between the tibiale and fibulare in the tarsus. It corresponds to the lunar in the carpus, and to a part of the astragalus in the tarsus of man and most mammals.
Intermell
v. i. & t.
• To intermeddle; to intermix.
Intermembral
a.
(Anat.) Between members or limbs; as, intermembral homology, the correspondence of the limbs with each other.
Intermembranous
a.
(Anat.) Within or beneath a membrane; as, intermembranous ossification.
Interment
n.
• The act or ceremony of depositing a dead body in the earth; burial; sepulture; inhumation.
Intermention
v. t.
• To mention among other things, or casually or incidentally.
Intermesenteric
a.
(Anat.) Within the mesentery; as, the intermesenteric, or aortic, plexus.
Intermetacarpal
a.
(Anat.) Between the metacarpal bones.
Intermetatarsal
a.
(Anat.) Between the metatarsal bones.
Intermezzo
n.
(Mus.) An interlude; an intermede.
Intermicate
v. i.
• To flash or shine between or among.
Intermication
n.
• A shining between or among.
Intermigration
n.
• Reciprocal migration; interchange of dwelling place by migration.
Interminable
a.
• Without termination; admitting no limit; boundless; endless; wearisomely protracted; as, interminable space or duration; interminable sufferings.
Interminableness
n.
• The state of being endless.
Interminably
adv.
• Without end or limit.
Interminate
a.
• Endless; as, interminate sleep.
v. t.
• To menace; to threaten.
Interminated
a.
• Interminable; interminate; endless; unending.
Intermination
n.
• A menace or threat.
Intermine
v. t.
• To intersect or penetrate with mines.
Intermingle
v. t.
• To mingle or mix together; to intermix.
v. i.
• To be mixed or incorporated.
Intermise
n.
• Interference; interposition.
Intermission
n.
• The act or the state of intermitting; the state of being neglected or disused; disuse; discontinuance.
• Cessation for a time; an intervening period of time; an interval; a temporary pause; as, to labor without intermission; an intermission of ten minutes.
(Med.) The temporary cessation or subsidence of a fever; the space of time between the paroxysms of a disease. Intermission is an entire cessation, as distinguished from remission, or abatement of fever.
• Intervention; interposition.
Intermissive
a.
• Having temporary cessations; not continual; intermittent.
Intermit
v. t.
• To cause to cease for a time, or at intervals; to interrupt; to suspend.
v. i.
• To cease for a time or at intervals; to moderate; to be intermittent, as a fever.
Intermittence
n.
• Act or state of intermitting; intermission.
Intermittent
a.
• Coming and going at intervals; alternating; recurrent; periodic; as, an intermittent fever.
n.
(Med.) An intermittent fever or disease.
Intermittently
adv.
• With intermissions; in an intermittent manner; intermittingly.
Intermittingly
adv.
• With intermissions; at intervals.
Intermix
v. t.
• To mix together; to intermingle.
v. i.
• To be mixed together; to be intermingled.
Intermixedly
adv.
• In a mixed manner.
Intermixture
n.
• A mass formed by mixture; a mass of ingredients mixed.
• Admixture; an additional ingredient.
Intermobility
n.
• Capacity of things to move among each other; as, the intermobility of fluid particles.
Intermodillion
n.
(Arch.) The space between two modillions.
Intermontane
a.
• Between mountains; as, intermontane soil.
Intermundane
a.
• Being, between worlds or orbs.
Intermundian
a.
• Intermundane.
Intermural
a.
• Lying between walls; inclosed by walls.
Intermure
v. t.
• To wall in; to inclose.
Intermuscular
a.
(Anat.) Between muscles; as, intermuscular septa.
Intermutation
n.
• Interchange; mutual or reciprocal change.
Intermutual
a.
• Mutual.
Intern
a.
• Internal.
v. t.
• To put for safe keeping in the interior of a place or country; to confine to one locality; as, to intern troops which have fled for refuge to a neutral country.
Internal
a.
• Inward; interior; being within any limit or surface; inclosed; — opposed to external; as, the internal parts of a body, or of the earth.
• Derived from, or dependent on, the thing itself; inherent; as, the internal evidence of the divine origin of the Scriptures.
• Pertaining to its own affairs or interests; especially, (said of a country) domestic, as opposed to foreign; as, internal trade; internal troubles or war.
• Pertaining to the inner being or the heart; spiritual.
• Intrinsic; inherent; real.
(Anat.) Lying toward the mesial plane; mesial.
Internality
n.
• The state of being internal or within; interiority.
Internally
adv.
• Inwardly; within the enveloping surface, or the boundary of a thing; within the body; beneath the surface.
• Hence: Mentally; spiritually.
Internasal
a.
(Anat.) Between the nasal cavities; as, the internasal cartilage.
International
a.
• Between or among nations; pertaining to the intercourse of nations; participated in by two or more nations; common to, or affecting, two or more nations.
• Of or concerning the association called the International.
n.
• The International; an abbreviated from of the title of the International Workingmen's Association, the name of an association, formed in London in 1864, which has for object the promotion of the interests of the industrial classes of all nations.
• A member of the International Association.
Internationalism
n.
• The state or principles of international interests and intercourse.
• The doctrines or organization of the International.
Internationalist
n.
• One who is versed in the principles of international law.
• A member of the International; one who believes in, or advocates the doctrines of, the International.
Internationalize
v. t.
• To make international; to cause to affect the mutual relations of two or more nations; as, to internationalize a principle of law, or a philanthropic enterprise.
Internationally
adv.
• In an international manner; from an international point of view.
Interne
n.
• That which is within; the interior.
Internecine
a.
• Involving, or accompanied by, mutual slaughter; mutually destructive.
Internecion
n.
• Mutual slaughter or destruction; massacre.
Internecive
a.
• Internecine.
Internection
n.
• Intimate connection.
Interneural
a.
(Anat.) Between the neural arches or neural spines.
n.
• An interneural spine or cartilage.
Internity
n.
• State of being within; interiority.
Internment
n.
• Confinement within narrow limits, — as of foreign troops, to the interior of a country.
Internodal
a.
• Of or pertaining to internodes; intervening between nodes or joints.
Internode
n.
(Bot.) The space between two nodes or points of the stem from which the leaves properly arise.
(Anat.) A part between two joints; a segment; specifically, one of the phalanges.
Internodial
a.
• Internodal.
Internuncial
a.
• Of or pertaining to an internuncio.
(Physiol.) Communicating or transmitting impressions between different parts of the body; — said of the nervous system.
Internunciess
n.
• A female messenger.
Internuncio
n.
• A messenger between two parties.
• A representative, or charge d'affaires, of the pope at a foreign court or seat of government, ranking next below a nuncio.
Internuncioship
n.
• The office or function of an internuncio.
Internuncius
n.
• Internuncio.
Interoceanic
a.
• Between oceans; connecting oceans; as, interoceanic communication; an interoceanic canal.
Interocular
a.
• Between, or within, the eyes; as, the interocular distance; situated between the eyes, as the antennae of some insects.
Interoperculum
n.
(Anat.) The postero-inferior opercular bone, in fishes.
Interorbital
a.
(Anat.) Between the orbits; as, the interorbital septum.
Interosculant
a.
• Mutually touching or intersecting; as, interosculant circles.
(Biol.) Uniting two groups; — said of certain genera which connect family groups, or of species that connect genera.
Interosculate
v. i. & t.
• To kiss together to touch.
(Biol.) To have the character of, or to lie between, two distinct groups.
Interpale
v. t.
• To place pales between or among; to separate by pales.
• To interweave or interlace.
Interparietal
a.
(Anat.) Between the parietal bones or cartilages; as, the interparietal suture.
n.
• The interparietal bone or cartilage
Interpause
n.
• An intermission.
Interpeal
v. t.
• To interpel.
Interpedencular
a.
(Anat.) Between peduncles; esp., between the peduncles, or crura, of the cerebrum.
Interpel
v. t.
• To interrupt, break in upon, or intercede with.
Interpellant
a.
• Interpelling; interrupting.
n.
• One who, or that which, interpels.
Interpellate
v. t.
• To question imperatively, as a minister, or other executive officer, in explanation of his conduct; — generally on the part of a legislative body.
Interpellation
n.
• The act of interpelling or interrupting; interruption.
• The act of interposing or interceding; intercession.
• An act of interpellating, or of demanding of an officer an explanation of his action; imperative or peremptory questioning; a point raised in a debate.
• A official summons or citation.
Interpenetrate
v. t.
• To penetrate between or within; to penetrate mutually.
v. i.
• To penetrate each the other; to penetrate between bodies or their parts.
Interpenetration
n.
• The act of penetrating between or within other substances; mutual penetration.
Interpenetrative
a.
• Penetrating among or between other substances; penetrating each the other; mutually penetrative.
Interpercular
a.
• Of or pertaining to the interoperculum.
n.
• The interopercular bone.
Interpetalary
a.
(Bot.) Between the petals of a flower.
Interpetiolar
a.
(Bot.) Being between petioles. Cf. Intrapetiolar.
Interphalangeal
a.
(Anat.) Between phalanges; as, interphalangeal articulations.
Interpilaster
n.
(Arch.) The interval or space between two pilasters.
Interplace
v. t.
• To place between or among; as, to interplace a name.
Interplanetary
a.
• Between planets; as, interplanetary spaces.
Interplay
n.
• Mutual action or influence; interaction; as, the interplay of affection.
Interplead
v. i.
(Law) To plead against each other, or go to trial between themselves, as the claimants in an in an interpleader.
Interpleader
n.
• One who interpleads.
(Law) A proceeding devised to enable a person, of whom the same debt, duty, or thing is claimed adversely by two or more parties, to compel them to litigate the right or title between themselves, and thereby to relieve himself from the suits which they might otherwise bring against him.
Interpledge
v. t.
• To pledge mutually.
Interpoint
v. t.
• To point; to mark with stops or pauses; to punctuate.
Interpolable
a.
• That may be interpolated; suitable to be interpolated.
Interpolate
v. t.
• To renew; to carry on with intermission.
• To alter or corrupt by the insertion of new or foreign matter; especially, to change, as a book or text, by the insertion of matter that is new, or foreign to the purpose of the author.
(Math.) To fill up intermediate terms of, as of a series, according to the law of the series; to introduce, as a number or quantity, in a partial series, according to the law of that part of the series.
Interpolated
a.
• Inserted in, or added to, the original; introduced; foisted in; changed by the insertion of new or spurious matter.
(Math.) Provided with necessary interpolations; as, an interpolated table.
• Introduced or determined by interpolation; as, interpolated quantities or numbers.
Interpolation
n.
• The act of introducing or inserting anything, especially that which is spurious or foreign.
• That which is introduced or inserted, especially something foreign or spurious.
(Math.) The method or operation of finding from a few given terms of a series, as of numbers or observations, other intermediate terms in conformity with the law of the series.
Interpolator
n.
• One who interpolates; esp., one who inserts foreign or spurious matter in genuine writings.
Interpone
v. t.
• To interpose; to insert or place between.
Interponent
n.
• One who, or that which, interposes; an interloper, an opponent.
Interposal
n.
• The act of interposing; interposition; intervention.
Interpose
v. t.
• To place between; as, to interpose a screen between the eye and the light.
• To thrust; to intrude; to between, either for aid or for troubling.
• To introduce or inject between the parts of a conversation or argument.
v. i.
• To be or come between.
• To step in between parties at variance; to mediate; as, the prince interposed and made peace.
• To utter a sentiment by way of interruption.
n.
• Interposition.
Interposer
n.
• One who, or that which, interposes or intervenes; an obstacle or interruption; a mediator or agent between parties.
Interposit
n.
• An intermediate depot or station between one commercial city or country and another.
Interposition
n.
• The act of interposing, or the state of being interposed; a being, placing, or coming between; mediation.
• The thing interposed.
Interposure
n.
• Interposition.
Interpret
v. t.
• To explain or tell the meaning of; to expound; to translate orally into intelligible or familiar language or terms; to decipher; to define; — applied esp. to language, but also to dreams, signs, conduct, mysteries, etc.; as, to interpret the Hebrew language to an Englishman; to interpret an Indian speech.
• To apprehend and represent by means of art; to show by illustrative representation; as, an actor interprets the character of Hamlet; a musician interprets a sonata; an artist interprets a landscape.
v. i.
• To act as an interpreter.
Interpretable
a.
• Admitting of interpretation; capable of being interpreted or explained.
Interpretament
n.
• Interpretation.
Interpretation
n.
• The act of interpreting; explanation of what is obscure; translation; version; construction; as, the interpretation of a foreign language, of a dream, or of an enigma.
• The sense given by an interpreter; exposition or explanation given; meaning; as, commentators give various interpretations of the same passage of Scripture.
• The power or explaining.
(Fine Arts) An artist's way of expressing his thought or embodying his conception of nature.
(Math.) The act or process of applying general principles or formulae to the explanation of the results obtained in special cases.
Interpretative
a.
• Designed or fitted to interpret; explanatory.
• According to interpretation; constructive.
Interpretatively
adv.
• By interpretation.
Interpreter
n.
• One who or that which interprets, explains, or expounds; a translator; especially, a person who translates orally between two parties.
Interpretive
a.
• Interpretative.
Interpubic
a.
(Anat.) Between the pubic bones or cartilages; as, the interpubic disk.
Interpunction
n.
• The insertion of points between word or sentences; punctuation.
Interradial
a.
• Between the radii, or rays; — in zoology, said of certain parts of radiate animals; as, the interradial plates of a starfish.
Interramal
a.
(Anat.) Between rami or branches; esp., between the mandibles, or rami of the lower jaw; intermandibular.
Interreceive
v. t.
• To receive between or within.
Interregency
n.
• An interregnum.
Interregent
n.
• A person who discharges the royal functions during an interregnum.
Interregnum
n.
• The time during which a throne is vacant between the death or abdication of a sovereign and the accession of his successor.
• Any period during which, for any cause, the executive branch of a government is suspended or interrupted.
Interreign
n.
• An interregnum.
Interrelated
a.
• Having a mutual or reciprocal relation or parallelism; correlative.
Interrelation
n.
• Mutual or reciprocal relation; correlation.
Interrenal
a.
(Anat.) Between the kidneys; as, the interrenal body, an organ found in many fishes.
n.
• The interrenal body.
Interrepellent
a.
• Mutually repellent.
Interrer
n.
• One who inters.
Interrex
n.
• An interregent, or a regent.
Interrogate
v. t.
• To question formally; to question; to examine by asking questions; as, to interrogate a witness.
v. i.
• To ask questions.
n.
• An interrogation; a question.
Interrogatee
n.
• One who is interrogated.
Interrogation
n.
• The act of interrogating or questioning; examination by questions; inquiry.
• A question put; an inquiry.
• A point, mark, or sign, thus [?], indicating that the sentence with which it is connected is a question. It is used to express doubt, or to mark a query. Called also interrogation point.
Interrogative
a.
• Denoting a question; expressed in the form of a question; as, an interrogative sentence; an interrogative pronoun.
n.
(Gram.) A word used in asking questions; as, who? which? why?
Interrogatively
adv.
• In the form of, or by means of, a question; in an interrogative manner.
Interrogator
n.
• One who asks questions; a questioner.
Interrogatory
n.
• A formal question or inquiry; esp. (Law), a question asked in writing.
a.
• Containing, expressing, or implying a question; as, an interrogatory sentence.
Interrupt
v. t.
• To break into, or between; to stop, or hinder by breaking in upon the course or progress of; to interfere with the current or motion of; to cause a temporary cessation of; as, to interrupt the remarks speaking.
• To divide; to separate; to break the monotony of; as, the evenness of the road was not interrupted by a single hill.
p. a.
• Broken; interrupted.
Interrupted
a.
• Broken; intermitted; suddenly stopped.
(Bot.) Irregular; — said of any arrangement whose symmetry is destroyed by local causes, as when leaflets are interposed among the leaves in a pinnate leaf.
Interruptedly
adv.
• With breaks or interruptions; discontinuously.
Interrupter
n.
• One who, or that which, interrupts.
(Elec.) A device for opening and closing an electrical circuit; a vibrating spring or tuning fork, arranged to make and break a circuit at rapidly recurring intervals, by the action of the current itself.
Interruption
n.
• The act of interrupting, or breaking in upon.
• The state of being interrupted; a breach or break, caused by the abrupt intervention of something foreign; intervention; interposition.
• Obstruction caused by breaking in upon course, current, progress, or motion; stop; hindrance; as, the author has met with many interruptions in the execution of his work; the speaker or the argument proceeds without interruption.
• Temporary cessation; intermission; suspension.
Interruptive
a.
• Tending to interrupt; interrupting.
Interscapular
a.
(Anat.) Between the scapulae or shoulder blades.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the upper back, or the part between the shoulders; as, the interscapular feathers.
Interscapulars
n. pl.
(Zool.) The interscapular feathers of a bird.
Interscendent
a.
(Math.) Having exponents which are radical quantities; — said of certain powers; as, x&root;2, or x&root;a.
Interscind
v. t.
• To cut off.
Interscribe
v. t.
• To write between.
Intersecant
a.
• Dividing into parts; crossing; intersecting.
Intersect
v. t.
• To cut into or between; to cut or cross mutually; to divide into parts; as, any two diameters of a circle intersect each other at the center.
v. i.
• To cut into one another; to meet and cross each other; as, the point where two lines intersect.
Intersection
n.
• The act, state, or place of intersecting.
(Geom.) The point or line in which one line or surface cuts another.
Intersectional
a.
• Pertaining to, or formed by, intersections.
Interseminate
v. t.
• To sow between or among.
Interseptal
a.
(Biol.) Between septa; as, the interseptal spaces or zones, between the transparent, or septal, zones in striated muscle; the interseptal chambers of a shell, or of a seed vessel.
Intersert
v. t.
• To put in between other things; to insert.
Interserttion
n.
• The act of interserting, or that which is interserted.
Intersesamoid
a.
(Anat.) Between sesamoid bones; as, intersesamoid ligaments.
Interset
v. t.
• To set between or among.
Intershock
v. t.
• To shock mutually.
Intersidereal
a.
• Between or among constellations or stars; interstellar.
Intersocial
a.
• Pertaining to the mutual intercourse or relations of persons in society; social.
Intersomnious
a.
• Between the times of sleeping; in an interval of wakefulness.
Interspace
n.
• Intervening space.
Interspeech
n.
• A speech interposed between others.
Intersperse
v. t.
• To scatter or set here and there among other things; to insert at intervals; as, to intersperse pictures in a book.
• To diversify or adorn with things set or scattered at intervals; to place something at intervals in or among; as, to intersperse a book with pictures.
Interspersion
n.
• The act of interspersing, or the state of being interspersed.
Interspiration
n.
• Spiritual inspiration at separate times, or at intervals.
Interstapedial
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to a part of the columella of the ear, between the stapes and the mediostapedial.
n.
• The interstapedial part of the columella.
Interstate
a.
• Pertaining to the mutual relations of States; existing between, or including, different States; as, interstate commerce.
Interstellar
a.
• Between or among the stars; as, interstellar space.
Interstellary
a.
• Interstellar.
Intersternal
a.
(Zool.) Between the sternal; — said of certain membranes or parts of insects and crustaceans.
Interstice
n.
• That which intervenes between one thing and another; especially, a space between things closely set, or between the parts which compose a body; a narrow chink; a crack; a crevice; a hole; an interval; as, the interstices of a wall.
• An interval of time; specifically (R. C. Ch.), in the plural, the intervals which the canon law requires between the reception of the various degrees of orders.
Intersticed
a.
• Provided with interstices; having interstices between; situated at intervals.
Interstinctive
a.
• Distinguishing.
Interstitial
a.
• Of or pertaining to interstices; intermediate; within the tissues; as, interstitial cavities or spaces in the tissues of animals or plants.
Interstition
n.
• An intervening period of time; interval.
Interstratification
n.
(Geol.) Stratification among or between other layers or strata; also, that which is interstratified.
Interstratified
a.
(Geol.) Stratified among or between other bodies; as, interstratified rocks.
Interstratify
v. t.
(Geol.) To put or insert between other strata.
Intertalk
v. i.
• To converse.
Intertangle
v. t.
• To entangle; to intertwine.
Intertarsal
a.
(Anat.) Between the tarsal bones; as, the intertarsal articulations.
Intertex
v. t.
• To intertwine; to weave or bind together.
Intertexture
n.
• The act of interweaving, or the state of being interwoven; that which is interwoven.
Interthoracic
a.
• In the thorax.
Intertie
n.
(Arch.) In any framed work, a horizontal tie other than sill and plate or other principal ties, securing uprights to one another.
Intertissued
a.
• Interwoven.
Intertraffic
n.
• Mutual trade of traffic.
Intertranspicuous
a.
• Transpicuous within or between.
Intertransverse
a.
• Between the transverse processes of the vertebrae.
Intertrigo
n.
(Med.) A rubbing or chafing of the skin; especially, an abrasion or excoriation of the skin between folds, as in fat or neglected children.
Intertrochanteric
a.
(Anat.) Between the trochanters of the femur.
Intertropical
a.
• Situated between or within the tropics.
Intertubular
a.
• Between tubes or tubules; as, intertubular cells; intertubular substance.
Intertwine
v. t.
• To unite by twining one with another; to entangle; to interlace.
v. i.
• To be twined or twisted together; to become mutually involved or enfolded.
n.
• The act intertwining, or the state of being intertwined.
Intertwiningly
adv.
• By intertwining or being intertwined.
Intertwist
v. t.
• To twist together one with another; to intertwine.
Intertwistingly
adv.
• By intertwisting, or being intertwisted.
Interval
n.
• A space between things; a void space intervening between any two objects; as, an interval between two houses or hills.
• Space of time between any two points or events; as, the interval between the death of Charles I. of England, and the accession of Charles II.
• A brief space of time between the recurrence of similar conditions or states; as, the interval between paroxysms of pain; intervals of sanity or delirium.
(Mus.) Difference in pitch between any two tones.
Intervallum
n.
• An interval.
Intervary
v. i.
• To alter or vary between; to change.
Interveined
a.
• Intersected, as with veins.
Intervene
v. i.
• To come between, or to be between, persons or things; — followed by between; as, the Mediterranean intervenes between Europe and Africa.
• To occur, fall, or come between, points of time, or events; as, an instant intervened between the flash and the report; nothing intervened ( i. e., between the intention and the execution) to prevent the undertaking.
• To interpose; as, to intervene to settle a quarrel.
• In a suit to which one has not been made a party, to put forward a defense of one's interest in the subject matter.
v. t.
• To come between.
n.
• A coming between; intervention; meeting.
Intervener
n.
• One who intervenes; especially (Law), a person who assumes a part in a suit between others.
Intervenient
a.
• Being or coming between; intercedent; interposed.
Intervent
v. t.
• To thwart; to obstruct.
Intervention
n.
• The act of intervening; interposition.
• Any interference that may affect the interests of others; especially, of one or more states with the affairs of another; mediation.
(Civil Law) The act by which a third person, to protect his own interest, interposes and becomes a party to a suit pending between other parties.
Interventor
n.
• One who intervenes; a mediator; especially (Eccles. Hist.), a person designated by a church to reconcile parties, and unite them in the choice of officers.
Interventricular
a.
(Anat.) Between the ventricles; as, the interventricular partition of the heart.
Intervenue
n.
• Interposition.
Intervert
v. t.
• To turn to another course or use.
Intervertebral
a.
(Anat.) Between vertebrae.
Interview
n.
• A mutual sight or view; a meeting face to face; usually, a formal or official meeting for consultation; a conference; as, the secretary had an interview with the President.
• A conservation, or questioning, for the purpose of eliciting information for publication; the published statement so elicited.
v. t.
• To have an interview with; to question or converse with, especially for the purpose of obtaining information for publication.
Interviewer
n.
• One who interviews; especially, one who obtains an interview with another for the purpose of eliciting his opinions or obtaining information for publication.
Interviewing
n.
• The act or custom of holding an interview or interviews.
Intervisible
a.
(Surv.) Mutually visible, or in sight, the one from the other, as stations.
Intervisit
v. i.
• To exchange visits.
Intervital
a.
• Between two lives.
Intervolution
n.
• The state of being intervolved or coiled up; a convolution; as, the intervolutions of a snake.
Intervolve
v. t.
• To involve one within another; to twist or coil together.
Interweave
v. t.
• To weave together; to intermix or unite in texture or construction; to intertwine; as, threads of silk and cotton interwoven.
• To intermingle; to unite intimately; to connect closely; as, to interweave truth with falsehood.
Interwish
v. t.
• To wish mutually in regarded to each other.
Interworking
n.
• The act of working in together; interweaving.
Interworld
n.
• A world between other worlds.
Interwreathe
v. t.
• To weave into a wreath; to intertwine.
Intestable
a.
(Law) Not capable of making a will; not legally qualified or competent to make a testament.
Intestacy
n.
• The state of being intestate, or of dying without having made a valid will.
Intestate
a.
• Without having made a valid will; without a will; as, to die intestate.
• Not devised or bequeathed; not disposed of by will; as, an intestate estate.
n.
(Law) A person who dies without making a valid will.
Intestinal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the intestines of an animal; as, the intestinal tube; intestinal digestion; intestinal ferments.
Intestine
a.
• Internal; inward; — opposed to external.
• Internal with regard to a state or country; domestic; not foreign; — applied usually to that which is evil; as, intestine disorders, calamities, etc.
• Depending upon the internal constitution of a body or entity; subjective.
• Shut up; inclosed.
n.
(Anat.) That part of the alimentary canal between the stomach and the anus.
• The bowels; entrails; viscera.
Intext
n.
• The text of a book.
Intextine
n.
(Bot.) A thin membrane existing in the pollen grains of some plants, and situated between the extine and the intine, as in .
Intextured
a.
• Inwrought; woven in.
Inthirst
v. t.
• To make thirsty.
Inthrall
v. t.
• To reduce to bondage or servitude; to make a thrall, slave, vassal, or captive of; to enslave.
Inthrallment
n.
• Act of inthralling, or state of being inthralled; servitude; bondage; vassalage.
Inthrone
v. t.
• Same as Enthrone.
Inthrong
v. i.
• To throng or collect together.
Inthronization
n.
• Enthronement.
Inthronize
v. t.
• To enthrone.
Intimacy
n.
• The state of being intimate; close familiarity or association; nearness in friendship.
Intimate
a.
• Innermost; inward; internal; deep-seated; hearty.
• Near; close; direct; thorough; complete.
• Close in friendship or acquaintance; familiar; confidential; as, an intimate friend.
n.
• An intimate friend or associate; a confidant.
v. t.
• To announce; to declare; to publish; to communicate; to make known.
• To suggest obscurely or indirectly; to refer to remotely; to give slight notice of; to hint; as, he intimated his intention of resigning his office.
Intimately
adv.
• In an intimate manner.
Intimation
n.
• The act of intimating; also, the thing intimated.
• Announcement; declaration.
• A hint; an obscure or indirect suggestion or notice; a remote or ambiguous reference; as, he had given only intimations of his design.
Intime
a.
• Inward; internal; intimate.
Intimidate
v. t.
• To make timid or fearful; to inspire of affect with fear; to deter, as by threats; to dishearten; to abash.
Intimidation
n.
• The act of making timid or fearful or of deterring by threats; the state of being intimidated; as, the voters were kept from the polls by intimidation.
Intimidatory
a.
• Tending or serving to intimidate.
Intinction
n.
• The act of tingeing or dyeing.
(Eccl.) A method or practice of the administration of the sacrament by dipping the bread or wafer in the wine and administering both together.
Intinctivity
n.
• The want of the quality of coloring or tingeing other bodies.
Intine
n.
(Bot.) A transparent, extensible membrane of extreme tenuity, which forms the innermost coating of grains of pollen.
Intitule
v. t.
• To entitle; to give a title to.
Into
prep.
• To the inside of; within. It is used in a variety of applications.
• Expressing entrance, or a passing from the outside of a thing to its interior parts; — following verbs expressing motion; as, come into the house; go into the church; one stream falls or runs into another; water enters into the fine vessels of plants.
• Expressing penetration beyond the outside or surface, or access to the inside, or contents; as, to look into a letter or book; to look into an apartment.
• Indicating insertion; as, to infuse more spirit or animation into a composition.
• Denoting inclusion; as, put these ideas into other words.
• Indicating the passing of a thing from one form, condition, or state to another; as, compound substances may be resolved into others which are more simple; ice is convertible into water, and water into vapor; men are more easily drawn than forced into compliance; we may reduce many distinct substances into one mass; men are led by evidence into belief of truth, and are often enticed into the commission of crimes'into; she burst into tears; children are sometimes frightened into fits; all persons are liable to be seduced into error and folly.
Intolerability
n.
• The quality of being intolerable; intolerableness.
Intolerable
a.
• Not tolerable; not capable of being borne or endured; not proper or right to be allowed; insufferable; insupportable; unbearable; as, intolerable pain; intolerable heat or cold; an intolerable burden.
• Enormous.
Intolerance
n.
• Want of capacity to endure; as, intolerance of light.
• The quality of being intolerant; refusal to allow to others the enjoyment of their opinions, chosen modes of worship, and the like; want of patience and forbearance; illiberality; bigotry; as, intolerance shown toward a religious sect.
Intolerancy
n.
• Intolerance.
Intolerant
a.
• Not enduring; not able to endure.
• Not tolerating difference of opinion or sentiment, especially in religious matters; refusing to allow others the enjoyment of their opinions, rights, or worship; unjustly impatient of the opinion of those disagree with us; not tolerant; unforbearing; bigoted.
n.
• An intolerant person; a bigot.
Intolerantly
adv.
• In an intolerant manner.
Intolerated
a.
• Not tolerated.
Intolerating
a.
• Intolerant.
Intoleration
n.
• Intolerance; want of toleration; refusal to tolerate a difference of opinion.
Intomb
v. t.
• To place in a tomb; to bury; to entomb.
Intonate
v. i.
• To thunder.
v. i.
(Mus.) To sound the tones of the musical scale; to practice the sol-fa.
• To modulate the voice in a musical, sonorous, and measured manner, as in reading the liturgy; to intone.
v. t.
• To utter in a musical or sonorous manner; to chant; as, to intonate the liturgy.
Intonation
n.
• A thundering; thunder.
n.
(Mus.) The act of sounding the tones of the musical scale.
• Singing or playing in good tune or otherwise; as, her intonation was false.
• Reciting in a musical prolonged tone; intonating, or singing of the opening phrase of a plain-chant, psalm, or canticle by a single voice, as of a priest.
Intone
v. t.
• To utter with a musical or prolonged note or tone; to chant; as, to intone the church service.
v. i.
• To utter a prolonged tone or a deep, protracted sound; to speak or recite in a measured, sonorous manner; to intonate.
Intorsion
n.
• A winding, bending, or twisting.
(Bot.) The bending or twining of any part of a plant toward one side or the other, or in any direction from the vertical.
Intort
v. t.
• To twist in and out; to twine; to wreathe; to wind; to wring.
Intoxicant
n.
• That which intoxicates; an intoxicating agent; as, alcohol, opium, and laughing gas are intoxicants.
Intoxicate
a.
• Intoxicated.
• Overexcited, as with joy or grief.
v. t.
• To poison; to drug.
• To make drunk; to inebriate; to excite or to stupefy by strong drink or by a narcotic substance.
• To excite to a transport of enthusiasm, frenzy, or madness; to elate unduly or excessively.
Intoxicatedness
n.
• The state of being intoxicated; intoxication; drunkenness.
Intoxicating
a.
• Producing intoxication; tted to intoxicate; as, intoxicating liquors.
Intoxication
n.
(Med.) A poisoning, as by a spirituous or a narcotic substance.
• The state of being intoxicated or drunk; inebriation; ebriety; drunkenness; the act of intoxicating or making drunk.
• A high excitement of mind; an elation which rises to enthusiasm, frenzy, or madness.
Intraaxillary
a.
(Bot.) Situated below the point where a leaf joins the stem.
Intracellular
a.
(Biol.) Within a cell; as, the intracellular movements seen in the pigment cells, the salivary cells, and in the protoplasm of some vegetable cells.
Intracolic
a.
(Anat.) Within the colon; as, the intracolic valve.
Intracranial
a.
• Within the cranium or skull.
Intractability
n.
• The quality of being intractable; intractableness.
Intractable
a.
• Not tractable; not easily governed, managed, or directed; indisposed to be taught, disciplined, or tamed; violent; stubborn; obstinate; refractory; as, an intractable child.
Intractile
a.
• Not tractile; incapable of being drawn out or extended.
Intrados
n.
(Arch.) The interior curve of an arch; esp., the inner or lower curved face of the whole body of voussoirs taken together.
Intrafoliaceous
a.
(Bot.) Growing immediately above, or in front of, a leaf; as, intrafoliaceous stipules.
Intrafusion
n.
• The act of pouring into a vessel; specif. (Med.), the operation of introducing a substance into a blood vessel; as, intrafusion of blood.
Intralobular
a.
(Anat.) Within lobules; as, the intralobular branches of the hepatic veins.
Intramarginal
a.
• Situated within the margin.
Intramercurial
a.
(Astron.) Between the planet Mercury and the sun; — as, the hypothetical Vulcan is intramercurial.
Intramolecular
a.
(Chem. & Physics) Between molecules; situated, or acting, between the molecules of bodies.
Intramundane
a.
• Being within the material world; — opposed to extramundane.
Intramural
a.
• Being within the walls, as of a city.
(Anat. & Med.) Being within the substance of the walls of an organ; as, intramural pregnancy.
Intranquillity
n.
• Unquietness; restlessness.
Intranscalent
a.
• Impervious to heat; adiathermic.
Intransgressible
a.
• Incapable of being transgressed; not to be passes over or crossed.
Intransigent
a.
• Refusing compromise; uncompromising; irreconcilable.
Intransigentes
n. pl.
(Spanish Politics) The extreme radicals; the party of the irreconcilables.
Intransitive
a.
• Not passing farther; kept; detained.
(Gram.) Not transitive; not passing over t an object; expressing an action or state that is limited to the agent or subject, or, in other words, an action which does not require an object to complete the sense; as, an intransitive verb, e. g., the bird flies; the dog runs.
Intransitively
adv.
(Gram.) Without an object following; in the manner of an intransitive verb.
Intransmissible
a.
• Not capable of being transmitted.
Intransmutability
n.
• The quality of being intransmutable.
Intransmutable
a.
• Not capable of being transmuted or changed into another substance.
Intranssient
a.
• Not transient; remaining; permanent.
Intrant
a.
• Entering; penetrating.
n.
• One who enters; especially, a person entering upon some office or station.
Intranuclear
a.
(Biol.) Within the nucleus of a cell; as. the intranuclear network of fibrils, seen in the first stages of karyokinesis.
Intraparietal
a.
• Situated or occurring within an inclosure; shut off from public sight; private; secluded; retired.
Intrapetiolar
a.
(Bot.) Situated between the petiole and the stem; — said of the pair of stipules at the base of a petiole when united by those margins next the petiole, thus seeming to form a single stipule between the petiole and the stem or branch; — often confounded with interpetiolar, from which it differs essentially in meaning.
Intraterritorial
a.
• Within the territory or a territory.
Intrathoracic
a.
• Within the thora or chest.
Intratropical
a.
• Within the tropics.
Intrauterine
a.
• Within the uterus or womb; as, intrauterine hemorrhage.
Intravalvular
a.
• Between valves.
Intravenous
a.
• Within the veins.
Intraventricular
a.
• Within or between ventricles.
Intreasure
v. t.
• To lay up, as in a treasury; to hoard.
Intreatable
a.
• Not to be entreated; inexorable.
Intreatance
n.
• Entreaty.
Intreatful
a.
• Full of entreaty.
Intrench
v. t.
• To cut in; to furrow; to make trenches in or upon.
• To surround with a trench or with intrenchments, as in fortification; to fortify with a ditch and parapet; as, the army intrenched their camp, or intrenched itself.
v. i.
• To invade; to encroach; to infringe or trespass; to enter on, and take possession of, that which belongs to another; — usually followed by on or upon; as, the king was charged with intrenching on the rights of the nobles, and the nobles were accused of intrenching on the prerogative of the crown.
Intrenchant
a.
• Not to be gashed or marked with furrows.
Intrenchment
n.
• The act of intrenching or the state of being intrenched.
(Mil.) Any defensive work consisting of at least a trench or ditch and a parapet made from the earth thrown up in making such a ditch.
• Any defense or protection.
• An encroachment or infringement.
Intrepid
a.
• Not trembling or shaking with fear; fearless; bold; brave; undaunted; courageous; as, an intrepid soldier; intrepid spirit.
Intrepidity
n.
• The quality or state of being intrepid; fearless bravery; courage; resoluteness; valor.
Intrepidly
adv.
• In an intrepid manner; courageously; resolutely.
Intricable
a.
• Entangling.
Intricacy
n.
• The state or quality of being intricate or entangled; perplexity; involution; complication; complexity; that which is intricate or involved; as, the intricacy of a knot; the intricacy of accounts; the intricacy of a cause in controversy; the intricacy of a plot.
Intricate
a.
• Entangled; involved; perplexed; complicated; difficult to understand, follow, arrange, or adjust; as, intricate machinery, labyrinths, accounts, plots, etc.
v. t.
• To entangle; to involve; to make perplexing.
Intricately
adv.
• In an intricate manner.
Intricateness
n.
• The state or quality of being intricate; intricacy.
Intrication
n.
• Entanglement.
Intrigante
n.
• A female intriguer.
Intrigue
v. i.
• To form a plot or scheme; to contrive to accomplish a purpose by secret artifice.
• To carry on a secret and illicit love or amour.
v. t.
• To fill with artifice and duplicity; to complicate; to embarrass.
n.
• Intricacy; complication.
• A complicated plot or scheme intended to effect some purpose by secret artifice; conspiracy; stratagem.
• The plot or romance; a complicated scheme of designs, actions, and events.
• A secret and illicit love affair between two persons of different sexes; an amour; a liaison.
Intriguer
n.
• One who intrigues.
Intriguery
n.
• Arts or practice of intrigue.
Intriguingly
adv.
• By means of, or in the manner of, intrigue.
Intrinse
a.
• Tightly drawn; or (perhaps) intricate.
Intrinsic
a.
• Inward; internal; hence, true; genuine; real; essential; inherent; not merely apparent or accidental; — opposed to extrinsic; as, the intrinsic value of gold or silver; the intrinsic merit of an action; the intrinsic worth or goodness of a person.
(Anat.) Included wholly within an organ or limb, as certain groups of muscles; — opposed to extrinsic.(Physics)(Geom.)
n.
n.
• A genuine quality.
Intrinsical
a.
• Intrinsic.
• Intimate; closely familiar.
Intrinsicality
n.
• The quality of eing intrinsic; essentialness; genuineness; reality.
Intrinsically
adv.
• Internally; n its nature; essentially; really; truly.
Intrinsicalness
n.
• The quality of being intrinsical; intrinsicality.
Intrinsicate
a.
• Intricate.
Introcession
n.
(Med.) A depression, or inward sinking of parts.
Introduce
v. t.
• To lead or bring in; to conduct or usher in; as, to introduce a person into a drawing-room.
• To put (something into a place); to insert; as, to introduce the finger, or a probe.
• To lead to and make known by formal announcement or recommendation; hence, to cause to be acquainted; as, to introduce strangers; to introduce one person to another.
• To bring into notice, practice, cultivation, or use; as, to introduce a new fashion, method, or plant.
• To produce; to cause to exist; to induce.
• To open to notice; to begin; to present; as, he introduced the subject with a long preface.
Introducement
n.
• Introduction.
Introducer
n.
• One who, or that which, introduces.
Introduct
v. t.
• To introduce.
Introduction
n.
• The act of introducing, or bringing to notice.
• The act of formally making persons known to each other; a presentation or making known of one person to another by name; as, the introduction of one stranger to another.
• That part of a book or discourse which introduces or leads the way to the main subject, or part; preliminary; matter; preface; proem; exordium.
• A formal and elaborate preliminary treatise; specifically, a treatise introductory to other treatises, or to a course of study; a guide; as, an introduction to English literature.
Introductive
a.
• Serving to introduce; introductory.
Introductor
n.
• An introducer.
Introductorily
adv.
• By way of introduction.
Introductory
a.
• Serving to introduce something else; leading to the main subject or business; preliminary; prefatory; as, introductory proceedings; an introductory discourse.
Introductress
n.
• A female introducer.
Introflexed
a.
• Flexed or bent inward.
Introgression
n.
• The act of going in; entrance.
Introit
n.
• A going in.
(R. C. Ch.) A psalm sung or chanted immediately before the collect, epistle, and gospel, and while the priest is entering within the rails of the altar.
• A part of a psalm or other portion of Scripture read by the priest at Mass immediately after ascending to the altar.
(R. C. Ch.) An anthem or psalm sung before the Communion service.
• Any composition of vocal music appropriate to the opening of church services.
Intromission
n.
• The act of sending in or of putting in; insertion.
• The act of letting go in; admission.
(Scots Law) An intermeddling with the affairs of another, either on legal grounds or without authority.
Intromit
v. t.
• To send in or put in; to insert or introduce.
• To allow to pass in; to admit.
v. i.
(Scots Law) To intermeddle with the effects or goods of another.
Intromittent
a.
• Throwing, or allowing to pass, into or within.
(Zool.) Used in copulation; — said of the external reproductive organs of the males of many animals, and sometimes of those of the females.
Intromitter
n.
• One who intromits.
Intropression
n.
• Pressure acting within.
Introreception
n.
• The act of admitting into or within.
Introrse
a.
(Bot.) Turning or facing inward, or toward the axis of the part to which it belongs.
Introspect
v. t.
• To look into or within; to view the inside of.
Introspection
n.
• A view of the inside or interior; a looking inward; specifically, the act or process of self-examination, or inspection of one's own thoughts and feelings; the cognition which the mind has of its own acts and states; self-consciousness; reflection.
Introspectionist
n.
(Metaph.) One given to the introspective method of examining the phenomena of the soul.
Introspective
a.
• Inspecting within; seeing inwardly; capable of, or exercising, inspection; self-conscious.
• Involving the act or results of conscious knowledge of physical phenomena; — contrasted with associational.
Introsume
v. t.
• To draw in; to swallow.
Introsusception
n.
• The act or process of receiving within.
(Med.) Same as Intussusception.
Introvenient
a.
• Coming in together; entering; commingling.
Introversion
n.
• The act of introverting, or the state of being introverted; the act of turning the mind inward.
Introvert
v. t.
• To turn or bend inward.
• To look within; to introspect.
Intrude
v. i.
• To thrust one's self in; to come or go in without invitation, permission, or welcome; to encroach; to trespass; as, to intrude on families at unseasonable hours; to intrude on the lands of another.
v. t.
• To thrust or force (something) in or upon; especially, to force (one's self) in without leave or welcome; as, to intrude one's presence into a conference; to intrude one's opinions upon another.
• To enter by force; to invade.
(Geol.) The cause to enter or force a way, as into the crevices of rocks.
Intruded
p. a.
(Geol.) Same as Intrusive.
Intruder
n.
• One who intrudes; one who thrusts himself in, or enters without right, or without leave or welcome; a trespasser.
Intrudress
n.
• A female intruder.
Intrunk
v. t.
• To inclose as in a trunk; to incase.
Intrusion
n.
• The act of intruding, or of forcing in; especially, the forcing (one's self) into a place without right or welcome; encroachment.
(Geol.) The penetrating of one rock, while in a plastic or metal state, into the cavities of another.
(Law) The entry of a stranger, after a particular estate or freehold is determined, before the person who holds in remainder or reversion has taken possession.
(Scotch Ch.) The settlement of a minister over 3 congregation without their consent.
Intrusional
a.
• Of or pertaining to intrusion.
Intrusionist
n.
• One who intrudes; especially, one who favors the appointment of a clergyman to a parish, by a patron, against the wishes of the parishioners.
Intrusive
a.
• Apt to intrude; characterized by intrusion; entering without right or welcome.
Intrust
v. t.
• To deliver (something) to another in trust; to deliver to (another) something in trust; to commit or surrender (something) to another with a certain confidence regarding his care, use, or disposal of it; as, to intrust a servant with one's money or intrust money or goods to a servant.
Intubation
n.
(Med.) The introduction of a tube into an organ to keep it open, as into the larynx in croup.
Intuition
n.
• A looking after; a regard to.
• Direct apprehension or cognition; immediate knowledge, as in perception or consciousness; — distinguished from "mediate" knowledge, as in reasoning; as, the mind knows by intuition that black is not white, that a circle is not a square, that three are more than two, etc.; quick or ready insight or apprehension.
• Any object or truth discerned by direct cognition; especially, a first or primary truth.
Intuitional
a.
• Pertaining to, or derived from, intuition; characterized by intuition; perceived by intuition; intuitive.
Intuitionalism
n.
(Metaph.) The doctrine that the perception or recognition of primary truth is intuitive, or direct and immediate; — opposed to sensationalism, and experientialism.
Intuitionalist
n.
• One who holds the doctrine of intuitionalism.
Intuitionism
n.
• Same as Intuitionalism.
Intuitionist
n.
• Same as Intuitionalist.
Intuitive
a.
• Seeing clearly; as, an intuitive view; intuitive vision.
• Knowing, or perceiving, by intuition; capable of knowing without deduction or reasoning.
• Received. reached, obtained, or perceived, by intuition; as, intuitive judgment or knowledge; — opposed to deductive.
Intuitively
adv.
• In an intuitive manner.
Intuitivism
n.
• The doctrine that the ideas of right and wrong are intuitive.
Intumesce
v. i.
• To enlarge or expand with heat; to swell; specifically, to swell up or bubble up under the action of heat, as before the blowpipe.
Intumescence
n.
• The act or process of swelling or enlarging; also, the state of being swollen; expansion; tumidity; especially, the swelling up of bodies under the action of heat.
• Anything swollen or enlarged, as a tumor.
Intumescent
a.
• Swelling up; expanding.
Intumulated
a.
• Unburied.
Intune
v. t.
• To intone. Cf. Entune.
Inturbidate
v. t.
• To render turbid; to darken; to confuse.
Inturgescence
n.
• A swelling; the act of swelling, or state of being swelled.
Intuse
n.
• A bruise; a contusion.
Intussuscepted
a.
• Received into some other thing or part, as a sword into a sheath; invaginated.
Intussusception
n.
• The reception of one part within another.
(Med.) The abnormal reception or slipping of a part of a tube, by inversion and descent, within a contiguous part of it; specifically, the reception or slipping of the upper part of the small intestine into the lower; introsusception; invagination.
(Bot.) The interposition of new particles of formative material among those already existing, as in a cell wall, or in a starch grain.
(Physiol.) The act of taking foreign matter, as food, into a living body; the process of nutrition, by which dead matter is absorbed by the living organism, and ultimately converted into the organized substance of its various tissues and organs.
Intwine
v. t.
• To twine or twist into, or together; to wreathe; as, a wreath of flowers intwined.
v. i.
• To be or to become intwined.
Intwinement
n.
• The act of twinning, or the state of being intwined.
Intwist
v. t.
• To twist into or together; to interweave.
Inulin
n.
(Chem.) A substance of very wide occurrence. It is found dissolved in the sap of the roots and rhizomes of many composite and other plants, as Inula, Helianthus, Campanula, etc., and is extracted by solution as a tasteless, white, semicrystalline substance, resembling starch, with which it is isomeric. It is intermediate in nature between starch and sugar. Called also dahlin, helenin, alantin, etc.
Inuloid
n.
(Chem.) A substance resembling inulin, found in the unripe bulbs of the dahila.
Inumbrate
v. t.
• To shade; to darken.
Inuncted
a.
• Anointed.
Inunction
n.
• The act of anointing, or the state of being anointed; unction; specifically (Med.), the rubbing of ointments into the pores of the skin, by which medicinal agents contained in them, such as mercury, iodide of potash, etc., are absorbed.
Inunctuosity
n.
• The want of unctuosity; freedom from greasiness or oiliness; as, the inunctuosity of porcelain clay.
Inundant
a.
• Overflowing.
Inundate
v. t.
• To cover with a flood; to overflow; to deluge; to flood; as, the river inundated the town.
• To fill with an overflowing abundance or superfluity; as, the country was inundated with bills of credit.
Inundation
n.
• The act of inundating, or the state of being inundated; an overflow; a flood; a rising and spreading of water over grounds.
• An overspreading of any kind; overflowing or superfluous abundance; a flood; a great influx; as, an inundation of tourists.
Inunderstanding
a.
• Void of understanding.
Inurbane
a.
• Uncivil; unpolished; rude.
Inurbanity
n.
• Want of urbanity or courtesy; unpolished manners or deportment; inurbaneness; rudeness.
Inure
v. t.
• To apply in use; to train; to discipline; to use or accustom till use gives little or no pain or inconvenience; to harden; to habituate; to practice habitually.
v. i.
• To pass into use; to take or have effect; to be applied; to serve to the use or benefit of; as, a gift of lands inures to the heirs.
Inurement
n.
• Use; practice; discipline; habit; custom.
Inurn
v. t.
• To put in an urn, as the ashes of the dead; hence, to bury; to intomb.
Inusitate
a.
• Unusual.
Inusitation
n.
• Want of use; disuse.
Inust
a.
• Burnt in.
Inustion
n.
• The act of burning or branding.
Inutile
a.
• Useless; unprofitable.
Inutility
n.
• Uselessness; the quality of being unprofitable; unprofitableness; as, the inutility of vain speculations and visionary projects.
Inutterable
a.
• Unutterable; inexpressible.
Invade
v. t.
• To go into or upon; to pass within the confines of; to enter; — used of forcible or rude ingress.
• To enter with hostile intentions; to enter with a view to conquest or plunder; to make an irruption into; to attack; as, the Romans invaded Great Britain.
• To attack; to infringe; to encroach on; to violate; as, the king invaded the rights of the people.
• To grow or spread over; to affect injuriously and progressively; as, gangrene invades healthy tissue.
v. i.
• To make an invasion.
Invader
n.
• One who invades; an assailant; an encroacher; an intruder.
Invaginate
v. t.
• To insert as in a sheath; to prce intussusception in.
Invagination
n.
(Biol.) The condition of an invaginated organ or part.
(Biol.) One of the methods by which the various germinal layers of the ovum are differentiated.
Invalescence
n.
• Strength; health.
Invaletudinary
a.
• Wanting health; valetudinary.
Invalid
a.
• Of no force, weight, or cogency; not valid; weak.
(Law) Having no force, effect, or efficacy; void; null; as, an invalid contract or agreement.
n.
• A person who is weak and infirm; one who is disabled for active service; especially, one in chronic ill health.
a.
• Not well; feeble; infirm; sickly; as, he had an invalid daughter.
v. t.
• To make or render invalid or infirm.
• To classify or enroll as an invalid.
Invalidate
v. t.
• To render invalid; to weaken or lessen the force of; to destroy the authority of; to render of no force or effect; to overthrow; as, to invalidate an agreement or argument.
Invalidation
n.
• The act of inavlidating, or the state of being invalidated.
Invalidism
n.
• The condition of an invalid; sickness; infirmity.
Invalidity
n.
• Want of validity or cogency; want of legal force or efficacy; invalidness; as, the invalidity of an agreement or of a will.
• Want of health; infirmity.
Invalidness
n.
• Invalidity; as, the invalidness of reasoning.
Invalorous
a.
• Not valorous; cowardly.
Invaluable
a.
• Valuable beyond estimation; inestimable; priceless; precious.
Invaluably
adv.
• Inestimably.
Invalued
a.
• Inestimable.
Invariability
n.
• The quality of being invariable; invariableness; constancy; uniformity.
Invariable
a.
• Not given to variation or change; unalterable; unchangeable; always uniform.
n.
(Math.) An invariable quantity; a constant.
Invariance
n.
(Math.) The property of remaining invariable under prescribed or implied conditions.
Invariant
n.
(Math.) An invariable quantity; specifically, a function of the coefficients of one or more forms, which remains unaltered, when these undergo suitable linear transformations.
Invasion
n.
• The act of invading; the act of encroaching upon the rights or possessions of another; encroachment; trespass.
• A warlike or hostile entrance into the possessions or domains of another; the incursion of an army for conquest or plunder.
• The incoming or first attack of anything hurtful or pernicious; as, the invasion of a disease.
Invasive
a.
• Tending to invade; characterized by invasion; aggressive.
Invect
v. i.
• To inveigh.
Invected
a.
(Her.) Having a border or outline composed of semicircles with the convexity outward; — the opposite of engrailed.
Invection
n.
• An inveighing against; invective.
Invective
a.
• Characterized by invection; critical; denunciatory; satirical; abusive; railing.
n.
• An expression which inveighs or rails against a person; a severe or violent censure or reproach; something uttered or written, intended to cast opprobrium, censure, or reproach on another; a harsh or reproachful accusation; — followed by against, having reference to the person or thing affected; as an invective against tyranny.
Invectively
adv.
• In an invective manner.
Inveigh
v. i.
• To declaim or rail (against some person or thing); to utter censorious and bitter language; to attack with harsh criticism or reproach, either spoken or written; to use invectives; — with against; as, to inveigh against character, conduct, manners, customs, morals, a law, an abuse.
Inveigher
n.
• One who inveighs.
Inveigle
v. t.
• To lead astray as if blind; to persuade to something evil by deceptive arts or flattery; to entice; to insnare; to seduce; to wheedle.
Inveiglement
n.
• The act of inveigling, or the state of being inveigled; that which inveigles; enticement; seduction.
Inveigler
n.
• One who inveigles.
Inveil
v. t.
• To cover, as with a vail.
Invendibility
n.
• The quality of being invendible; invendibleness; unsalableness.
Invendible
a.
• Not vendible or salable.
Invent
v. t.
• To come or light upon; to meet; to find.
• To discover, as by study or inquiry; to find out; to devise; to contrive or produce for the first time; — applied commonly to the discovery of some serviceable mode, instrument, or machine.
• To frame by the imagination; to fabricate mentally; to forge; — in a good or a bad sense; as, to invent the machinery of a poem; to invent a falsehood.
Inventer
n.
• One who invents.
Inventful
a.
• Full of invention.
Inventible
a.
• Capable of being invented.
Inventibleness
n.
• Quality of being inventible.
Invention
n.
• The act of finding out or inventing; contrivance or construction of that which has not before existed; as, the invention of logarithms; the invention of the art of printing.
• That which is invented; an original contrivance or construction; a device; as, this fable was the invention of Esop; that falsehood was her own invention.
• Thought; idea.
• A fabrication to deceive; a fiction; a forgery; a falsehood.
• The faculty of inventing; imaginative faculty; skill or ingenuity in contriving anything new; as, a man of invention.
(Fine Arts, Rhet., etc.) The exercise of the imagination in selecting and treating a theme, or more commonly in contriving the arrangement of a piece, or the method of presenting its parts.
Inventious
a.
• Inventive.
Inventive
a.
• Able and apt to invent; quick at contrivance; ready at expedients; as, an inventive head or genius.
Inventor
n.
• One who invents or finds out something new; a contriver; especially, one who invents mechanical devices.
Inventorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to an inventory.
Inventory
n.
• An account, catalogue, or schedule, made by an executor or administrator, of all the goods and chattels, and sometimes of the real estate, of a deceased person; a list of the property of which a person or estate is found to be possessed; hence, an itemized list of goods or valuables, with their estimated worth; specifically, the annual account of stock taken in any business.
v. t.
• To make an inventory of; to make a list, catalogue, or schedule of; to insert or register in an account of goods; as, a merchant inventories his stock.
Inventress
n.
• A woman who invents.
Inveracity
n.
• Want of veracity.
Inverisimilitude
n.
• Want of verisimilitude or likelihood; improbability.
Inverse
a.
• Opposite in order, relation, or effect; reversed; inverted; reciprocal; — opposed to direct.
(Bot.) Inverted; having a position or mode of attachment the reverse of that which is usual.
(Math.) Opposite in nature and effect; — said with reference to any two operations, which, when both are performed in succession upon any quantity, reproduce that quantity; as, multiplication is the inverse operation to division. The symbol of an inverse operation is the symbol of the direct operation with -1 as an index. Thus sin-1 x means the arc whose sine is x.
n.
• That which is inverse.
Inversely
adv.
• In an inverse order or manner; by inversion; — opposed to directly.
Inversion
n.
• The act of inverting, or turning over or backward, or the state of being inverted.
• A change by inverted order; a reversed position or arrangement of things; transposition.
(Mil.) A movement in tactics by which the order of companies in line is inverted, the right being on the left, the left on the right, and so on.
(Math.) A change in the order of the terms of a proportion, so that the second takes the place of the first, and the fourth of the third.
(Geom.) A peculiar method of transformation, in which a figure is replaced by its inverse figure. Propositions that are true for the original figure thus furnish new propositions that are true in the inverse figure.
(Gram.) A change of the usual order of words or phrases; as, "of all vices, impurity is one of the most detestable," instead of, "impurity is one of the most detestable of all vices."
(Rhet.) A method of reasoning in which the orator shows that arguments advanced by his adversary in opposition to him are really favorable to his cause.
(Mus.) Said of intervals, when the lower tone is placed an octave higher, so that fifths become fourths, thirds sixths, etc.
• Said of a chord, when one of its notes, other than its root, is made the bass.
• Said of a subject, or phrase, when the intervals of which it consists are repeated in the contrary direction, rising instead of falling, or vice versa.
• Said of double counterpoint, when an upper and a lower part change places.
(Geol.) The folding back of strata upon themselves, as by upheaval, in such a manner that the order of succession appears to be reversed.
(Chem.) The act or process by which cane sugar (sucrose), under the action of heat and acids or ferments (as diastase), is broken or split up into grape sugar (dextrose), and fruit sugar (levulose); also, less properly, the process by which starch is converted into grape sugar (dextrose).
Invert
v. t.
• To turn over; to put upside down; to upset; to place in a contrary order or direction; to reverse; as, to invert a cup, the order of words, rules of justice, etc.
(Mus.) To change the position of; — said of tones which form a chord, or parts which compose harmony.
• To divert; to convert to a wrong use.
(Chem.) To convert; to reverse; to decompose by, or subject to, inversion.
v. i.
(Chem.) To undergo inversion, as sugar.
a.
(Chem.) Subjected to the process of inversion; inverted; converted; as, invert sugar.
n.
(Masonry) An inverted arch.
Invertebral
a.
(Zool.) Same as Invertebrate.
Invertebrata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A comprehensive division of the animal kingdom, including all except the Vertebrata.
Invertebrate
a.
(Zool.) Destitute of a backbone; having no vertebrae; of or pertaining to the Invertebrata.
n.
• One of the Invertebrata.
Invertebrated
a.
• Having no backbone; invertebrate.
Inverted
a.
• Changed to a contrary or counterchanged order; reversed; characterized by inversion.
(Geol.) Situated apparently in reverse order, as strata when folded back upon themselves by upheaval.
Invertedly
adv.
• In an inverted order.
Invertible
a.
• Capable of being inverted or turned.
(Chem.) Capable of being changed or converted; as, invertible sugar.
a.
• Incapable of being turned or changed.
Invertin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) An unorganized ferment which causes cane sugar to take up a molecule of water and be converted into invert sugar.
Invest
v. t.
• To put garments on; to clothe; to dress; to array; — opposed to divest. Usually followed by with, sometimes by in; as, to invest one with a robe.
• To put on.
• To clothe, as with office or authority; to place in possession of rank, dignity, or estate; to endow; to adorn; to grace; to bedeck; as, to invest with honor or glory; to invest with an estate.
• To surround, accompany, or attend.
• To confer; to give.
(Mil.) To inclose; to surround of hem in with troops, so as to intercept succors of men and provisions and prevent escape; to lay siege to; as, to invest a town.
• To lay out (money or capital) in business with the iew of obtaining an income or profit; as, to invest money in bank stock.
v. i.
• To make an investment; as, to invest in stocks; — usually followed by in.
Investient
a.
• Covering; clothing.
Investigable
a.
• Capable or susceptible of being investigated; admitting research.
a.
• Unsearchable; inscrutable.
Investigate
v. t.
• To follow up step by step by patient inquiry or observation; to trace or track mentally; to search into; to inquire and examine into with care and accuracy; to find out by careful inquisition; as, to investigate the causes of natural phenomena.
v. i.
• To pursue a course of investigation and study; to make investigation.
Investigation
n.
• The act of investigating; the process of inquiring into or following up; research; study; inquiry, esp. patient or thorough inquiry or examination; as, the investigations of the philosopher and the mathematician; the investigations of the judge, the moralist.
Investigative
a.
• Given to investigation; inquisitive; curious; searching.
Investigator
n.
• One who searches diligently into a subject.
Investiture
n.
• The act or ceremony of investing, or the of being invested, as with an office; a giving possession; also, the right of so investing.
(Feudal Law) Livery of seizin.
• That with which anyone is invested or clothed; investment; clothing; covering.
Investive
a.
• Investing.
Investment
n.
• The act of investing, or the state of being invested.
• That with which anyone is invested; a vestment.
(Mil.) The act of surrounding, blocking up, or besieging by an armed force, or the state of being so surrounded.
• The laying out of money in the purchase of some species of property; the amount of money invested, or that in which money is invested.
Investor
n.
• One who invests.
Investure
n.
• Investiture; investment.
v. t.
• To clothe; to invest; to install.
Inveteracy
n.
• Firm establishment by long continuance; firmness or deep-rooted obstinacy of any quality or state acquired by time; as, the inveteracy of custom, habit, or disease; — usually in a bad sense; as, the inveteracy of prejudice or of error.
• Malignity; spitefulness; virulency.
Inveterate
a.
• Old; long-established.
• Firmly established by long continuance; obstinate; deep-rooted; of long standing; as, an inveterate disease; an inveterate abuse.
• Having habits fixed by long continuance; confirmed; habitual; as, an inveterate idler or smoker.
• Malignant; virulent; spiteful.
v. t.
• To fix and settle by long continuance.
Inveterately
adv.
• In an inveterate manner or degree.
Inveterateness
n.
• Inveteracy.
Inveteration
n.
• The act of making inveterate.
Invict
a.
• Invincible.
Invidious
a.
• Envious; malignant.
• Worthy of envy; desirable; enviable.
• Likely to incur or produce ill will, or to provoke envy; hateful; as, invidious distinctions.
Invigor
v. t.
• To invigorate.
Invigorate
v. t.
• To give vigor to; to strengthen; to animate; to give life and energy to.
Invigoration
n.
• The act of invigorating, or the state of being invigorated.
Invile
v. t.
• To render vile.
Invillaged
p. a.
• Turned into, or reduced to, a village.
Invincibility
n.
• The quality or state of being invincible; invincibleness.
Invincible
a.
• Incapable of being conquered, overcome, or subdued; unconquerable; insuperable; as, an invincible army, or obstacle.
Inviolability
n.
• The quality or state of being inviolable; inviolableness.
Inviolable
a.
• Not violable; not susceptible of hurt, wound, or harm (used with respect to either physical or moral damage); not susceptible of being profaned or corrupted; sacred; holy; as, inviolable honor or chastity; an inviolable shrine.
• Unviolated; uninjured; undefiled; uncorrupted.
• Not capable of being broken or violated; as, an inviolable covenant, agreement, promise, or vow.
Inviolableness
n.
• The quality or state of being inviolable; as, the inviolableness of divine justice.
Inviolably
adv.
• Without violation.
Inviolacy
n.
• The state or quality of being inviolate; as, the inviolacy of an oath.
Inviolaness
n.
• The state of being inviolate.
Inviolately
adv.
• In an inviolate manner.
Invious
a.
• Untrodden.
Invirile
a.
• Deficient in manhood; unmanly; effeminate.
Invirility
n.
• Absence of virility or manhood; effeminacy.
Inviscate
v. t.
• To daub or catch with glue or birdlime; to entangle with glutinous matter.
Inviscerate
v. t.
• To breed; to nourish.
a.
• Deep-seated; internal.
Invisibility
n.
• The state or quality of being invisible; also, that which is invisible.
Invisible
a.
• Incapable of being seen; not perceptible by vision; not visible.
n.
• An invisible person or thing; specifically, God, the Supreme Being.
• A Rosicrucian; — so called because avoiding declaration of his craft.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of those (as in the 16th century) who denied the visibility of the church.
Invisibleness
n.
• The quality or state of being invisible; invisibility.
Invisibly
adv.
• In an invisible manner,
Invision
n.
• Want of vision or of the power of seeing.
Invitation
n.
• The act of inviting; solicitation; the requesting of a person's company; as, an invitation to a party, to a dinner, or to visit a friend.
• A document written or printed, or spoken words, onveying the message by which one is invited.
• Allurement; enticement.
Invitatory
a.
• Using or containing invitations.
n.
• That which invites; specifically, the invitatory psalm, or a part of it used in worship.
Invite
v. t.
• To ask; to request; to bid; to summon; to ask to do some act, or go to some place; esp., to ask to an entertainment or visit; to request the company of; as, to invite to dinner, or a wedding, or an excursion.
• To allure; to draw to; to tempt to come; to induce by pleasure or hope; to attract.
• To give occasion for; as, to invite criticism.
v. i.
• To give invitation.
Invitement
n.
• Invitation.
Inviter
n.
• One who, or that which, invites.
Invitiate
a.
• Not vitiated.
Inviting
a.
• Alluring; tempting; as, an inviting amusement or prospect.
Invitrifiable
a.
• Not admitting of being vitrified, or converted into glass.
Invocate
v. t.
• To invoke; to call on, or for, in supplication; to implore.
Invocation
n.
• The act or form of calling for the assistance or presence of some superior being; earnest and solemn entreaty; esp., prayer offered to a divine being.
(Law) A call or summons; especially, a judicial call, demand, or order; as, the invocation of papers or evidence into court.
Invocatory
a.
• Making or containing invocation; invoking.
Invoice
n.
(Com.) A written account of the particulars of merchandise shipped or sent to a purchaser, consignee, factor, etc., with the value or prices and charges annexed.
• The lot or set of goods as shipped or received; as, the merchant receives a large invoice of goods.
v. t.
• To make a written list or account of, as goods to be sent to a consignee; to insert in a priced list; to write or enter in an invoice.
Invoke
v. t.
• To call on for aid or protection; to invite earnestly or solemnly; to summon; to address in prayer; to solicit or demand by invocation; to implore; as, to invoke the Supreme Being, or to invoke His and blessing.
Involucel
n.
(Bot.) A partial, secondary, or small involucre.
Involucellate
a.
(Bot.) Furnished with involucels.
Involucral
a.
• Pertaining to, possessing, or like, an involucrum.
Involucre
n.
(Bot.) A whorl or set of bracts around a flower, umbel, or head.
• A continuous marginal covering of sporangia, in certain ferns, as in the common brake, or the cup-shaped processes of the filmy ferns.
• The peridium or volva of certain fungi. Called also involucrum.
Involucred
a.
(Bot.) Having an involucre, as umbels, heads, etc.
Involucret
n.
(Bot.) An involucel.
Involucrum
n.
(Zool.) A sheath which surrounds the base of the lasso cells in the Siphonophora.
Involuntarily
adv.
• In an involuntary manner; not voluntarily; not intentionally or willingly.
Involuntariness
n.
• The quality or state of being involuntary; unwillingness; automatism.
Involuntary
a.
• Not having will of the power of choice.
• Not under the influence or control of the will; not voluntary; as, the involuntary movements of the body; involuntary muscle fibers.
• Not proceeding from choice; done unwillingly; reluctant; compulsory; as, involuntary submission.
Involute
n.
(Geom.) A curve traced by the end of a string wound upon another curve, or unwound from it; — called also evolvent.
Involution
n.
• The act of involving or infolding.
• The state of being entangled or involved; complication; entanglement.
• That in which anything is involved, folded, or wrapped; envelope.
(Gram.) The insertion of one or more clauses between the subject and the verb, in a way that involves or complicates the construction.
(Math.) The act or process of raising a quantity to any power assigned; the multiplication of a quantity into itself a given number of times; — the reverse of evolution.
(Geom.) The relation which exists between three or more sets of points, a.a', b.b', c.c', so related to a point O on the line, that the product Oa.Oa' = Ob.Ob' = Oc.Oc' is constant. Sets of lines or surfaces possessing corresponding properties may be in involution.
(Med.) The return of an enlarged part or organ to its normal size, as of the uterus after pregnancy.
Involve
v. t.
• To roll or fold up; to wind round; to entwine.
• To envelop completely; to surround; to cover; to hide; to involve in darkness or obscurity.
• To complicate or make intricate, as in grammatical structure.
• To connect with something as a natural or logical consequence or effect; to include necessarily; to imply.
• To take in; to gather in; to mingle confusedly; to blend or merge.
• To envelop, infold, entangle, or embarrass; as, to involve a person in debt or misery.
• To engage thoroughly; to occupy, employ, or absorb.
(Math.) To raise to any assigned power; to multiply, as a quantity, into itself a given number of times; as, a quantity involved to the third or fourth power.
Involved
a.
(Zool.) Same as Involute.
Involvedness
n.
• The state of being involved.
Involvement
n.
• The act of involving, or the state of being involved.
Invulgar
v. t.
• To cause to become or appear vulgar.
a.
• Not vulgar; refined; elegant.
Invulnerability
n.
• Quality or state of being invulnerable.
Invulnerable
a.
• Incapable of being wounded, or of receiving injury.
• Unanswerable; irrefutable; that can not be refuted or convinced; as, an invulnerable argument.
Invulnerableness
n.
• Invulnerability.
Invulnerate
a.
• Invulnerable.
Inwall
v. t.
• To inclose or fortify as with a wall.
n.
• An inner wall; specifically (Metal.), the inner wall, or lining, of a blast furnace.
Inward
a.
• Being or placed within; inner; interior; — opposed to outward.
• Seated in the mind, heart, spirit, or soul.
• Intimate; domestic; private.
n.
• That which is inward or within; especially, in the plural, the inner parts or organs of the body; the viscera.
• The mental faculties; — usually pl.
• An intimate or familiar friend or acquaintance.
Inwardly
adv.
• In the inner parts; internally.
• Toward the center; inward; as, to curve inwardly.
• In the heart or mind; mentally; privately; secrety; as, he inwardly repines.
• Intimately; thoroughly.
Inwardness
n.
• Internal or true state; essential nature; as, the inwardness of conduct.
• Intimacy; familiarity.
• Heartiness; earnestness.
Inweave
v. t.
• To weave in or together; to intermix or intertwine by weaving; to interlace.
Inwheel
v. t.
• To encircle.
Inwit
n.
• Inward sense; mind; understanding; conscience.
Inwith
prep.
• Within.
Inwork
v. t. & i.
• To work in or within.
Inwrap
v. t.
• To cover by wrapping; to involve; to infold; as, to inwrap in a cloak, in smoke, etc.
• To involve, as in difficulty or perplexity; to perplex.
Inwreathe
v. t.
• To surround or encompass as with a wreath.
Inwrought
p. p. or a.
• Wrought or worked in or among other things; worked into any fabric so as to from a part of its texture; wrought or adorned, as with figures.
Io
n.
• An exclamation of joy or triumph; — often interjectional.
Iodal
n.
(Chem.) An oily liquid, Cl3.CHO, analogous to chloral and bromal.
Iodate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of iodic acid.
Iodhydrin
n.
(Chem.) One of a series of compounds containing iodine, and analogous to the chlorhydrins.
Iodic
a.
(Chem.) to, or containing, iodine; specif., denoting those compounds in which it has a relatively high valence; as, iodic acid.
Iodide
n.
(Chem.) A binary compound of iodine, or one which may be regarded as binary; as, potassium iodide.
Iodine
n.
(Chem.) A nonmetallic element, of the halogen group, occurring always in combination, as in the iodides. When isolated it is in the form of dark gray metallic scales, resembling plumbago, soft but brittle, and emitting a chlorinelike odor. Symbol I. Atomic weight 126.5. If heated, iodine volatilizes in beautiful violet vapors.
Iodism
n.
(Med.) A morbid state produced by the use of iodine and its compounds, and characterized by palpitation, depression, and general emaciation, with a pustular eruption upon the skin.
Iodize
v. t.
• To treat or impregnate with iodine or its compounds; as, to iodize a plate for photography.
Iodizer
n.
• One who, or that which, iodizes.
Iodoform
n.
(Chem.) A yellow, crystalline, volatile substance, CI3H, having an offensive odor and sweetish taste, and analogous to chloroform. It is used in medicine as a healing and antiseptic dressing for wounds and sores.
Iodoquinine
n.
(Chem.) A iodide of quinine obtained as a brown substance,. It is the base of herapathite.
Iodous
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or containing, iodine.
Ioduret
n.
(Chem.) Iodide.
Iodyrite
n.
(Min.) Silver iodide, a mineral of a yellowish color.
Iolite
n.
(Min.) A silicate of alumina, iron, and magnesia, having a bright blue color and vitreous luster; cordierite. It is remarkable for its dichroism, and is also called dichroite.
Ion
n.
(Elec. Chem.) One of the elements which appear at the respective poles when a body is subjected to electro-chemical decomposition. Cf. Anion, Cation.
Ionian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Ionia or the Ionians; Ionic.
n.
• A native or citizen of Ionia.
Ionic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Ionia or the Ionians.
(Arch.) Pertaining to the Ionic order of architecture, one of the three orders invented by the Greeks, and one of the five recognized by the Italian writers of the sixteenth century. Its distinguishing feature is a capital with spiral volutes.
a.
• Of or pertaining to an ion; composed of ions.
n.
(Pros.) A foot consisting of four syllables: either two long and two short, — that is, a spondee and a pyrrhic, in which case it is called the greater Ionic; or two short and two long, — that is, a pyrrhic and a spondee, in which case it is called the smaller Ionic.
• A verse or meter composed or consisting of Ionic feet.
• The Ionic dialect; as, the Homeric Ionic.
(Print.) Ionic type.
Ionidium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of violaceous plants, chiefly found in tropical America, some species of which are used as substitutes for ipecacuanha.
Iota
n.
• The ninth letter of the Greek alphabet (ι) corresponding with the English i.
• A very small quantity or degree; a jot; a particle.
Iotacism
n.
• The frequent use of the sound of iota (that of English e in be), as among the modern Greeks; also, confusion from sounding , , , , , etc., like .
Iowas
n. pl.
• ; sing. Iowa. (Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians which formerly occupied the region now included in the State of Iowa.
Ipecac
n.
• An abbreviation of Ipecacuanha, and in more frequent use.
Ipecacuanha
n.
(Med. & Bot.) The root of a Brazilian rubiaceous herb (Cephaelis Ipecacuanha), largely employed as an emetic; also, the plant itself; also, a medicinal extract of the root. Many other plants are used as a substitutes; among them are the black or Peruvian ipecac (Psychotria emetica), the white ipecac (Ionidium Ipecacuanha), the bastard or wild ipecac (Asclepias Curassavica), and the undulated ipecac (Richardsonia scabra).
Ipocras
n.
• Hippocras.
Ipomoea
n.
• , and like." Gray.] (Bot.) A genus of twining plants with showy monopetalous flowers, including the morning-glory, the sweet potato, and the cypress vine.
Ipomoeic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained by the oxidation of convolvulin (obtained from jalap, the tubers of Ipomoea purga), and identical in most of its properties with sebacic acid.
Iracund
a.
• Irascible; choleric.
Irade
n.
• A decree of the Sultan.
Iran
n.
• The native name of Persia.
Iranian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Iran.
n.
• A native of Iran; also, the Iranian or Persian language, a division of the Aryan family of languages.
Iranic
a.
• Iranian.
Irascibility
n.
• The quality or state of being irascible; irritability of temper; irascibleness.
Irascible
a.
• Prone to anger; easily provoked or inflamed to anger; choleric; irritable; as, an irascible man; an irascible temper or mood.
Irate
a.
• Angry; incensed; enraged.
Ire
n.
• Anger; wrath.
Ireful
a.
• Full of ire; angry; wroth.
Irefulness
n.
• Wrathfulness.
Irenarch
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) An officer in the Greek empire having functions corresponding to those of a justice of the peace.
Irenicon
n.
• A proposition or device for securing peace, especially in the church.
Irenics
n.
(Eccl.) That branch of Christian science which treats of the methods of securing unity among Christians or harmony and union among the churches; — called also Irenical theology.
Irestone
n.
(Mining) Any very hard rock.
Irian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the iris.
Iricism
n.
• Irishism.
Iridal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the iris or rainbow; prismatic; as, the iridal colors.
Iridectomy
n.
(Surg.) The act or process of cutting out a portion of the iris in order to form an artificial pupil.
Iridescence
n.
• Exhibition of colors like those of the rainbow; the quality or state of being iridescent; a prismatic play of color; as, the iridescence of mother-of-pearl.
Iridescent
a.
• Having colors like the rainbow; exhibiting a play of changeable colors; nacreous; prismatic; as, iridescent glass.
Iridian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the iris or rainbow.
Iridiated
a.
• Iridescent.
Iridic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the iris of the eye.
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to iridium; — said specifically of those compounds in which iridium has a relatively high valence.
Iridioscope
n.
• A kind of ophthalmoscope.
Iridious
a.
(Chem.) Of or pertaining to iridium; — applied specifically to compounds in which iridium has a low valence.
Iridium
n.
(Chem.) A rare metallic element, of the same group as platinum, which it much resembles, being silver-white, but harder, and brittle, and indifferent to most corrosive agents. With the exception of osmium, it is the heaviest substance known, its specific gravity being 22.4. Symbol Ir. Atomic weight 192.5.
Iridize
v. t.
• To point or tip with iridium, as a gold pen.
• To make iridescent; as, to iridize glass.
Iridoline
n.
(Chem.) A nitrogenous base C10H9N, extracted from coal-tar naphtha, as an oily liquid. It is a member of the quinoline series, and is probably identical with lepidine.
Iris
n.
(Class. Myth.) The goddess of the rainbow, and swift-footed messenger of the gods.
• The rainbow.
• An appearance resembling the rainbow; a prismatic play of colors.
(Anat.) The contractile membrane perforated by the pupil, and forming the colored portion of the eye.
(Bot.) A genus of plants having showy flowers and bulbous or tuberous roots, of which the flower-de-luce (fleur-de-lis), orris, and other species of flag are examples.
Irisated
a.
• Exhibiting the prismatic colors; irised; iridescent.
Iriscope
n.
• A philosophical toy for exhibiting the prismatic tints by means of thin films.
Irised
a.
• Having colors like those of the rainbow; iridescent.
Irish
a.
• Of or pertaining to Ireland or to its inhabitants; produced in Ireland.
n. sing. & pl.
• The natives or inhabitants of Ireland, esp. the Celtic natives or their descendants.
• The language of the Irish; the Hiberno-Celtic.
• An old game resembling backgammon.
Irishism
n.
• A mode of speaking peculiar to the Irish; an Hibernicism.
Irishman
n.
• A man born in Ireland or of the Irish race; an Hibernian.
Irishry
n.
• The Celtic people of Ireland.
Iritis
n.
(Med.) An inflammation of the iris of the eye.
Irk
v. t.
• To weary; to give pain; to annoy; — used only impersonally at present.
Irksome
a.
• Wearisome; tedious; disagreeable or troublesome by reason of long continuance or repetition; as, irksome hours; irksome tasks.
• Weary; vexed; uneasy.
Iron
n.
(Chem.) The most common and most useful metallic element, being of almost universal occurrence, usually in the form of an oxide (as hematite, magnetite, etc.), or a hydrous oxide (as limonite, turgite, etc.). It is reduced on an enormous scale in three principal forms; viz., cast iron, steel, and wrought iron. Iron usually appears dark brown, from oxidation or impurity, but when pure, or an fresh surface, is a gray or white metal. It is easily oxidized (rusted) by moisture, and is attacked by many corrosive agents. Symbol Fe (Latin Ferrum). Atomic weight 55.9. Specific gravity, pure iron, 7.86; cast iron, 7.1. In magnetic properties, it is superior to all other substances.
• An instrument or utensil made of iron; — chiefly in composition; as, a flatiron, a smoothing iron, etc.
• Fetters; chains; handcuffs; manacles.
• Strength; power; firmness; inflexibility; as, to rule with a rod of iron.
a.
• Of, or made of iron; consisting of iron; as, an iron bar, dust.
• Resembling iron in color; as, iron blackness.
• Like iron in hardness, strength, impenetrability, power of endurance, insensibility, etc.; as:
• Rude; hard; harsh; severe
• Firm; robust; enduring; as, an iron constitution
• Inflexible; unrelenting; as, an iron will
• Not to be broken; holding or binding fast; tenacious
v. t.
• To smooth with an instrument of iron; especially, to smooth, as cloth, with a heated flatiron; — sometimes used with out.
• To shackle with irons; to fetter or handcuff.
• To furnish or arm with iron; as, to iron a wagon.
Ironbound
a.
• Bound as with iron; rugged; as, an ironbound coast.
• Rigid; unyielding; as, ironbound traditions.
Ironclad
a.
• Clad in iron; protected or covered with iron, as a vessel for naval warfare.
• Rigorous; severe; exacting; as, an ironclad oath or pledge.
n.
• A naval vessel having the parts above water covered and protected by iron or steel usually in large plates closely joined and made sufficiently thick and strong to resist heavy shot.
Ironer
n.
• One who, or that which, irons.
Ironheads
n.
(Bot.) A European composite herb (Centaurea nigra); — so called from the resemblance of its knobbed head to an iron ball fixed on a long handle.
Ironic
a.
• Ironical.
Ironical
a.
• Pertaining to irony; containing, expressing, or characterized by, irony; as, an ironical remark.
• Addicted to the use of irony; given to irony.
Ironing
n.
• The act or process of smoothing, as clothes, with hot flatirons.
• The clothes ironed.
Ironish
a.
• Resembling iron, as in taste.
Ironist
n.
• One who uses irony.
Ironmaster
n.
• A manufacturer of iron, or large dealer therein.
Ironmonger
n.
• A dealer in iron or hardware.
Ironmongery
n.
• Hardware; a general name for all articles made of iron.
Ironsides
n.
• A cuirassier or cuirassiers; also, hardy veteran soldiers; — applied specifically to Cromwell's cavalry.
Ironsmith
n.
• A worker in iron; one who makes and repairs utensils of iron; a blacksmith.
(Zool.) An East Indian barbet (Megalaima faber), inhabiting the Island of Hainan. The name alludes to its note, which resembles the sounds made by a smith.
Ironstone
n.
• A hard, earthy ore of iron.
Ironware
n.
• Articles made of iron, as household utensils, tools, and the like.
Ironweed
n.
(Bot.) A tall weed with purplish flowers (Vernonia Noveboracensis). The name is also applied to other plants of the same genus.
Ironwood
n.
(Bot.) A tree unusually hard, strong, or heavy wood.
Ironwork
n.
• Anything made of iron; — a general name of such parts or pieces of a building, vessel, carriage, etc., as consist of iron.
Ironwort
n.
(Bot.) An herb of the Mint family (Sideritis), supposed to heal sword cuts; also, a species of Galeopsis.
Irony
a.
• Made or consisting of iron; partaking of iron; iron; as, irony chains; irony particles.
• Resembling iron taste, hardness, or other physical property.
n.
• Dissimulation; ignorance feigned for the purpose of confounding or provoking an antagonist.
• A sort of humor, ridicule, or light sarcasm, which adopts a mode of speech the meaning of which is contrary to the literal sense of the words.
Iroquois
n. sing. & pl.
(Ethnol.) A powerful and warlike confederacy of Indian tribes, formerly inhabiting Central New York and constituting most of the Five Nations. Also, any Indian of the Iroquois tribes.
Irous
a.
• Irascible; passionate.
Irp
a.
• Making irps.
Irradiant
a.
• Irradiating or illuminating; as, the irradiant moon.
Irradiate
v. t.
• To throw rays of light upon; to illuminate; to brighten; to adorn with luster.
• To enlighten intellectually; to illuminate; as, to irradiate the mind.
• To animate by heat or light.
• To radiate, shed, or diffuse.
v. i.
• To emit rays; to shine.
a.
• Illuminated; irradiated.
Irradiation
n.
• Act of irradiating, or state of being irradiated.
• Illumination; irradiance; brilliancy.
• Fig.: Mental light or illumination.
(Opt.) The apparent enlargement of a bright object seen upon a dark ground, due to the fact that the portions of the retina around the image are stimulated by the intense light; as when a dark spot on a white ground appears smaller, or a white spot on a dark ground larger, than it really is, esp. when a little out of focus.
Irradicate
v. t.
• To root deeply.
Irrational
a.
• Not rational; void of reason or understanding; as, brutes are irrational animals.
• Not according to reason; absurd; foolish.
(Math.) Not capable of being exactly expressed by an integral number, or by a vulgar fraction; surd; — said especially of roots.
Irrationality
n.
• The quality or state of being irrational.
Irrationally
adv.
• In an irrational manner.
Irrationalness
n.
• Irrationality.
Irrebuttable
a.
• Incapable of being rebutted.
Irreceptive
a.
• Not receiving; incapable of receiving.
Irreclaimable
a.
• Incapable of being reclaimed.
Irrecognition
n.
• A failure to recognize; absence of recognition.
Irrecognizable
a.
• Not recognizable.
Irreconcilability
n.
• The quality or state of being irreconcilable; irreconcilableness.
Irreconcilable
a.
• Not reconcilable; implacable; incompatible; inconsistent; disagreeing; as, irreconcilable enemies, statements.
Irreconcile
v. t.
• To prevent from being reconciled; to alienate or disaffect.
Irreconcilement
n.
• The state or quality of being unreconciled; disagreement.
Irreconciliation
n.
• Want of reconciliation; disagreement.
Irrecordable
a.
• Not fit or possible to be recorded.
Irrecoverable
a.
• Not capable of being recovered, regained, or remedied; irreparable; as, an irrecoverable loss, debt, or injury.
Irrecuperable
a.
• Irrecoverable.
Irrecured
a.
• Incurable.
Irrecusable
a.
• Not liable to exception or rejection.
Irredeemability
n.
• The state or quality of being irredeemable; irredeemableness.
Irredeemable
a.
• Not redeemable; that can not be redeemed; not payable in gold or silver, as a bond; — used especially of such government notes, issued as currency, as are not convertible into coin at the pleasure of the holder.
Irreducibility
n.
• The state or quality of being irreducible.
Irreducible
a.
• Incapable of being reduced, or brought into a different state; incapable of restoration to its proper or normal condition; as, an irreducible hernia.
(Math.) Incapable of being reduced to a simpler form of expression; as, an irreducible formula.
Irreflection
n.
• Want of reflection.
Irreflective
a.
• Not reflective.
Irrefragability
n.
• The quality or state of being irrefragable; incapability of being refuted.
Irrefragable
a.
• Not refragable; not to be gainsaid or denied; not to be refuted or overthrown; unanswerable; incontestable; undeniable; as, an irrefragable argument; irrefragable evidence.
Irrefrangibility
n.
• The quality or state of being irrefrangible; irrefrangibleness.
Irrefrangible
a.
• Not refrangible; that can not be refracted in passing from one medium to another.
Irrefromable
a.
• Incapable of being reformed; incorrigible.
Irrefutable
a.
• Incapable of being refuted or disproved; indisputable.
Irregeneracy
n.
• Unregeneracy.
Irregeneration
n.
• An unregenerate state.
Irregular
a.
• Not regular; not conforming to a law, method, or usage recognized as the general rule; not according to common form; not conformable to nature, to the rules of moral rectitude, or to established principles; not normal; unnatural; immethodical; unsymmetrical; erratic; no straight; not uniform; as, an irregular line; an irregular figure; an irregular verse; an irregular physician; an irregular proceeding; irregular motion; irregular conduct, etc. Cf. Regular.
n.
• One who is not regular; especially, a soldier not in regular service.
Irregularist
n.
• One who is irregular.
Irregularity
n.
• The state or quality of being irregular; that which is irregular.
Irregularly
adv.
• In an irregular manner.
Irregulate
v. t.
• To make irregular; to disorder.
Irregulous
a.
• Lawless.
Irrejectable
a.
• That can not be rejected; irresistible.
Irrelapsable
a.
• Not liable to relapse; secure.
Irrelate
a.
• Irative; unconnected.
Irrelation
n.
• The quality or state of being irrelative; want of connection or relation.
Irrelative
a.
• Not relative; without mutual relations; unconnected.
Irrelavance
n.
• Irrelevancy.
Irrelavancy
n.
• The quality or state of being irrelevant; as, the irrelevancy of an argument.
Irrelavant
a.
• Not relevant; not applicable or pertinent; not bearing upon or serving to support; foreign; extraneous; as, testimony or arguments irrelevant to a case.
Irrelievable
a.
• Not admitting relief; incurable; hopeless.
Irreligion
n.
• The state of being irreligious; want of religion; impiety.
Irreligionist
n.
• One who is irreligious.
Irreligious
a.
• Destitute of religion; not controlled by religious motives or principles; ungodly. Cf. Impiou.
• Indicating a want of religion; profane; wicked; as, irreligious speech.
Irreligiously
adv.
• In an irreligious manner.
Irreligiousness
n.
• The state or quality of being irreligious; ungodliness.
Irremeable
a.
• Admitting no return; as, an irremeable way.
Irremediable
a.
• Not to be remedied, corrected, or redressed; incurable; as, an irremediable disease or evil.
Irremediableness
n.
• The state or quality of being irremediable.
Irremediably
adv.
• In a manner, or to a degree, that precludes remedy, cure, or correction.
Irremissible
a.
• Not remissible; unpardonable; as, irremissible crimes.
Irremission
n.
• Refusal of pardon.
Irremissive
a.
• Not remitting; unforgiving.
Irremittable
a.
• Not capable of being remitted; irremissible.
Irremobability
n.
• The quality or state of being irremovable; immovableness.
Irremovable
a.
• Not removable; immovable; inflexible.
Irremoval
n.
• Absence of removal.
Irremunerable
a.
• Not remunerable; not capable of remuneration.
Irrenowned
a.
• Not renowned.
Irreparability
n.
• The quality or state of being irreparable; irreparableness.
Irreparable
a.
• Not reparable; not capable of being repaired, recovered, regained, or remedied; irretrievable; irremediable; as, an irreparable breach; an irreparable loss.
Irreparableness
n.
• Quality of being irreparable.
Irreparably
adv.
• In an irreparable manner.
Irrepealability
n.
• The quality or state of being irrepealable.
Irrepealable
a.
• Not repealable; not capable of being repealed or revoked, as a law.
Irrepentance
n.
• Want of repentance; impenitence.
Irreprehensible
a.
• Not reprehensible; blameless; innocent.
Irrepresentable
a.
• Not capable of being represented or portrayed.
Irrepressible
a.
• Not capable of being repressed, restrained, or controlled; as, irrepressible joy; an irrepressible conflict.
Irrepressibly
adv.
• In a manner or to a degree that can not be repressed.
Irreproachable
a.
• Not reproachable; above reproach; not deserving reproach; blameless.
Irreproachableness
n.
• The quality or state of being irreproachable; integrity; innocence.
Irreproachably
adv.
• In an irreproachable manner; blamelessly.
Irreprovable
a.
• Incapable of being justly reproved; irreproachable; blameless; upright.
Irreptitious
a.
• Surreptitious; spurious.
Irreputable
a.
• Disreputable.
Irresilient
a.
• Not resilient; not recoiling or rebounding; inelastic.
Irresistance
n.
• Nonresistance; passive submission.
Irresistibility
n.
• The quality or state of being irrestible, irresistibleness.
Irresistible
a.
• That can not be successfully resisted or opposed; superior to opposition; resistless; overpowering; as, an irresistible attraction.
Irresistibleness
n.
• Quality of being irrestible.
Irresistibly
adv.
• In an irrestible manner.
Irresistless
a.
• Irresistible.
Irresoluble
a.
• Incapable of being dissolved or resolved into parts; insoluble.
• Incapable of being relieved or assisted.
Irresolubleness
n.
• The state or quality of being irresoluble; insolubility.
Irresolute
a.
• Not resolute; not decided or determined; wavering; given to doubt or irresolution.
Irresolution
n.
• Want of resolution; want of decision in purpose; a fluctuation of mind, as in doubt, or between hope and fear; irresoluteness; indecision; vacillation.
Irresolvability
n.
• The quality of being irresolvable; irresolvableness.
Irresolvable
a.
• Incapable of being resolved; not separable into component parts.
Irresolvableness
n.
• The quality or state of being irresolvable; irresolvability.
Irresolvedly
adv.
• Without settled determination; in a hesitating manner; doubtfully.
Irrespective
a.
• Without regard for conditions, circumstances, or consequences; unbiased; independent; impartial; as, an irrespective judgment.
• Disrespectful.
Irrespectively
adv.
• Without regard to conditions; not making circumstances into consideration.
Irrespirable
a.
• Unfit for respiration; not having the qualities necessary to support animal life; as, irrespirable air.
Irresponsibility
n.
• Want of, or freedom from, responsibility or accountability.
Irresponsible
a.
• Nor responsible; not liable or able to answer fro consequences; innocent.
• Not to be trusted; unreliable.
Irresponsibly
adv.
• So as not to be responsible.
Irresponsive
a.
• Not responsive; not able, ready, or inclined to respond.
Irresuscitable
a.
• Incapable of being resuscitated or revived.
Irretention
n.
• Want of retaining power; forgetfulness.
Irretentive
a.
• Not retentive; as, an irretentive memory.
Irretraceable
a.
• Incapable of being retraced; not retraceable.
Irretractile
a.
• Not retractile.
• Not tractile or ductile.
Irretrievable
a.
• Not retrievable; irrecoverable; irreparable; as, an irretrievable loss.
Irretrievableness
n.
• The state or quality of being irretrievable.
Irretrievably
adv.
• In an irretrievable manner.
Irreturnable
a.
• Not to be returned.
Irrevealable
a.
• Incapable of being revealed.
Irreverence
n.
• The state or quality of being irreverent; want of proper reverence; disregard of the authority and character of a superior.
Irreverend
a.
• Irreverent.
Irreverent
a.
• Not reverent; showing a want of reverence; expressive of a want of veneration; as, an irreverent babbler; an irreverent jest.
Irreverently
adv.
• In an irreverent manner.
Irreversibility
n.
• The state or quality of being irreversible; irreversibleness.
Irreversible
a.
• Incapable of being reversed or turned about or back; incapable of being made to run backward; as, an irreversible engine.
• Incapable of being reversed, recalled, repealed, or annulled; as, an irreversible sentence or decree.
Irreversibleness
n.
• The state or quality of being irreversible.
Irreversibly
adv.
• In an irreversible manner.
Irrevocability
n.
• The state or quality of being irrevocable; irrevocableness.
Irrevocable
a.
• Incapable of being recalled or revoked; unchangeable; irreversible; unalterable; as, an irrevocable promise or decree; irrevocable fate.
Irrevokable
a.
• Irrevocable.
Irrevoluble
a.
• That has no finite period of revolution; not revolving.
Irrhetorical
a.
• Not rethorical.
Irrigate
v. t.
• To water; to wet; to moisten with running or dropping water; to bedew.
(Agric.) To water, as land, by causing a stream to flow upon, over, or through it, as in artificial channels.
Irrigation
n.
• The act or process of irrigating, or the state of being irrigated; especially, the operation of causing water to flow over lands, for nourishing plants.
Irriguous
a.
• Watered; watery; moist; dewy.
• Gently penetrating or pervading.
Irrisible
a.
• Not risible.
Irrision
n.
• The act of laughing at another; derision.
Irritability
n.
• The state or quality of being irritable; quick excitability; petulance; fretfulness; as, irritability of temper.
(Physiol.) A natural susceptibility, characteristic of all living organisms, tissues, and cells, to the influence of certain stimuli, response being manifested in a variety of ways, — as that quality in plants by which they exhibit motion under suitable stimulation; esp., the property which living muscle processes, of responding either to a direct stimulus of its substance, or to the stimulating influence of its nerve fibers, the response being indicated by a change of form, or contraction; contractility.
(Med.) A condition of morbid excitability of an organ or part of the body; undue susceptibility to the influence of stimuli.
Irritable
a.
• Capable of being irriated.
• Very susceptible of anger or passion; easily inflamed or exasperated; as, an irritable temper.
(Physiol.) Endowed with irritability; susceptible of irritation; capable of being excited to action by the application of certain stimuli.
(Med.) Susceptible of irritation; unduly sensitive to irritants or stimuli.
Irritableness
n.
• Irritability.
Irritably
adv.
• In an irritable manner.
Irritancy
n.
(Scots Law) The state or quality of being null and void; invalidity; forfeiture.
n.
• The state o quality of being irritant or irritating.
Irritant
a.
(Scots Law) Rendering null and void; conditionally invalidating.
a.
• Irritating; producing irritation or inflammation.
n.
• That which irritates or excites.
(Physiol. & Med.) Any agent by which irritation is produced; as, a chemical irritant; a mechanical or electrical irritant.
(Toxicology) A poison that produces inflammation.
Irritate
v. t.
• To render null and void.
v. t.
• To increase the action or violence of; to heighten excitement in; to intensify; to stimulate.
• To excite anger or displeasure in; to provoke; to tease; to exasperate; to annoy; to vex; as, the insolence of a tyrant irritates his subjects.
(Physiol.) To produce irritation in; to stimulate; to cause to contract.
(Med.) To make morbidly excitable, or oversensitive; to fret; as, the skin is irritated by friction; to irritate a wound by a coarse bandage.
a.
• Excited; heightened.
Irritation
n.
• The act of irritating, or exciting, or the state of being irritated; excitement; stimulation, usually of an undue and uncomfortable kind; especially, excitement of anger or passion; provocation; annoyance; anger.
(Physiol.) The act of exciting, or the condition of being excited to action, by stimulation; — as, the condition of an organ of sense, when its nerve is affected by some external body; esp., the act of exciting muscle fibers to contraction, by artificial stimulation; as, the irritation of a motor nerve by electricity; also, the condition of a muscle and nerve, under such stimulation.
(Med.) A condition of morbid excitability or oversensitiveness of an organ or part of the body; a state in which the application of ordinary stimuli produces pain or excessive or vitiated action.
Irritative
a.
• Serving to excite or irritate; irritating; as, an irritative agent.
• Accompanied with, or produced by, increased action or irritation; as, an irritative fever.
Irritatory
a.
• Exciting; producing irritation; irritating.
Irrorate
v. t.
• To sprinkle or moisten with dew; to bedew.
a.
(Zool.) Covered with minute grains, appearing like fine sand.
Irroration
n.
• The act of bedewing; the state of being moistened with de.
Irrotational
a.
(Physics) Not rotatory; passing from one point to another by a movement other than rotation; — said of the movement of parts of a liquid or yielding mass.
Irrubrical
a.
• Contrary to the rubric; not rubrical.
Irrugate
v. t.
• To wrinkle.
Irrupted
a.
• Broken with violence.
Irruption
n.
• A bursting in; a sudden, violent rushing into a place; as, irruptions of the sea.
• A sudden and violent inroad, or entrance of invaders; as, the irruptions of the Goths into Italy.
Irruptive
a.
• Rushing in or upon.
Irvingite
n.
(Eccl.) The common designation of one a sect founded by the Rev. Edward Irving (about 1830), who call themselves the Catholic Apostolic Church. They are highly ritualistic in worship, have an elaborate hierarchy of apostles, prophets, etc., and look for the speedy coming of Christ.
Is't
• A contraction of is it.
Is
v. i.
• The third person singular of the substantive verb be, in the indicative mood, present tense; as, he is; he is a man.
Isabelline
a.
• Of an isabel or isabella color.
Isagoge
n.
• An introduction.
Isagogics
n.
(Theol.) That part of theological science directly preliminary to actual exegesis, or interpretation of the Scriptures.
Isagon
n.
(Math.) A figure or polygon whose angles are equal.
Isapostolic
a.
• Having equal, or almost equal, authority with the apostles of their teachings.
Isatide
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance obtained by the partial reduction of isatin.
Isatin
n.
(Chem.) An orange-red crystalline substance, C8H5NO2, obtained by the oxidation of indigo blue. It is also produced from certain derivatives of benzoic acid, and is one important source of artificial indigo.
Isatis
n.
(Bot.) A genus of herbs, some species of which, especially the Isatis tinctoria, yield a blue dye similar to indigo; woad.
Isatogen
n.
(Chem.) A complex nitrogenous radical, C8H4NO2, regarded as the essential residue of a series of compounds, related to isatin, which easily pass by reduction to indigo blue.
Isatropic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid obtained from atropine, and isomeric with cinnamic acid.
Ischiadic
a.
(Anat.) Ischial.
Ischial
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the ischium or hip; ischiac; ischiadic; ischiatic.
Ischiatic
a.
(Anat.) Same as Ishial.
Ischiocapsular
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the ischium and the capsule of the hip joint; as, the ischiocapsular ligament.
Ischiocerite
n.
(Zool.) The third joint or the antennae of the Crustacea.
Ischiopodite
n.
(Zool.) The third joint of the typical appendages of Crustacea.
Ischiorectal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the region between the rectum and ishial tuberosity.
Ischuretic
a.
• Having the quality of relieving ischury.
n.
• An ischuretic medicine.
Ischury
n.
(Med.) A retention or suppression of urine.
Isentropic
a.
(Physics) Having equal entropy.
Isethionic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid, HO.C2H4.SO3H, obtained as an oily or crystalline substance, by the action of sulphur trioxide on alcohol or ether. It is derivative of sulphuric acid.
Ishmaelite
n.
• A descendant of Ishmael (the son of Abraham and Hagar), of whom it was said, "His hand will be against every man, and every man's hand against him."
• One at enmity with society; a wanderer; a vagabond; an outcast.
Ishmaelitish
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, an Ishmaelite or the Ishmaelites.
Isiac
a.
• Pertaining to the goddess Isis; as, Isiac mysteries.
Isicle
n.
• A icicle.
Isidorian
a.
• Pertaining, or ascribed, to Isidore; as, the Isidorian decretals, a spurious collection of decretals published in the ninth century.
Isinglass
n.
• A semitransparent, whitish, and very pure from of gelatin, chiefly prepared from the sounds or air bladders of various species of sturgeons (as the Acipenser huso) found in the of Western Russia. It used for making jellies, as a clarifier, etc. Cheaper forms of gelatin are not unfrequently so called. Called also fish glue.
(Min.) A popular name for mica, especially when in thin sheets.
Isis
n.
(Myth.) The principal goddess worshiped by the Egyptians. She was regarded as the mother of Horus, and the sister and wife of Osiris. The Egyptians adored her as the goddess of fecundity, and as the great benefactress of their country, who instructed their ancestors in the art of agriculture.
(Zool.) Any coral of the genus Isis, or family Isidae, composed of joints of white, stony coral, alternating with flexible, horny joints.
(Astron.) One of the asteroids.
Islam
n.
• The religion of the Mohammedans; Mohammedanism; Islamism. Their formula of faith is: There is no God but Allah, and Mohammed is his prophet.
• The whole body of Mohammedans, or the countries which they occupy.
Islamism
n.
• The faith, doctrines, or religious system of the Mohammedans; Mohammedanism; Islam.
Islamite
n.
• A Mohammedan.
Islamitic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Islam; Mohammedan.
Islamize
v. i. & t.
• To conform, or cause to conform, to the religion of Islam.
Island
n.
• A tract of land surrounded by water, and smaller than a continent. Cf. Continent.
• Anything regarded as resembling an island; as, an island of ice.
v. t.
• To cause to become or to resemble an island; to make an island or islands of; to isle.
• To furnish with an island or with islands; as, to island the deep.
Islander
n.
• An inhabitant of an island.
Islandy
a.
• Of or pertaining to islands; full of islands.
Isle
n.
• An island.
(Zool.) A spot within another of a different color, as upon the wings of some insects.
v. t.
• To cause to become an island, or like an island; to surround or encompass; to island.
Islet
n.
• A little island.
Ism
n.
• A doctrine or theory; especially, a wild or visionary theory.
Isobar
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line connecting or marking places upon the surface of the earth where height of the barometer reduced to sea level is the same either at a given time, or for a certain period (mean height), as for a year; an isopiestic line.
Isobar
n.
• The quality or state of being equal in weight, especially in atmospheric pressure. Also, the theory, method, or application of isobaric science.
Isobaric
a.
(Phys. Geog.) Denoting equal pressure; as, an isobaric line; specifically, of or pertaining to isobars.
Isobarometric
a.
(Phys. Geog.) Indicating equal barometric pressure.
Isobathytherm
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line connecting the points on the surface of the earth where a certain temperature is found at the same depth.
Isobathythermic
a.
• Of or pertaining to an isobathytherm; possessing or indicating the same temperature at the same depth.
Isocephalism
n.
(Art) A peculiarity in the design of bas-relief by which the heads of human figures are kept at the same height from the ground, whether the personages are seated, standing, or mounted on horseback; — called also isokephaleia.
Isochasm
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line connecting places on the earth's surface at which there is the same mean frequency of auroras.
Isochasmic
a.
• Indicating equal auroral display; as, an isochasmic line.
Isocheim
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line connecting places on the earth having the same mean winter temperature. Cf. Isothere.
Isocheimic
a.
• The same as Isocheimal.
Isochimene
n.
• The same as Isocheim.
Isochromatic
a.
(Opt.) Having the same color; connecting parts having the same color, as lines drawn through certain points in experiments on the chromatic effects of polarized light in crystals.
Isochronal
a.
• Uniform in time; of equal time; performed in equal times; recurring at regular intervals; isochronal vibrations or oscillations.
Isochronic
a.
• Isochronal.
Isochronism
n.
• The state or quality of being isochronous.
Isochronon
n.
• A clock that is designed to keep very accurate time.
Isochronous
a.
• Same as Isochronal.
Isochroous
a.
• Having the same tint or color throughout; uniformly or evenly colored.
Isocrymal
a.
(Phys. Geog.) Pertaining to, having the nature of, or illustrating, an isocryme; as, an isocrymal line; an isocrymal chart.
Isocryme
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line connecting points on the earth's surface having the same mean temperature in the coldest month of the year.
Isocrymic
a.
• Isocrymal.
Isocyanic
a.
(Chem.) Designating an acid isomeric with cyanic acid.
Isocyanuric
a.
(Chem.) Designating, or pertaining to, an acid isomeric with cyanuric acid, and called also fulminuric acid.
Isodiabatic
a.
(Physics) Pertaining to the reception or the giving out of equal quantities of heat by a substance.
Isodiametric
a.
(Crystallog.) Developed alike in the directions of the several lateral axes; — said of crystals of both the tetragonal and hexagonal systems.
(Bot.) Having the several diameters nearly equal; — said of the cells of ordinary parenchyma.
Isodimorphic
a.
• Isodimorphous.
Isodimorphism
n.
• Isomorphism between the two forms severally of two dimorphous substances.
Isodimorphous
a.
• Having the quality of isodimorphism.
Isodulcite
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline, sugarlike substance, obtained by the decomposition of certain glucosides, and intermediate in nature between the hexacid alcohols (ductile, mannite, etc.) and the glucoses.
Isodynamic
a.
• Of, pertaining to, having, or denoting, equality of force.
Isodynamous
a.
• Of equal force or size.
Isogeotherm
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line or curved surface passing beneath the earth's surface through points having the same mean temperature.
Isogonic
a.
• Pertaining to, or noting, equal angles.
a.
(Zool.) Characterized by isogonism.
Isogonism
n.
(Zool.) The quality of having similar sexual zooids or gonophores and dissimilar hydrants; — said of certain hydroids.
Isographic
a.
• Of or pertaining to isography.
Isography
n.
• Imitation of another's handwriting,
Isohyetose
a.
(Phys. Geog.) Of or pertaining to lines connecting places on the earth's surface which have a mean annual rainfall.
n.
• An isohyetose line.
Isolable
a.
(Chem.) Capable of being isolated, or of being obtained in a pure state; as, gold is isolable.
Isolate
v. t.
• To place in a detached situation; to place by itself or alone; to insulate; to separate from others.
(Elec.) To insulate.
(Chem.) To separate from all foreign substances; to make pure; to obtain in a free state.
Isolated
a.
• Placed or standing alone; detached; separated from others.
Isolatedly
adv.
• In an isolated manner.
Isolation
n.
• The act of isolating, or the state of being isolated; insulation; separation; loneliness.
Isolator
n.
• One who, or that which, isolates.
Isologous
a.
(Chem.) Having similar proportions, similar relations, or similar differences of composition; — said specifically of groups or series which differ by a constant difference; as, ethane, ethylene, an acetylene, or their analogous compounds, form an isologous series.
Isomer
n.
(Chem.) A body or compound which is isomeric with another body or compound; a member of an isomeric series.
Isomeric
a.
(Chem.) Having the same percentage composition; — said of two or more different substances which contain the same ingredients in the same proportions by weight, often used with with. Specif.: (a) Polymeric; i. e., having the same elements united in the same proportion by weight, but with different molecular weights; as, acetylene and benzine are isomeric (polymeric) with each other in this sense.(b) Metameric; i. e., having the same elements united in the same proportions by weight, and with the same molecular weight, but which a different structure or arrangement of the ultimate parts; as, ethyl alcohol and methyl ether are isomeric (metameric) with each other in this sense.
Isomeride
n.
(Chem.) An isomer.
Isomerism
n.
(Chem.) The state, quality, or relation, of two or more isomeric substances.
Isomeromorphism
n.
(Crystallog.) Isomorphism between substances that are isomeric.
Isomorph
n.
• A substance which is similar to another in crystalline form and composition.
Isomorphic
a.
• Isomorphous.
Isomorphism
n.
(Crystallog.) A similarity of crystalline form between substances of similar composition, as between the sulphates of barium (BaSO4) and strontium (SrSO4). It is sometimes extended to include similarity of form between substances of unlike composition, which is more properly called homoeomorphism.
Isomorphous
a.
• Having the quality of isomorphism.
Isonandra
n.
(Bot.) A genus of sapotaceous trees of India. Isonandra Gutta is the principal source of gutta-percha.
Isonephelic
a.
(Phys. Geog.) Having, or indicating, an equal amount of cloudiness for a given period; as, isonephelic regions; an isonephelic line.
Isonicotine
n.
(Chem.) A crystalline, nitrogenous base, C10H14N2, isomeric with nicotine.
Isonicotinic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, isonicotine.
• Pertaining to, or designating, an acid isomeric with nicotinic acid.
Isonomic
a.
• The same, or equal, in law or right; one in kind or origin; analogous; similar.
Isonomy
n.
• Equal law or right; equal distribution of rights and privileges; similarity.
Isopathy
n.
(Med.) The system which undertakes to cure a disease by means of the virus of the same disease.
• The theory of curing a diseased organ by eating the analogous organ of a healthy animal.
• The doctrine that the power of therapeutics is equal to that of the causes of disease.
Isopepsin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) Pepsin modified by exposure to a temperature of from 40° to 60° C.
Isoperimetrical
a.
(Geom.) Having equal perimeters of circumferences; as, isoperimetrical figures or bodies.
Isoperimetry
n.
(Geom.) The science of figures having equal perimeters or boundaries.
Isopiestic
a.
(Thermodynamics) Having equal pressure.
Isopleura
n. pl.
(Zool.) A subclass of Gastropoda, in which the body is symmetrical, the right and left sides being equal.
Isopod
a.
(Zool.) Having the legs similar in structure; belonging to the Isopoda.
n.
• One of the Isopoda.
Isopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of sessile-eyed Crustacea, usually having seven pairs of legs, which are all similar in structure.
Isopodiform
a.
(Zool.) Having the shape of an isopod; — said of the larvae of certain insects.
Isopodous
a.
• Same as Isopod.
Isopogonous
a.
(Zool.) Having the two webs equal in breath; — said of feathers.
Isoprene
n.
(Chem.) An oily, volatile hydrocarbon, obtained by the distillation of caoutchouc or guttaipercha.
Isopycnic
a.
(Physics) Having equal density, as different regions of a medium; passing through points at which the density is equal; as, an isopycnic line or surface.
n.
(Physics) A line or surface passing through those points in a medium, at which the density is the same.
Isorcin
n.
(Chem.) A crystalline hydrocarbon derivative, metameric with orcin, but produced artificially; — called also cresorcin.
Isorropic
a.
• Of equal value.
Isosceles
a.
(Geom.) Having two legs or sides that are equal; — said of a triangle.
Isospondyli
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive order of fishes, including the salmons, herrings, and many allied forms.
Isospondylous
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Isospondyli; having the anterior vertebrae separate and normal.
Isosporic
a.
(Bot.) Producing but one kind of spore, as the ferns and Equiseta. Cf. Heterosporic.
Isostemonous
a.
(Bot.) Having exactly as many stamens as petals.
Isostemony
n.
(Bot.) The quality or state of being isostemonous.
Isosulphocyanate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of isosulphocyanic acid.
Isosulphocyanic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid, HNCS, isomeric with sulphocyanic acid.
Isotheral
a.
• Having the nature of an isothere; indicating the distribution of temperature by means of an isothere; as, an isotheral chart or line.
Isothere
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line connecting points on the earth's surface having the same mean summer temperature.
Isotherm
n.
(Phys. Geog.) A line connecting or marking points on the earth's surface having the same temperature. This may be the temperature for a given time of observation, or the mean temperature for a year or other period. Also, a similar line based on the distribution of temperature in the ocean.
Isothermal
a.
• Relating to equality of temperature.
(Phys. Geog.) Having reference to the geographical distribution of temperature, as exhibited by means of isotherms; as, an isothermal line; an isothermal chart.
Isothermobath
n.
(Phys. Geog) A line drawn through points of equal temperature in a vertical section of the ocean.
Isothermobathic
a.
• Of or pertaining to an isothermobath; possessing or indicating equal temperatures in a vertical section, as of the ocean.
Isotherombrose
n.
(Phys. Geog) A line connecting or marking points on the earth's surface, which have the same mean summer rainfall.
Isotonic
a.
• Having or indicating, equal tones, or tension.
Isotrimorphic
a.
• Isotrimorphous.
Isotrimorphism
n.
• Isomorphism between the three forms, severally, of two trimorphous substances.
Isotrimorphous
a.
• Having the quality of isotrimorphism; isotrimorphic.
Isotropic
a.
(Physics) Having the same properties in all directions; specifically, equally elastic in all directions.
Isotropism
n.
• Isotropy.
Isotropous
a.
• Isotropic.
Isotropy
n.
(Physics) Uniformity of physical properties in all directions in a body; absence of all kinds of polarity; specifically, equal elasticity in all directions.
Isouric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a complex nitrogenous acid, isomeric with uric acid.
Israelite
n.
• A descendant of Israel, or Jacob; a Hebrew; a Jew.
Issuable
a.
• Leading to, producing, or relating to, an issue; capable of being made an issue at law.
• Lawful or suitable to be issued; as, a writ issuable on these grounds.
Issuably
adv.
• In an issuable manner; by way of issue; as, to plead issuably.
Issuance
n.
• The act of issuing, or giving out; as, the issuance of an order; the issuance of rations, and the like.
Issuant
a.
(Her.) Issuing or coming up; — a term used to express a charge or bearing rising or coming out of another.
Issue
n.
• The act of passing or flowing out; a moving out from any inclosed place; egress; as, the issue of water from a pipe, of blood from a wound, of air from a bellows, of people from a house.
• The act of sending out, or causing to go forth; delivery; issuance; as, the issue of an order from a commanding officer; the issue of money from a treasury.
• That which passes, flows, or is sent out; the whole quantity sent forth or emitted at one time; as, an issue of bank notes; the daily issue of a newspaper.
• Progeny; a child or children; offspring. In law, sometimes, in a general sense, all persons descended from a common ancestor; all lineal descendants.
• Produce of the earth, or profits of land, tenements, or other property; as, A conveyed to B all his right for a term of years, with all the issues, rents, and profits.
• A discharge of flux, as of blood.
(Med.) An artificial ulcer, usually made in the fleshy part of the arm or leg, to produce the secretion and discharge of pus for the relief of some affected part.
• The final outcome or result; upshot; conclusion; event; hence, contest; test; trial.
• A point in debate or controversy on which the parties take affirmative and negative positions; a presentation of alternatives between which to choose or decide.
(Law) In pleading, a single material point of law or fact depending in the suit, which, being affirmed on the one side and denied on the other, is presented for determination.
v. i.
• To pass or flow out; to run out, as from any inclosed place.
• To go out; to rush out; to sally forth; as, troops issued from the town, and attacked the besiegers.
• To proceed, as from a source; as, water issues from springs; light issues from the sun.
• To proceed, as progeny; to be derived; to be descended; to spring.
• To extend; to pass or open; as, the path issues into the highway.
• To be produced as an effect or result; to grow or accrue; to arise; to proceed; as, rents and profits issuing from land, tenements, or a capital stock.
• To close; to end; to terminate; to turn out; as, we know not how the cause will issue.
(Law) In pleading, to come to a point in fact or law, on which the parties join issue.
v. t.
• To send out; to put into circulation; as, to issue notes from a bank.
• To deliver for use; as, to issue provisions.
• To send out officially; to deliver by authority; as, to issue an order; to issue a writ.
Issueless
a.
• Having no issue or progeny; childless.
Issuer
n.
• One who issues, emits, or publishes.
Isthmian
a.
• Of or pertaining to an isthmus, especially to the Isthmus of Corinth, in Greece.
Isthmus
n.
(Geog.) A neck or narrow slip of land by which two continents are connected, or by which a peninsula is united to the mainland; as, the Isthmus of Panama; the Isthmus of Suez, etc.
Istle
n.
• Same as Ixtle.
Isuret
n.
(Chem.) An artificial nitrogenous base, isomeric with urea, and forming a white crystalline substance; — called also isuretine.
It
pron.
• The neuter pronoun of the third person, corresponding to the masculine pronoun he and the feminine she, and having the same plural (they, their of theirs, them).
• As a substance for any noun of the neuter gender; as, here is the book, take it home.
• As a demonstrative, especially at the beginning of a sentence, pointing to that which is about to be stated, named, or mentioned, or referring to that which apparent or well known; as, I saw it was John.
• As an indefinite nominative for a impersonal verb; as, it snows; it rains.
• As a substitute for such general terms as, the state of affairs, the condition of things, and the like; as, how is it with the sick man?
• As an indefinite object after some intransitive verbs, or after a substantive used humorously as a verb; as, to foot it (i. e., to walk).
Itacism
n.
(Greek Gram.) Pronunciation of (eta) as the modern Greeks pronounce it, that is, like e in the English word be. This was the pronunciation advocated by Reuhlin and his followers, in opposition to the etacism of Erasmus.
Itacist
n.
• One who is in favor of itacism.
Itacolumite
n.
(Min.) A laminated, granular, siliceous rocks, often occurring in regions where the diamond is found.
Itaconic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, an acid, C5H6O4, which is obtained as a white crystalline substance by decomposing aconitic and other organic acids.
Itala
n.
• An early Latin version of the Scriptures (the Old Testament was translated from the Septuagint, and was also called the Italic version).
Italian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Italy, or to its people or language.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Italy.
• The language used in Italy, or by the Italians.
Italianate
v. t.
• To render Italian, or conformable to Italian customs; to Italianize.
a.
• Italianized; Italianated.
Italianism
n.
• A word, phrase, or idiom, peculiar to the Italians; an Italicism.
• Attachment to, or sympathy for, Italy.
Italianize
v. i.
• To play the Italian; to speak Italian.
• To render Italian in any respect; to Italianate.
Italic
a.
• Relating to Italy or to its people.
• Applied especially to a kind of type in which the letters do not stand upright, but slope toward the right; — so called because dedicated to the States of Italy by the inventor, Aldus Manutius, about the year 1500.
n.
(Print.) An Italic letter, character, or type (see Italic, a., 2.); — often in the plural; as, the Italics are the author's. Italic letters are used to distinguish words for emphasis, importance, antithesis, etc. Also, collectively, Italic letters.
Italicism
n.
• A phrase or idiom peculiar to the Italian language; to Italianism.
• The use of Italics.
Italicize
v. t. & i.
• To print in Italic characters; to underline written letters or words with a single line; as, to Italicize a word; Italicizes too much.
Itch
v. i.
• To have an uneasy sensation in the skin, which inclines the person to scratch the part affected.
• To have a constant desire or teasing uneasiness; to long for; as, itching ears.
n.
(Med.) An eruption of small, isolated, acuminated vesicles, produced by the entrance of a parasitic mite (the Sarcoptes scabei), and attended with itching. It is transmissible by contact.
• Any itching eruption.
• A sensation in the skin occasioned (or resembling that occasioned) by the itch eruption; — called also scabies, psora, etc.
• A constant irritating desire.
Itchiness
n.
• The state of being itchy.
Itchless
a.
• Free from itching.
Itchy
a.
• Infected with the itch, or with an itching sensation.
Item
adv.
• Also; as an additional article.
n.
• An article; a separate particular in an account; as, the items in a bill.
• A hint; an innuendo.
• A short article in a newspaper; a paragraph; as, an item concerning the weather.
v. t.
• To make a note or memorandum of.
Itemize
v. t.
• To state in items, or by particulars; as, to itemize the cost of a railroad.
Iter
n.
(Anat.) A passage; esp., the passage between the third and fourth ventricles in the brain; the aqueduct of Sylvius.
Iterable
a.
• Capable of being iterated or repeated.
Iterance
n.
• Iteration.
Iterant
a.
• Repeating; iterating; as, an iterant echo.
Iterate
a.
• Uttered or done again; repeated.
v. t.
• To utter or do a second time or many times; to repeat; as, to iterate advice.
adv.
• By way of iteration.
Iteration
n.
• Recital or performance a second time; repetition.
Iterative
a.
• Repeating.
Ithyphallic
a.
• Lustful; lewd; salacious; indecent; obscene.
Itineracy
n.
• The act or practice of itinerating; itinerancy.
Itinerancy
n.
• A passing from place to place.
• A discharge of official duty involving frequent change of residence; the custom or practice of discharging official duty in this way; also, a body of persons who thus discharge official duty.
Itinerant
a.
• Passing or traveling about a country; going or preaching on a circuit; wandering; not settled; as, an itinerant preacher; an itinerant peddler.
a.
• One who travels from place to place, particularly a preacher; one who is unsettled.
Itinerantly
adv.
• In an itinerant manner.
Itinerary
a.
• Itinerant; traveling; passing from place to place; done on a journey.
n.
• An account of travels, or a register of places and distances as a guide to travelers; as, the Itinerary of Antoninus.
Itinerate
v. i.
• To wander without a settled habitation; to travel from place or on a circuit, particularly for the purpose of preaching, lecturing, etc.
Its
• Possessive form of the pronoun it.
Itself
pron.
• The neuter reciprocal pronoun of It; as, the thing is good in itself; it stands by itself.
Itworn
p. a.
• Worn, wrought, or stamped in.
Itzibu
n.
(Numis.) A silver coin of Japan, worth about thirty-four cents.
Iulidan
n.
(Zool.) One of the Iulidae, a family of myriapods, of which the genus Iulus is the type.
Iulus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of chilognathous myriapods. The body is long and round, consisting of numerous smooth, equal segments, each of which bears two pairs of short legs. It includes the galleyworms.
Ivied
a.
• Overgrown with ivy.
Ivoride
n.
• A composition resembling ivory in appearance and used as a substitute for it.
Ivory
n.
• The hard, white, opaque, fine-grained substance constituting the tusks of the elephant. It is a variety of dentine, characterized by the minuteness and close arrangement of the tubes, as also by their double flexure. It is used in manufacturing articles of ornament or utility.
• The tusks themselves of the elephant, etc.
• Any carving executed in ivory.
• Teeth; as, to show one's ivories.
Ivorytype
n.
(photog.) A picture produced by superposing a very light print, rendered translucent by varnish, and tinted upon the back, upon a stronger print, so as to give the effect of a photograph in natural colors; — called also hellenotype.
Ivy
n.
• A plant of the genus Hedera (H. helix), common in Europe. Its leaves are evergreen, dark, smooth, shining, and mostly five-pointed; the flowers yellowish and small; the berries black or yellow. The stem clings to walls and trees by rootlike fibers.
Iwis
adv.
• Indeed; truly.
Ixia
n.
(Bot.) A South African bulbous plant of the Iris family, remarkable for the brilliancy of its flowers.
Ixodes
n.
(Zool.) A genus of parasitic Acarina, which includes various species of ticks.
Ixodian
n.
(Zool.) A tick of the genus Ixodes, or the family Ixodidae.
Izard
n.
(Zool.) A variety of the chamois found in the Pyrenees.
Izedi
n.
• One of an Oriental religious sect which worships Satan or the Devil.
Izedism
n.
• The religion of the Izedis.
Izzard
n.
• The letter z; — formerly so called.

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