Dictionary Of The English Language "Enu"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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Enubilate
v. t.
• To clear from mist, clouds, or obscurity.
Enubilous
a.
• Free from fog, mist, or clouds; clear.
Enucleate
v. t.
• To bring or peel out, as a kernel from its enveloping husks its enveloping husks or shell.
(Med.) To remove without cutting (as a tumor).
• To bring to light; to make clear.
Enucleation
n.
• The act of enucleating; elucidation; exposition.
Enumerate
v. t.
• To count; to tell by numbers; to count over, or tell off one after another; to number; to reckon up; to mention one by one; to name over; to make a special and separate account of; to recount; as, to enumerate the stars in a constellation.
Enumeration
n.
• The act of enumerating, making separate mention, or recounting.
• A detailed account, in which each thing is specially noticed.
(Rhet.) A recapitulation, in the peroration, of the heads of an argument.
Enumerative
a.
• Counting, or reckoning up, one by one.
Enumerator
n.
• One who enumerates.
Enunciable
a.
• Capable of being enunciated or expressed.
Enunciate
v. t.
• To make a formal statement of; to announce; to proclaim; to declare, as a truth.
• To make distinctly audible; to utter articulately; to pronounce; as, to enunciate a word distinctly.
v. i.
• To utter words or syllables articulately.
Enunciation
n.
• The act of enunciating, announcing, proclaiming, or making known; open attestation; declaration; as, the enunciation of an important truth.
• Mode of utterance or pronunciation, especially as regards fullness and distinctness or articulation; as, to speak with a clear or impressive enunciation.
• That which is enunciated or announced; words in which a proposition is expressed; an announcement; a formal declaration; a statement.
Enunciative
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, enunciation; declarative.
Enunciator
n.
• One who enunciates or proclaims.
Enunciatory
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, enunciation or utterance.
Enuresis
n.
(Med.) An involuntary discharge of urine; incontinence of urine.
Envassal
v. t.
• To make a vassal of.
Envault
v. t.
• To inclose in a vault; to entomb.
Enveigle
v. t.
• To entice.
Envelop
v. t.
• To put a covering about; to wrap up or in; to inclose within a case, wrapper, integument or the like; to surround entirely; as, to envelop goods or a letter; the fog envelops a ship.
Envelopment
n.
• The act of enveloping or wrapping; an inclosing or covering on all sides.
• That which envelops or surrounds; an envelop.
Envenime
v. t.
• To envenom.
Envenom
v. t.
• To taint or impregnate with venom, or any substance noxious to life; to poison; to render dangerous or deadly by poison, as food, drink, a weapon; as, envenomed meat, wine, or arrow; also, to poison (a person) by impregnating with venom.
• To taint or impregnate with bitterness, malice, or hatred; to imbue as with venom; to imbitter.
Envermeil
v. t.
• To color with, or as with, vermilion; to dye red.
Enviable
a.
• Fitted to excite envy; capable of awakening an ardent desire to posses or to resemble.
Envie
v. i.
• To vie; to emulate; to strive.
Envier
n.
• One who envies; one who desires inordinately what another possesses.
Envigor
v. t.
• To invigorate.
Envious
a.
• Malignant; mischievous; spiteful.
• Feeling or exhibiting envy; actuated or directed by, or proceeding from, envy; — said of a person, disposition, feeling, act, etc.; jealously pained by the excellence or good fortune of another; maliciously grudging; — followed by of, at, and against; as, an envious man, disposition, attack; envious tongues.
• Inspiring envy.
• Excessively careful; cautious.
Environ
v. t.
• To surround; to encompass; to encircle; to hem in; to be round about; to involve or envelop.
adv.
• About; around.
Environment
n.
• Act of environing; state of being environed.
• That which environs or surrounds; surrounding conditions, influences, or forces, by which living forms are influenced and modified in their growth and development.
Environs
n. pl.
• The parts or places which surround another place, or lie in its neighborhood; suburbs; as, the environs of a city or town.
Envisage
v. t.
• To look in the face of; to apprehend; to regard.
Envisagement
n.
• The act of envisaging.
Envolume
v. t.
• To form into, or incorporate with, a volume.
Envolup
v. t.
• To wrap up; to envelop.
Envoy
n.
• One dispatched upon an errand or mission; a messenger; esp., a person deputed by a sovereign or a government to negotiate a treaty, or transact other business, with a foreign sovereign or government; a minister accredited to a foreign government. An envoy's rank is below that of an ambassador.
• An explanatory or commendatory postscript to a poem, essay, or book; — also in the French from, l'envoi.
Envoyship
n.
• The office or position of an envoy.
Envy
n.
• Malice; ill will; spite.
• Chagrin, mortification, discontent, or uneasiness at the sight of another's excellence or good fortune, accompanied with some degree of hatred and a desire to possess equal advantages; malicious grudging; — usually followed by of; as, they did this in envy of Caesar.
• Emulation; rivalry.
• Public odium; ill repute.
• An object of envious notice or feeling.
v. t.
• To feel envy at or towards; to be envious of; to have a feeling of uneasiness or mortification in regard to (any one), arising from the sight of another's excellence or good fortune and a longing to possess it.
• To feel envy on account of; to have a feeling of grief or repining, with a longing to possess (some excellence or good fortune of another, or an equal good fortune, etc.); to look with grudging upon; to begrudge.
• To long after; to desire strongly; to covet.
• To do harm to; to injure; to disparage.
• To hate.
• To emulate.
v. i.
• To be filled with envious feelings; to regard anything with grudging and longing eyes; — used especially with at.
• To show malice or ill will; to rail.
Envyned
a.
• Stored or furnished with wine.
Enwallow
v. t.
• To plunge into, or roll in, flith; to wallow.
Enwheel
v. t.
• To encircle.
Enwiden
v. t.
• To widen.
Enwind
v. t.
• To wind about; to encircle.
Enwoman
v. t.
• To endow with the qualities of a woman.
Enwomb
v. t.
• To conceive in the womb.
• To bury, as it were in a womb; to hide, as in a gulf, pit, or cavern.
Enwrap
v. t.
• To envelop.
Enwrapment
n.
• Act of enwrapping; a wrapping or an envelope.
Enzootic
a.
• Afflicting animals; — used of a disease affecting the animals of a district. It corresponds to an endemic disease among men.
Enzyme
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) An unorganized or unformed ferment, in distinction from an organized or living ferment; a soluble, or chemical, ferment. Ptyalin, pepsin, diastase, and rennet are good examples of enzymes.
Eocene
a.
(Geol.) Pertaining to the first in time of the three subdivisions into which the Tertiary formation is divided by geologists, and alluding to the approximation in its life to that of the present era; as, Eocene deposits.
n.
• The Eocene formation.
Eolian
a.
• Aolian.
(Geol.) Formed, or deposited, by the action of wind, as dunes.
Eolipile
n.
• Same as Aolipile.
Eolis
n.
(Zool.) A genus of nudibranch mollusks having clusters of branchial papillae along the back.
Eophyte
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil plant which is found in the lowest beds of the Silurian age.
Eophytic
a.
• Of or pertaining to eophytes.
Eos
n.
(Gr. Myth.) Aurora, the goddess of morn.
Eosaurus
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct marine reptile from the coal measures of Nova Scotia; — so named because supposed to be of the earliest known reptiles.
Eosin
n.
(Chem.) A yellow or brownish red dyestuff obtained by the action of bromine on fluorescein, and named from the fine rose-red which it imparts to silk. It is also used for making a fine red ink. Its solution is fluorescent.
Eosphorite
n.
(Min.) A hydrous phosphate of alumina and manganese. It is generally of a rose-pink color, — whence the name.
Eozoic
a.
(Geol.) Of or pertaining to rocks or strata older than the Paleozoic, in many of which the eozoon has been found.
Eozoon
n.
(Paleon.) A peculiar structure found in the Archaean limestones of Canada and other regions. By some geologists it is believed to be a species of gigantic Foraminifera, but others consider it a concretion, without organic structure.
Eozoonal
a.
(Paleon.) Pertaining to the eozoon; containing eozoons; as, eozoonal limestone.
Epacris
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs, natives of Australia, New Zealand, etc., having pretty white, red, or purple blossoms, and much resembling heaths.
Epact
n.
(Chron.) The moon's age at the beginning of the calendar year, or the number of days by which the last new moon has preceded the beginning of the year.
Epagoge
n.
(Logic) The adducing of particular examples so as to lead to a universal conclusion; the argument by induction.
Epagogic
a.
• Inductive.
Epalate
a.
(Zool.) Without palpi.
Epanadiplosis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure by which the same word is used both at the beginning and at the end of a sentence; as, "Rejoice in the Lord always: and again I say, Rejoice."
Epanalepsis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure by which the same word or clause is repeated after intervening matter.
Epanaphora
n.
(Rhet.) Same as Anaphora.
Epanastrophe
n.
(Rhet.) Same as Anadiplosis.
Epanodos
n.
(Rhet.) A figure of speech in which the parts of a sentence or clause are repeated in inverse order
Epanody
n.
(Bot.) The abnormal change of an irregular flower to a regular form; — considered by evolutionists to be a reversion to an ancestral condition.
Epanorthosis
n.
• A figure by which a speaker recalls a word or words, in order to substitute something else stronger or more significant; as, Most brave! Brave, did I say? most heroic act!
Epanthous
a.
(Bot.) Growing upon flowers; — said of certain species of fungi.
Eparch
n.
• In ancient Greece, the governor or perfect of a province; in modern Greece, the ruler of an eparchy.
Eparchy
n.
• A province, prefecture, or territory, under the jurisdiction of an eparch or governor; esp., in modern Greece, one of the larger subdivisions of a monarchy or province of the kingdom; in Russia, a diocese or archdiocese.
Eparterial
a.
(Anat.) Situated upon or above an artery; — applied esp. to the branches of the bronchi given off above the point where the pulmonary artery crosses the bronchus.
Epaule
n.
(Fort.) The shoulder of a bastion, or the place where its face and flank meet and form the angle, called the angle of the shoulder.
Epaulement
n.
(Fort.) A side work, made of gabions, fascines, or bags, filled with earth, or of earth heaped up, to afford cover from the flanking fire of an enemy.
Epaxial
a.
(Anat.) Above, or on the dorsal side of, the axis of the skeleton; episkeletal.
Epeira
n.
(Zool.) A genus of spiders, including the common garden spider (E. diadema). They spin geometrical webs.
Epencephalic
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the epencephalon.
• Situated on or over the brain.
Epencephalon
n.
(Anat.) The segment of the brain next behind the midbrain, including the cerebellum and pons; the hindbrain. Sometimes abbreviated to epen.
Ependyma
n.
(Anat.) The epithelial lining of the ventricles of the brain and the canal of the spinal cord; endyma; ependymis.
Epenetic
a.
• Bestowing praise; eulogistic; laudatory.
Epenthesis
n.
(Gram.) The insertion of a letter or a sound in the body of a word; as, the b in "nimble" from AS. n&emac;mol.
Epenthetic
a.
(Gram.) Inserted in the body of a word; as, an epenthetic letter or sound.
Epexegesis
n.
• A full or additional explanation; exegesis.
Epexegetical
a.
• Relating to epexegesis; explanatory; exegetical.
Ephemera
n.
(Med.) A fever of one day's continuance only.
(Zool.) A genus of insects including the day flies, or ephemeral flies.
Ephemeral
a.
• Beginning and ending in a day; existing only, or no longer than, a day; diurnal; as, an ephemeral flower.
• Short-lived; existing or continuing for a short time only.
n.
• Anything lasting but a day, or a brief time; an ephemeral plant, insect, etc.
Ephemeran
n.
(Zool.) One of the ephemeral flies.
Ephemeric
a.
• Ephemeral.
Ephemeris
n.
• A diary; a journal.
(Anat.) A publication giving the computed places of the heavenly bodies for each day of the year, with other numerical data, for the use of the astronomer and navigator; an astronomical almanac; as, the "American Ephemeris and Nautical Almanac."
• Any tabular statement of the assigned places of a heavenly body, as a planet or comet, on several successive days.
(Literature) A collective name for reviews, magazines, and all kinds of periodical literature.
Ephemerist
n.
• One who studies the daily motions and positions of the planets.
• One who keeps an ephemeris; a journalist.
Ephemeron
n.
(Zool.) One of the ephemeral flies.
Ephemerous
a.
• Ephemeral.
Ephesian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Ephesus, an ancient city of Ionia, in Asia Minor.
n.
• A native of Ephesus.
• A jolly companion; a roisterer.
Ephialtes
n.
• The nightmare.
Ephippial
a.
• Saddle-shaped; occupying an ephippium.
Ephippium
n.
(Anat.) A depression in the sphenoid bone; the pituitary fossa.
(Zool.) A saddle-shaped cavity to contain the winter eggs, situated on the back of Cladocera.
Ephod
n.
(Jew. Antiq.) A part of the sacerdotal habit among Jews, being a covering for the back and breast, held together on the shoulders by two clasps or brooches of onyx stones set in gold, and fastened by a girdle of the same stuff as the ephod. The ephod for the priests was of plain linen; that for the high priest was richly embroidered in colors. The breastplate of the high priest was worn upon the ephod in front.
Ephor
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A magistrate; one of a body of five magistrates chosen by the people of ancient Sparta. They exercised control even over the king.
Ephoral
a.
• Pertaining to an ephor.
Ephoralty
n.
• The office of an ephor, or the body of ephors.
Ephraim
n.
(Zool.) A hunter's name for the grizzly bear.
Ephyra
n.
(Zool.) A stage in the development of discophorous medusae, when they first begin to swim about after being detached from the strobila.
Epiblast
n.
(Biol.) The outer layer of the blastoderm; the ectoderm.
Epiblastic
a.
(Biol.) Of or relating to, or consisting of, the epiblast.
Epiblema
n.
(Bot.) The epidermal cells of rootlets, specially adapted to absorb liquids.
Epibolic
a.
(Biol.) Growing or covering over; — said of a kind of invagination.
Epiboly
n.
(Biol.) Epibolic invagination.
Epibranchial
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the segment between the ceratobranchial and pharyngobranchial in a branchial arch.
n.
• An epibranchial cartilage or bone.
Epic
a.
• Narrated in a grand style; pertaining to or designating a kind of narrative poem, usually called an heroic poem, in which real or fictitious events, usually the achievements of some hero, are narrated in an elevated style.
n.
• An epic or heroic poem.
Epical
a.
• Epic
Epicardiac
a.
(Anat.) Of or relating to the epicardium.
Epicardium
n.
(Anat.) That of the pericardium which forms the outer surface of the heart; the cardiac pericardium.
Epicarican
n.
(Zool.) An isopod crustacean, parasitic on shrimps.
Epicarp
(Bot.) The external or outermost layer of a fructified or ripened ovary.
Epicede
n.
• A funeral song or discourse; an elegy.
Epicedial
a.
• Elegiac; funereal.
Epicedian
a.
• Epicedial.
n.
• An epicede.
Epicedium
n.
• An epicede.
Epicene
a. & n.
• Common to both sexes; — a term applied, in grammar, to such nouns as have but one form of gender, either the masculine or feminine, to indicate animals of both sexes; as , bos, for the ox and cow; sometimes applied to eunuchs and hermaphrodites.
• Fig.: Sexless; neither one thing nor the other.
Epicentral
a.
(Anat.) Arising from the centrum of a vertebra.
Epicerastic
a.
(Med.) Lenient; assuaging.
Epichirema
n.
(Rhet. & Logic) A syllogism in which the proof of the major or minor premise, or both, is introduced with the premises themselves, and the conclusion is derived in the ordinary manner.
Epichordal
a.
(Anat.) Upon or above the notochord; — applied esp. to a vertebral column which develops upon the dorsal side of the notochord, as distinguished from a perichordal column, which develops around it.
Epichorial
a.
• In or of the country.
Epicleidium
n.
(Anat.) A projection, formed by a separate ossification, at the scapular end of the clavicle of many birds.
Epiclinal
a.
(Bot.) Situated on the receptacle or disk of a flower.
Epicoele
n.
(Anat.) A cavity formed by the invagination of the outer wall of the body, as the atrium of an amphioxus and possibly the body cavity of vertebrates.
Epicoene
a.
• Epicene.
Epicolic
a.
(Anat.) Situated upon or over the colon; — applied to the region of the abdomen adjacent to the colon.
Epicondylar
n.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or resembling, an epicondyle.
Epicondyle
n.
(Anat.) A projection on the inner side of the distal end of the numerus; the internal condyle.
Epicoracoid
n.
(Anat.) A ventral cartilaginous or bony element of the coracoid in the shoulder girdle of some vertebrates.
Epicranial
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the epicranium; as epicranial muscles.
Epicranium
n.
(Anat.) The upper and superficial part of the head, including the scalp, muscles, etc.
(Zool.) The dorsal wall of the head of insects.
Epictetain
a.
• Pertaining to Epictetus, the Roman Stoic philosopher, whose conception of life was to be passionless under whatever circumstances.
Epicure
n.
• A follower of Epicurus; an Epicurean.
• One devoted to dainty or luxurious sensual enjoyments, esp. to the luxuries of the table.
Epicurean
a.
• Pertaining to Epicurus, or following his philosophy.
• Given to luxury; adapted to luxurious tastes; luxurious; pertaining to good eating.
n.
• A follower or Epicurus.
• One given to epicurean indulgence.
Epicureanism
n.
• Attachment to the doctrines of Epicurus; the principles or belief of Epicurus.
Epicurely
adv.
• Luxuriously.
Epicureous
a.
• Epicurean.
Epicurism
n.
• The doctrines of Epicurus.
• Epicurean habits of living; luxury.
Epicurize
v. i.
• To profess or tend towards the doctrines of Epicurus.
• To feed or indulge like an epicure.
Epicycle
n.
(Ptolemaic Astron.) A circle, whose center moves round in the circumference of a greater circle; or a small circle, whose center, being fixed in the deferent of a planet, is carried along with the deferent, and yet, by its own peculiar motion, carries the body of the planet fastened to it round its proper center.
(Mech.) A circle which rolls on the circumference of another circle, either externally or internally.
Epicyclic
a.
• Pertaining to, resembling, or having the motion of, an epicycle.
Epicycloid
n.
(Geom.) A curve traced by a point in the circumference of a circle which rolls on the convex side of a fixed circle.
Epicycloidal
a.
• Pertaining to the epicycloid, or having its properties.
Epideictic
a.
• Serving to show forth, explain, or exhibit; — applied by the Greeks to a kind of oratory, which, by full amplification, seeks to persuade.
Epidemic
n.
(Med.) An epidemic disease.
• Anything which takes possession of the minds of people as an epidemic does of their bodies; as, an epidemic of terror.
Epidemically
adv.
• In an epidemic manner.
Epidemiography
n.
(Med.) A treatise upon, or history of, epidemic diseases.
Epidemiological
a.
• Connected with, or pertaining to, epidemiology.
Epidemiologist
n.
• A person skilled in epidemiology.
Epidemiology
n.
(Med.) That branch of science which treats of epidemics.
Epidemy
n.
(Med.) An epidemic disease.
Epiderm
n.
(Anat.) The epidermis.
Epidermal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the epidermis; epidermic; cuticular.
Epidermatic
a.
• Epidermal.
Epidermatoid
a.
(Anat.) Epidermoid.
Epidermeous
a.
• Epidermal.
Epidermic
a.
• Epidermal; connected with the skin or the bark.
Epidermical
a.
• Epidermal.
Epidermidal
a.
• Epidermal.
Epidermis
n.
(Anat.) The outer, nonsensitive layer of the skin; cuticle; scarfskin.
(Bot.) The outermost layer of the cells, which covers both surfaces of leaves, and also the surface of stems, when they are first formed. As stems grow old this layer is lost, and never replaced.
Epidermoid
a.
(Anat.) Like epidermis; pertaining to the epidermis.
Epidermose
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) Keratin.
Epididymis
n.
(Anat.) An oblong vermiform mass on the dorsal side of the testicle, composed of numerous convolutions of the excretory duct of that organ.
Epididymitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the epididymis, one of the common results of gonorrhea.
Epidote
n.
(Min.) A mineral, commonly of a yellowish green (pistachio) color, occurring granular, massive, columnar, and in monoclinic crystals. It is a silicate of alumina, lime, and oxide of iron, or manganese.
Epidotic
a.
• Related to, resembling, or containing epidote; as, an epidotic granite.
Epigaea
n.
(Bot.) An American genus of plants, containing but a single species (E. repens), the trailing arbutus.
Epigaeous
a.
(Bot.) Growing on, or close to, the ground.
Epigastrial
a.
(Anat.) Epigastric.
Epigastric
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the epigastrium, or to the epigastric region.
(Zool.) Over the stomach; — applied to two of the areas of the carapace of crabs.
Epigastrium
n.
(Anat.) The upper part of the abdomen.
Epigeal
a.
(Bot.) Epigaeous.
Epigene
a.
(Crystallog.) Foreign; unnatural; unusual; — said of forms of crystals not natural to the substances in which they are found.
(Geol.) Formed originating on the surface of the earth; — opposed to hypogene; as, epigene rocks.
Epigenesis
n.
(Biol.) The theory of generation which holds that the germ is created entirely new, not merely expanded, by the procreative power of the parents. It is opposed to the theory of evolution, also to syngenesis.
Epigenesist
n.
(Biol.) One who believes in, or advocates the theory of, epigenesis.
Epigenetic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the epigenesis; produced according to the theory of epigenesis.
Epigeous
a.
• Same as Epigaeous.
Epiglottic
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or connected with, the epiglottis.
Epiglottidean
a.
(Anat.) Same as Epiglottic.
Epiglottis
n.
(Anat.) A cartilaginous lidlike appendage which closes the glottis while food or drink is passing while food or drink is passing through the pharynx.
Epignathous
a.
(Zool.) Hook-billed; having the upper mandible longer than the lower.
Epigram
n.
• A short poem treating concisely and pointedly of a single thought or event. The modern epigram is so contrived as to surprise the reader with a witticism or ingenious turn of thought, and is often satirical in character.
• An effusion of wit; a bright thought tersely and sharply expressed, whether in verse or prose.
• The style of the epigram.
Epigrammatically
adv.
• In the way of epigram; in an epigrammatic style.
Epigrammatist
n.
• One who composes epigrams, or makes use of them.
Epigrammatize
v. t.
• To represent by epigrams; to express by epigrams.
Epigrammatizer
n.
• One who writes in an affectedly pointed style.
Epigrammist
n.
• An epigrammatist.
Epigraph
n.
• Any inscription set upon a building; especially, one which has to do with the building itself, its founding or dedication.
(Literature) A citation from some author, or a sentence framed for the purpose, placed at the beginning of a work or of its separate divisions; a motto.
Epigraphics
n.
• The science or study of epigraphs.
Epigraphist
n.
• A student of, or one versed in, epigraphy.
Epigraphy
n.
• The science of inscriptions; the art of engraving inscriptions or of deciphering them.
Epigynous
a.
(Bot.) Adnate to the surface of the ovary, so as to be apparently inserted upon the top of it; — said of stamens, petals, sepals, and also of the disk.
Epihyal
n.
(Anat.) A segment next above the ceratohyal in the hyoidean arch.
Epilepsy
n.
(Med.) The "falling sickness," so called because the patient falls suddenly to the ground; a disease characterized by paroxysms (or fits) occurring at interval and attended by sudden loss of consciousness, and convulsive motions of the muscles.
Epileptic
a.
• Pertaining to, affected with, or of the nature of, epilepsy.
n.
• One affected with epilepsy.
• A medicine for the cure of epilepsy.
Epileptical
a.
• Epileptic.
Epileptiform
a.
• Resembling epilepsy.
Epileptogenous
a.
(Med.) Producing epilepsy or epileptoid convulsions; — applied to areas of the body or of the nervous system, stimulation of which produces convulsions.
Epileptoid
a.
(Med.) Resembling epilepsy; as, epileptoid convulsions.
Epilogation
n.
• A summing up in a brief account.
Epilogism
n.
• Enumeration; computation.
Epilogistic
a.
• Of or pertaining to epilogue; of the nature of an epilogue.
Epilogize
v. i. & t.
• To speak an epilogue to; to utter as an epilogue.
Epilogue
n.
(Drama) A speech or short poem addressed to the spectators and recited by one of the actors, after the conclusion of the play.
(Rhet.) The closing part of a discourse, in which the principal matters are recapitulated; a conclusion.
Epiloguize
v. i. & t.
• Same as Epilogize.
Epimachus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of highly ornate and brilliantly colored birds of Australia, allied to the birds of Paradise.
Epimeal
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the epimera.
Epimere
n.
(Biol.) One of the segments of the transverse axis, or the so called homonymous parts; as, for example, one of the several segments of the extremities in vertebrates, or one of the similar segments in plants, such as the segments of a segmented leaf.
Epimeron
n.
(Zool.) In crustaceans: The part of the side of a somite external to the basal joint of each appendage
• In insects: The lateral piece behind the episternum.
Epinastic
a.
(Physiol.) A term applied to that phase of vegetable growth in which an organ grows more rapidly on its upper than on its under surface.
Epineural
a.
(Anat.) Arising from the neurapophysis of a vertebra.
Epineurium
n.
(Anat.) The connective tissue framework and sheath of a nerve which bind together the nerve bundles, each of which has its own special sheath, or perineurium.
Epinglette
n.
(Mil.) An iron needle for piercing the cartridge of a cannon before priming.
Epinicial
a.
• Relating to victory.
Epinicion
n.
• A song of triumph.
Epinikian
a.
• Epinicial.
Epiornis
n.
(Zool.) One of the gigantic ostrichlike birds of the genus Apiornis, only recently extinct. Its remains have been found in Madagascar.
Epiotic
n.
(Anat.) The upper and outer element of periotic bone, — in man forming a part of the temporal bone.
Epipedometry
n.
(Geom.) The mensuration of figures standing on the same base.
Epiperipheral
a.
(Physiol.) Connected with, or having its origin upon, the external surface of the body; — especially applied to the feelings which originate at the extremities of nerves distributed on the outer surface, as the sensation produced by touching an object with the finger; — opposed to entoperipheral.
Epipetalous
a.
(Bot.) Borne on the petals or corolla.
Epiphany
n.
• An appearance, or a becoming manifest.
(Eccl.) A church festival celebrated on the 6th of January, the twelfth day after Christmas, in commemoration of the visit of the Magi of the East to Bethlehem, to see and worship the child Jesus; or, as others maintain, to commemorate the appearance of the star to the Magi, symbolizing the manifestation of Christ to the Gentles; Twelfthtide.
Epipharyngeal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the segments above the epibranchial in the branchial arches of fishes.
n.
• An epipharyngeal bone or cartilage.
Epipharynx
n.
(Zool.) A structure which overlaps the mouth of certain insects.
Epiphonema
n.
(Rhet.) An exclamatory sentence, or striking reflection, which sums up or concludes a discourse.
Epiphoneme
n.
• Epiphonema.
Epiphora
n.
(Med.) The watery eye; a disease in which the tears accumulate in the eye, and trickle over the cheek.
(Rhet.) The emphatic repetition of a word or phrase, at the end of several sentences or stanzas.
Epiphragm
n.
(Zool.) A membranaceous or calcareous septum with which some mollusks close the aperture of the shell during the time of hibernation, or aestivation.
Epiphyllous
a.
(Bot.) Growing upon, or inserted into, the leaf.
Epiphyllum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of cactaceous plants having flattened, jointed stems, and petals united in a tube. The flowers are very showy, and several species are in cultivation.
Epiphylospermous
a.
(Bot.) Bearing fruit on the black of the leaves, as ferns.
Epiphysis
n.
(Anat.) The end, or other superficial part, of a bone, which ossifies separately from the central portion, or diaphysis
• The cerebral epiphysis, or pineal gland.
Epiphytal
a.
(Bot.) Pertaining to an epiphyte.
Epiphyte
n.
(Bot.) An air plant which grows on other plants, but does not derive its nourishment from them.
(Med.) A vegetable parasite growing on the surface of the body.
Epiplastron
n.
(Anat.) One of the first pair of lateral plates in the plastron of turtles.
Epipleural
a.
(Anat.) Arising from the pleurapophysis of a vertebra.
Epiplexis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure by which a person seeks to convince and move by an elegant kind of upbraiding.
Epiploce
n.
(Rhet.) A figure by which one striking circumstance is added, in due gradation, to another; climax; e. g., "He not only spared his enemies, but continued them in employment; not only continued, but advanced them."
Epiploic
a.
• Relating to the epiploon.
Epipodial
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the epipodialia or the parts of the limbs to which they belong.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the epipodium of Mollusca.
Epipodiale
n.
(Anat.) One of the bones of either the forearm or shank, the epipodialia being the radius, ulna, tibia, and fibula.
Epipodite
n.
(Zool.) The outer branch of the legs in certain Crustacea.
Epipodium
n.
(Zool.) One of the lateral lobes of the foot in certain gastropods.
Epipolic
a.
(Opt.) Producing, or relating to, epipolism or fluorescence.
Epipolized
a.
• Changed to the epipolic condition, or that in which the phenomenon of fluorescence is presented; produced by fluorescence; as, epipolized light.
Epipteric
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to a small Wormian bone sometimes present in the human skull between the parietal and the great wing of the sphenoid.
n.
• The epipteric bone.
Epipterygoid
a.
(Anat.) Situated upon or above the pterygoid bone.
n.
• An epipterygoid bone or cartilage; the columella in the skulls of many lizards.
Epipubic
a.
• Relating to the epipubis.
Epipubis
n.
(Anat.) A cartilage or bone in front of the pubis in some amphibians and other animals.
Episcopacy
n.
• Government of the church by bishops; church government by three distinct orders of ministers — bishops, priests, and deacons — of whom the bishops have an authority superior and of a different kind.
Episcopal
a.
• Governed by bishops; as, an episcopal church.
• Belonging to, or vested in, bishops; as, episcopal jurisdiction or authority; the episcopal system.
Episcopalian
a.
• Pertaining to bishops, or government by bishops; episcopal; specifically, of or relating to the Protestant Episcopal Church.
n.
• One who belongs to an episcopal church, or adheres to the episcopal form of church government and discipline; a churchman; specifically, in the United States, a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church.
Episcopalianism
n.
• The doctrine and usages of Episcopalians; episcopacy.
Episcopally
adv.
• By episcopal authority; in an episcopal manner.
Episcopant
n.
• A bishop.
Episcoparian
a.
• Episcopal.
Episcopate
n.
• A bishopric; the office and dignity of a bishop.
• The collective body of bishops.
• The time of a bishop's rule.
v. i.
• To act as a bishop; to fill the office of a prelate.
Episcopicide
n.
• The killing of a bishop.
Episcopize
v. t.
• To make a bishop of by consecration.
v. i.
• To perform the duties of a bishop.
Episcopy
n.
• Survey; superintendence.
• Episcopacy.
Episepalous
a.
(Bot.) Growing on the sepals or adnate to them.
Episkeletal
a.
(Anat.) Above or outside of the endoskeleton; epaxial.
Episodal
a.
• Same as Episodic.
Episode
n.
(Rhet.) A separate incident, story, or action, introduced for the purpose of giving a greater variety to the events related; an incidental narrative, or digression, separable from the main subject, but naturally arising from it.
Episodial
a.
• Pertaining to an episode; by way of episode; episodic.
Epispadias
n.
(Med.) A deformity in which the urethra opens upon the top of the penis, instead of at its extremity.
Epispastic
a.
(Med.) Attracting the humors to the skin; exciting action in the skin; blistering.
n.
(Med.) An external application to the skin, which produces a puriform or serous discharge by exciting inflammation; a vesicatory.
Episperm
n.
(Bot.) The skin or coat of a seed, especially the outer coat.
Epispermic
a.
(Bot.) Pertaining, or belonging, to the episperm, or covering of a seed.
Epispore
n.
(Bot.) The thickish outer coat of certain spores.
Epistaxis
n.
(Med.) Bleeding at the nose.
Epistemology
n.
• The theory or science of the method or grounds of knowledge.
Episternal
a.
(Anat. & Zool.) Of or pertaining to the episternum.
Episternum
n.
(Anat.) A median bone connected with the sternum, in many vertebrates; the interclavicle.
• Same as Epiplastron.
(Zool.) One of the lateral pieces next to the sternum in the thorax of insects.
Epistilbite
n.
(Min.) A crystallized, transparent mineral of the Zeolite family. It is a hydrous silicate of alumina and lime.
Epistle
n.
• A writing directed or sent to a person or persons; a written communication; a letter; — applied usually to formal, didactic, or elegant letters.
(Eccl.) One of the letters in the New Testament which were addressed to their Christian brethren by Apostles.
v. t.
• To write; to communicate in a letter or by writing.
Epistler
n.
• A writer of epistles, or of an epistle of the New Testament.
(Eccl.) The ecclesiastic who reads the epistle at the communion service.
Epistolar
a.
• Epistolary.
Epistolary
a.
• Pertaining to epistles or letters; suitable to letters and correspondence; as, an epistolary style.
• Contained in letters; carried on by letters.
Epistolean
n.
• One who writes epistles; a correspondent.
Epistoler
n.
(Eccl.) One of the clergy who reads the epistle at the communion service; an epistler.
Epistolet
n.
• A little epistle.
Epistolize
v. i.
• To write epistles.
Epistolizer
n.
• A writer of epistles.
Epistolographic
a.
• Pertaining to the writing of letters; used in writing letters; epistolary.
Epistolography
n.
• The art or practice of writing epistles.
Epistrophe
n.
(Rhet.) A figure in which successive clauses end with the same word or affirmation; e. g., "Are they Hebrews? so am I. Are they Israelites? so am I."
Epistyle
n.
(Anc. Arch.) A massive piece of stone or wood laid immediately on the abacus of the capital of a column or pillar; — now called architrave.
Episyllogism
n.
(Logic) A syllogism which assumes as one of its premises a proposition which was the conclusion of a preceding syllogism, called, in relation to this, the prosyllogism.
Epitaph
n.
• An inscription on, or at, a tomb, or a grave, in memory or commendation of the one buried there; a sepulchral inscription.
• A brief writing formed as if to be inscribed on a monument, as that concerning Alexander: "Sufficit huic tumulus, cui non sufficeret orbis."
v. t.
• To commemorate by an epitaph.
v. i.
• To write or speak after the manner of an epitaph.
Epitapher
n.
• A writer of epitaphs.
Epitaphic
a.
• Pertaining to an epitaph; epitaphian.
n.
• An epitaph.
Epitaphist
n.
• An epitapher.
Epitasis
n.
• That part which embraces the main action of a play, poem, and the like, and leads on to the catastrophe; — opposed to protasis.
(Med.) The period of violence in a fever or disease; paroxysm.
Epithalamic
a.
• Belonging to, or designed for, an epithalamium.
Epithalamium
n.
• A nuptial song, or poem in honor of the bride and bridegroom.
Epithalamy
n.
• Epithalamium.
Epitheca
n.
(Zool.) A continuous and, usually, structureless layer which covers more or less of the exterior of many corals.
Epithelial
a.
• Of or pertaining to epithelium; as, epithelial cells; epithelial cancer.
Epithelioid
a.
(Anat.) Like epithelium; as, epithelioid cells.
Epithelioma
n.
(Med.) A malignant growth containing epithelial cells; — called also epithelial cancer.
Epithelium
n.
(Anat.) The superficial layer of cells lining the alimentary canal and all its appendages, all glands and their ducts, blood vessels and lymphatics, serous cavities, etc. It often includes the epidermis (i. e., keratin-producing epithelial cells), and it is sometimes restricted to the alimentary canal, the glands and their appendages, — the term endothelium being applied to the lining membrane of the blood vessels, lymphatics, and serous cavities.
Epitheloid
a.
(Anat.) Epithelioid.
Epithem
n.
(Med.) Any external topical application to the body, except ointments and plasters, as a poultice, lotion, etc.
Epithema
n.
(Zool.) A horny excrescence upon the beak of birds.
Epithesis
n.
• The addition of a letter at the end of a word, without changing its sense; as, numb for num, whilst for whiles.
Epithet
n.
• An adjective expressing some quality, attribute, or relation, that is properly or specially appropriate to a person or thing; as, a just man; a verdant lawn.
• Term; expression; phrase.
v. t.
• To describe by an epithet.
Epithite
n.
• A lazy, worthless fellow; a vagrant.
Epithumetic
a.
• Epithumetical.
Epithumetical
a.
• Pertaining to sexual desire; sensual.
Epitithides
n.
(Arch.) The uppermost member of the cornice of an entablature.
Epitomator
n.
• An epitomist.
Epitome
n.
• A work in which the contents of a former work are reduced within a smaller space by curtailment and condensation; a brief summary; an abridgement.
• A compact or condensed representation of anything.
Epitomist
n.
• One who makes an epitome; one who abridges; an epitomizer.
Epitomize
v. t.
• To make an epitome of; to shorten or abridge, as a writing or discourse; to reduce within a smaller space; as, to epitomize the works of Justin.
• To diminish, as by cutting off something; to curtail; as, to epitomize words.
Epitomizer
n.
• An epitomist.
Epitrite
n.
(Gr. & Lat. Pros.) A foot consisting of three long syllables and one short syllable.
Epitrochlea
n.
(Anat.) A projection on the outer side of the distal end of the humerus; the external condyle.
Epitrochlear
a.
• Relating to the epitrochlea.
Epitrochoid
n.
(Geom.) A kind of curve.
Epitrope
n.
(Rhet.) A figure by which permission is either seriously or ironically granted to some one, to do what he proposes to do; e. g., "He that is unjust, let him be unjust still."
Epizeuxis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure by which a word is repeated with vehemence or emphasis, as in the following lines: -
Epizoon
n.
(Zool.) One of the artificial group of invertebrates of various kinds, which live parasitically upon the exterior of other animals; an ectozoon. Among them are the lice, ticks, many acari, the lerneans, or fish lice, and other crustaceans.
Epizootic
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to an epizoon.
(Geol.) Containing fossil remains; — said of rocks, formations, mountains, and the like.
• Of the nature of a disease which attacks many animals at the same time; — corresponding to epidemic diseases among men.
Eploring
a.
• Employed in, or designed for, exploration.
Epoch
n.
• A fixed point of time, established in history by the occurrence of some grand or remarkable event; a point of time marked by an event of great subsequent influence; as, the epoch of the creation; the birth of Christ was the epoch which gave rise to the Christian era.
• A period of time, longer or shorter, remarkable for events of great subsequent influence; a memorable period; as, the epoch of maritime discovery, or of the Reformation.
(Geol.) A division of time characterized by the prevalence of similar conditions of the earth; commonly a minor division or part of a period.
(Astron.) The date at which a planet or comet has a longitude or position.
• An arbitrary fixed date, for which the elements used in computing the place of a planet, or other heavenly body, at any other date, are given; as, the epoch of Mars; lunar elements for the epoch March 1st, 1860.
Epochal
a.
• Belonging to an epoch; of the nature of an epoch.
Epode
n.
(Poet.) The after song; the part of a lyric ode which follows the strophe and antistrophe, — the ancient ode being divided into strophe, antistrophe, and epode.
• A species of lyric poem, invented by Archilochus, in which a longer verse is followed by a shorter one; as, the Epodes of Horace. It does not include the elegiac distich.
Epodic
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, an epode.
Eponymic
a.
• Same as Eponymous.
Eponymist
n.
• One from whom a race, tribe, city, or the like, took its name; an eponym.
Eponymous
a.
• Relating to an eponym; giving one's name to a tribe, people, country, and the like.
Eponymy
n.
• The derivation of the name of a race, tribe, etc., from that of a fabulous hero, progenitor, etc.
Epopt
n.
• One instructed in the mysteries of a secret system.
Epos
n.
• An epic.
Epotation
n.
• A drinking up; a quaffing.
Epozoan
n.
(Zool.) An epizoon.
Epozoic
a.
(Zool.) Living upon the exterior of another animal; ectozoic; — said of external parasites.
Epsomite
n.
• Native sulphate of magnesia or Epsom salt.
Epulary
a.
• Of or pertaining to a feast or banquet.
Epulation
n.
• A feasting or feast; banquet.
Epulis
n.
(Med.) A hard tumor developed from the gums.
Epulose
a.
• Feasting to excess.
Epulosity
n.
• A feasting to excess.
Epulotic
a.
• Promoting the skinning over or healing of sores; as, an epulotic ointment.
n.
• An epulotic agent.
Epuration
n.
• Purification.
Equability
n.
• The quality or condition of being equable; evenness or uniformity; as, equability of temperature; the equability of the mind.
Equable
a.
• Equal and uniform; continuing the same at different times; — said of motion, and the like; uniform in surface; smooth; as, an equable plain or globe.
• Uniform in action or intensity; not variable or changing; — said of the feelings or temper.
Equableness
n.
• Quality or state of being equable.
Equably
adv.
• In an equable manner.
Equal
a.
• Agreeing in quantity, size, quality, degree, value, etc.; having the same magnitude, the same value, the same degree, etc.; — applied to number, degree, quantity, and intensity, and to any subject which admits of them; neither inferior nor superior, greater nor less, better nor worse; corresponding; alike; as, equal quantities of land, water, etc. ; houses of equal size; persons of equal stature or talents; commodities of equal value.
• Bearing a suitable relation; of just proportion; having competent power, abilities, or means; adequate; as, he is not equal to the task.
• Not variable; equable; uniform; even; as, an equal movement.
• Evenly balanced; not unduly inclining to either side; characterized by fairness; unbiased; impartial; equitable; just.
• Of the same interest or concern; indifferent.
(Mus.) Intended for voices of one kind only, either all male or all female; — opposed to mixed.
(Math.) Exactly agreeing with respect to quantity.
n.
• One not inferior or superior to another; one having the same or a similar age, rank, station, office, talents, strength, or other quality or condition; an equal quantity or number; as, "If equals be taken from equals the remainders are equal."
• State of being equal; equality.
v. t.
• To be or become equal to; to have the same quantity, the same value, the same degree or rank, or the like, with; to be commenurate with.
• To make equal return to; to recompense fully.
• To make equal or equal to; to equalize; hence, to compare or regard as equals; to put on equality.
Equalitarian
n.
• One who believes in equalizing the condition of men; a leveler.
Equality
n.
• The condition or quality of being equal; agreement in quantity or degree as compared; likeness in bulk, value, rank, properties, etc.; as, the equality of two bodies in length or thickness; an equality of rights.
• Sameness in state or continued course; evenness; uniformity; as, an equality of temper or constitution.
• Evenness; uniformity; as, an equality of surface.
(Math.) Exact agreement between two expressions or magnitudes with respect to quantity; — denoted by the symbol =; thus, a = x signifies that a contains the same number and kind of units of measure that x does.
Equalization
n.
• The act of equalizing, or state of being equalized.
Equalize
v. t.
• To make equal; to cause to correspond, or be like, in amount or degree as compared; as, to equalize accounts, burdens, or taxes.
• To pronounce equal; to compare as equal.
• To be equal to; equal; to match.
Equalizer
n.
• One who, or that which, equalizes anything.
Equally
adv.
• In an equal manner or degree in equal shares or proportion; with equal and impartial justice; without difference; alike; evenly; justly; as, equally taxed, furnished, etc.
Equalness
n.
• Equality; evenness.
Equangular
a.
• Having equal angles; equiangular.
Equanimity
n.
• Evenness of mind; that calm temper or firmness of mind which is not easily elated or depressed; patience; calmness; composure; as, to bear misfortunes with equanimity.
Equanimous
a.
• Of an even, composed frame of mind; of a steady temper; not easily elated or depressed.
Equant
n.
(Ptolemaic Astron.) A circle around whose circumference a planet or the center of ann epicycle was conceived to move uniformly; — called also eccentric equator.
Equate
v. t.
• To make equal; to reduce to an average; to make such an allowance or correction in as will reduce to a common standard of comparison; to reduce to mean time or motion; as, to equate payments; to equate lines of railroad for grades or curves; equated distances.
Equation
n.
• A making equal; equal division; equality; equilibrium.
(Math.) An expression of the condition of equality between two algebraic quantities or sets of quantities, the sign = being placed between them; as, a binomial equation; a quadratic equation; an algebraic equation; a transcendental equation; an exponential equation; a logarithmic equation; a differential equation, etc.
(Astron.) A quantity to be applied in computing the mean place or other element of a celestial body; that is, any one of the several quantities to be added to, or taken from, its position as calculated on the hypothesis of a mean uniform motion, in order to find its true position as resulting from its actual and unequal motion.
Equator
n.
(Geog.) The imaginary great circle on the earth's surface, everywhere equally distant from the two poles, and dividing the earth's surface into two hemispheres.
(Astron.) The great circle of the celestial sphere, coincident with the plane of the earth's equator; — so called because when the sun is in it, the days and nights are of equal length; hence called also the equinoctial, and on maps, globes, etc., the equinoctial line.
Equatorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to the equator; as, equatorial climates; also, pertaining to an equatorial instrument.
n.
(Astron.) An instrument consisting of a telescope so mounted as to have two axes of motion at right angles to each other, one of them parallel to the axis of the earth, and each carrying a graduated circle, the one for measuring declination, and the other right ascension, or the hour angle, so that the telescope may be directed, even in the daytime, to any star or other object whose right ascension and declination are known. The motion in right ascension is sometimes communicated by clockwork, so as to keep the object constantly in the field of the telescope. Called also an equatorial telescope.
Equatorially
adv.
• So as to have motion or direction parallel to the equator.
Equerry
n.
• A large stable or lodge for horses.
• An officer of princes or nobles, charged with the care of their horses.
Equery
n.
• Same as Equerry.
Equestrian
a.
• Of or pertaining to horses or horsemen, or to horsemanship; as, equestrian feats, or games.
• Being or riding on horseback; mounted; as, an equestrian statue.
• Belonging to, or composed of, the ancient Roman equities or knights; as, the equestrian order.
n.
• One who rides on horseback; a horseman; a rider.
Equestrianism
n.
• The art of riding on horseback; performance on horseback; horsemanship; as, feats equestrianism.
Equestrienne
n.
• A woman skilled in equestrianism; a horsewoman.
Equiangled
a.
• Equiangular.
Equiangular
a.
• Having equal angles; as, an equiangular figure; a square is equiangular.
Equibalance
n.
• Equal weight; equiponderance.
v. t.
• To make of equal weight; to balance equally; to counterbalance; to equiponderate.
Equicrescent
a.
(Math.) Increasing by equal increments; as, an equicrescent variable.
Equicrural
a.
• Having equal legs or sides; isosceles.
Equicrure
a.
• Equicrural.
Equidifferent
a.
• Having equal differences; as, the terms of arithmetical progression are equidifferent.
Equidistance
n.
• Equal distance.
Equidistant
a.
• Being at an equal distance from the same point or thing.
Equidiurnal
a.
• Pertaining to the time of equal day and night; — applied to the equinoctial line.
Equiform
a.
• Having the same form; uniform.
Equilateral
a.
• Having all the sides equal; as, an equilateral triangle; an equilateral polygon.
n.
• A side exactly corresponding, or equal, to others; also, a figure of equal sides.
Equilibrate
v. t.
• To balance two scales, sides, or ends; to keep even with equal weight on each side; to keep in equipoise.
Equilibration
n.
• Act of keeping a balance, or state of being balanced; equipoise.
(Biol.) The process by which animal and vegetable organisms preserve a physiological balance.
Equilibrious
a.
• Evenly poised; balanced.
Equilibrist
n.
• One who balances himself in unnatural positions and hazardous movements; a balancer.
Equilibrity
n.
• The state of being balanced; equality of weight.
Equilibrium
n.
• Equality of weight or force; an equipoise or a state of rest produced by the mutual counteraction of two or more forces.
• A level position; a just poise or balance in respect to an object, so that it remains firm; equipoise; as, to preserve the equilibrium of the body.
• A balancing of the mind between motives or reasons, with consequent indecision and doubt.
Equimomental
a.
(Mech.) Having equal moments of inertia.
Equimultiple
a.
• Multiplied by the same number or quantity.
n.
(Math.) One of the products arising from the multiplication of two or more quantities by the same number or quantity. Thus, seven times 2, or 14, and seven times 4, or 28, are equimultiples of 2 and 4.
Equine
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a horse.
Equinia
n.
(Med.) Glanders.
Equinoctial
a.
• Pertaining to an equinox, or the equinoxes, or to the time of equal day and night; as, the equinoctial line.
• Pertaining to the regions or climate of the equinoctial line or equator; in or near that line; as, equinoctial heat; an equinoctial sun.
• Pertaining to the time when the sun enters the equinoctial points; as, an equinoctial gale or storm, that is, one happening at or near the time of the equinox, in any part of the world.
n.
• The equinoctial line.
Equinoctially
adv.
• Towards the equinox.
Equinox
n.
• The time when the sun enters one of the equinoctial points, that is, about March 21 and September 22.
• Equinoctial wind or storm.
Equinumerant
a.
• Equal as to number.
Equip
v. t.
• To furnish for service, or against a need or exigency; to fit out; to supply with whatever is necessary to efficient action in any way; to provide with arms or an armament, stores, munitions, rigging, etc.; — said esp. of ships and of troops.
• To dress up; to array; accouter.
Equipage
n.
• Furniture or outfit, whether useful or ornamental; especially, the furniture and supplies of a vessel, fitting her for a voyage or for warlike purposes, or the furniture and necessaries of an army, a body of troops, or a single soldier, including whatever is necessary for efficient service; equipments; accouterments; habiliments; attire.
• Retinue; train; suite.
• A carriage of state or of pleasure with all that accompanies it, as horses, liveried servants, etc., a showy turn-out.
Equipaged
a.
• Furnished with equipage.
Equiparable
a.
• Comparable.
Equiparate
v. t.
• To compare.
Equipedal
a.
(Zool.) Equal-footed; having the pairs of feet equal.
Equipendency
n.
• The act or condition of hanging in equipoise; not inclined or determined either way.
Equipensate
v. t.
• To weigh equally; to esteem alike.
Equipment
n.
• The act of equipping, or the state of being equipped, as for a voyage or expedition.
• Whatever is used in equipping; necessaries for an expedition or voyage; the collective designation for the articles comprising an outfit; equipage; as, a railroad equipment (locomotives, cars, etc. ; for carrying on business); horse equipments; infantry equipments; naval equipments; laboratory equipments.
Equipoise
n.
• Equality of weight or force; hence, equilibrium; a state in which the two ends or sides of a thing are balanced, and hence equal; state of being equally balanced; — said of moral, political, or social interests or forces.
• Counterpoise.
Equipollent
a.
• Having equal power or force; equivalent.
(Logic) Having equivalent signification and reach; expressing the same thing, but differently.
Equipollently
adv.
• With equal power.
Equiponderant
a.
• Being of the same weight.
Equiponderate
v. i.
• To be equal in weight; to weigh as much as another thing.
v. t.
• To make equal in weight; to counterbalance.
Equiponderous
a.
• Having equal weight.
Equipondious
a.
• Of equal weight on both sides; balanced.
Equipotential
a.
(Mech. & Physics) Having the same potential.
Equiradical
a.
• Equally radical.
Equirotal
a.
• Having wheels of the same size or diameter; having equal rotation.
Equisetaceous
a.
(Bot.) Belonging to the Equisetaceae, or Horsetail family.
Equisetiform
a.
(Bot.) Having the form of the equisetum.
Equisetum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of vascular, cryptogamic, herbaceous plants; — also called horsetails.
Equisonance
n.
(Mus.) An equal sounding; the consonance of the unison and its octaves.
Equisonant
a.
• Of the same or like sound.
Equitable
a.
• Possessing or exhibiting equity; according to natural right or natural justice; marked by a due consideration for what is fair, unbiased, or impartial; just; as an equitable decision; an equitable distribution of an estate; equitable men.
(Law) That can be sustained or made available or effective in a court of equity, or upon principles of equity jurisprudence; as, an equitable estate; equitable assets, assignment, mortgage, etc.
Equitableness
n.
• The quality of being equitable, just, or impartial; as, the equitableness of a judge, a decision, or distribution of property.
Equitably
adv.
• In an equitable manner; justly; as, the laws should be equitably administered.
Equitancy
n.
• Horsemanship.
Equitant
a.
• Mounted on, or sitting upon, a horse; riding on horseback.
(Bot.) Overlapping each other; — said of leaves whose bases are folded so as to overlap and bestride the leaves within or above them, as in the iris.
Equitation
n.
• A riding, or the act of riding, on horseback; horsemanship.
Equitemporaneous
a.
• Contemporaneous.
Equites
n. pl
(Rom. Antiq.) An order of knights holding a middle place between the senate and the commonalty; members of the Roman equestrian order.
Equity
n.
• Equality of rights; natural justice or right; the giving, or desiring to give, to each man his due, according to reason, and the law of God to man; fairness in determination of conflicting claims; impartiality.
(Law) An equitable claim; an equity of redemption; as, an equity to a settlement, or wife's equity, etc.
(Law) A system of jurisprudence, supplemental to law, properly so called, and complemental of it.
Equivalence
n.
• The condition of being equivalent or equal; equality of worth, value, signification, or force; as, an equivalence of definitions.
• Equal power or force; equivalent amount.
(Chem.) The quantity of the combining power of an atom, expressed in hydrogen units; the number of hydrogen atoms can combine with, or be exchanged for; valency.
• The degree of combining power as determined by relative weight.
v. t.
• To be equivalent or equal to; to counterbalance.
Equivalency
n.
• Same as Equivalence.
Equivalent
a.
• Equal in wortir or value, force, power, effect, import, and the like; alike in significance and value; of the same import or meaning.
(Geom.) Equal in measure but not admitting of superposition; — applied to magnitudes; as, a square may be equivalent to a triangle.
(Geol.) Contemporaneous in origin; as, the equivalent strata of different countries.
n.
• Something equivalent; that which is equal in value, worth, weight, or force; as, to offer an equivalent for damage done.
(Chem.) That comparative quantity by weight of an element which possesses the same chemical value as other elements, as determined by actual experiment and reference to the same standard. Specifically: (a) The comparative proportions by which one element replaces another in any particular compound; thus, as zinc replaces hydrogen in hydrochloric acid, their equivalents are 32.5 and 1. (b) The combining proportion by weight of a substance, or the number expressing this proportion, in any particular compound; as, the equivalents of hydrogen and oxygen in water are respectively 1 and 8, and in hydric dioxide 1 and 16.
(Chem.) A combining unit, whether an atom, a radical, or a molecule; as, in acid salt two or more equivalents of acid unite with one or more equivalents of base.
v. t.
• To make the equivalent to; to equal; equivalence.
Equivalently
adv.
• In an equal manner.
Equivalue
v. t.
• To put an equal value upon; to put (something) on a par with another thing.
Equivalvular
a.
(Zool.) Same as Equivalve or Equivalved.
Equivocacy
n.
• Equivocalness.
Equivocal
a.
(Literally, called equally one thing or the other; hence:) Having two significations equally applicable; capable of double interpretation; of doubtful meaning; ambiguous; uncertain; as, equivocal words; an equivocal sentence.
• Capable of being ascribed to different motives, or of signifying opposite feelings, purposes, or characters; deserving to be suspected; as, his actions are equivocal.
• Uncertain, as an indication or sign; doubtful.
n.
• A word or expression capable of different meanings; an ambiguous term; an equivoque.
Equivocally
adv.
• In an equivocal manner.
Equivocalness
n.
• The state of being equivocal.
Equivocate
v. i.
• To use words of equivocal or doubtful signification; to express one's opinions in terms which admit of different senses, with intent to deceive; to use ambiguous expressions with a view to mislead; as, to equivocate is the work of duplicity.
v. t.
• To render equivocal or ambiguous.
Equivocation
n.
• The use of expressions susceptible of a double signification, with a purpose to mislead.
Equivocator
n.
• One who equivocates.
Equivocatory
a.
• Indicating, or characterized by, equivocation.
Equivorous
a.
• Feeding on horseflesh; as, equivorous Tartars.
Equus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of mammals, including the horse, ass, etc.
Era
n.
• A fixed point of time, usually an epoch, from which a series of years is reckoned.
• A period of time reckoned from some particular date or epoch; a succession of years dating from some important event; as, the era of Alexander; the era of Christ, or the Christian era (see under Christian).
• A period of time in which a new order of things prevails; a signal stage of history; an epoch.
Eradiate
v. i.
• To shoot forth, as rays of light; to beam; to radiate.
Eradiation
n.
• Emission of radiance.
Eradicable
a.
• Capable of being eradicated.
Eradicate
v. t.
• To pluck up by the roots; to root up; as, an oak tree eradicated.
• To root out; to destroy utterly; to extirpate; as, to eradicate diseases, or errors.
Eradication
n.
• The act of plucking up by the roots; a rooting out; extirpation; utter destruction.
• The state of being plucked up by the roots.
Eradicative
a.
• Tending or serving to eradicate; curing or destroying thoroughly, as a disease or any evil.
n.
(Med.) A medicine that effects a radical cure.
Erasable
a.
• Capable of being erased.
Erase
v. t.
• To rub or scrape out, as letters or characters written, engraved, or painted; to efface; to expunge; to cross out; as, to erase a word or a name.
• Fig.: To obliterate; to expunge; to blot out; — used of ideas in the mind or memory.
Erased
p. pr. & a.
• Rubbed or scraped out; effaced; obliterated.
(Her.) Represented with jagged and uneven edges, as is torn off; — used esp. of the head or limb of a beast. Cf. Couped.
Erasement
n.
• The act of erasing; a rubbing out; expunction; obliteration.
Eraser
n.
• One who, or that which, erases; esp., a sharp instrument or a piece of rubber used to erase writings, drawings, etc.
Erasion
n.
• The act of erasing; a rubbing out; obliteration.
Erastian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of the followers of Thomas Erastus, a German physician and theologian of the 16th century. He held that the punishment of all offenses should be referred to the civil power, and that holy communion was open to all. In the present day, an Erastian is one who would see the church placed entirely under the control of the State.
Erastianism
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) The principles of the Erastains.
Erasure
n.
• The act of erasing; a scratching out; obliteration.
Erative
a.
• Pertaining to the Muse Erato who presided over amatory poetry.
Erato
n.
(Class. Myth.) The Muse who presided over lyric and amatory poetry.
Erbium
n.
(Chem.) A rare metallic element associated with several other rare elements in the mineral gadolinite from Ytterby in Sweden. Symbol Er. Atomic weight 165.9. Its salts are rose-colored and give characteristic spectra. Its sesquioxide is called erbia.
Ercedeken
n.
• An archdeacon.
Erd
n.
• The earth.
Ere
prep. & adv.
• Before; sooner than.
• Rather than.
v. t.
• To plow.
Erebus
n.
(Greek Myth.) A place of nether darkness, being the gloomy space through which the souls passed to Hades.
(Greek Myth.) The son of Chaos and brother of Nox, who dwelt in Erebus.
Erect
a.
• Upright, or having a vertical position; not inverted; not leaning or bent; not prone; as, to stand erect.
• Directed upward; raised; uplifted.
• Bold; confident; free from depression; undismayed.
• Watchful; alert.
(Bot.) Standing upright, with reference to the earth's surface, or to the surface to which it is attached.
(Her.) Elevated, as the tips of wings, heads of serpents, etc.
v. t.
• To raise and place in an upright or perpendicular position; to set upright; to raise; as, to erect a pole, a flagstaff, a monument, etc.
• To raise, as a building; to build; to construct; as, to erect a house or a fort; to set up; to put together the component parts of, as of a machine.
• To lift up; to elevate; to exalt; to magnify.
• To animate; to encourage; to cheer.
• To set up as an assertion or consequence from premises, or the like.
• To set up or establish; to found; to form; to institute.
v. i.
• To rise upright.
Erectable
a.
• Capable of being erected; as, an erectable feather.
Erecter
n.
• An erector; one who raises or builds.
Erectile
a.
• Capable of being erected; susceptible of being erected of dilated.
Erectility
n.
• The quality or state of being erectile.
Erection
n.
• The act of erecting, or raising upright; the act of constructing, as a building or a wall, or of fitting together the parts of, as a machine; the act of founding or establishing, as a commonwealth or an office; also, the act of rousing to excitement or courage.
• The state of being erected, lifted up, built, established, or founded; exaltation of feelings or purposes.
• State of being stretched to stiffness; tension.
• Anything erected; a building of any kind.
(Physiol.) The state of a part which, from having been soft, has become hard and swollen by the accumulation of blood in the erectile tissue.
Erective
a.
• Making erect or upright; raising; tending to erect.
Erectly
adv.
• In an erect manner or posture.
Erectness
n.
• Uprightness of posture or form.
Erector
n.
• One who, or that which, erects.
(Anat.) A muscle which raises any part.
(Physics) An attachment to a microscope, telescope, or other optical instrument, for making the image erect instead of inverted.
Erelong
adv.
• Before the apse of a long time; soon; — usually separated, ere long.
Eremacausis
n.
• A gradual oxidation from exposure to air and moisture, as in the decay of old trees or of dead animals.
Eremite
n.
• A hermit.
Eremitish
a.
• Eremitic.
Eremitism
n.
• The state of a hermit; a living in seclusion from social life.
Ereption
n.
• A snatching away.
Eretation
n.
• A creeping forth.
Erethism
n.
(Med.) A morbid degree of excitement or irritation in an organ.
Erethistic
a.
• Relating to erethism.
Erf
n.
• A garden plot, usually about half an acre.
Erg
n.
(Physics) The unit of work or energy in the C. G. S. system, being the amount of work done by a dyne working through a distance of one centimeter; the amount of energy expended in moving a body one centimeter against a force of one dyne. One foot pound is equal to 13,560,000 ergs.
Ergat
v. t.
• To deduce logically, as conclusions.
Ergo
conj. or adv.
• Therefore; consequently; — often used in a jocular way.
Ergot
n.
• A diseased condition of rye and other cereals, in which the grains become black, and often spur-shaped. It is caused by a parasitic fungus, Claviceps purpurea.
• The mycelium or spawn of this fungus infecting grains of rye and wheat. It is a powerful remedial agent, and also a dangerous poison, and is used as a means of hastening childbirth, and to arrest bleeding.
(Far.) A stub, like soft horn, about the size of a chestnut, situated behind and below the pastern joint.
Ergotic
a.
• Pertaining to, or derived from, ergot; as, ergotic acid.
Ergotin
n.
(Med.) An extract made from ergot.
Ergotine
(Chem.) A powerful astringent alkaloid extracted from ergot as a brown, amorphous, bitter substance. It is used to produce contraction of the uterus.
Ergotism
n.
• A logical deduction.
n.
(Med.) A diseased condition produced by eating rye affected with the ergot fungus.
Ergotized
a.
• Affected with the ergot fungus; as, ergotized rye.
Erica
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubby plants, including the heaths, many of them producing beautiful flowers.
Ericaceous
a.
(Bot.) Belonging to the Heath family, or resembling plants of that family; consisting of heats.
Ericinol
n.
(Chem.) A colorless oil (quickly becoming brown), with a pleasant odor, obtained by the decomposition of ericolin.
Ericius
n.
• The Vulgate rendering of the Hebrew word qip&omac;d, which in the "Authorized Version" is translated bittern, and in the Revised Version, porcupine.
Ericolin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside found in the bearberry (and others of the Ericaceae), and extracted as a bitter, yellow, amorphous mass.
Eridanus
n.
(Anat.) A long, winding constellation extending southward from Taurus and containing the bright star Achernar.
Erigible
a.
• Capable of being erected.
Erin
n.
• An early, and now a poetic, name of Ireland.
Erinaceous
a.
(Zool.) Of the Hedgehog family; like, or characteristic of, a hedgehog.
Eringo
n.
• The sea holly.
Erinite
n.
(Min.) A hydrous arseniate of copper, of an emerald-green color; — so called from Erin, or Ireland, where it occurs.
Erinys
n.
(Class. Myth.) An avenging deity; one of the Furies; sometimes, conscience personified.
Eriometer
n.
(Opt.) An instrument for measuring the diameters of minute particles or fibers, from the size of the colored rings produced by the diffraction of the light in which the objects are viewed.
Eristalis
n.
(Zool.) A genus of dipterous insects whose young (called rat-tailed larvae) are remarkable for their long tapering tail, which spiracles at the tip, and for their ability to live in very impure and salt waters; — also called drone fly.
Erke
a.
• ASlothful.
Erlking
n.
• A personification, in German and Scandinavian mythology, of a spirit natural power supposed to work mischief and ruin, esp. to children.
Erme
v. i.
• To grieve; to feel sad.
Ermin
n.
• An Armenian.
Ermine
n.
(Zool.) A valuable fur-bearing animal of the genus Mustela (M. erminea), allied to the weasel; the stoat. It is found in the northern parts of Asia, Europe, and America. In summer it is brown, but in winter it becomes white, except the tip of the tail, which is always black.
• The fur of the ermine, as prepared for ornamenting garments of royalty, etc., by having the tips of the tails, which are black, arranged at regular intervals throughout the white.
• By metonymy, the office or functions of a judge, whose state robe, lined with ermine, is emblematical of purity and honor without stain.
(Her.) One of the furs.
v. t.
• To clothe with, or as with, ermine.
Ermined
a.
• Clothed or adorned with the fur of the ermine.
Ermit
n.
• A hermit.
Ern
v. i.
• To stir with strong emotion; to grieve; to mourn.
Ernestful
a.
• Serious.
Erode
v. t.
• To eat into or away; to corrode; as, canker erodes the flesh.
Eroded
p. p. & a.
• Eaten away; gnawed; irregular, as if eaten or worn away.
(Bot.) Having the edge worn away so as to be jagged or irregularly toothed.
Erodent
n.
(Med.) A medicine which eats away extraneous growths; a caustic.
Erogate
v. t.
• To lay out, as money; to deal out; to expend.
Erogation
n.
• The act of giving out or bestowing.
Eros
n.
(Greek Myth.) Love; the god of love; — by earlier writers represented as one of the first and creative gods, by later writers as the son of Aphrodite, equivalent to the Latin god Cupid.
Erose
a.
• Irregular or uneven as if eaten or worn away.
(Bot.) Jagged or irregularly toothed, as if nibbled out or gnawed.
Erosion
n.
• The act or operation of eroding or eating away.
• The state of being eaten away; corrosion; canker.
Erosive
a.
• That erodes or gradually eats away; tending to erode; corrosive.
Erostrate
a.
(Bot.) Without a beak.
Eroteme
n.
• A mark indicating a question; a note of interrogation.
Erotesis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure o speech by which a strong affirmation of the contrary, is implied under the form o an earnest interrogation, as in the following lines; -
Erotic
n.
• An amorous composition or poem.
Eroticism
n.
• Erotic quality.
Erpetologist
n.
• Herpetologist.
Erpetology
n.
(Zool.) Herpetology.
Err
v. i.
• To wander; to roam; to stray.
• To deviate from the true course; to miss the thing aimed at.
• To miss intellectual truth; to fall into error; to mistake in judgment or opinion; to be mistaken.
• To deviate morally from the right way; to go astray, in a figurative sense; to do wrong; to sin.
• To offend, as by erring.
Errable
a.
• Liable to error; fallible.
Errableness
n.
• Liability to error.
Errabund
a.
• Erratic.
Errancy
n.
• A wandering; state of being in error.
Errand
n.
• A special business intrusted to a messenger; something to be told or done by one sent somewhere for the purpose; often, a verbal message; a commission; as, the servant was sent on an errand; to do an errand. Also, one's purpose in going anywhere.
Errant
a.
• Wandering; deviating from an appointed course, or from a direct path; roving.
• Notorious; notoriously bad; downright; arrant.
(Eng. Law) Journeying; itinerant; — formerly applied to judges who went on circuit and to bailiffs at large.
n.
• One who wanders about.
Errantia
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of chaetopod annelids, including those that are not confined to tubes.
Errantry
n.
• A wandering; a roving; esp., a roving in quest of adventures.
• The employment of a knight-errant.
Erratic
a.
• Having no certain course; roving about without a fixed destination; wandering; moving; — hence, applied to the planets as distinguished from the fixed stars.
• Deviating from a wise of the common course in opinion or conduct; eccentric; strange; queer; as, erratic conduct.
• Irregular; changeable.
n.
• One who deviates from common and accepted opinions; one who is eccentric or preserve in his intellectual character.
• A rogue.
(Geol.) Any stone or material that has been borne away from its original site by natural agencies; esp., a large block or fragment of rock; a bowlder.
Erratical
a.
• Erratic.
Erration
n.
• A wandering; a roving about.
Erratum
n.
• An error or mistake in writing or printing.
Erroneous
a.
• Wandering; straying; deviating from the right course; — hence, irregular; unnatural.
• Misleading; misled; mistaking.
• Containing error; not conformed to truth or justice; incorrect; false; mistaken; as, an erroneous doctrine; erroneous opinion, observation, deduction, view, etc.
Error
n.
• A wandering; a roving or irregular course.
• A wandering or deviation from the right course or standard; irregularity; mistake; inaccuracy; something made wrong or left wrong; as, an error in writing or in printing; a clerical error.
• A departing or deviation from the truth; falsity; false notion; wrong opinion; mistake; misapprehension.
• A moral offense; violation of duty; a sin or transgression; iniquity; fault.
(Math.) The difference between the approximate result and the true result; — used particularly in the rule of double position.
(Mensuration) The difference between an observed value and the true value of a quantity.
• The difference between the observed value of a quantity and that which is taken or computed to be the true value; — sometimes called residual error.
(Law.) A mistake in the proceedings of a court of record in matters of law or of fact.
(Baseball) A fault of a player of the side in the field which results in failure to put out a player on the other side, or gives him an unearned base.
Errorful
a.
• Full of error; wrong.
Errorist
n.
• One who encourages and propagates error; one who holds to error.
Ers
n.
(Bot.) The bitter vetch (Ervum Ervilia).
Erse
n.
• A name sometimes given to that dialect of the Celtic which is spoken in the Highlands of Scotland; — called, by the Highlanders, Gaelic.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Celtic race in the Highlands of Scotland, or to their language.
Erst
adv.
• First.
• Previously; before; formerly; heretofore.
Erstwhile
adv.
• Till then or now; heretofore; formerly.
Erthine
n.
(Med.) A medicine designed to be snuffed up the nose, to promote discharges of mucus; a sternutatory.
a.
• Causing or increasing secretion of nasal mucus.
Erubescent
a.
• Red, or reddish; blushing.
Eruca
n.
(Zool.) An insect in the larval state; a caterpillar; a larva.
Erucic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, a genus of cruciferous Mediterranean herbs (Eruca or Brassica); as, erucic acid, a fatty acid resembling oleic acid, and found in colza oil, mustard oil, etc.
Erucifrom
a.
(Zool.) Having the form of a caterpillar; — said of insect larvae.
Eructation
n.
• The act of belching wind from the stomach; a belch.
• A violent belching out or emitting, as of gaseous or other matter from the crater of a volcano, geyser, etc.
Erudiate
v. t.
• To instruct; to educate; to teach.
Erudite
a.
• Characterized by extensive reading or knowledge; well instructed; learned.
Erudition
n.
• The act of instructing; the result of thorough instruction; the state of being erudite or learned; the acquisitions gained by extensive reading or study; particularly, learning in literature or criticism, as distinct from the sciences; scholarship.
Erugate
a.
• Freed from wrinkles; smooth.
Eruginous
a.
• Partaking of the substance or nature of copper, or of the rust copper; resembling the trust of copper or verdigris; aeruginous.
Erumpent
a.
(Bot.) Breaking out; — said of certain fungi which burst through the texture of leaves.
Erupt
v. t.
• To cause to burst forth; to eject; as, to erupt lava.
Eruption
n.
• The act of breaking out or bursting forth; as: (a) A violent throwing out of flames, lava, etc., as from a volcano of a fissure in the earth's crust. (b) A sudden and overwhelming hostile movement of armed men from one country to another. Milton. (c) A violent commotion.
• That which bursts forth.
• A violent exclamation; ejaculation.
(Med.) The breaking out of pimples, or an efflorescence, as in measles, scarlatina, etc.
Eruptional
a.
• Eruptive.
Eruptive
a.
• Breaking out or bursting forth.
(Med.) Attended with eruption or efflorescence, or producing it; as, an eruptive fever.
(Geol.) Produced by eruption; as, eruptive rocks, such as the igneous or volcanic.
n.
(Geol.) An eruptive rock.
Erynggium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of umbelliferous plants somewhat like thistles in appearance. Eryngium maritimum, or sea holly, has been highly esteemed as an aphrodisiac, the roots being formerly candied.
Eryngo
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Eryngium.
Erysipelas
n.
(Med.) St. Anthony's fire; a febrile disease accompanied with a diffused inflammation of the skin, which, starting usually from a single point, spreads gradually over its surface. It is usually regarded as contagious, and often occurs epidemically.
Erysipelatoid
a.
• Resembling erysipelas.
Erysipelatous
a.
• Resembling erysipelas, or partaking of its nature.
Erysipelous
a.
• Erysipelatous.
Erythema
n.
(Med.) A disease of the skin, in which a diffused inflammation forms rose-colored patches of variable size.
Erythematic
a.
(Med.) Characterized by, or causing, a morbid redness of the skin; relating to erythema.
Erythematous
a.
(Med.) Relating to, or causing, erythema.
Erythric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, erythrin.
Erythrina
n.
(Bot.) A genus of leguminous plants growing in the tropics; coral tree; — so called from its red flowers.
Erythrism
n.
(Zool.) A condition of excessive redness.
Erythrite
n.
(Chem.) A colorless crystalline substance, C4H6.(OH)4, of a sweet, cooling taste, extracted from certain lichens, and obtained by the decomposition of erythrin; — called also erythrol, erythroglucin, erythromannite, pseudorcin, cobalt bloom, and under the name phycite obtained from the alga Protococcus vulgaris. It is a tetrabasic alcohol, corresponding to glycol and glycerin.
(Min.) A rose-red mineral, crystallized and earthy, a hydrous arseniate of cobalt, known also as cobalt bloom; — called also erythrin or erythrine.
Erythrochroic
a.
(Zool.) Having, or subject to, erythrochroism.
Erythrochroism
n.
(Zool.) An unusual redness, esp. in the plumage of birds, or hair of mammals, independently of age, sex, or season.
Erythrodextrin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A dextrin which gives a red color with iodine.
Erythrogen
n.
(Chem.) Carbon disulphide; — so called from certain red compounds which it produces in combination with other substances.
• A substance reddened by acids, which is supposed to be contained in flowers.
• A crystalline substance obtained from diseased bile, which becomes blood-red when acted on by nitric acid or ammonia.
Erythrogranulose
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A term applied by Brucke to a substance present in small amount in starch granules, colored red by iodine.
Erythroid
a.
• Of a red color; reddish; as, the erythroid tunic (the cremaster muscle).
Erythroleic
a.
(Chem.) Having a red color and oily appearance; — applied to a purple semifluid substance said to be obtained from archil.
Erythrolein
n.
(Chem.) A red substance obtained from litmus.
Erythrolitmin
n.
(Chem.) Erythrolein.
Erythronium
n.
(Chem.) A name originally given (from its red acid) to the metal vanadium.
Erythrophleine
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline alkaloid, extracted from sassy bark (Erythrophleum Guineense).
Erythrosin
n.
(Chem.) A red substance formed by the oxidation of tyrosin.
• A red dyestuff obtained from fluorescein by the action of iodine.
Erythroxylon
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs or small trees of the Flax family, growing in tropical countries. E. Coca is the source of cocaine.
Erythrozyme
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A ferment extracted from madder root, possessing the power of inducing alcoholic fermentation in solutions of sugar.
Escalade
n.
(Mil.) A furious attack made by troops on a fortified place, in which ladders are used to pass a ditch or mount a rampart.
v. t.
(Mil.) To mount and pass or enter by means of ladders; to scale; as, to escalate a wall.
Escalop
n.
(Zool.) A bivalve shell of the genus Pecten.
• A regular, curving indenture in the margin of anything.
• The figure or shell of an escalop, considered as a sign that the bearer had been on a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.
(Her.) A bearing or a charge consisting of an escalop shell.
Escaloped
a.
• Cut or marked in the form of an escalop; scalloped.
(Her.) Covered with a pattern resembling a series of escalop shells, each of which issues from between two others. Its appearance is that of a surface covered with scales.
Escambio
n.
(Eng. Law) A license formerly required for the making over a bill of exchange to another over sea.
Escapable
a.
• Avoidable.
Escapade
n.
• The fling of a horse, or ordinary kicking back of his heels; a gambol.
• Act by which one breaks loose from the rules of propriety or good sense; a freak; a prank.
Escape
v. t.
• To flee from and avoid; to be saved or exempt from; to shun; to obtain security from; as, to escape danger.
• To avoid the notice of; to pass unobserved by; to evade; as, the fact escaped our attention.
v. i.
• To flee, and become secure from danger; — often followed by from or out of.
• To get clear from danger or evil of any form; to be passed without harm.
• To get free from that which confines or holds; — used of persons or things; as, to escape from prison, from arrest, or from slavery; gas escapes from the pipes; electricity escapes from its conductors.
n.
• The act of fleeing from danger, of evading harm, or of avoiding notice; deliverance from injury or any evil; flight; as, an escape in battle; a narrow escape; also, the means of escape; as, a fire escape.
• That which escapes attention or restraint; a mistake; an oversight; also, transgression.
• A sally.
(Law) The unlawful permission, by a jailer or other custodian, of a prisoner's departure from custody.
(Arch.) An apophyge.
• Leakage or outflow, as of steam or a liquid.
(Elec.) Leakage or loss of currents from the conducting wires, caused by defective insulation.
Escapement
n.
• The act of escaping; escape.
• Way of escape; vent.
• The contrivance in a timepiece which connects the train of wheel work with the pendulum or balance, giving to the latter the impulse by which it is kept in vibration; — so called because it allows a tooth to escape from a pallet at each vibration.
Escaper
n.
• One who escapes.
Escargatoire
n.
• A nursery of snails.
Escarp
n.
(Fort.) The side of the ditch next the parapet; — same as scarp, and opposed to counterscarp.
v. t.
(Mil.) To make into, or furnish with, a steep slope, like that of a scrap.
Escarpment
n.
• A steep descent or declivity; steep face or edge of a ridge; ground about a fortified place, cut away nearly vertically to prevent hostile approach.
Eschar
n.
(Med.) A dry slough, crust, or scab, which separates from the healthy part of the body, as that produced by a burn, or the application of caustics.
n.
(Geol.) In Ireland, one of the continuous mounds or ridges of gravelly and sandy drift which extend for many miles over the surface of the country. Similar ridges in Scotland are called kames or kams.
Eschara
n.
(Zool.) A genus of Bryozoa which produce delicate corals, often incrusting like lichens, but sometimes branched.
Escharine
a.
(Zool.) Like, or pertaining to, the genus Eschara, or family Escharidae.
Escharotic
a.
(Med.) Serving or tending to form an eschar;; producing a scar; caustic.
n.
(Med.) A substance which produces an eschar; a caustic, esp., a mild caustic.
Eschatological
a.
• Pertaining to the last or final things.
Eschatology
n.
• The doctrine of the last or final things, as death, judgment, and the events therewith connected.
Eschaunge
n.
• Exchange.
Escheat
n.
(Law)(Feud. & Eng. Law) The falling back or reversion of lands, by some casualty or accident, to the lord of the fee, in consequence of the extinction of the blood of the tenant, which may happen by his dying without heirs, and formerly might happen by corruption of blood, that is, by reason of a felony or attainder
(U. S. Law) The reverting of real property to the State, as original and ultimate proprietor, by reason of a failure of persons legally entitled to hold the same.
• A writ, now abolished, to recover escheats from the person in possession.
• Lands which fall to the lord or the State by escheat.
• That which falls to one; a reversion or return
v. i.
(Law) To revert, or become forfeited, to the lord, the crown, or the State, as lands by the failure of persons entitled to hold the same, or by forfeiture.
v. t.
(Law) To forfeit.
Escheatable
a.
• Liable to escheat.
Escheatage
n.
• The right of succeeding to an escheat.
Escheator
n.
(Law) An officer whose duty it is to observe what escheats have taken place, and to take charge of them.
Eschevin
n.
• The alderman or chief officer of an ancient guild.
Eschew
v. t.
• To shun; to avoid, as something wrong, or from a feeling of distaste; to keep one's self clear of.
• To escape from; to avoid.
Eschewer
n.
• One who eschews.
Eschewment
n.
• The act of eschewing.
Eschscholtzia
n.
(Bot.) A genus of papaveraceous plants, found in California and upon the west coast of North America, some species of which produce beautiful yellow, orange, rose-colored, or white flowers; the California poppy.
Eschynite
n.
(Min.) A rare mineral, containing chiefly niobium, titanium, thorium, and cerium. It was so called by Berzelius on account of the inability of chemical science, at the time of its discovery, to separate some of its constituents.
Escocheon
n.
• Escutcheon.
Escort
n.
• A body of armed men to attend a person of distinction for the sake of affording safety when on a journey; one who conducts some one as an attendant; a guard, as of prisoners on a march; also, a body of persons, attending as a mark of respect or honor; — applied to movements on land, as convoy is to movements at sea.
• Protection, care, or safeguard on a journey or excursion; as, to travel under the escort of a friend.
v. t.
• To attend with a view to guard and protect; to accompany as safeguard; to give honorable or ceremonious attendance to; — used esp. with reference to journeys or excursions on land; as, to escort a public functionary, or a lady; to escort a baggage wagon.
Escot
v. t.
• To pay the reckoning for; to support; to maintain.
Escribed
a.
• Drawn outside of; — used to designate a circle that touches one of the sides of a given triangle, and also the other two sides produced.
Escript
n.
• A writing.
Escritoire
n.
• A piece of furniture used as a writing table, commonly with drawers, pigeonholes, and the like; a secretary or writing desk.
Escritorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to an escritoire.
Escrow
n.
(Law) A deed, bond, or other written engagement, delivered to a third person, to be held by him till some act is done or some condition is performed, and then to be by him delivered to the grantee.
Escuage
n.
(Feud. Law) Service of the shield, a species of knight service by which a tenant was bound to follow his lord to war, at his own charge. It was afterward exchanged for a pecuniary satisfaction. Called also scutage.
Esculapian
n.
• Asculapian.
Esculapius
n.
• Same as Asculapius.
Esculent
a.
• Suitable to be used by man for food; eatable; edible; as, esculent plants; esculent fish.
n.
• Anything that is fit for eating; that which may be safely eaten by man.
Esculic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, the horse-chestnut; as, esculic acid.
Esculin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside obtained from the Asculus hippocastanum, or horse-chestnut, and characterized by its fine blue fluorescent solutions.
Escurial
n.
• A palace and mausoleum of the kinds of Spain, being a vast and wonderful structure about twenty-five miles northwest of Madrid.
Escutcheon
n.
(Her.) The surface, usually a shield, upon which bearings are marshaled and displayed. The surface of the escutcheon is called the field, the upper part is called the chief, and the lower part the base (see Chiff, and Field.). That side of the escutcheon which is on the right hand of the knight who bears the shield on his arm is called dexter, and the other side sinister.
• A marking upon the back of a cow's udder and the space above it (the perineum), formed by the hair growing upward or outward instead of downward. It is esteemed an index of milking qualities.
(Naut.) That part of a vessel's stern on which her name is written.
(Carp.) A thin metal plate or shield to protect wood, or for ornament, as the shield around a keyhole.
(Zool.) The depression behind the beak of certain bivalves; the ligamental area.
Escutcheoned
a.
• Having an escutcheon; furnished with a coat of arms or ensign.
Ese
n.
• Ease; pleasure.
Esemplastic
a.
• Shaped into one; tending to, or formative into, unity.
Esential
n.
• Existence; being.
• That which is essential; first or constituent principle; as, the essentials or religion.
Esentially
adv.
• In an essential manner or degree; in an indispensable degree; really; as, essentially different.
Esentialness
n.
• Essentiality.
Eserine
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid found in the Calabar bean, and the seed of Physostigma venenosum; physostigmine. It is used in ophthalmic surgery for its effect in contracting the pupil.
Esexual
a.
(Biol.) Sexless; asexual.
Esguard
n.
• Guard.
Eskimo
n.
(Ethnol.) One of a peculiar race inhabiting Arctic America and Greenland. In many respects the Eskimos resemble the Mongolian race.
Esloin
v. t.
• To remove; to banish; to withdraw; to avoid; to eloign.
Esnecy
n.
(Eng. Law) A prerogative given to the eldest coparcener to choose first after an inheritance is divide.
Esodic
a.
(Physiol.) Conveying impressions from the surface of the body to the spinal cord; — said of certain nerves. Opposed to exodic.
Esophagal
a.
(Anat.) Esophageal.
Esophageal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the esophagus.
Esophagean
a.
(Anat.) Esophageal.
Esophagotomy
n.
(Surg.) The operation of making an incision into the esophagus, for the purpose of removing any foreign substance that obstructs the passage.
Esophagus
n.
(Anat.) That part of the alimentary canal between the pharynx and the stomach; the gullet.
Esoteric
a.
• Designed for, and understood by, the specially initiated alone; not communicated, or not intelligible, to the general body of followers; private; interior; acroamatic; — said of the private and more recondite instructions and doctrines of philosophers. Opposed to exoteric.
Esoterical
a.
• Esoteric.
Esoterically
adv.
• In an esoteric manner.
Esotericism
n.
• Esoteric doctrine or principles.
Esoterics
n.
• Mysterious or hidden doctrines; secret science.
Esotery
n.
• Mystery; esoterics; — opposed to exotery.
Esox
n.
(Zool.) A genus of fresh-water fishes, including pike and pickerel.
Espace
n.
• Space.
Espadon
n.
• A long, heavy, two-handed and two-edged sword, formerly used by Spanish foot soldiers and by executioners.
Espalier
n.
(Hort.) A railing or trellis upon which fruit trees or shrubs are trained, as upon a wall; a tree or row of trees so trained.
v. t.
• To form an espalier of, or to protect by an espalier.
Esparcet
n.
(Bot.) The common sainfoin (Onobrychis sativa), an Old World leguminous forage plant.
Esparto
n.
(Bot.) A species of Spanish grass (Macrochloa tenacissima), of which cordage, shoes, baskets, etc., are made. It is also used for making paper.
Espauliere
n.
• A defense for the shoulder, composed of flexible overlapping plates of metal, used in the 15th century; — the origin of the modern epaulette.
Especial
a.
• Distinguished among others of the same class or kind; special; concerning a species or a single object; principal; particular; as, in an especial manner or degree.
Especially
adv.
• In an especial manner; chiefly; particularly; peculiarly; in an uncommon degree.
Especialness
n.
• The state of being especial.
Esperance
n.
• Hope.
Espiaille
n.
• Espial.
Espial
n.
• The act of espying; notice; discovery.
• One who espies; a spy; a scout.
Espier
n.
• One who espies.
Espinel
n.
• A kind of ruby.
Espionage
n.
• The practice or employment of spies; the practice of watching the words and conduct of others, to make discoveries, as spies or secret emissaries; secret watching.
Esplanade
n.
(Fort.) A clear space between a citadel and the nearest houses of the town.
• The glacis of the counterscarp, or the slope of the parapet of the covered way toward the country.
(Hort.) A grass plat; a lawn.
• Any clear, level space used for public walks or drives; esp., a terrace by the seaside.
Esplees
n. pl.
(Old Eng. Law) The full profits or products which ground or land yields, as the hay of the meadows, the feed of the pasture, the grain of arable fields, the rents, services, and the like.
Espousage
n.
• Espousal.
Espousal
n.
• The act of espousing or betrothing; especially, in the plural, betrothal; plighting of the troths; a contract of marriage; sometimes, the marriage ceremony.
• The uniting or allying one's self with anything; maintenance; adoption; as, the espousal of a quarrel.
Espouse
v. t.
• To betroth; to promise in marriage; to give as spouse.
• To take as spouse; to take to wife; to marry.
• To take to one's self with a view to maintain; to make one's own; to take up the cause of; to adopt; to embrace.
Espousement
n.
• The act of espousing, or the state of being espoused.
Espouser
n.
• One who espouses; one who embraces the cause of another or makes it his own.
Espressivo
a.
(Mus.) With expression.
Espringal
n.
(Mil. Antiq.) An engine of war used for throwing viretons, large stones, and other missiles; a springal.
Esprit
n.
• Spirit.
Espy
v. t.
• To catch sight of; to perceive with the eyes; to discover, as a distant object partly concealed, or not obvious to notice; to see at a glance; to discern unexpectedly; to spy; as, to espy land; to espy a man in a crowd.
• To inspect narrowly; to examine and keep watch upon; to watch; to observe.
v. i.
• To look or search narrowly; to look about; to watch; to take notice; to spy.
n.
• A spy; a scout.
Esquimau
n.
• Same as Eskimo.
Esquire
n.
• Originally, a shield-bearer or armor-bearer, an attendant on a knight; in modern times, a title of dignity next in degree below knight and above gentleman; also, a title of office and courtesy; — often shortened to squire.
v. t.
• To wait on as an esquire or attendant in public; to attend.
Esquisse
n.
(Fine Arts) The first sketch of a picture or model of a statue.
Essay
n.
• An effort made, or exertion of body or mind, for the performance of anything; a trial; attempt; as, to make an essay to benefit a friend.
(Lit.) A composition treating of any particular subject; — usually shorter and less methodical than a formal, finished treatise; as, an essay on the life and writings of Homer; an essay on fossils, or on commerce.
• An assay.
v. t.
• To exert one's power or faculties upon; to make an effort to perform; to attempt; to endeavor; to make experiment or trial of; to try.
• To test the value and purity of (metals); to assay.
Essayer
n.
• One who essays.
Essayist
n.
• A writer of an essay, or of essays.
Essence
n.
• The constituent elementary notions which constitute a complex notion, and must be enumerated to define it; sometimes called the nominal essence.
• The constituent quality or qualities which belong to any object, or class of objects, or on which they depend for being what they are (distinguished as real essence); the real being, divested of all logical accidents; that quality which constitutes or marks the true nature of anything; distinctive character; hence, virtue or quality of a thing, separated from its grosser parts.
• Constituent substance.
• A being; esp., a purely spiritual being.
• The predominant qualities or virtues of a plant or drug, extracted and refined from grosser matter; or, more strictly, the solution in spirits of wine of a volatile or essential oil; as, the essence of mint, and the like.
• Perfume; odor; scent; or the volatile matter constituting perfume.
v. t.
• To perfume; to scent.
Essene
n.
• One of a sect among the Jews in the time of our Savior, remarkable for their strictness and abstinence.
Essenism
n.
• The doctrine or the practices of the Essenes.
Essential
a.
• Belonging to the essence, or that which makes an object, or class of objects, what it is.
• Hence, really existing; existent.
• Important in the highest degree; indispensable to the attainment of an object; indispensably necessary.
• Containing the essence or characteristic portion of a substance, as of a plant; highly rectified; pure; hence, unmixed; as, an essential oil.
(Mus.) Necessary; indispensable; — said of those tones which constitute a chord, in distinction from ornamental or passing tones.
(Med.) Idiopathic; independent of other diseases.
Essentiality
n.
• The quality of being essential; the essential part.
Essentiate
v. t.
• To form or constitute the essence or being of.
v. i.
• To become assimilated; to be changed into the essence.
Essoin
v. t.
(Eng. Law) To excuse for nonappearance in court.
Essoiner
n.
(Eng. Law) An attorney who sufficiently excuses the absence of another.
Essonite
n.
(Min.) Cinnamon stone, a variety of garnet.
Essorant
a.
(Her.) Standing, but with the wings spread, as if about to fly; — said of a bird borne as a charge on an escutcheon.
Est
n. & adv.
• East.
Establish
v. t.
• To make stable or firm; to fix immovably or firmly; to set (a thing) in a place and make it stable there; to settle; to confirm.
• To appoint or constitute for permanence, as officers, laws, regulations, etc.; to enact; to ordain.
• To originate and secure the permanent existence of; to found; to institute; to create and regulate; — said of a colony, a state, or other institutions.
• To secure public recognition in favor of; to prove and cause to be accepted as true; as, to establish a fact, usage, principle, opinion, doctrine, etc.
• To set up in business; to place advantageously in a fixed condition; — used reflexively; as, he established himself in a place; the enemy established themselves in the citadel.
Establisher
n.
• One who establishes.
Establishment
n.
• The act of establishing; a ratifying or ordaining; settlement; confirmation.
• The state of being established, founded, and the like; fixed state.
• That which is established; as: (a) A form of government, civil or ecclesiastical; especially, a system of religion maintained by the civil power; as, the Episcopal establishment of England. (b) A permanent civil, military, or commercial, force or organization. (c) The place in which one is permanently fixed for residence or business; residence, including grounds, furniture, equipage, etc.; with which one is fitted out; also, any office or place of business, with its fixtures; that which serves for the carrying on of a business; as, to keep up a large establishment; a manufacturing establishment.
Establishmentarian
n.
• One who regards the Church primarily as an establishment formed by the State, and overlooks its intrinsic spiritual character.
Estacade
n.
(Mil.) A dike of piles in the sea, a river, etc., to check the approach of an enemy.
Estancia
n.
• A grazing; a country house.
Estate
n.
• Settled condition or form of existence; state; condition or circumstances of life or of any person; situation.
• Social standing or rank; quality; dignity.
• A person of high rank.
• A property which a person possesses; a fortune; possessions, esp. property in land; also, property of all kinds which a person leaves to be divided at his death.
• The state; the general body politic; the common-wealth; the general interest; state affairs.
• The great classes or orders of a community or state (as the clergy, the nobility, and the commonalty of England) or their representatives who administer the government; as, the estates of the realm (England), which are (1) the lords spiritual, (2) the lords temporal, (3) the commons.
(Law) The degree, quality, nature, and extent of one's interest in, or ownership of, lands, tenements, etc.; as, an estate for life, for years, at will, etc.
v. t.
• To establish.
• Tom settle as a fortune.
• To endow with an estate.
Esteem
v. t.
• To set a value on; to appreciate the worth of; to estimate; to value; to reckon.
• To set a high value on; to prize; to regard with reverence, respect, or friendship.
v. i.
• To form an estimate; to have regard to the value; to consider.
n.
• Estimation; opinion of merit or value; hence, valuation; reckoning; price.
• High estimation or value; great regard; favorable opinion, founded on supposed worth.
Esteemable
a.
• Worthy of esteem; estimable.
Esteemer
n.
• One who esteems; one who sets a high value on any thing.
Ester
n.
(Chem.) An ethereal salt, or compound ether, consisting of an organic radical united with the residue of any oxygen acid, organic or inorganic; thus the natural fats are esters of glycerin and the fatty acids, oleic, etc.
Esthesiometer
n.
• Same as Asthesiometer.
Estiferous
a.
• Producing heat.
Estimable
a.
• Capable of being estimated or valued; as, estimable damage.
• Valuable; worth a great price.
• Worth of esteem or respect; deserving our good opinion or regard.
n.
• A thing worthy of regard.
Estimableness
n.
• The quality of deserving esteem or regard.
Estimably
adv.
• In an estimable manner.
Estimate
v. t.
• To judge and form an opinion of the value of, from imperfect data, — either the extrinsic (money), or intrinsic (moral), value; to fix the worth of roughly or in a general way; as, to estimate the value of goods or land; to estimate the worth or talents of a person.
• To from an opinion of, as to amount,, number, etc., from imperfect data, comparison, or experience; to make an estimate of; to calculate roughly; to rate; as, to estimate the cost of a trip, the number of feet in a piece of land.
n.
• A valuing or rating by the mind, without actually measuring, weighing, or the like; rough or approximate calculation; as, an estimate of the cost of a building, or of the quantity of water in a pond.
Estimation
n.
• The act of estimating.
• An opinion or judgment of the worth, extent, or quantity of anything, formed without using precise data; valuation; as, estimations of distance, magnitude, amount, or moral qualities.
• Favorable opinion; esteem; regard; honor.
• Supposition; conjecture.
Estimative
a.
• Inclined, or able, to estimate; serving for, or capable of being used in, estimating.
• Pertaining to an estimate.
Estimator
n.
• One who estimates or values; a valuer.
Estoile
n.
(Her.) A six-pointed star whose rays are wavy, instead of straight like those of a mullet.
Estop
v. t.
(Law) To impede or bar by estoppel.
Estoppel
n.
(Law) A stop; an obstruction or bar to one's alleging or denying a fact contrary to his own previous action, allegation, or denial; an admission, by words or conduct, which induces another to purchase rights, against which the party making such admission can not take a position inconsistent with the admission.
• The agency by which the law excludes evidence to dispute certain admissions, which the policy of the law treats as indisputable.
Estovers
n. pl.
(Law) Necessaries or supples; an allowance to a person out of an estate or other thing for support; as of wood to a tenant for life, etc., of sustenance to a man confined for felony of his estate, or alimony to a woman divorced out of her husband's estate.
Estrade
n.
(Arch.) A portion of the floor of a room raised above the general level, as a place for a bed or a throne; a platform; a dais.
Estramacon
n.
• A straight, heavy sword with two edges, used in the 16th and 17th centuries.
• A blow with edge of a sword.
Estrange
v. t.
• To withdraw; to withhold; hence, reflexively, to keep at a distance; to cease to be familiar and friendly with.
• To divert from its original use or purpose, or from its former possessor; to alienate.
• To alienate the affections or confidence of; to turn from attachment to enmity or indifference.
Estrangedness
n.
• State of being estranged; estrangement.
Estrangement
n.
• The act of estranging, or the state of being estranged; alienation.
Estranger
n.
• One who estranges.
Estrangle
v. t.
• To strangle.
Estrapade
n.
(Man.) The action of a horse, when, to get rid of his rider, he rears, plunges, and kicks furiously.
Estray
v. i.
• To stray.
n.
(Law) Any valuable animal, not wild, found wandering from its owner; a stray.
Estre
n.
• The inward part of a building; the interior.
Estreat
n.
(Law) A true copy, duplicate, or extract of an original writing or record, esp. of amercements or penalties set down in the rolls of court to be levied by the bailiff, or other officer.
v. t.
(Law) To extract or take out from the records of a court, and send up to the court of exchequer to be enforced; — said of a forfeited recognizance.
• To bring in to the exchequer, as a fine.
Estrepe
v. t.
(Law) To strip or lay bare, as land of wood, houses, etc.; to commit waste.
Estrepement
n.
(Law) A destructive kind of waste, committed by a tenant for life, in lands, woods, or houses.
Estrich
n.
• Ostrich.
(Com.) The down of the ostrich.
Estuance
n.
• Heat.
Estuarine
a.
• Pertaining to an estuary; estuary.
Estuary
n.
• A place where water boils up; a spring that wells forth.
• A passage, as the mouth of a river or lake, where the tide meets the current; an arm of the sea; a frith.
a.
• Belonging to, or formed in, an estuary; as, estuary strata.
Estuate
v. i.
• To boil up; to swell and rage; to be agitated.
Estuation
n.
• The act of estuating; commotion, as of a fluid; agitation.
Estufa
n.
• An assembly room in dwelling of the Pueblo Indians.
Esture
n.
• Commotion.
Esurient
a.
• Inclined to eat; hungry; voracious.
n.
• One who is hungry or greedy.
Esurine
a.
• Causing hunger; eating; corroding.
n.
(Med.) A medicine which provokes appetites, or causes hunger.
Etaac
n.
(Zool.) The blue buck.
Etacism
n.
(Greek Gram.) The pronunciation of the Greek η (eta) like the Italian e long, that is like a in the English word ate.
Etacist
n.
• One who favors etacism.
Etch
n.
• A variant of Eddish.
v. t.
• To produce, as figures or designs, on mental, glass, or the like, by means of lines or strokes eaten in or corroded by means of some strong acid.
• To subject to etching; to draw upon and bite with acid, as a plate of metal.
• To sketch; to delineate.
v. i.
• To practice etching; to make etchings.
Etcher
n.
• One who etches.
Etching
n.
• The act, art, or practice of engraving by means of acid which eats away lines or surfaces left unprotected in metal, glass, or the like.
• A design carried out by means of the above process; a pattern on metal, glass, etc., produced by etching.
• An impression on paper, parchment, or other material, taken in ink from an etched plate.
Eteostic
n.
• A kind of chronogram.
Eterminable
a.
• Interminable.
Eternal
a.
• Without beginning or end of existence; always existing.
• Without end of existence or duration; everlasting; endless; immortal.
• Continued without intermission; perpetual; ceaseless; constant.
• Existing at all times without change; immutable.
• Exceedingly great or bad; — used as a strong intensive.
n.
• One of the appellations of God.
• That which is endless and immortal.
Eternalist
n.
• One who holds the existence of matter to be from eternity.
Eternalize
v. t.
• To make eternal.
Eternally
adv.
• In an eternal manner.
Eternify
v. t.
• To make eternal.
Eternity
n.
• Infinite duration, without beginning in the past or end in the future; also, duration without end in the future; endless time.
• Condition which begins at death; immortality.
Eternization
n.
• The act of eternizing; the act of rendering immortal or famous.
Eternize
v. t.
• To make eternal or endless.
• To make forever famous; to immortalize; as, to eternize one's self, a name, exploits.
Etesian
a.
• Periodical; annual; — applied to winds which annually blow from the north over the Mediterranean, esp. the eastern part, for an irregular period during July and August.
Ethal
n.
(Chem.) A white waxy solid, C16H33.OH; — called also cetylic alcohol.
Ethane
n.
(Chem.) A gaseous hydrocarbon, C2H6, forming a constituent of ordinary illuminating gas. It is the second member of the paraffin series, and its most important derivatives are common alcohol, aldehyde, ether, and acetic acid. Called also dimethyl.
Ethe
a.
• Easy.
Ethel
a.
• Noble.
Ethene
n.
(Chem.) Ethylene; olefiant gas.
Ethenic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from. or resembling, ethene or ethylene; as, ethenic ether.
Ethenyl
n.
(Chem.) A trivalent hydrocarbon radical, CH3.C.
• A univalent hydrocarbon radical of the ethylene series, CH2:CH; — called also vinyl
Etheostomoid
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to, or like, the genus Etheostoma.
n.
• Any fish of the genus Etheostoma and related genera, allied to the perches; — also called darter. The etheostomoids are small and often bright-colored fishes inhabiting the fresh waters of North America. About seventy species are known.
Ether
n.
(Physics) A medium of great elasticity and extreme tenuity, supposed to pervade all space, the interior of solid bodies not excepted, and to be the medium of transmission of light and heat; hence often called luminiferous ether.
• Supposed matter above the air; the air itself.
(Chem.) A light, volatile, mobile, inflammable liquid, (C2H5)2O, of a characteristic aromatic odor, obtained by the distillation of alcohol with sulphuric acid, and hence called also sulphuric ether. It is powerful solvent of fats, resins, and pyroxylin, but finds its chief use as an anaesthetic. Called also ethyl oxide.
• Any similar oxide of hydrocarbon radicals; as, amyl ether; valeric ether.
Ethereal
a.
• Pertaining to the hypothetical upper, purer air, or to the higher regions beyond the earth or beyond the atmosphere; celestial; as, ethereal space; ethereal regions.
• Consisting of ether; hence, exceedingly light or airy; tenuous; spiritlike; characterized by extreme delicacy, as form, manner, thought, etc.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, ether; as, ethereal salts.
Etherealism
n.
• Ethereality.
Ethereality
n.
• The state of being ethereal; etherealness.
Etherealization
n.
• An ethereal or spiritlike state.
Etherealize
v. t.
• To convert into ether, or into subtile fluid; to saturate with ether.
• To render ethereal or spiritlike.
Ethereally
adv.
• In an ethereal manner.
Etherealness
n.
• Ethereality.
Ethereous
a.
• Formed of ether; ethereal.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or resembling, either.
Etherification
n.
(Chem.) The act or process of making ether; specifically, the process by which a large quantity of alcohol is transformed into ether by the agency of a small amount of sulphuric, or ethyl sulphuric, acid.
Etheriform
a.
• Having the form of ether.
Etherin
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline hydrocarbon, regarded as a polymeric variety of ethylene, obtained in heavy oil of wine, the residue left after making ether; — formerly called also concrete oil of wine.
Etherization
n.
(Med.) The administration of ether to produce insensibility.
• The state of the system under the influence of ether.
Etherize
v. t.
• To convert into ether.
• To render insensible by means of ether, as by inhalation; as, to etherize a patient.
Etherol
n.
(Chem.) An oily hydrocarbon regarded as a polymeric variety of ethylene, produced with etherin.
Ethically
adv.
• According to, in harmony with, moral principles or character.
Ethicist
n.
• One who is versed in ethics, or has written on ethics.
Ethics
n.
• The science of human duty; the body of rules of duty drawn from this science; a particular system of principles and rules concerting duty, whether true or false; rules of practice in respect to a single class of human actions; as, political or social ethics; medical ethics.
Ethide
n.
(Chem.) Any compound of ethyl of a binary type; as, potassium ethide.
Ethidene
n.
(Chem.) Ethylidene.
Ethine
n.
(Chem.) Acetylene.
Ethionic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or designating, an acid so called.
Ethiopic
n.
• The language of ancient Ethiopia; the language of the ancient Abyssinian empire (in Ethiopia), now used only in the Abyssinian church. It is of Semitic origin, and is also called Geez.
Ethiops
n.
(Old Chem.) A black substance; — formerly applied to various preparations of a black or very dark color.
Ethmoid
n.
(Anat.) The ethmoid bone.
Ethmotrubinal
n.
• An ethmoturbinal bone.
Ethmovomerine
n.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the region of the vomer and the base of the ethmoid in the skull.
Ethnarch
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The governor of a province or people.
Ethnarchy
n.
• The dominion of an ethnarch; principality and rule.
Ethnic
n.
• A heathen; a pagan.
Ethnically
adv.
• In an ethnical manner.
Ethnicism
n.
• Heathenism; paganism; idolatry.
Ethnographer
n.
• One who investigates ethnography.
Ethnographically
adv.
• In an ethnographical manner.
Ethnography
n.
• That branch of knowledge which has for its subject the characteristics of the human family, developing the details with which ethnology as a comparative science deals; descriptive ethnology.
Ethnologically
adv.
• In an ethnological manner; by ethnological classification; as, one belonging ethnologically to an African race.
Ethnologist
n.
• One versed in ethnology; a student of ethnology.
Ethnology
n.
• The science which treats of the division of mankind into races, their origin, distribution, and relations, and the peculiarities which characterize them.
Ethologist
n.
• One who studies or writes upon ethology.
Ethology
n.
• A treatise on morality; ethics.
• The science of the formation of character, national and collective as well as individual.
Ethopoetic
• Expressing character.
Ethule
(Chem.) Ethyl.
Ethyl
n.
(Chem.) A monatomic, hydrocarbon radical, C2H5 of the paraffin series, forming the essential radical of ethane, and of common alcohol and ether.
Ethylamine
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, mobile, inflammable liquid, C2H5.NH2, very volatile and with an ammoniacal odor. It is a strong base, and is a derivative of ammonia. Called also ethyl carbamine, and amido ethane.
Ethylate
(Chem.) A compound derived from ethyl alcohol by the replacement of the hydroxyl hydrogen, after the manner of a hydrate; an ethyl alcoholate; as, potassium ethylate, C2H5.O.K.
Ethylene
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, gaseous hydrocarbon, C2H4, forming an important ingredient of illuminating gas, and also obtained by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid in alcohol. It is an unsaturated compound and combines directly with chlorine and bromine to form oily liquids (Dutch liquid), — hence called olefiant gas. Called also ethene, elayl, and formerly, bicarbureted hydrogen.
Ethylic
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, ethyl; as, ethylic alcohol.
Ethylidene
(Chem.) An unsymmetrical, divalent, hydrocarbon radical, C2H4 metameric with ethylene but written thus, CH3.CH to distinguish it from the symmetrical ethylene, CH2.CH2. Its compounds are derived from aldehyde. Formerly called also ethidene.
Ethylin
(Chem.) Any one of the several complex ethers of ethyl and glycerin.
Ethylsulphuric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or containing, ethyl and sulphuric acid.
Etiolate
v. i.
• To become white or whiter; to be whitened or blanched by excluding the light of the sun, as, plants.
(Med.) To become pale through disease or absence of light.
v. t.
• To blanch; to bleach; to whiten by depriving of the sun's rays.
(Med.) To cause to grow pale by disease or absence of light.
Etiolation
n.
• The operation of blanching plants, by excluding the light of the sun; the condition of a blanched plant.
(Med.) Paleness produced by absence of light, or by disease.
Etiological
a.
• Pertaining to, or inquiring into, causes; aetiological.
Etiology
n.
• The science of causes. Same as tiology.
Etiquette
n.
• The forms required by good breeding, or prescribed by authority, to be observed in social or official life; observance of the proprieties of rank and occasion; conventional decorum; ceremonial code of polite society.
Etna
n.
• A kind of small, portable, cooking apparatus for which heat is furnished by a spirit lamp.
Etnean
a.
• Pertaining to Etna, a volcanic mountain in Sicily.
Etoolin
n.
(Bot.) A yellowish coloring matter found in plants grown in darkness, which is supposed to be an antecedent condition of chlorophyll.
Etrurian
a.
• Of or relating to ancient Etruria, in Italy. "Etrurian Shades." Milton,
n.
• A native or inhabitant of ancient Etruria.
Etruscan
n.
• Of or relating to Etruria.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Etruria.
Ettin
n.
• A giant.
Ettle
v. t.
• To earn.
Etude
n.
• A composition in the fine arts which is intended, or may serve, for a study.
(Mus.) A study; an exercise; a piece for practice of some special point of technical execution.
Etul
n.
• A case for one several small articles; esp., a box in which scissors, tweezers, and other articles of toilet or of daily use are carried.
Etymic
a.
• Relating to the etymon; as, an etymic word.
Etymologer
n.
• An etymologist.
Etymological
a.
• Pertaining to etymology, or the derivation of words.
Etymologicon
n.
• an etymological dictionary or manual.
Etymologist
n.
• One who investigates the derivation of words.
Etymologize
v. t.
• To give the etymology of; to trace to the root or primitive, as a word.
v. t.
• To search into the origin of words; to deduce words from their simple roots.
Etymology
n.
• That branch of philological science which treats of the history of words, tracing out their origin, primitive significance, and changes of from and meaning.
• That pert of grammar which relates to the changes in the form of the words in a language; inflection.
Etymon
n.
• 1. An original form; primitive word; root.
• Original or fundamental signification.
Etypical
a.
(Biol.) Diverging from, or lacking conformity to, a type.
Eu
• A prefix used frequently in composition, signifying well, good, advantageous; — the opposite of dys-.
Eucairite
n.
(Min.) A metallic mineral, a selenide of copper and silver; — so called by Berzelius on account of its being found soon after the discovery of the metal selenium.
Eucalyn
n.
(Chem.) An unfermentable sugar, obtained as an uncrystallizable sirup by the decomposition of melitose; also obtained from a Tasmanian eucalyptus, — whence its name.
Eucalyptol
n.
(Chem.) A volatile, terpenelike oil extracted from the eucalyptus, and consisting largely of cymene.
Eucalyptus
n.
(Bot.) A myrtaceous genus of trees, mostly Australian. Many of them grow to an immense height, one or two species exceeding the height even of the California Sequoia.
Eucharis
n.
(Bot.) A genus of South American amaryllidaceous plants with large and beautiful white blossoms.
Eucharist
n.
• The act of giving thanks; thanksgiving.
(Eccl.) The sacrament of the Lord's Supper; the solemn act of ceremony of commemorating the death of Christ, in the use of bread and wine, as the appointed emblems; the communion.
Euchite
n.
• One who resolves religion into prayer.
Euchloric
a.
(Chem.) Relating to, or consisting of, euchlorine; as, euchloric .
Euchlorine
n.
(Chem.) A yellow or greenish yellow gas, first prepared by Davy, evolved from potassium chlorate and hydrochloric acid. It is supposed to consist of chlorine tetroxide with some free chlorine.
Euchologue
n.
• Euchology.
Euchre
n.
• A game at cards, that may be played by two, three, or four persons, the highest card (except when an extra card called the Joker is used) being the knave of the same suit as the trump, and called right bower, the lowest card used being the seven, or frequently, in two-handed euchre, the nine spot.
v. t.
• To defeat, in a game of euchre, the side that named the trump.
• To defeat or foil thoroughly in any scheme.
Euchroic
a.
(Chem.) Having a fine color.
Euchroite
n.
(Min.) A mineral occurring in transparent emerald green crystals. It is hydrous arseniate of copper.
Euchrone
n.
(Chem.) A substance obtained from euchroic acid.
Euchymy
n.
(Med.) A good state of he blood and other fluids of the body.
Euclase
n.
(Min.) A brittle gem occurring in light green, transparent crystals, affording a brilliant clinodiagonal cleavage. It is a silicate of alumina and glucina.
Euclid
n.
• A Greek geometer of the 3d century ; also, his treatise on geometry, and hence, the principles of geometry, in general.
Euclidian
n.
• Related to Euclid, or to the geometry of Euclid.
Eucopepoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group which includes the typical copepods and the lerneans.
Eucrasy
(Med.) Such a due mixture of qualities in bodies as constitutes health or soundness.
Euctical
• Expecting a wish; supplicatory.
Eudenic
a.
• Well-born; of high birth.
Eudialyte
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a brownish red color and vitreous luster, consisting chiefly of the silicates of iron, zirconia, and lime.
Eudiometer
n.
(Chem.) An instrument for the volumetric measurement of gases; — so named because frequently used to determine the purity of the air.
Eudiometry
n.
(Chem.) The art or process of determining he constituents of a gaseous mixture by means of the eudiometer, or for ascertaining the purity of the air or the amount of oxygen in it.
Eudipleura
n. pl.
(Biol.) The fundamental forms of organic life, that are composed of two equal and symmetrical halves.
Eudoxian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Eudoxius, patriarch of Antioch and Constantinople in the 4th century, and a celebrated defender of the doctrines of Arius.
Euganoidei
n. pl.
(Zool) A group which includes the bony ganoids, as the gar pikes.
Euge
n.
• Applause.
Eugenic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, cloves; as, eugenic acid.
Eugenics
n.
• The science of improving stock, whether human or animal.
Eugenin
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, crystalline substance extracted from oil of cloves; — called also clove camphor.
Eugenol
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, aromatic, liquid hydrocarbon, C10H12O2 resembling the phenols, and hence also called eugenic acid. It is found in the oils of pimento and cloves.
Eugeny
• Nobleness of birth.
Eugeuia
n.
(Bot.) A genus of mytraceous plants, mostly of tropical countries, and including several aromatic trees and shrubs, among which are the trees which produce allspice and cloves of commerce.
Eugh
n.
• The yew.
Euharmonic
a.
(Mus.) Producing mathematically perfect harmony or concord; sweetly or perfectly harmonious.
Euhemerism
n.
• The theory, held by Euhemerus, that the gods of mythology were but deified mortals, and their deeds only the amplification in imagination of human acts.
Euhemerist
n.
• One who advocates euhemerism.
Euhemeristic
a.
• Of or pertaining to euhemerism.
Euhemerize
v. t.
• To interpret (mythology) on the theory of euhemerism.
Euisopoda
(Zool.) A group which includes the typical Isopoda.
Eulachon
n.
(Zool.) The candlefish.
Eulerian
a.
• Pertaining Euler, a German mathematician of the 18th century.
Eulogist
n.
• One who eulogizes or praises; panegyrist; encomiast.
Eulogium
n.
• A formal eulogy.
Eulogize
v. t.
• To speak or write in commendation of (another); to extol in speech or writing; to praise.
Eulogy
n.
• A speech or writing in commendation of the character or services of a person; as, a fitting eulogy to worth.
Eulytite
n.
(Min.) a mineral, consisting chiefly of the silicate of bismuth, found at Freiberg; — called also culytine.
Eumenides
n. pl.
(Class. Myth.) A euphemistic name for the Furies of Erinyes.
Eumolpus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of small beetles, one species of which (E. viti) is very injurious to the vines in the wine countries of Europe.
Eunomian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Eunomius, bishop of Cyzicus (4th century A. D.), who held that Christ was not God but a created being, having a nature different from that of the Father.
a.
• Of or pertaining to Eunomius or his doctrine.
Eunomy
n.
• Equal law, or a well-adjusted constitution of government.
Eunuch
n.
• A male of the human species castrated; commonly, one of a class of such persons, in Oriental countries, having charge of the women's apartments. Some of them, in former times, gained high official rank.
Eunuchism
n.
• The state of being eunuch.
Euonymin
n.
(Med.) A principle or mixture of principles derived from Euonymus atropurpureus, or spindle tree.
Euonymus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of small European and American trees; the spindle tree. The bark is used as a cathartic.
Euornithes
n. pl.
(Zool.) The division of Aves which includes all the typical birds, or all living birds except the penguins and birds of ostrichlike form.
Euosmitte
n.
(Min.) A fossil resin, so called from its strong, peculiar, pleasant odor.
Eupathy
n.
• Right feeling.
Eupatorium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of perennial, composite herbs including hemp agrimony, boneset, throughwort, etc.
Eupatrid
n.
• One well born, or of noble birth.
Eupeptic
a.
• Of or pertaining to good digestion; easy of digestion; having a good digestion; as, eupeptic food; an eupeptic man.
Euphemism
n.
(Rhet.) A figure in which a harts or indelicate word or expression is softened; a way of describing an offensive thing by an inoffensive expression; a mild name for something disagreeable.
Euphemize
v. t. & i.
• To express by a euphemism, or in delicate language; to make use of euphemistic expressions.
Euphoniad
n.
(Mus.) An instrument in which are combined the characteristic tones of the organ and various other instruments.
Euphonicon
n.
(Mus.) A kind of uptight piano.
Euphonious
a.
• Pleasing or sweet in sound; euphonic; smooth-sounding.
Euphonism
n.
• An agreeable combination of sounds; euphony.
Euphonium
n.
(Mus.) A bass instrument of the saxhorn family.
Euphonize
v. t.
• To make euphonic.
Euphonon
n.
(Mus.) An instrument resembling the organ in tine and the upright piano in form. It is characterized by great strength and sweetness of tone.
Euphonous
n.
• Euphonious.
Euphony
n.
• A pleasing or sweet sound; an easy, smooth enunciation of sounds; a pronunciation of letters and syllables which is pleasing to the ear.
Euphorbia
n.
(Bot.) Spurge, or bastard spurge, a genus of plants of many species, mostly shrubby, herbaceous succulents, affording an acrid, milky juice. Some of them are armed with thorns. Most of them yield powerful emetic and cathartic products.
Euphorbium
n.
(Med.) An inodorous exudation, usually in the form of yellow tears, produced chiefly by the African Euphorbia resinifrea. It was formerly employed medicinally, but was found so violent in its effects that its use is nearly abandoned.
Euphotide
n.
(Min.) A rock occurring in the Alps, consisting of saussurite and smaragdite; — sometimes called gabbro.
Euphrasy
n.
(Bot.) The plant eyesight (euphrasia officionalis), formerly regarded as beneficial in disorders of the eyes.
Euphroe
n.
• A block or long slat of wood, perforated for the passage of the crowfoot, or cords by which an awning is held up.
Euphuism
n.
(Rhet.) An affectation of excessive elegance and refinement of language; high-flown diction.
Euphuist
n.
• One who affects excessive refinement and elegance of language; — applied esp. to a class of writers, in the age of Elizabeth, whose productions are marked by affected conceits and high-flown diction.
Euphuistic
a.
• Belonging to the euphuists, or euphuism; affectedly refined.
Euphuize
v. t.
• To affect excessive refinement in language; to be overnice in expression.
Eupione
n.
(Chem.) A limpid, oily liquid obtained by the destructive distillation of various vegetable and animal substances; — specifically, an oil consisting largely of the higher hydrocarbons of the paraffin series.
Eupittone
n.
(Chem.) A yellow, crystalline substance, resembling aurin, and obtained by the oxidation of pittacal; — called also eupittonic acid.
Eupittonic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, eupittone.
Euplastic
a.
(Med.) Having the capacity of becoming organizable in a high degree, as the matter forming the false membranes which sometimes result from acute inflammation in a healthy person.
n.
(Med.) Organizable substance by which the tissues of an animal body are renewed.
Euplectella
n.
(Zool) A genus of elegant, glassy sponges, consisting of interwoven siliceous fibers, and growing in the form of a cornucopia; — called also Venus's flower-basket.
Euplexoptera
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of insects, including the earwig. The anterior wings are short, in the form of elytra, while the posterior wings fold up beneath them.
Eupnaea
n.
(Physiol.) Normal breathing where arterialization of the blood is normal, in distinction from dyspnaea, in which the blood is insufficiently arterialized.
Eupryion
n.
• A contrivance for obtaining a light instantaneous, as a lucifer match.
Eurasian
n.
• A child of a European parent on the one side and an Asiatic on the other.
• One born of European parents in Asia.
a.
• Of European and Asiatic descent; of or pertaining to both Europe and Asia; as, the great Eurasian plain.
Eurasiatio
a.
(Geog.) Of or pertaining to the continents of Europe and Asia combined.
Eureka
• The exclamation attributed to Archimedes, who is said to have cried out "Eureka! eureka!" (I have found it! I have found it!), upon suddenly discovering a method of finding out how much the gold of King Hiero's crown had been alloyed. Hence, an expression of triumph concerning a discovery.
Eurhipidurous
a.
(Zool.) Having a fanlike tail; belonging to the Eurhipidurae, a division of Aves which includes all living birds.
Euripize
v. t.
• To whirl hither and thither.
Euripus
n.
• A strait; a narrow tract of water, where the tide, or a current, flows and reflows with violence, as the ancient fright of this name between Eubaea and Baeotia. Hence, a flux and reflux.
Euritic
a.
• Of or pelating to eurite.
Euritte
n.
(Min.) A compact feldspathic rock; felsite.
Euroclydon
n.
• A tempestuous northeast wind which blows in the Mediterranean.
European
a.
• Of or pertaining to Europe, or to its inhabitants.
n.
• A native or an inhabitant of Europe.
Europeanize
v. t.
• To cause to become like the Europeans in manners or character; to habituate or accustom to European usages.
Eurus
n.
• The east wind.
Euryale
n.
(Bot.) A genus of water lilies, growing in India and China. The only species (E. ferox) is very prickly on the peduncles and calyx. The rootstocks and seeds are used as food.
(Zool) A genus of ophiurans with much-branched arms.
Euryalida
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of Ophiuroidea, including the genera Euryale, Astrophyton, etc. They generally have the arms branched.
Eurycerous
a.
(Zool.) Having broad horns.
Eurypteroid
a.
(Paleon.) Like, or pertaining to, the genus Euryperus.
Eurypteroidea
n. pl.
(Paleont.) An extinct order of Merostomata, of which the genus Eurypterus is the type. They are found only in Paleozoic rocks.
Eurypterus
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of extinct Merostomata, found in Silurian rocks. Some of the species are more than three feet long.
Eurythmy
n.
(Fine Arts) Just or harmonious proportion or movement, as in the composition of a poem, an edifice, a painting, or a statue.
(Med.) Regularly of the pulse.
Eusebian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Eusebius, bishop of Caesarea, who was a friend and protector of Arius.
Eustachian
a.
(Anat.) Discovered by Eustachius.
• Pertaining to the Eustachian tube; as, Eustachian catheter.
Eutaxy
n.
• Good or established order or arrangement.
Euterpe
(Class. Myth.) The Muse who presided over music.
(Bot.) A genus of palms, some species of which are elegant trees.
Euterpean
a.
• Of or pertaining to Euterpe or to music.
Euthanasia
n.
• An easy death; a mode of dying to be desired.
Euthanasy
n.
• Same as Euthanasia.
Euthiochroic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or denoting, an acid so called.
Euthyneura
n. pl.
(Zool.) A large division of gastropod molluske, including the Pulmonifera and Opisthobranchiata.
Eutrophy
n.
(Med.) Healthy nutrition; soundless as regards the nutritive functions.
Eutychian
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Eutyches [5th century], who held that the divine and the human in the person of Christ were blended together as to constitute but one nature; a monophysite; — opposed to Nestorian.
Eutychianism
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) The doctrine of Eutyches and his followers.
Euxanthic
a.
(Chem.) Having a yellow color; pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, euxanthin.
Euxanthin
n.
(Chem.) A yellow pigment imported from India and China. It has a strong odor, and is said to be obtained from the urine of herbivorous animals when fed on the mango. It consists if a magnesium salt of euxanthic acid. Called also puri, purree, and Indian yellow.
Euxenite
n.
(Min.) A brownish black mineral with a metallic luster, found in Norway. It contains niobium, titanium, yttrium, and uranium, with some other metals.
Evacate
v. t.
• To empty.
Evacuant
a.
• Emptying; evacuative; purgative; cathartic.
n.
(Med.) A purgative or cathartic.
Evacuate
v. t.
• To make empty; to empty out; to remove the contents of; as, to evacuate a vessel or dish.
• Fig.: To make empty; to deprive.
• To remove; to eject; to void; o discharge, as the contents of a vessel, or of the bowels.
• To withdraw from; to quit; to retire from; as, soldiers from a country, city, or fortress.
• To make void; to nullify; to vacate; as, to evacuate a contract or marriage.
v. i.
• To let blood
Evacuation
n.
• The act of emptying, clearing of the contents, or discharging
(Mil.) Withdrawal of troops from a town, fortress, etc.
(Med.) Voidance of any matter by the natural passages of the body or by an artificial opening; defecation; also, a diminution of the fluids of an animal body by cathartics, venesection, or other means.
• That which is evacuated or discharged; especially, a discharge by stool or other natural means.
• Abolition; nullification.
Evacuative
a.
• Serving of tending to evacuate; cathartic; purgative.
Evacuator
n.
• One who evacuates; a nullifier.
Evacuatory
n.
• A purgative.
Evade
v. t.
• To get away from by artifice; to avoid by dexterity, subterfuge, address, or ingenuity; to elude; to escape from cleverly; as, to evade a blow, a pursuer, a punishment; to evade the force of an argument.
v. t.
• To escape; to slip away; — sometimes with from.
• To attempt to escape; to practice artifice or sophistry, for the purpose of eluding.
Evadible
a.
• Capable of being evaded.
Evagation
n.
• A wandering about; excursion; a roving.
Evagination
n.
• The act of unsheathing.
Eval
a.
• Relating to time or duration.
Evaluate
v. t.
• To fix the value of; to rate; to appraise.
Evaluation
n.
• Valuation; appraisement.
Evanesce
v. i.
• To vanish away; to because dissipated and disappear, like vapor.
Evanescence
n.
• The act or state of vanishing away; disappearance; as, the evanescence of vapor, of a dream, of earthly plants or hopes.
Evanescent
a.
• Liable to vanish or pass away like vapor; vanishing; fleeting; as, evanescent joys.
• Vanishing from notice; imperceptible.
Evanescently
adv. In a vanishing manner
• ; imperceptibly.
Evangel
n.
• Good news; announcement of glad tidings; especially, the gospel, or a gospel.
Evangelian
a.
• Rendering thanks for favors.
Evangelic
a.
• Belonging to, or contained in, the gospel; evangelical.
Evangelical
a.
• Contained in, or relating to, the four Gospels; as, the evangelical history.
• Belonging to, agreeable or consonant to, or contained in, the gospel, or the truth taught in the New Testament; as, evangelical religion.
• Earnest for the truth taught in the gospel; strict in interpreting Christian doctrine; preeminetly orthodox; — technically applied to that party in the Church of England, and in the Protestant Episcopal Church, which holds the doctrine of "Justification by Faith alone"; the Low Church party. The term is also applied to other religion bodies not regarded as orthodox.
n.
• One of evangelical principles.
Evangelicalism
n.
• Adherence to evangelical doctrines; evangelism.
Evangelically
adv.
• In an evangelical manner.
Evangelicalness
n.
• State of being evangelical.
Evangelicism
n.
• Evangelical principles; evangelism.
Evangelicity
n.
• Evangelicism.
Evangelism
n.
• The preaching or promulgation of the gospel.
Evangelist
n.
• A bringer of the glad tidings of Church and his doctrines. Specially: (a) A missionary preacher sent forth to prepare the way for a resident pastor; an itinerant missionary preacher. (b) A writer of one of the four Gospels (With the definite article); as, the four evangelists, Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John. (c) A traveling preacher whose efforts are chiefly directed to arouse to immediate repentance.
Evangelistary
n.
• A selection of passages from the Gospels, as a lesson in divine service.
Evangelistic
a.
• Pertaining to the four evangelists; designed or fitted to evangelize; evangelical; as, evangelistic efforts.
Evangelization
n.
• The act of evangelizing; the state of being evangelized.
Evangelize
v. t.
• To instruct in the gospel; to preach the gospel to; to convert to Christianity; as, to evangelize the world.
v. i.
• To preach the gospel.
Evangely
n.
• Evangel.
Evangile
n.
• Good tidings; evangel.
Evanid
a.
• Liable to vanish or disappear; faint; weak; evanescent; as, evanid color.
Evanish
v. i.
• To vanish.
Evanishment
n.
• A vanishing; disappearance.
Evaporable
a.
• Capable of being converted into vapor, or dissipated by evaporation.
Evaporaive
a.
• Pertaining to, or producing, evaporation; as, the evaporative process.
Evaporate
v. t.
• To pass off in vapor, as a fluid; to escape and be dissipated, either in visible vapor, or in practice too minute to be visible.
• To escape or pass off without effect; to be dissipated; to be wasted, as, the spirit of writer often evaporates in the process of translation.
v. t.
• To convert from a liquid or solid state into vapor (usually) by the agency of heat; to dissipate in vapor or fumes.
• To expel moisture from (usually by means of artificial heat), leaving the solid portion; to subject to evaporation; as, to evaporate apples.
• To give vent to; to dissipate.
a.
• Dispersed in vapors.
Evaporation
n.
• The process by which any substance is converted from a liquid state into, and carried off in, vapor; as, the evaporation of water, of ether, of camphor.
• The transformation of a portion of a fluid into vapor, in order to obtain the fixed matter contained in it in a state of greater consistence.
• That which is evaporated; vapor.
Evaporator
n.
• An apparatus for condensing vegetable juices, or for drying fruit by heat.
Evaporometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for ascertaining the quantity of a fluid evaporated in a given time; an atmometer.
Evasible
a.
• That may be evaded.
Evasion
n.
• The act of eluding or avoiding, particularly the pressure of an argument, accusation, charge, or interrogation; artful means of eluding.
Evasive
a.
• Tending to evade, or marked by evasion; elusive; shuffling; avoiding by artifice.
Eve
n.
• Evening.
• The evening before a holiday, — from the Jewish mode of reckoning the day as beginning at sunset. not at midnight; as, Christians eve is the evening before Christmas; also, the period immediately preceding some important event.
Evectics
n.
• The branch of medical science which teaches the method of acquiring a good habit of body.
Evection
• The act of carrying up or away; exaltation.
(Astron.) An inequality of the moon's motion is its orbit to the attraction of the sun, by which the equation of the center is diminished at the syzygies, and increased at the quadratures by about 1° 20'.
• The libration of the moon.
Even
n.
n.
a.
• Level, smooth, or equal in surface; not rough; free from irregularities; hence uniform in rate of motion of action; as, even ground; an even speed; an even course of conduct.
• Equable; not easily ruffed or disturbed; calm; uniformly self-possessed; as, an even temper.
• Parallel; on a level; reaching the same limit.
• Balanced; adjusted; fair; equitable; impartial; just to both side; owing nothing on either side; — said of accounts, bargains, or persons indebted; as, our accounts are even; an even bargain.
• Without an irregularity, flaw, or blemish; pure.
• Associate; fellow; of the same condition.
• Not odd; capable of division by two without a remainder; — said of numbers; as, 4 and 10 are even numbers.
v. t.
• To make even or level; to level; to lay smooth.
• To equal
• To place in an equal state, as to obligation, or in a state in which nothing is due on either side; to balance, as accounts; to make quits.
• To set right; to complete.
• To act up to; to keep pace with.
v. i.
• To be equal.
adv.
• In an equal or precisely similar manner; equally; precisely; just; likewise; as well.
• Up to, or down to, an unusual measure or level; so much as; fully; quite.
• As might not be expected; — serving to introduce what is unexpected or less expected.
• At the very time; in the very case.
Evene
v. i.
• To happen.
Evener
n.
• One who, or that which makes even.
• In vehicles, a swinging crossbar, to the ends of which other crossbars, or whiffletrees, are hung, to equalize the draught when two or three horses are used abreast.
Evenfall
n.
• Beginning of evening.
Evenhand
n.
• Equality.
Evenhanded
a.
• Fair or impartial; unbiased. "Evenhanded justice." Shak.
Evening
n.
• The latter part and close of the day, and the beginning of darkness or night; properly, the decline of the day, or of the sum.
• The latter portion, as of life; the declining period, as of strength or glory.
Evenly
adv.
• With an even, level, or smooth surface; without roughness, elevations, or depression; uniformly; equally; comfortably; impartially; serenely.
Evenminded
a.
• Having equanimity.
Evenness
n.
• The state of being ven, level, or disturbed; smoothness; horizontal position; uniformity; impartiality; calmness; equanimity; appropriate place or level; as, evenness of surface, of a fluid at rest, of motion, of dealings, of temper, of condition.
Evensong
n.
• A song for the evening; the evening service or form of worship (in the Church of England including vespers and compline); also, the time of evensong.
Event
n.
• That which comes, arrives, or happens; that which falls out; any incident, good or bad.
• An affair in hand; business; enterprise.
• The consequence of anything; the issue; conclusion; result; that in which an action, operation, or series of operations, terminates.
v. t.
• To break forth.
Eventerate
v. t.
• To rip open; todisembowel.
Eventful
a.
• Full of, or rich in, events or incidents; as, an eventful journey; an eventful period of history; an eventful period of life.
Eventide
n.
• The time of evening; evening.
Eventilate
v. t.
• To winnow out; to fan.
• To discuss; to ventilate.
Eventilation
n.
• The act of eventilating; discussion.
Eventless
a.
• Without events; tame; monotomous; marked by nothing unusual; uneventful.
Eventognathi
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of fishes including a vast number of freshwater species such as the carp, loach, chub, etc.
Eventration
n.
(Med.) A tumor containing a large portion of the abdominal viscera, occasioned by relaxation of the walls of the abdomen.
• A wound, of large extent, in the abdomen, through which the greater part of the intestines protrude.
• The act af disemboweling.
Eventtual
a.
• Coming or happening as a consequence or result; consequential.
• Final; ultimate.
(Law) Dependent on events; contingent.
Eventuality
n.
• The coming as a consequence; contingency; also, an event which comes as a consequence.
(Phren.) Disposition to take cognizance of events.
Eventually
adv.
• In an eventual manner; finally; ultimately.
Eventuate
v. i.
• To come out finally or in conclusion; to result; to come to pass.
Eventuation
n.
• The act of eventuating or happening as a result; the outcome.
Ever
adv.
• At any time; at any period or point of time.
• At all times; through all time; always; forever.
• Without cessation; continually.
Everduring
a.
• Everlasting.
Everglade
n.
• A swamp or low tract of land inundated with water and interspersed with hummocks, or small islands, and patches of high grass; as, the everglades of Florida.
Evergreen
a.
(Bot.) Remaining unwithered through the winter, or retaining unwithered leaves until the leaves of the next year are expanded, as pines cedars, hemlocks, and the like.
n.
(Bot.) An evergreen plant.
• Twigs and branches of evergreen plants used for decoration.
Everlasting
a.
• Lasting or enduring forever; exsisting or continuing without end; immoral; eternal.
• Continuing indefinitely, or during a long period; perpetual; sometimes used, colloquially, as a strong intensive; as, this everlasting nonsence.
Everlastingly
adv.
• In an everlasting manner.
Everlastingness
n.
• The state of being everlasting; endless duration; indefinite duration.
Everliving
a.
• Living always; immoral; eternal; as, the everliving God.
• Continual; incessant; unintermitted.
Evermore
adv.
• During eternity; always; forever; for an indefinite period; at all times; — often used substantively with for.
Evernic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to Evernia, a genus of lichens; as, evernic acid.
Everse
v. t.
• To overthrow or subvert.
Eversion
n.
• The act of eversing; destruction.
• The state of being turned back or outward; as, eversion of eyelids; ectropium.
Eversive
a.
• Tending to evert or overthrow; subversive; with of.
Evert
v. t.
• To overthrow; to subvert.
• To turn outwards, or inside out, as an intestine.
Every
a. & a. pron.
• All the parts which compose a whole collection or aggregate number, considered in their individuality, all taken separately one by one, out of an indefinite bumber.
• Every one. Cf.
Everybody
n.
• Every person.
Everyday
a.
• Used or fit for every day; common; usual; as, an everyday suit or clothes.
Everyone
n.
• Everybody; — commonly separated, every one.
Everything
n.
• Whatever pertains to the subject under consideration; all things.
Everywhen
adv.
• At any or all times; every instant.
Everywhere
adv.
• In every place; in all places; hence, in every part; throughly; altogether.
Everywhereness
n.
• Ubiquity; omnipresence.
Evestigate
v. t.
• To investigate.
Evet
n.
(Zool.) The common newt or eft. In America often applied to several species of aquatic salamanders.
Evibrate
v. t. & i.
• To vibrate.
Evict
v. t.
(Law) To dispossess by a judicial process; to dispossess by paramount right or claim of such right; to eject; to oust.
• To evince; to prove.
Eviction
n.
• The act or process of evicting; or state of being evicted; the recovery of lands, tenements, etc., from another's possession by due course of law; dispossession by paramount title or claim of such title; ejectment; ouster.
• Conclusive evidence; proof.
Evidence
n.
• That which makes evident or manifest; that which furnishes, or tends to furnish, proof; any mode of proof; the ground of belief or judgement; as, the evidence of our senses; evidence of the truth or falsehood of a statement.
• One who bears witness.
(Law) That which is legally submitted to competent tribunal, as a means of ascertaining the truth of any alleged matter of fact under investigation before it; means of making proof; — the latter, strictly speaking, not being synonymous with evidence, but rather the effect of it.
v. t.
• To render evident or clear; to prove; to evince; as, to evidence a fact, or the guilt of an offender.
Evidencer
n.
• One whi gives evidence.
Evident
a.
• Clear to the vision; especially, clear to the understanding, and satisfactory to the judgment; as, the figure or color of a body is evident to the senses; the guilt of an offender can not always be made evident.
Evidential
a.
• Relating to, or affording, evidence; indicative; especially, relating to the evidences of Christianity.
Evidentiary
a.
• Furnishing evidence; asserting; proving; evidential.
Evidently
adv.
• In an evident manner; clearly; plainly.
Evidentness
n.
• State of being evident.
Evigilation
n.
• A waking up or awakening.
Evil
a.
• Having qualities tending to injury and mischief; having a nature or properties which tend to badness; mischievous; not good; worthless or deleterious; poor; as, an evil beast; and evil plant; an evil crop.
• Having or exhibiting bad moral qualities; morally corrupt; wicked; wrong; vicious; as, evil conduct, thoughts, heart, words, and the like.
• Producing or threatening sorrow, distress, injury, or calamity; unpropitious; calamitous; as, evil tidings; evil arrows; evil days.
n.
• Anything which impairs the happiness of a being or deprives a being of any good; anything which causes suffering of any kind to sentient beings; injury; mischief; harm; — opposed to good.
• Moral badness, or the deviation of a moral being from the principles of virtue imposed by conscience, or by the will of the Supreme Being, or by the principles of a lawful human authority; disposition to do wrong; moral offence; wickedness; depravity.
• malady or disease; especially in the phrase king's evil, the scrofula.
adv.
• In an evil manner; not well; ill; badly; unhappily; injuriously; unkindly.
Evilly
adv.
• In an evil manner; not well; ill.
Evilness
n.
• The condition or quality of being evil; badness; viciousness; malignity; vileness; as, evilness of heart; the evilness of sin.
Evince
v. t.
• To conquer; to subdue.
• To show in a clear manner; to prove beyond any reasonable doubt; to manifest; to make evident; to bring to light; to evidence.
Evincement
n.
• The act of evincing or proving, or the state of being evinced.
Evincible
a.
• Capable of being proved or clearly brought to light; demonstrable.
Evincive
a.
• Tending to prove; having the power to demonstrate; demonstrative; indicative.
Evirate
v. t.
• To emasculate; to dispossess of manhood.
Eviration
n.
• Castration.
Eviscerate
v. t.
• To take out the entrails of; to disembowel; to gut.
Evisceration
a.
• A disemboweling.
Evitable
a.
• A voidable.
Evitate
v. t.
• To shun; to avoid.
Evitation
n.
• A shunning; avoidance.
Evite
v. t.
• To shun.
Eviternal
a.
• Eternal; everlasting.
Eviternity
n.
• Eternity.
Evocate
v. t.
• To call out or forth; to summon; to evoke.
Evocation
n.
• The act of calling out or forth.
Evocative
a.
• Calling forth; serving to evoke; developing.
Evocator
n.
• One who calls forth.
Evoke
v. t.
• To call out; to summon forth.
• To call away; to remove from one tribunal to another.
Evolation
n.
• A flying out or up.
Evolute
n.
(Geom.) A curve from which another curve, called the involute or evolvent, is described by the end of a thread gradually wound upon the former, or unwound from it. It is the locus of the centers of all the circles which are osculatory to the given curve or evolvent.
Evolutility
n.
(Biol.) The faculty possessed by all substances capable of self-nourishment of manifesting the nutritive acts by changes of form, of volume, or of structure.
Evolution
n.
• The act of unfolding or unrolling; hence, in the process of growth; development; as, the evolution of a flower from a bud, or an animal from the egg.
• A series of things unrolled or unfolded.
(Geom.) The formation of an involute by unwrapping a thread from a curve as an evolute.
(Arith. & Alg.) The extraction of roots; — the reverse of involution.
(Mil. & Naval) A prescribed movement of a body of troops, or a vessel or fleet; any movement designed to effect a new arrangement or disposition; a maneuver.
(Biol.) A general name for the history of the steps by which any living organism has acquired the morphological and physiological characters which distinguish it; a gradual unfolding of successive phases of growth or development.
• That theory of generation which supposes the germ to preexist in the parent, and its parts to be developed, but not actually formed, by the procreative act; — opposed to epigenesis.
(Metaph.) That series of changes under natural law which involves continuous progress from the homogeneous to the heterogeneous in structure, and from the single and simple to the diverse and manifold in quality or function. The pocess is by some limited to organic beings; by others it is applied to the inorganic and the psychical. It is also applied to explain the existence and growth of institutions, manners, language, civilization, and every product of human activity. The agencies and laws of the process are variously explained by different philosophrs.
Evolutional
a.
• Relating to evolution.
Evolutionary
a.
• Relating to evolution; as, evolutionary discussions.
Evolutionism
n.
• The theory of, or belief in, evolution.
Evolutionist
n.
• One skilled in evolutions.
• one who holds the doctrine of evolution, either in biology or in metaphysics.
Evolve
v. t.
• To unfold or unroll; to open and expand; to disentangle and exhibit clearly and satisfactorily; to develop; to derive; to educe.
• To throw out; to emit; as, to evolve odors.
v. i.
• To become open, disclosed, or developed; to pass through a process of evolution.
Evolvement
n.
• The act of evolving, or the state of being evolved; evolution.
Evolvent
n.
(Geom.) The involute of a curve.
Evomit
v. t.
• To vomit.
Evomition
n.
• The act of vomiting.
Evulgate
v. t.
• To publish abroad.
Evulgation
n.
• A divulging.
Evulsion
n.
• The act of plucking out; a rooting out.
Ew
n.
• A yew.
Ewe
n.
(Zool.) The female of the sheep, and of sheeplike animals.
Ewer
n.
• A kind of widemouthed pitcher or jug; esp., one used to hold water for the toilet.
Ewt
n.
(Zool.) The newt.
Exacerbate
v. t.
• To render more violent or bitter; to irriate; to exasperate; to imbitter, as passions or disease.
Exacerbation
n.
• The act rendering more violent or bitter; the state of being exacerbated or intensified in violence or malignity; as, exacerbation of passion.
(Med.) A periodical increase of violence in a disease, as in remittent or continious fever; an increased energy of diseased and painful action.
Exacerbescence
n.
• Increase of irritation or violence, particularly the increase of a fever or disease.
Exacervation
n.
• The act of heaping up.
Exacinate
v. t.
• To remove the kernel form.
Exacination
n.
• Removal of the kernel.
Exacritude
n.
• The quality of being exact; exactness.
Exact
a.
• Precisely agreeing with a standard, a fact, or the truth; perfectly conforming; neither exceeding nor falling short in any respect; true; correct; precise; as, the clock keeps exact time; he paid the exact debt; an exact copy of a letter; exact accounts.
• Habitually careful to agree with a standard, a rule, or a promise; accurate; methodical; punctual; as, a man exact in observing an appointment; in my doings I was exact.
• Precisely or definitely conceived or stated; strict.
v. t.
• To demand or require authoritatively or peremptorily, as a right; to enforce the payment of, or a yielding of; to compel to yield or to furnish; hence, to wrest, as a fee or reward when none is due; — followed by from or of before the one subjected to exaction; as, to exact tribute, fees, obedience, etc., from or of some one.
v. i.
• To practice exaction.
Exacter
n.
• An exactor.
Exacting
a.
• Oppressive or unreasonably severe in making demands or requiring the exact fulfillment of obligations; harsh; severe. "A temper so exacting." T. Arnold
Exaction
n.
• The act of demanding with authority, and compelling to pay or yield; compulsion to give or furnish; a levying by force; a driving to compliance; as, the exaction to tribute or of obedience; hence, extortion.
• That which is exacted; a severe tribute; a fee, reward, or contribution, demanded or levied with severity or injustice.
Exactly
adv.
• In an exact manner; precisely according to a rule, standard, or fact; accurately; strictly; correctly; nicely.
Exactness
n.
• The condition of being exact; accuracy; nicety; precision; regularity; as, exactness of jurgement or deportment.
• Careful observance of method and conformity to truth; as, exactness in accounts or business.
Exactor
n.
• One who exacts or demands by authority or right; hence, an extortioner; also, one unreasonably severe in injunctions or demands.
Exactress
n.
• A woman who is an exactor.
Exacuate
v. t.
• To whet or sharpen.
Exaeresis
n.
(Surg.) In old writers, the operations concerned in the removal of parts of the body.
Exaggerate
v. t.
• To heap up; to accumulate.
• To amplify; to magnify; to enlarge beyond bounds or the truth ; to delineate extravagantly ; to overstate the truth concerning.
Exaggerated
a.
• Enlarged beyond bounds or the truth.
Exaggerating
a.
• That exaggerates; enlarging beyond bounds.
Exaggeration
n.
• The act of heaping or piling up.
• The act of exaggerating; the act of doing or representing in an excessive manner; a going beyond the bounds of truth reason, or justice; a hyperbolical representation; hyperbole; overstatement.
(Paint.) A representation of things beyond natural life, in expression, beauty, power, vigor.
Exaggerative
a.
• Tending to exaggerate; involving exaggeration.
Exaggerator
n.
• One who exaggerates; one addicted to exaggeration.
Exaggeratory
a.
• Containing, or tending to, exaggeration; exaggerative.
Exagitate
v. t.
• To stir up; to agitate.
• To satirize; to censure severely.
Exagitation
n.
• Agitation.
Exalbuminous
a.
(Bot.) Having no albumen about the embryo; — said of certain seeds.
Exalt
v. t.
• To raise high; to elevate; to lift up.
• To elevate in rank, dignity, power, wealth, character, or the like; to dignify; to promote; as, to exalt a prince to the throne, a citizen to the presidency.
• To elevate by prise or estimation; to magnify; to extol; to glorify.
• To lift up with joy, pride, or success; to inspire with delight or satisfaction; to elate.
• To elevate the tone of, as of the voice or a musical instrument.
(Alchem.) To render pure or refined; to intensify or concentrate; as, to exalt the juices of bodies.
Exaltate
a.
(Astrol.) Exercising its highest influence; — said of a planet.
Exaltation
n.
• The act of exalting or raising high; also, the state of being exalted; elevation.
(Alchem.) The refinement or subtilization of a body, or the increasing of its virtue or principal property.
(Astrol.) That place of a planet in the zodiac in which it was supposed to exert its strongest influence.
Exalted
a.
• Raised to lofty height; elevated; extolled; refined; dignified; sublime.
Exalter
n.
• One who exalts or raises to dignity.
Exaltment
n.
• Exaltation.
Examen
n.
• Examination; inquiry.
Exametron
n.
• An hexameter.
Examinable
a.
• Capable of being examined or inquired into.
Examinant
n.
• One who examines; an examiner.
• One who is to be examined.
Examinate
n.
• A person subjected to examination.
Examination
n.
• The act of examining, or state of being examined; a careful search, investigation, or inquiry; scrutiny by study or experiment.
• A process prescribed or assigned for testing qualification; as, the examination of a student, or of a candidate for admission to the bar or the ministry.
Examinator
n.
• An examiner.
Examine
v. t.
• To test by any appropriate method; to inspect carefully with a view to discover the real character or state of; to subject to inquiry or inspection of particulars for the purpose of obtaining a fuller insight into the subject of examination, as a material substance, a fact, a reason, a cause, the truth of a statement; to inquire or search into; to explore; as, to examine a mineral; to examine a ship to know whether she is seaworthy; to examine a proposition, theory, or question.
• To interrogate as in a judicial proceeding; to try or test by question; as, to examine a witness in order to elicit testimony, a student to test his qualifications, a bankrupt touching the state of his property, etc.
Examinee
n.
• A person examined.
Examiner
n.
• One who examines, tries, or inspects; one who interrogates; an officer or person charged with the duty of making an examination; as, an examiner of students for a degree; an examiner in chancery, in the patent office, etc.
Examinership
n.
• The office or rank of an examiner.
Examining
a.
• Having power to examine; appointed to examine; as, an examining committee.
Examplary
a.
• Serving for example or pattern; exemplary.
Example
n.
• One or a portion taken to show the character or quality of the whole; a sample; a specimen.
• That which is to be followed or imitated as a model; a pattern or copy.
• That which resembles or corresponds with something else; a precedent; a model.
• That which is to be avoided; one selected for punishment and to serve as a warning; a warning.
• An instance serving for illustration of a rule or precept, especially a problem to be solved, or a case to be determined, as an exercise in the application of the rules of any study or branch of science; as, in trigonometry and grammar, the principles and rules are illustrated by examples.
v. t.
• To set an example for; to give a precedent for; to exemplify; to give an instance of; to instance.
Exampleless
a.
• Without or above example.
Exampler
n.
• A pattern; an exemplar.
Exampless
a.
• Exampleless. [Wrongly formed.]
Exanguious
a.
• Bloodless.
Exangulous
a.
• Having no corners; without angles.
Exanimate
a.
• Lifeless; dead.
• Destitute of animation; spiritless; disheartened.
v. t.
• To deprive of animation or of life.
Exanimation
n.
• Deprivation of life or of spirits.
Exanimous
a.
• Lifeless; dead.
Exannulate
a.
(Bot.) Having the sporangium destitute of a ring; — said of certain genera of ferns.
Exanthem
n.
• Same as Exanthema.
Exanthema
n.
(Med.) An efflorescence or discoloration of the skin; an eruption or breaking out, as in measles, smallpox, scarlatina, and the like diseases; — sometimes limited to eruptions attended with fever.
Exanthesis
n.
(Med.) An eruption of the skin; cutaneous efflorescence.
Exantlate
v. t.
• To exhaust or wear out.
Exantlation
n.
• Act of drawing out ; exhaustion.
Exarate
v. t.
• To plow up; also, to engrave; to write.
Exaration
n.
• Act of plowing; also, act of writing.
Exarch
n.
• A viceroy; in Ravenna, the title of the viceroys of the Byzantine emperors; in the Eastern Church, the superior over several monasteries; in the modern Greek Church, a deputy of the patriarch , who visits the clergy, investigates ecclesiastical cases, etc.
Exarchate
n.
• The office or the province of an exarch.
Exarillate
a.
(Bot.) Having no aril; — said of certain seeds, or of the plants producing them.
Exarticulate
a.
(Zool.) Having but one joint; — said of certain insects.
Exarticulation
n.
• Luxation; the dislocation of a joint.
Exasperate
a.
• Exasperated; imbittered.
v. t.
• To irritate in a high degree; to provoke; to enrage; to exscite or to inflame the anger of; as, to exasperate a person or his feelings.
• To make grievous, or more grievous or malignant; to aggravate; to imbitter; as, to exasperate enmity.
Exasperater
n.
• One who exasperates or inflames anger, enmity, or violence.
Exasperation
n.
• The act of exasperating or the state of being exasperated; irritation; keen or bitter anger.
• Increase of violence or malignity; aggravation; exacerbation.
Exaspidean
a.
(Zool.) Having the anterior scute extending around the tarsus on the outer side, leaving the inner side naked; — said of certain birds.
Exaugurate
v. t.
• To annul the consecration of; to secularize; to unhellow.
Exauguration
n.
• The act of exaugurating; desecration.
Exauthorate
v. t.
• To deprive of authority or office; to depose; to discharge.
Exauthoration
n.
• Deprivation of authority or dignity; degration.
Exauthorize
v. t.
• To deprive of uthority.
v. t.
• To deprive of authority.
Excalceate
v. t.
• To deprive of shoes.
Excalceation
n.
• The act of depriving or divesting of shoes.
Excalfaction
n.
• A heating or warming; calefaction.
Excalfactive
a.
• Serving to heat; warming.
Excalfactory
a.
• Heating; warming.
Excalibur
n.
• The name of King Arthur's mythical sword.
Excandescence
n.
• A growing hot; a white or glowing heat; incandescence.
• Violent anger; a growing angry.
Excandescent
a.
• White or glowing with heat.
Excantation
n.
• Disenchantment by a countercharm.
Excarnate
v. t.
• To deprive or clear of flesh.
Excarnation
n.
• The act of depriving or divesting of flesh; excarnification; — opposed to incarnation.
Excarnificate
v. t.
• To clear of flesh; to excarnate.
Excarnification
n.
• The act of excarnificating or of depriving of flesh; excarnation.
Excavate
v. t.
• To hollow out; to form cavity or hole in; to make hollow by cutting, scooping, or digging; as, to excavate a ball; to excavate the earth.
• To form by hollowing; to shape, as a cavity, or anything that is hollow; as, to excavate a canoe, a cellar, a channel.
(Engin.) To dig out and remove, as earth.
Excavation
n.
• The act of excavating, or of making hollow, by cutting, scooping, or digging out a part of a solid mass.
• A cavity formed by cutting, digging, or scooping.
(Engin.) An uncovered cutting in the earth, in distinction from a covered cutting or tunnel.
• The material dug out in making a channel or cavity.
Excavator
n.
• One who, or that which, excavates or hollows out; a machine, as a dredging machine, or a tool, for excavating.
Excave
v. t.
• To excavate.
Excecate
v. t.
• To blind.
Excecation
n.
• The act of making blind.
Excedent
n.
• Excess.
Exceed
v. t.
• To go beyond; to proceed beyond the given or supposed limit or measure of; to outgo; to surpass; — used both in a good and a bad sense; as, one man exceeds another in bulk, stature, weight, power, skill, etc. ; one offender exceeds another in villainy; his rank exceeds yours.
v. i.
• To go too far; to pass the proper bounds or measure.
• To be more or greater; to be paramount.
Exceedable
a.
• Capable of exceeding or surpassing.
Exceeder
n.
• One who exceeds.
Exceeding
a.
• More than usual; extraordinary; more than sufficient; measureless.
adv.
• In a very great degree; extremely; exceedingly.
Exceedingly
adv.
• To a very great degree; beyond what is usual; surpassingly. It signifies more than very.
Excel
v. t.
• To go beyond or surpass in good qualities or laudable deeds; to outdo or outgo, in a good sense.
• To exceed or go beyond; to surpass.
v. i.
• To surpass others in good qualities, laudable actions, or acquirements; to be distinguished by superiority; as, to excel in mathematics, or classics.
Excellence
n.
• The quality of being excellent; state of possessing good qualities in an eminent degree; exalted merit; superiority in virtue.
• An excellent or valuable quality; that by which any one excels or is eminent; a virtue.
• A title of honor or respect; — more common in the form excellency.
Excellency
n.
• Excellence; virtue; dignity; worth; superiority.
• A title of honor given to certain high dignitaries, esp. to viceroys, ministers, and ambassadors, to English colonial governors, etc. It was formerly sometimes given to kings and princes.
Excellent
a.
• Excelling; surpassing others in some good quality or the sum of qualities; of great worth; eminent, in a good sense; superior; as, an excellent man, artist, citizen, husband, discourse, book, song, etc.; excellent breeding, principles, aims, action.
• Superior in kind or degree, irrespective of moral quality; — used with words of a bad significance.
adv.
• Excellently; eminently; exceedingly.
Excellently
adv.
• In an excellent manner; well in a high degree.
• In a high or superior degree; — in this literal use, not implying worthiness.
Excelsior
a.
• More lofty; still higher; ever upward.
n.
• A kind of stuffing for upholstered furniture, mattresses, etc., in which curled shreds of wood are substituted for curled hair.
Excentral
a.
(Bot.) Out of the center.
Excentricity
• . (Math.) Same as Eccentricity.
Except
v. t.
• To take or leave out (anything) from a number or a whole as not belonging to it; to exclude; to omit.
• To object to; to protest against.
v. i.
• To take exception; to object; — usually followed by to, sometimes by against; as, to except to a witness or his testimony.
prep.
• With exclusion of; leaving or left out; excepting.
conj.
• Unless; if it be not so that.
Exceptant
a.
• Making exception.
Excepting
prep. & conj.
• , but properly a participle. With rejection or exception of; excluding; except.
Exception
n.
• The act of excepting or excluding; exclusion; restriction by taking out something which would otherwise be included, as in a class, statement, rule.
• That which is excepted or taken out from others; a person, thing, or case, specified as distinct, or not included; as, almost every general rule has its exceptions.
(Law) An objection, oral or written, taken, in the course of an action, as to bail or security; or as to the decision of a judge, in the course of a trail, or in his charge to a jury; or as to lapse of time, or scandal, impertinence, or insufficiency in a pleading; also, as in conveyancing, a clause by which the grantor excepts something before granted.
• An objection; cavil; dissent; disapprobation; offense; cause of offense; — usually followed by to or against.
Exceptionable
a.
• Liable to exception or objection; objectionable.
Exceptional
a.
• Forming an exception; not ordinary; uncommon; rare; hence, better than the average; superior.
Exceptioner
n.
• One who takes exceptions or makes objections.
Exceptionless
a.
• Without exception.
Exceptious
a.
• Disposed or apt to take exceptions, or to object; captious.
Exceptive
a.
• That excepts; including an exception; as, an exceptive proposition.
Exceptless
a.
• Not exceptional; usual.
Exceptor
n.
• One who takes exceptions.
Excerebration
n.
• The act of removing or beating out the brains.
Excerebrose
a.
• Brainless.
Excern
v. t.
• To excrete; to throw off through the pores; as, fluids are excerned in perspiration.
Excernent
a.
(Physiol.) Connected with, or pertaining to, excretion.
Excerp
v. t.
• To pick out.
Excerpt
v. t.
• To select; to extract; to cite; to quote.
n.
• An extract; a passage selected or copied from a book or record.
Excerption
n.
• The act of excerpting or selecting.
• That which is selected or gleaned; an extract.
Excerptive
a.
• That excerpts, selects, or chooses.
Excerptor
n.
• One who makes excerpts; a picker; a culler.
Excess
n.
• The state of surpassing or going beyond limits; the being of a measure beyond sufficiency, necessity, or duty; that which exceeds what is usual or prover; immoderateness; superfluity; superabundance; extravagance; as, an excess of provisions or of light.
• An undue indulgence of the appetite; transgression of proper moderation in natural gratifications; intemperance; dissipation.
• The degree or amount by which one thing or number exceeds another; remainder; as, the difference between two numbers is the excess of one over the other.
Excessive
a.
• Characterized by, or exhibiting, excess; overmuch.
Exchange
n.
• The act of giving or taking one thing in return for another which is regarded as an equivalent; as, an exchange of cattle for grain.
• The act of substituting one thing in the place of another; as, an exchange of grief for joy, or of a scepter for a sword, and the like; also, the act of giving and receiving reciprocally; as, an exchange of civilities or views.
• The thing given or received in return; esp., a publication exchanged for another.
(Com.) The process of setting accounts or debts between parties residing at a distance from each other, without the intervention of money, by exchanging orders or drafts, called bills of exchange. These may be drawn in one country and payable in another, in which case they are called foreign bills; or they may be drawn and made payable in the same country, in which case they are called inland bills. The term bill of exchange is often abbreviated into exchange; as, to buy or sell exchange.
(Law) A mutual grant of equal interests, the one in consideration of the other. Estates exchanged must be equal in quantity, as fee simple for fee simple.
• The place where the merchants, brokers, and bankers of a city meet at certain hours, to transact business. In this sense often contracted to 'Change.
v. t.
• To part with give, or transfer to another in consideration of something received as an equivalent; — usually followed by for before the thing received.
• To part with for a substitute; to lay aside, quit, or resign (something being received in place of the thing with); as, to exchange a palace for cell.
• To give and receive reciprocally, as things of the same kind; to barter; to swap; as, to exchange horses with a neighbor; to exchange houses or hats.
v. i.
• To be changed or received in exchange for; to pass in exchange; as, dollar exchanges for ten dimes.
Exchangeability
n.
• The quality or state of being exchangeable.
Exchangeable
a.
• Capable of being exchanged; fit or proper to be exchanged.
• Available for making exchanges; ratable.
Exchangeably
adv.
• By way of exchange.
Exchanger
n.
• One who exchanges; one who practices exchange.
Exchequer
n.
• One of the superior courts of law; — so called from a checkered cloth, which covers, or formerly covered, the table.
• The department of state having charge of the collection and management of the royal revenue. Hence, the treasury; and, colloquially, pecuniary possessions in general; as, the company's exchequer is low.
v. t.
• To institute a process against (any one) in the Court of Exchequer.
Excide
v. t.
• To cut off.
Excipient
a.
• Taking an exception.
n.
• An exceptor.
(Med.) An inert or slightly active substance used in preparing remedies as a vehicle or medium of administration for the medicinal agents.
Excisable
a.
• Liable or subject to excise; as, tobacco in an excisable commodity.
Excise
n.
• In inland duty or impost operating as an indirect tax on the consumer, levied upon certain specified articles, as, tobacco, ale, spirits, etc., grown or manufactured in the country. It is also levied to pursue certain trades and deal in certain commodities. Certain direct taxes (as, in England, those on carriages, servants, plate, armorial bearings, etc.), are included in the excise. Often used adjectively; as, excise duties; excise law; excise system.
• That department or bureau of the public service charged with the collection of the excise taxes.
v. t.
• To lay or impose an excise upon.
• To impose upon; to overcharge.
v. t.
• To cut out or off; to separate and remove; as, to excise a tumor.
Exciseman
n.
• An officer who inspects and rates articles liable to excise duty.
Excision
n.
• The act of excising or cutting out or off; extirpation; destruction.
(Eccl.) The act of cutting off from the church; excommunication.
(Surg.) The removal, especially of small parts, with a cutting instrument.
Excitability
n.
• The quality of being readily excited; proneness to be affected by exciting causes.
(Physiol.) The property manifested by living organisms, and the elements and tissues of which they are constituted, of responding to the action of stimulants; irritability; as, nervous excitability.
Excitable
a.
• Capable of being excited, or roused into action; susceptible of excitement; easily stirred up, or stimulated.
Excitant
a.
• Tending to excite; exciting.
n.
(Physiol.) An agent or influence which arouses vital activity, or produces increased action, in a living organism or in any of its tissues or parts; a stimulant.
Excitate
v. t.
• To excite.
Excitation
n.
• The act of exciting or putting in motion; the act of rousing up or awakening.
(Physiol.) The act of producing excitement (stimulation); also, the excitement produced.
Excitative
a.
• Having power to excite; tending or serving to excite; excitatory.
Excitator
n.
(Elec.) A kind of discarder.
Excitatory
a.
• Tending to excite; containing excitement; excitative.
Excite
v. t.
• To call to activity in any way; to rouse to feeling; to kindle to passionate emotion; to stir up to combined or general activity; as, to excite a person, the spirits, the passions; to excite a mutiny or insurrection; to excite heat by friction.
(Physiol.) To call forth or increase the vital activity of an organism, or any of its parts.
Exciteful
n.
• Full of exciting qualities; as, an exciteful story; exciteful players.
Excitement
n.
• The act of exciting, or the state of being roused into action, or of having increased action; impulsion; agitation; as, an excitement of the people.
• That which excites or rouses; that which moves, stirs, or induces action; a motive.
(Physiol.) A state of aroused or increased vital activity in an organism, or any of its organs or tissues.
Exciter
n.
• One who, or that which, excites.
Exciting
a.
• Calling or rousing into action; producing excitement; as, exciting events; an exciting story.
Excitive
a.
• Serving or tending to excite; excitative.
n.
• That which excites; an excitant.
Exclaim
v. t.& i.
• To cry out from earnestness or passion; to utter with vehemence; to call out or declare loudly; to protest vehemently; to vociferate; to shout; as, to exclaim against oppression with wonder or astonishment; "The field is won!" he exclaimed.
n.
• Outcry; clamor.
Exclaimer
n.
• One who exclaims.
Exclamation
n.
• A loud calling or crying out; outcry; loud or emphatic utterance; vehement vociferation; clamor; that which is cried out, as an expression of feeling; sudden expression of sound or words indicative of emotion, as in surprise, pain, grief, joy, anger, etc.
(Rhet.) A word expressing outcry; an interjection; a word expressing passion, as wonder, fear, or grief.
(Print.) A mark or sign by which outcry or emphatic utterance is marked; thus [!]; — called also exclamation point.
Exclamative
a.
• Exclamatory.
Exclamatory
a.
• Containing, expressing, or using exclamation; as, an exclamatory phrase or speaker.
Exclave
n.
• A portion of a country which is separated from the main part and surrounded by politically alien territory.
Exclude
v. t.
• To shut out; to hinder from entrance or admission; to debar from participation or enjoyment; to deprive of; to except; — the opposite to admit; as, to exclude a crowd from a room or house; to exclude the light; to exclude one nation from the ports of another; to exclude a taxpayer from the privilege of voting.
• To thrust out or eject; to expel; as, to exclude young animals from the womb or from eggs.
Exclusion
n.
• The act of excluding, or of shutting out, whether by thrusting out or by preventing admission; a debarring; rejection; prohibition; the state of being excluded.
(Physiol.) The act of expelling or ejecting a fetus or an egg from the womb.
• Thing emitted.
Exclusionary
a.
• Tending to exclude; causing exclusion; exclusive.
Exclusionism
n.
• The character, manner, or principles of an exclusionist.
Exclusionist
n.
• One who would exclude another from some right or privilege; esp., one of the anti-popish politicians of the time of Charles .
Exclusive
a.
• Having the power of preventing entrance; debarring from participation or enjoyment; possessed and enjoyed to the exclusion of others; as, exclusive bars; exclusive privilege; exclusive circles of society.
• Not taking into the account; excluding from consideration; — opposed to inclusive; as, five thousand troops, exclusive of artillery.
n.
• One of a coterie who exclude others; one who from real of affected fastidiousness limits his acquaintance to a select few.
Exclusiveness
n.
• Quality of being exclusive.
Exclusivism
n.
• The act or practice of excluding being exclusive; exclusiveness.
Exclusivist
n.
• One who favor or practices any from of exclusiveness or exclusivism.
Exclusory
a.
• Able to exclude; excluding; serving to exclude.
Excoct
v. t.
• To boil out; to produce by boiling.
Excoction
• The act of excocting or boiling out.
Excogitate
v. t.
• To think out; to find out or discover by thinking; to devise; to contrive.
v. i.
• To cogitate.
Excogitation
n.
• The act of excogitating; a devising in the thoughts; invention; contrivance.
Excommune
v. t.
• To exclude from participation in; to excommunicate.
Excommunicable
a.
• Liable or deserving to be excommunicated; making excommunication possible or proper.
Excommunicant
n.
• One who has been excommunicated.
Excommunicate
a.
• Excommunicated; interdicted from the rites of the church.
n.
• One excommunicated.
v. t.
• To put out of communion; especially, to cut off, or shut out, from communion with the church, by an ecclesiastical sentence.
• To lay under the ban of the church; to interdict.
Excommunication
n.
• The act of communicating or ejecting; esp., an ecclesiastical censure whereby the person against whom it is pronounced is, for the time, cast out of the communication of the church; exclusion from fellowship in things spiritual.
Excommunicator
n.
• One who excommunicates.
Excommunion
• . A shutting out from communion; excommunication.
Excoriable
• . Capable of being excoriated.
Excoriation
n.
• The act of excoriating or flaying, or state of being excoriated, or stripped of the skin; abrasion.
• Stripping of possession; spoliation.
Excorticate
v. t.
• To strip of bark or skin; to decorticate.
Excortication
n.
• The act of stripping off bark, or the state of being thus stripped; decortication.
Excreable
a.
• Capable of being discharged by spitting.
Excreate
v. t.
• To spit out; to discharge from the throat by hawking and spitting.
Excreation
n.
• Act of spitting out.
Excrement
n.
• Matter excreted and ejected; that which is excreted or cast out of the animal body by any of the natural emunctories; especially, alvine, discharges; dung; ordure.
n.
• An excrescence or appendage; an outgrowth.
Excremental
a.
• Of or pertaining to excrement.
Excrementive
a.
• Serving to excrete; connected with excretion or excrement.
Excrementize
v. i.
• To void excrement.
Excrescence
n.
• An excrescent appendage, as, a wart or tumor; anything growing out unnaturally from anything else; a preternatural or morbid development; hence, a troublesome superfluity; an incumbrance; as, an excrescence on the body, or on a plant.
Excrescency
n.
• Excrescence.
Excrescent
a.
• Growing out in an abnormal or morbid manner or as a superfluity.
Excrescential
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, an excrescence.
Excreta
n. pl.
• Matters to be excreted.
Excrete
v. t.
• To separate and throw off; to excrete urine.
Excretin
n.
(physiol. Chem.) A nonnitrogenous, crystalline body, present in small quantity in human faeces.
Excretion
n.
• The act of excreting.
• That which is excreted; excrement.
Excretive
a.
• Having the power of excreting, or promoting excretion.
Excretory
a.
• Having the quality of excreting, or throwing off excrementitious matter.
Excruciable
a.
• Liable to torment.
Excruciate
a.
• Excruciated; tortured.
v. t.
• To inflict agonizing pain upon; to torture; to torment greatly; to rack; as, to excruciate the heart or the body.
Excruciating
• . Torturing; racking. "Excruciating pain." V. Knox. "Excruciating fears." Bentley
Excruciation
n.
• The act of inflicting agonizing pain, or the state of being thus afflicted; that which excruciates; torture.
Excubation
n.
• A keeping watch.
Excubitorium
n.
(Eccl. Antiq.) A gallery in a church, where persons watched all night.
Exculpable
• . Capable of being exculpated; deserving exculpation.
Exculpate
v. t.
• To clear from alleged fault or guilt; to prove to be guiltless; to relieve of blame; to acquit.
Exculpation
n.
• The act of exculpating from alleged fault or crime; that which exculpates; excuse.
Exculpatory
• . Clearing, or tending to clear, from alleged fault or guilt; excusing.
Excur
i.
• To run out or forth; to extend.
Excurrent
a.
• Running or flowing out
(Bot.) Running or extending out; as, an excurrent midrib, one which projects beyond the apex of a leaf; an excurrent steam or trunk, one which continues to the top
(Zool) Characterized by a current which flows outward; as, an excurrent orifice or tube.
Excurse
v. t.
• To journey or pass thought.
Excursion
• A running or going out or forth; an expedition; a sally.
• A journey chiefly for recreation; a pleasure trip; a brief tour; as, an excursion into the country.
• A wandering from a subject; digression.
(Mach.) Length of stroke, as of a piston; stroke. [An awkward use of the word.]
Excursionist
n.
• One who goes on an excursion, or pleasure trip.
Excursive
a.
• Prone to make excursions; wandering; roving; exploring; as, an excursive fancy.
Excursus
n.
• A dissertation or digression appended to a work, and containing a more extended exposition of some important point or topic.
Excusable
a.
• That may be excused, forgiven, justified, or acquitted of blame; pardonable; as, the man is excusable; an excusable action.
Excusation
n.
• Excuse; apology.
Excusator
n.
• One who makes, or is authorized to make, an excuse; an apologist.
Excusatory
a.
• Making or containing excuse or apology; apologetical; as, an excusatory plea.
Excuse
v. t.
• To free from accusation, or the imputation of fault or blame; to clear from guilt; to release from a charge; to justify by extenuating a fault; to exculpate; to absolve; to acquit.
• To pardon, as a fault; to forgive entirely, or to admit to be little censurable, and to overlook; as, we excuse irregular conduct, when extraordinary circumstances appear to justify it.
• To regard with indulgence; to view leniently or to overlook; to pardon.
• To free from an impending obligation or duty; hence, to disengage; to dispense with; to release by favor; also, to remit by favor; not to exact; as, to excuse a forfeiture.
• To relieve of an imputation by apology or defense; to make apology for as not seriously evil; to ask pardon or indulgence for.
n.
• The act of excusing, apologizing, exculpating, pardoning, releasing, and the like; acquittal; release; absolution; justification; extenuation.
• That which is offered as a reason for being excused; a plea offered in extenuation of a fault or irregular deportment; apology; as, an excuse for neglect of duty; excuses for delay of payment.
• That which excuses; that which extenuates or justifies a fault.
Excuseless
a.
• Having no excuse; not admitting of excuse or apology.
Excusement
n.
• Excuse.
Excuser
n.
• One who offers excuses or pleads in extenuation of the fault of another.
• One who excuses or forgives another.
Excuss
v. t.
• To shake off; to discard.
• To inspect; to investigate; to decipher.
• To seize and detain by law, as goods.
Excussion
n.
• The act of excusing; seizure by law.
Exeat
n.
• A license for absence from a college or a religious house.
• A permission which a bishop grants to a priest to go out of his diocese.
Execrable
a.
• Deserving to be execrated; accursed; damnable; detestable; abominable; as, an execrable wretch.
Execrate
v. t.
• To denounce evil against, or to imprecate evil upon; to curse; to protest against as unholy or detestable; hence, to detest utterly; to abhor; to abominate.
Execration
n.
• The act of cursing; a curse dictated by violent feelings of hatred; imprecation; utter detestation expressed.
• That which is execrated; a detested thing.
Execrative
a.
• Cursing; imprecatory; vilifying.
n.
• A word used for cursing; an imprecatory word or expression.
Execratory
a.
• Of the nature of execration; imprecatory; denunciatory. C. Kingsley.
n.
• A formulary of execrations.
Exect
v. t.
• To cut off or out.
Executable
a.
• Capable of being executed; feasible; as, an executable project.
Executant
n.
• One who executes or performs; esp., a performer on a musical instrument.
Execute
v. t.
• To follow out or through to the end; to carry out into complete effect; to complete; to finish; to effect; to perform;
• To complete, as a legal instrument; to perform what is required to give validity to, as by signing and perhaps sealing and delivering; as, to execute a deed, lease, mortgage, will, etc.
• To give effect to; to do what is provided or required by; to perform the requirements or stimulations of; as, to execute a decree, judgment, writ, or process.
• To infect capital punishment on; to put to death in conformity to a legal sentence; as, to execute a traitor.
• Too put to death illegally; to kill.
(Mus.) To perform, as a piece of music, either on an instrument or with the voice; as, to execute a difficult part brilliantly.
v. i.
• To do one's work; to act one's part of purpose.
• To perform musically.
Executer
n.
• One who performs or carries into effect.
Execution
n.
• The act of executing; a carrying into effect or to completion; performance; achievement; consummation; as, the execution of a plan, a work, etc.
• A putting to death as a legal penalty; death lawfully inflicted; as, the execution of a murderer.
• The act of the mode of performing a work of art, of performing on an instrument, of engraving, etc.; as, the execution of a statue, painting, or piece of music.
(Law) The carrying into effect the judgment given in a court of law.
• A judicial writ by which an officer is empowered to carry a judgment into effect; final process.
• The act of signing, and delivering a legal instrument, or giving it the forms required to render it valid; as, the execution of a deed, or a will.
• That which is executed or accomplished; effect; effective work; — usually with do.
• The act of sacking a town.
Executioner
n.
• One who executes; an executer.
• One who puts to death in conformity to legal warrant, as a hangman.
Executive
a.
• Designed or fitted for execution, or carrying into effect; as, executive talent; qualifying for, concerned with, or pertaining to, the execution of the laws or the conduct of affairs; as, executive power or authority; executive duties, officer, department, etc.
n.
• An impersonal title of the chief magistrate or officer who administers the government, whether king, president, or governor; the governing person or body.
Executively
adv.
• In the way of executing or performing.
Executor
n.
• One who executes or performs; a doer; as, an executor of baseness.
• An executioner.
(Law) The person appointed by a to execute his will, or to see its provisions carried into effect, after his decease.
Executorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to an executive.
Executorship
n.
• The office of an executor.
Executory
a.
• Pertaining to administration, or putting the laws in force; executive.
(Law) Designed to be executed or carried into effect in time to come, or to take effect on a future contingency; as, an executory devise, reminder, or estate; an executory contract.
Executress
n.
• An executrix.
Executrix
n.
(Law) A woman exercising the functions of an executor.
Exedent
a.
• Eating out; consuming.
Exedra
n.
(Class. Antiq.) A room in a public building, furnished with seats.
(Arch.) The projection of any part of a building in a rounded form.
• Any out-of-door seat in stone, large enough for several persons; esp., one of curved form.
Exegesis
n.
• Exposition; explanation; especially, a critical explanation of a text or portion of Scripture.
(Math.) The process of finding the roots of an equation.
Exegete
n.
• An exegetist.
Exegetics
n.
• The science of interpretation or exegesis.
Exegetist
n.
• One versed in the science of exegesis or interpretation; — also called exegete.
Exemplar
n.
• A model, original, or pattern, to be copied or imitated; a specimen; sometimes; an ideal model or type, as that which an artist conceives.
• A copy of a book or writing.
a.
• Exemplary.
Exemplarily
adv.
• In a manner fitted or designed to be an example for imitation or for warning; by way of example.
Exemplariness
n.
• The state or quality of being exemplary; fitness to be an example.
Exemplarity
n.
• Exemplariness.
Exemplary
a.
• Serving as a pattern; deserving to be proposed for imitation; commendable; as, an exemplary person; exemplary conduct.
• Serving as a warning; monitory; as, exemplary justice, punishment, or damages.
• Illustrating as the proof of a thing.
n.
• An exemplar; also, a copy of a book or writing.
Exemplifiable
a.
• That can be exemplified.
Exemplification
n.
• The act of exemplifying; a showing or illustrating by example.
• That which exemplifies; a case in point; example.
(Law) A copy or transcript attested to be correct by the seal of an officer having custody of the original.
Exemplifier
n.
• One who exemplifies by following a pattern.
Exemplify
v. t.
• To show or illustrate by example.
• To copy; to transcribe; to make an attested copy or transcript of, under seal, as of a record.
• To prove or show by an attested copy.
Exempt
a.
• Cut off; set apart.
• Extraordinary; exceptional.
• Free, or released, from some liability to which others are subject; excepted from the operation or burden of some law; released; free; clear; privileged; — (with from): not subject to; not liable to; as, goods exempt from execution; a person exempt from jury service.
n.
• One exempted or freed from duty; one not subject.
• One of four officers of the Yeomen of the Royal Guard, having the rank of corporal; an Exon.
v. t.
• To remove; to set apart.
• To release or deliver from some liability which others are subject to; to except or excuse from he operation of a law; to grant immunity to; to free from obligation; to release; as, to exempt from military duty, or from jury service; to exempt from fear or pain.
Exemptible
a.
• That may be exempted.
Exemption
n.
• The act of exempting; the state of being exempt; freedom from any charge, burden, evil, etc., to which others are subject; immunity; privilege; as, exemption of certain articles from seizure; exemption from military service; exemption from anxiety, suffering, etc.
Exemptitious
a.
• Separable.
Exenterate
v. t.
• To take out the bowels or entrails of; to disembowel; to eviscerate; as, exenterated fishes.
Exenteration
n.
• Act of exenterating.
Exequatur
n.
• A written official recognition of a consul or commercial agent, issued by the government to which he is accredited, and authorizing him to exercise his powers in the place to which he is assigned.
• Official recognition or permission.
Exequial
a.
• Of or pertaining to funerals; funereal.
Exequious
a.
• Funereal.
Exequy
n.
• A funeral rite (usually in the plural); the ceremonies of burial; obsequies; funeral procession.
Exercent
a.
• Practicing; professional.
Exercisable
a.
• That may be exercised, used, or exerted.
Exercise
n.
• The act of exercising; a setting in action or practicing; employment in the proper mode of activity; exertion; application; use; habitual activity; occupation, in general; practice.
• Exertion for the sake of training or improvement whether physical, intellectual, or moral; practice to acquire skill, knowledge, virtue, perfectness, grace, etc.
• Bodily exertion for the sake of keeping the organs and functions in a healthy state; hygienic activity; as, to take exercise ob horseback.
• The performance of an office, a ceremony, or a religious duty.
• That which is done for the sake of exercising, practicing, training, or promoting skill, health, mental, improvement, moral discipline, etc.; that which is assigned or prescribed for such ebbs; hence, a disquisition; a lesson; a task; as, military or naval exercises; musical exercises; an exercise in composition.
• That which gives practice; a trial; a test.
v. t.
• To set in action; to cause to act, move, or make exertion; to give employment to; to put in action habitually or constantly; to school or train; to exert repeatedly; to busy.
• To exert for the sake of training or improvement; to practice in order to develop; hence, also, to improve by practice; to discipline, and to use or to for the purpose of training; as, to exercise arms; to exercise one's self in music; to exercise troops.
• To occupy the attention and effort of; to task; to tax, especially in a painful or vexatious manner; harass; to vex; to worry or make anxious; to affect; to discipline; as, exercised with pain.
• To put in practice; to carry out in action; to perform the duties of; to use; to employ; to practice; as, to exercise authority; to exercise an office.
v. i.
• To exercise one's self, as under military training; to drill; to take exercise; to use action or exertion; to practice gymnastics; as, to exercise for health or amusement.
Exerciser
n.
• One who exercises.
Exercisible
a.
• Capable of being exercised, employed, or enforced; as, the authority of a magistrate is exercisible within his jurisdiction.
Exercitation
n.
• exercise; practice; use.
Exergue
n.
(Numis.) The small space beneath the base line of a subject engraved on a coin or medal. It usually contains the date, place, engraver's name, etc., or other subsidiary matter.
Exert
v. t.
• To thrust forth; to emit; to push out.
• To put force, ability, or anything of the nature of an active faculty; to put in vigorous action; to bring into active operation; as, to exert the strength of the body, limbs, faculties, or imagination; to exert the mind or the voice.
• To put forth, as the result or exercise of effort; to bring to bear; to do or perform.
Exertion
n.
• The act of exerting, or putting into motion or action; the active exercise of any power or faculty; an effort, esp. a laborious or perceptible effort; as, an exertion of strength or power; an exertion of the limbs or of the mind; it is an exertion for him to move, to-day.
Exertive
a.
• Having power or a tendency to exert; using exertion.
Exertment
n.
• Exertion.
Exesion
n.
• The act of eating out or through.
Exestuate
v. i.
• To be agitated; to boil up; to effervesce.
Exestuation
n.
• A boiling up; effervescence.
Exeunt
• They go out, or retire from the scene; as, exeunt all except Hamlet.
Exfetation
n
(Med.) Imperfect fetation in some organ exterior to the uterus; extra-uterine fetation.
Exfoliate
v. i.
• To separate and come off in scales or laminae, as pieces of carious bone or of bark.
(Min.) To split into scales, especially to become converted into scales at the result of heat or decomposition.
v. t.
• To remove scales, laminae, or splinters from the surface of.
Exfoliation
n.
• The scaling off of a bone, a rock, or a mineral, etc.; the state of being exfoliated.
Exfoliative
a.
• Having the power of causing exfoliation.
n.
• An exfoliative agent.
Exhalable
a.
• Capable of being exhaled or evaporated.
Exhalant
a.
• Having the quality of exhaling or evaporating.
Exhalation
n.
• The act or process of exhaling, or sending forth in the form of steam or vapor; evaporation.
• That which is exhaled, or which rises in the form of vapor, fume, or steam; effluvium; emanation; as, exhalations from the earth or flowers, decaying matter, etc.
• A bright phenomenon; a meteor.
Exhale
v. t.
• To breathe out. Hence: To emit, as vapor; to send out, as an odor; to evaporate; as, the earth exhales vapor; marshes exhale noxious effluvia.
• To draw out; to cause to be emitted in vapor; as, the sum exhales the moisture of the earth.
v. i.
• To rise or be given off, as vapor; to pass off, or vanish.
Exhalement
n.
• Exhalation.
Exhalence
n.
• Exhalation.
Exhaust
v. t.
• To draw or let out wholly; to drain off completely; as, to exhaust the water of a well; the moisture of the earth is exhausted by evaporation.
• To empty by drawing or letting out the contents; as, to exhaust a well, or a treasury.
• To drain, metaphorically; to use or expend wholly, or till the supply comes to an end; to deprive wholly of strength; to use up; to weary or tire out; to wear out; as, to exhaust one's strength, patience, or resources.
• To bring out or develop completely; to discuss thoroughly; as, to exhaust a subject.
(Chem.) To subject to the action of various solvents in order to remove all soluble substances or extractives; as, to exhaust a drug successively with water, alcohol, and ether.
a.
• Drained; exhausted; having expended or lost its energy.
• Pertaining to steam, air, gas, etc., that is released from the cylinder of an engine after having preformed its work.
n.
(Steam Engine) The steam let out of a cylinder after it has done its work there.
• The foul air let out of a room through a register or pipe provided for the purpose.
Exhauster
n.
• One who, or that which, exhausts or draws out.
Exhaustibility
n.
• Capability of being exhausted.
Exhaustible
a.
• Capable of being exhausted, drained off, or expended.
Exhausting
a.
• Producing exhaustion; as, exhausting labors.
Exhaustion
n.
• The act of draining out or draining off; the act of emptying completely of the contents.
• The state of being exhausted or emptied; the state of being deprived of strength or spirits.
(Math.) An ancient geometrical method in which an exhaustive process was employed. It was nearly equivalent to the modern method of limits.
Exhaustive
a.
• Serving or tending to exhaust; exhibiting all the facts or arguments; as, an exhaustive method.
Exhaustless
a.
• Not be exhausted; inexhaustible; as, an exhaustless fund or store.
Exhaustment
n.
• Exhaustion; drain.
Exhausture
n.
• Exhaustion.
Exheredate
v. t.
• To disinherit.
Exheredation
n.
• A disinheriting; disherisor.
Exhereditation
n.
• A disinheriting; disherison.
Exhibit
v. t.
• To hold forth or present to view; to produce publicly, for inspection; to show, especially in order to attract notice to what is interesting; to display; as, to exhibit commodities in a warehouse, a picture in a gallery.
(Law) To submit, as a document, to a court or officer, in course of proceedings; also, to present or offer officially or in legal form; to bring, as a charge.
(Med.) To administer as a remedy; as, to exhibit calomel.
n.
• Any article, or collection of articles, displayed to view, as in an industrial exhibition; a display; as, this exhibit was marked A; the English exhibit.
(Law) A document produced and identified in court for future use as evidence.
Exhibiter
n.
• One who exhibits; one who presents a petition, charge or bill.
Exhibition
n.
• The act of exhibiting for inspection, or of holding forth to view; manifestation; display.
• That which is exhibited, held forth, or displayed; also, any public show; a display of works of art, or of feats of skill, or of oratorical or dramatic ability; as, an exhibition of animals; an exhibition of pictures, statues, etc.; an industrial exhibition.
• Sustenance; maintenance; allowance, esp. for meat and drink; pension. Specifically: (Eng. Univ.) Private benefaction for the maintenance of scholars.
(Med.) The act of administering a remedy.
Exhibitioner
n.
(Eng. Univ.) One who has a pension or allowance granted for support.
Exhibitive
a.
• Serving for exhibition; representative; exhibitory.
Exhibitor
n.
• One who exhibits.
Exhibitory
a.
• Exhibiting; publicly showing.
Exhilarant
a.
• Exciting joy, mirth, or pleasure.
n.
• That which exhilarates.
Exhilarate
v. t.
• To make merry or jolly; to enliven; to animate; to gladden greatly; to cheer; as, good news exhilarates the mind; wine exhilarates a man.
v. i.
• To become joyous.
Exhilarating
a.
• That exhilarates; cheering; gladdening.
Exhilaration
n.
• The act of enlivening the spirits; the act of making glad or cheerful; a gladdening.
• The state of being enlivened or cheerful.
Exhort
v. t.
• To incite by words or advice; to animate or urge by arguments, as to a good deed or laudable conduct; to address exhortation to; to urge strongly; hence, to advise, warn, or caution.
v. i.
• To deliver exhortation; to use words or arguments to incite to good deeds.
n.
• Exhortation.
Exhortation
n.
• The act of practice of exhorting; the act of inciting to laudable deeds; incitement to that which is good or commendable.
• Language intended to incite and encourage; advice; counsel; admonition.
Exhortative
a.
• Serving to exhort; exhortatory; hortative.
Exhortatory
a.
• Of or pertaining to exhortation; hortatory.
Exhorter
n.
• One who exhorts or incites.
Exhumated
a.
• Disinterred.
Exhumation
n.
• The act of exhuming that which has been buried; as, the exhumation of a body.
Exhume
v. t.
• To dig out of the ground; to take out of a place of burial; to disinter.
Exigence
n.
• Exigency.
Exigency
n.
• The state of being exigent; urgent or exacting want; pressing necessity or distress; need; a case demanding immediate action, supply, or remedy; as, an unforeseen exigency.
Exigent
a.
• Exacting or requiring immediate aid or action; pressing; critical.
n.
• Exigency; pressing necessity; decisive moment.
(o. Eng. Law) The name of a writ in proceedings before outlawry.
Exigenter
n.
(O. Eng. Law) An officer in the Court of King's Bench and Common Pleas whose duty it was make out exigents. The office in now abolished.
Exigible
a.
• That may be exacted; repairable.
Exiguity
n.
• Scantiness; smallness; thinness.
Exiguous
a.
• Scanty; small; slender; diminutive. "Exiguous resources." Carlyle.
Exile
n.
• Forced separation from one's native country; expulsion from one's home by the civil authority; banishment; sometimes, voluntary separation from one's native country.
• The person expelled from his country by authority; also, one who separates himself from his home.
v. t.
• To banish or expel from one's own country or home; to drive away.
a.
• Small; slender; thin; fine.
Exilement
n.
• Banishment.
Exilic
a.
• Pertaining to exile or banishment, esp. to that of the Jews in Babylon.
Exilition
n.
• A sudden springing or leaping out.
Exility
n.
• Smallness; meagerness; slenderness; fineness, thinness.
Eximious
a.
• Select; choice; hence, extraordinary, excellent.
Exinanite
v. t.
• To make empty; to render of no effect; to humble.
Exinanition
• n. [L. exinanitio.] An emptying; an enfeebling; exhaustion; humiliation.
Exist
v. i.
• To be as a fact and not as a mode; to have an actual or real being, whether material or spiritual.
• To be manifest in any manner; to continue to be; as, great evils existed in his reign.
• To live; to have life or the functions of vitality; as, men can not exist water, nor fishes on land.
Existence
n.
• The state of existing or being; actual possession of being; continuance in being; as, the existence of body and of soul in union; the separate existence of the soul; immortal existence.
• Continued or repeated manifestation; occurrence, as of events of any kind; as, the existence of a calamity or of a state of war.
• That which exists; a being; a creature; an entity; as, living existences.
Existency
n.
• Existence.
Existent
a.
• Having being or existence; existing; being; occurring now; taking place.
Existential
a.
• Having existence. Bp. Barlow.
Exister
n.
• One who exists.
Existible
a.
• Capable of existence.
Existimation
n.
• Esteem; opinion; reputation.
Exit
• He (or she ) goes out, or retires from view; as, exit Macbeth.
n.
• The departure of a player from the stage, when he has performed his part.
• Any departure; the act of quitting the stage of action or of life; death; as, to make one's exit.
• A way of departure; passage out of a place; egress; way out.
Exo
• A prefix signifying out of, outside; as in exocarp, exogen, exoskeleton.
Exocarp
n.
(Bot.) The outer portion of a fruit, as the flesh of a peach or the rind of an orange.
Exoccipital
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to a bone or region on each side of the great foremen of the skull.
n.
• The exoccipital bone, which often forms a part of the occipital in the adult, but is usually distinct in the young.
Exoculate
v. t.
• To deprive of eyes.
Exode
n.
• Departure; exodus; esp., the exodus of the Israelites from Egypt.
(Gr. Drama) The final chorus; the catastrophe.
(Rom. Antig.) An afterpiece of a comic description, either a farce or a travesty.
Exodic
a.
(Physiol.) Conducting influences from the spinal cord outward; — said of the motor or efferent nerves. Opposed to esodic.
Exodus
n.
• A going out; particularly (the Exodus), the going out or journey of the Israelites from Egypt under the conduct of Moses; and hence, any large migration from a place.
• The second of the Old Testament, which contains the narrative of the departure of the Israelites from Egypt.
Exody
n.
• Exodus; withdrawal.
Exogamous
a.
• Relating to exogamy; marrying outside of the limits of one's own tribe; — opposed to endogenous.
Exogamy
n.
• The custom, or tribal law, which prohibits marriage between members of the same tribe; marriage outside of the tribe; — opposed to endogamy.
Exogen
n.
(Bot.) A plant belonging to one of the greater part of the vegetable kingdom, and which the plants are characterized by having c wood bark, and pith, the wood forming a layer between the other two, and increasing, if at all, by the animal addition of a new layer to the outside next to the bark. The leaves are commonly netted-veined, and the number of cotyledons is two, or, very rarely, several in a whorl. Cf. Endogen.
Exogenetic
a.
(Biol.) Arising or growing from without; exogenous.
Exogenous
a.
(Bot.) Pertaining to, or having the character of, an exogen; — the opposite of endogenous.
(Biol.) Growing by addition to the exterior.
(Anat.) Growing from previously ossified parts; — opposed to autogenous.
Exogyra
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of Cretaceous fossil shells allied to oysters.
Exolete
a.
• Obsolete; out of use; state; insipid.
Exolve
v. t.
• To loose; to pay.
Exon
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Exeter, in England.
n.
• An officer of the Yeomen of the Guard; an Exempt.
Exonerate
v. t.
• To unload; to disburden; to discharge.
• To relieve, in a moral sense, as of a charge, obligation, or load of blame resting on one; to clear of something that lies upon oppresses one, as an accusation or imputation; as, to exonerate one's self from blame, or from the charge of avarice.
• To discharge from duty or obligation, as a ball.
Exoneration
n.
• The act of disburdening, discharging, or freeing morally from a charge or imputation; also, the state of being disburdened or freed from a charge.
Exonerative
a.
• Freeing from a burden or obligation; tending to exonerate.
Exonerator
n.
• One who exonerates or frees from obligation.
Exophthalmia
n.
(Med.) The protrusion of the eyeball so that the eyelids will not cover it, in consequence of disease.
Exophthalmic
a.
• Of or pertaining to, or characterized by, exophthalmia.
Exophthalmy
n.
(Med.) Exophthalmia.
Exophyllous
a.
(Bot.) Not sheathed in another leaf.
Exopodite
n.
(Zool) The external branch of the appendages of Crustacea.
Exoptable
a.
• Very desirable.
Exoptile
n.
(Bot.) A name given by Lestiboudois to dicotyledons; — so called because the plumule is naked.
Exorate
v. t.
• To persuade, or to gain, by entreaty.
Exoration
n.
• Entreaty.
Exorbitant
a.
• Departing from an orbit or usual track; hence, deviating from the usual or due course; going beyond the appointed rules or established limits of right or propriety; excessive; extravagant; enormous; inordinate; as, exorbitant appetites and passions; exorbitant charges, demands, or claims.
• Not comprehended in a settled rule or method; anomalous.
Exorbitantly
adv.
• In an exorbitant, excessive, or irregular manner; enormously.
Exorbitate
v. i.
• To go out of the track; to deviate.
Exorcise
v. t.
• To cast out, as a devil, evil spirits, etc., by conjuration or summoning by a holy name, or by certain ceremonies; to expel (a demon) or to conjure (a demon) to depart out of a person possessed by one.
• To deliver or purify from the influence of an evil spirit or demon.
Exorcism
n.
• The act of exorcising; the driving out of evil spirits from persons or places by conjuration; also, the form of conjuration used.
• Conjuration for raising spirits.
Exordial
a.
• Pertaining to the exordium of a discourse: introductory.
Exordium
n.
• A beginning; an introduction; especially, the introductory part of a discourse or written composition, which prepares the audience for the main subject; the opening part of an oration.
Exorhiza
n.
(Bot.) A plant Whose radicle is not inclosed or sheathed by the cotyledons or plumule.
Exornation
n.
• Ornament; decoration; embellishment.
Exortive
a.
• Rising; relating to the east.
Exosculate
v. t.
• To kiss; especially, to kiss repeatedly or fondly.
Exoskeletal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the exoskeleton; as exoskeletal muscles.
Exoskeleton
n.
(Anat.) The hardened parts of the external integument of an animal, including hair, feathers, nails, horns, scales, etc.,as well as the armor of armadillos and many reptiles, and the shells or hardened integument of numerous invertebrates; external skeleton; dermoskeleton.
Exosmose
n.
(Physics) The passage of gases, vapors, or liquids thought membranes or porous media from within outward, in the phenomena of osmose; — opposed to endosmose.
Exosmotic
a.
• Pertaining to exosmose.
Exospore
n.
(Biol.) The extreme outer wall of a spore; the epispore.
Exossation
n.
• A depriving of bone or of fruit stones.
Exosstate
v. t.
• To deprive of bones; to take out the bones of; to bone.
Exostome
n.
(Bot.) The small aperture or foremen in the outer coat of the ovule of a plant.
Exostosis
n.
(Med.) Any protuberance of a bone which is not natural; an excrescence or morbid enlargement of a bone.
(Bot.) A knot formed upon or in the wood of trees by disease.
Exoterics
n. pl.
(Philos.) The public lectures or published writings of Aristotle.
Exotery
n.
• That which is obvious, public, or common.
Exotheca
n.
(Zool.) The tissue which fills the interspaces between the costae of many madreporarian corals, usually consisting of small transverse or oblique septa.
Exotic
a.
• Introduced from a foreign country; not native; extraneous; foreign; as, an exotic plant; an exotic term or word.
n.
• Anything of foreign origin; something not of native growth, as a plant, a word, a custom.
Exotical
a.
• Foreign; not native; exotic.
Exoticism
n.
• The state of being exotic; also, anything foreign, as a word or idiom; an exotic.
Expabsible
a.
• Capable of being expanded or spread out widely.
Expand
v. t.
• To lay open by extending; to open wide; to spread out; to diffuse; as, a flower expands its leaves.
• To cause the particles or parts of to spread themselves or stand apart, thus increasing bulk without addition of substance; to make to occupy more space; to dilate; to distend; to extend every way; to enlarge; — opposed to contract; as, to expand the chest; heat expands all bodies; to expand the sphere of benevolence.
(Math.) To state in enlarged form; to develop; as, to expand an equation.
v. i.
• To become widely opened, spread apart, dilated, distended, or enlarged; as, flowers expand in the spring; metals expand by heat; the heart expands with joy.
Expander
n.
• Anything which causes expansion esp. (Mech.) a tool for stretching open or expanding a tube, etc.
Expanding
a.
• That expands, or may be expanded; extending; spreading; enlarging.
Expanse
n.
• That which is expanded or spread out; a wide extent of space or body; especially, the arch of the sky.
v. t.
• To expand.
Expansibility
n.
• The capacity of being expanded; as, the expansibility of air.
Expansile
a.
• Expansible.
Expansion
n.
• The act of expanding or spreading out; the condition of being expanded; dilation; enlargement.
• That which is expanded; expanse; extend surface; as the expansion of a sheet or of a lake; the expansion was formed of metal.
• Space thought which anything is expanded; also, pure space.
(Com.) Enlargement or extension of business transaction; esp., increase of the circulation of bank notes.
(Math.) The developed result of an indicated operation; as, the expansion of (a + b)2 is a2 + 2ab + b2.
(Steam Ebgine) The operation of steam in a cylinder after its communication with the boiler has been cut off, by which it continues to exert pressure upon the moving piston.
(Nav. Arch.) The enlargement of the ship mathematically from a model or drawing to the full or building size, in the process of construction.
Expansive
a.
• Having a capacity or tendency to expand or dilate; diffusive; of much expanse; wide-extending; as, the expansive force of heat; the expansive quality of air.
Expansure
n.
• Expanse.
Expatiate
v. i.
• To range at large, or without restraint.
• To enlarge in discourse or writing; to be copious in argument or discussion; to descant.
v. t.
• To expand; to spread; to extend; to diffuse; to broaden.
Expatiation
n.
• Act of expatiating.
Expatiatory
a.
• Expansive; diffusive.
Expatriate
v. t.
• To banish; to drive or force (a person) from his own country; to make an exile of.
• Reflexively, as To expatriate one's self: To withdraw from one's native country; to renounce the rights and liabilities of citizenship where one is born, and become a citizen of another country.
Expatriation
n.
• The act of banishing, or the state of banishment; especially, the forsaking of one's own country with a renunciation of allegiance.
Expect
v. t.
• To wait for; to await.
• To look for (mentally); to look forward to, as to something that is believed to be about to happen or come; to have a previous apprehension of, whether of good or evil; to look for with some confidence; to anticipate; — often followed by an infinitive, sometimes by a clause (with, or without, that); as I expect to receive wages; I expect that the troops will be defeated. "Good: I will expect you." Shak. "Expecting thy reply." Shak.
v. t.
• To wait; to stay. Sandys.
n.
• Expectation.
Expectable
a.
• That may be expected or looked for.
Expectant
a.
• Waiting in expectation; looking for
(Med.) waiting for the efforts of nature, with little active treatment.
n.
• One who waits in expectation; one held in dependence by hope of receiving some good.
Expectation
n.
• The act or state of expecting or looking forward to an event as about to happen.
• That which is expected or looked for.
• The prospect of the future; grounds upon which something excellent is expected to happen; prospect of anything good to come, esp. of c or rank.
• The value of any chance (as the prospect of prize or property) which depends upon some contingent event. Expectations are computed for or against the occurrence of the event.
(Med.) The leaving of the disease principally to the efforts of nature to effect a cure.
Expectative
a.
• Constituting an object of expectation; contingent.
n.
• Something in expectation; esp., an expectative grace.
Expectedly
adv.
• In conformity with expectation.
Expecter
n.
• One who expects.
Expectingly
adv.
• In state of expectation.
Expective
a.
• Expectative.
Expectorant
a.
(Med.) Tending to facilitate expectoration or to promote discharges of mucus, etc., from the lungs or throat.
n.
• An expectorant medicine.
Expectorate
v. t.
• To eject from the trachea or lungs; to discharge, as phlegm or other matter, by coughing, hawking, and spitting; to spit forth.
v. i.
• To discharge matter from the lungs or throat bu hawking and spitting; to spit.
Expectoration
n.
• The act of ejecting phlegm or mucus from the throat or lungs, by coughing, hawking, and spitting.
• That which is expectorated, as phlegm or mucus.
Expectorative
a. & n.
• Same as Expectorant.
Expede
v. t.
• To expedite; to hasten.
Expediate
v. t.
• To hasten; to expedite.
Expedient
a.
• Hastening or forward; hence, tending to further or promote a proposed object; fit or proper under the circumstances; conducive to self-interest; desirable; advisable; advantageous; — sometimes contradistinguished from right.
• Quick; expeditious.
n.
• That which serves to promote or advance; suitable means to accomplish an end.
• Means devised in an exigency; shift.
Expediential
• . Governed by expediency; seeking advantage; as an expediential policy. "Calculating, expediential understanding." Hare.
Expediently
adv.
• In an expedient manner; fitly; suitably; conveniently.
• With expedition; quickly.
Expediment
n.
• An expedient.
Expeditate
v. t.
(Eng. Forest Laws) To deprive of the claws or the balls of the fore feet; as, to expeditate a dog that he may not chase deer.
Expedite
a.
• Free of impediment; unimpeded.
• Expeditious; quick; speedily; prompt.
v. t.
• To relieve of impediments; to facilitate; to accelerate the process or progress of; to hasten; to quicken; as, to expedite the growth of plants.
• To despatch; to send forth; to issue officially.
Expeditely
adv.
• In expedite manner; expeditiously.
Expediteness
n.
• Quality of being expedite.
Expedition
n.
• The quality of being expedite; efficient promptness; haste; dispatch; speed; quickness; as to carry the mail with expedition.
Expeditionary
a.
• Of or pertaining to an expedition; as, an expeditionary force.
Expeditious
a.
• Possessed of, or characterized by, expedition, or efficiency and rapidity in action; performed with, or acting with, expedition; quick; having celerity; speedily; as, an expeditious march or messenger.
Expeditive
a.
• Performing with speed.
Expeditoinist
n.
• One who goes upon an expedition. .
Expel
v. t.
• To drive or force out from that within which anything is contained, inclosed, or situated; to eject; as to expel air from a bellows.
• To cut off from further connection with an institution of learning, a society, and the like; as, to expel a student or member.
• To keep out, off, or away; to exclude.
• To discharge; to shoot.
Expellable
a.
• Capable of being expelled or driven out.
Expeller
n.
• One who. or that which, expels.
Expend
v. t.
• To lay out, apply, or employ in any way; to consume by use; to use up or distribute, either in payment or in donations; to spend; as, they expend money for food or in charity; to expend time labor, and thought; to expend hay in feeding cattle, oil in a lamp, water in mechanical operations.
v. i.
• To be laid out, used, or consumed.
• To pay out or disburse money.
Expenditure
n.
• The act of expending; a laying out, as of money; disbursement.
• That which is expended or paid out; expense.
Expenitor
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A disburser; especially, one of the disbursers of taxes for the repair of sewers.
Expense
n.
• A spending or consuming; disbursement; expenditure.
• That which is expended, laid out, or consumed; cost; outlay; charge; — sometimes with the notion of loss or damage to those on whom the expense falls; as, the expenses of war; an expense of time
• Loss.
Expensefull
a.
• Full of expense; costly; chargeable.
Expenseless
a.
• Without cost or expense.
Expensive
a.
• Occasioning expense; calling for liberal outlay; costly; dear; liberal; as, expensive dress; an expensive house or family.
• Free in expending; very liberal; especially, in a bad scene; extravagant; lavish.
Experience
n.
• Trial, as a test or experiment.
• The effect upon the judgment or feelings produced by any event, whether witnessed or participated in; personal and direct impressions as contrasted with description or fancies; personal acquaintance; actual enjoyment or suffering.
• An act of knowledge, one or more, by which single facts or general truths are ascertained; experimental or inductive knowledge; hence, implying skill, facility, or practical wisdom gained by personal knowledge, feeling or action; as, a king without experience of war.
Experienced
p. p. & a.
• Taught by practice or by repeated observations; skillful or wise by means of trials, use, or observation; as, an experienced physician, workman, soldier; an experienced eye.
Experiencer
n.
• One who experiences.
• An experimenter.
Experient
a.
• Experienced.
Experiential
a.
• Derived from, or pertaining to, experience.
Experientialism
n.
(Philos.) The doctrine that experience, either that ourselves or of others, is the test or criterion of general knowledge; — opposed to intuitionists.
Experientiallist
n.
• One who accepts the doctrine of experientialism. Also used adjectively.
Experiment
n.
• Atrial or special observation, made to confirm or disprove something doubtful; esp., one under conditions determined by the experimenter; an act or operation undertaken in order to discover some unknown principle or effect, or to test, establish, or illustrate some suggest or known truth; practical test; poof.
• Experience.
v. t.
• To make experiment; to operate by test or trial; — often with on, upon, or in, referring to the subject of an experiment; with, referring to the instrument; and by, referring to the means; as, to experiment upon electricity; he experimented in plowing with ponies, or by steam power.
v.t
• , To try; to know, perceive, or prove, by trial experience.
Experimental
a.
• Pertaining to experiment; founded on, or derived from, experiment or trial; as, experimental science; given to, or skilled in, experiment; as, an experimental philosopher.
• Known by, or derived from, experience; as, experimental religion.
Experimentalize
v. i.
• To make experiments (upon); to experiment.
Experimentally
adv.
• By experiment; by experience or trial.
Experimentarian
a.
• Relying on experiment or experience.
n.
• One who relies on experiment or experience.
Experimentation
n.
• The act of experimenting; practice by experiment. J. S. Mill. Page 528
Experimentator
n.
• An experimenter.
Experimenter
n.
• One who makes experiments; one skilled in experiments.
Experimentist
n.
• An experimenter.
Experimetalist
n.
• One who makes experiments; an experimenter.
Experrection
n.
• A waking up or arousing.
Expert
a.
• Taught by use, practice, or experience, experienced; having facility of operation or performance from practice; knowing and ready from much practice; clever; skillful; as, an expert surgeon; expert in chess or archery.
n.
• An expert or experienced person; one instructed by experience; one who has skill, experience, or extensive knowledge in his calling or in any special branch of learning.
(Law) A specialist in a particular profession or department of science requiring for its mastery peculiar culture and erudition.
• A sworn appraiser
v. t.
• To experience.
Expertly
adv.
• In a skillful or dexterous manner; adroitly; with readiness and accuracy.
Expertness
n.
• Skill derived from practice; readiness; as, expertness in seamanship, or in reasoning.
Expetible
a.
• Worthy of being wished for; desirable.
Expiable
a.
• Capable of being expiated or atoned for; as, an expiable offense; expiable guilt.
Expiate
v. t.
• To extinguish the guilt of by sufferance of penalty or some equivalent; to make complete satisfaction for; to atone for; to make amends for; to make expiation for; as, to expiate a crime, a guilt, or sin.
• To purify with sacred rites.
a.
• Terminated.
Expiation
n.
• The act of making satisfaction or atonement for any crime or fault; the extinguishing of guilt by suffering or penalty.
• The means by which reparation or atonement for crimes or sins is made; an expiatory sacrifice or offering; an atonement.
• An act by which the treats of prodigies were averted among the ancient heathen.
Expiatist
n.
• An expiator.
Expiator
n.
• One who makes expiation or atonement.
Expiatorious
a.
• Of an expiatory nature; expiatory.
Expiatory
a.
• Having power, or intended, to make expiation; atoning; as, an expiatory sacrifice.
Expilation
n.
• The act of expilating or stripping off; plunder; pillage.
Expilator
n.
• One who pillages; a plunderer; a pillager.
Expirable
a.
• That may expire; capable of being brought to an end.
Expirant
n.
• One who expires or is expiring.
Expiration
n.
• The act of expiring
(Physiol.) The act or process of breathing out, or forcing air from the lungs through the nose or mouth; as, respiration consists of inspiration and expiration; — opposed to inspiration
• Emission of volatile matter; exhalation.
• The last emission of breath; death
• A coming to a close; cessation; extinction; termination; end
• That which is expired; matter breathed forth; that which is produced by breathing out, as a sound.
Expiratory
a.
(Physiol.) Pertaining to, or employed in, the expiration or emission of air from the lungs; as, the expiratory muscles.
Expire
v. t.
• To breathe out; to emit from the lungs; to throw out from the mouth or nostrils in the process of respiration; — opposed to inspire.
• To give forth insensibly or gently, as a fluid or vapor; to emit in minute particles; to exhale; as, the earth expires a damp vapor; plants expire odors.
• To emit; to give out.
• To bring to a close; to terminate.
v. i.
• To emit the breath.
• To emit the last breath; to breathe out the life; to die; as, to expire calmly; to expire in agony.
• To come to an end; to cease; to terminate; to perish; to become extinct; as, the flame expired; his lease expires to-day; the month expired on Saturday.
• To burst forth; to fly out with a blast.
Expiring
a.
• Breathing out air from the lungs; emitting fluid or volatile matter; exhaling; breathing the last breath; dying; ending; terminating.
• Pertaining to, or uttered at, the time of dying; as, expiring words; expiring groans.
Expiry
n.
• Expiration.
Expiscate
v. t.
• To fish out; to find out by skill or laborious investigation; to search out.
Expiscation
n.
• The act of expiscating; a fishing.
Expiscatory
a.
• Tending to fish out; searching out
Explain
v. t.
• To flatten; to spread out; to unfold; to expand.
• To make plain, manifest, or intelligible; to clear of obscurity; to expound; to unfold and illustrate the meaning of; as, to explain a chapter of the Bible.
v. i.
• To give an explanation.
Explainable
a.
• Capable of being explained or made plain to the understanding; capable of being interpreted.
Explainer
n.
• One who explains; an expounder or expositor; a commentator; an interpreter.
Explanate
a.
(Bot. & Zool.) Spreading or extending outwardly in a flat form.
Explanation
n.
• The act of explaining, expounding, or interpreting; the act of clearing from obscurity and making intelligible; as, the explanation of a passage in Scripture, or of a contract or treaty.
• That which explains or makes clear; as, a satisfactory explanation.
• The meaning attributed to anything by one who explains it; definition; inerpretation; sense.
• A mutual exposition of terms, meaning, or motives, with a view to adjust a misunderstanding, and reconcile differences; reconciliation; agreement; as, to come to an explanation.
Explanative
a.
• Explanatory.
Explanatoriness
n.
• The quality of being explanatory.
Explanatory
a.
• Serving to explain; containing explanation; as explanatory notes.
Expletion
n.
• Accomplishment; fulfillment.
Expletive
a.
• Filling up; hence, added merely for the purpose of filling up; superfluous.
n.
• A word, letter, or syllable not necessary to the sense, but inserted to fill a vacancy; an oath.
Expletively
adv.
• In the manner of an expletive.
Expletory
a.
• Serving to fill up; expletive; superfluous; as, an expletory word.
Explicable
a.
• Capable of being explicated; that may be explained or accounted for; admitting explanation.
Explicableness
n.
• Quality of being explicable.
Explicate
a.
• Evolved; unfolded.
v. t.
• To unfold; to expand; to lay open.
• To unfold the meaning or sense of; to explain; to clear of difficulties or obscurity; to interpret.
Explication
n.
• The act of opening, unfolding, or explaining; explanation; exposition; interpretation.
• The sense given by an expositor.
Explicative
a.
• Serving to unfold or explain; tending to lay open to the understanding; explanatory.
Explicator
n.
• One who unfolds or explains; an expounder; an explainer.
Explicatory
a.
• Explicative.
Explicit
• A word formerly used (as finis is now) at the conclusion of a book to indicate the end.
a.
• Not implied merely, or conveyed by implication; distinctly stated; plain in language; open to the understanding; clear; not obscure or ambiguous; express; unequivocal; as, an explicit declaration.
• Having no disguised meaning or reservation; unreserved; outspoken; — applied to persons; as, he was earnest and explicit in his statement.
Explicitly
adv.
• In an explicit manner; clearly; plainly; without disguise or reservation of meaning; not by inference or implication; as, he explicitly avows his intention.
Explicitness
n.
• The quality of being explicit; clearness; directness.
Explode
v. i.
• To become suddenly expanded into a great volume of gas or vapor; to burst violently into flame; as gunpowder explodes.
• To burst with force and a loud report; to detonate, as a shell filled with powder or the like material, or as a boiler from too great pressure of steam.
• To burst forth with sudden violence and noise; as, at this, his wrath exploded.
v. t.
• To drive from the stage by noisy expressions of disapprobation; to hoot off; to drive away or reject noisily; as, to explode a play.
• To bring into disrepute, and reject; to drive from notice and acceptance; as, to explode a scheme, fashion, or doctrine.
• To cause to explode or burst noisily; to detonate; as, to explode powder by touching it with fire.
• To drive out with violence and noise, as by powder.
Explodent
n.
• An instrument or agent causing explosion; an exploder; also, an explosive.
Exploder
n.
• One who or that which explodes.
• One who rejects an opinion or scheme with open contempt.
Exploit
n.
• A deed or act; especially, a heroic act; a deed of renown; an adventurous or noble achievement; as, the exploits of Alexander the Great.
• Combat; war.
• To utilize; to make available; to get the value or usefulness out of; as, to exploit a mine or agricultural lands; to exploit public opinion.
• Hence: To draw an illegitimate profit from; to speculate on; to put upon.
Exploitation
n.
• The act of exploiting or utilizing.
Exploiture
n.
• The act of exploiting or accomplishing; achievement.
• Exploitation.
Explorable
a.
• That may be explored; as, an explorable region.
Explorate
v. t.
• To explore.
Exploration
n.
• The act of exploring, penetrating, or ranging over for purposes of discovery, especially of geographical discovery; examination; as, the exploration of unknown countries
(Med.) physical examination.
Explorative
a.
• Exploratory.
Explorator
n.
• One who explores; one who examines closely; a searcher.
Exploratory
a.
• Serving or intended to explore; searching; examining; explorative.
Explore
v. t.
• To seek for or after; to strive to attain by search; to look wisely and carefully for.
• To search through or into; to penetrate or range over for discovery; to examine thoroughly; as, to explore new countries or seas; to explore the depths of science.
Explorement
n.
• The act of exploring; exploration.
Explorer
n.
• One who explores; also, an apparatus with which one explores, as a diving bell.
Explosion
n.
• The act of exploding; detonation; a chemical action which causes the sudden formation of a great volume of expanded gas; as, the explosion of gunpowder, of fire damp,etc.
• A bursting with violence and loud noise, because of internal pressure; as, the explosion of a gun, a bomb, a steam boiler, etc.
• A violent outburst of feeling, manifested by excited language, action, etc.; as, an explosion of wrath.
Explosive
a.
• Driving or bursting out with violence and noise; causing explosion; as, the explosive force of gunpowder.
n.
• An explosive agent; a compound or mixture susceptible of a rapid chemical reaction, as gunpowder, or nitro-glycerine.
• A sound produced by an explosive impulse of the breath; (Phonetics) one of consonants p, b, t, d, k, g, which are sounded with a sort of explosive power of voice.
Explosively
adv.
• In an explosive manner.
Expolish
v. t.
• To polish thoroughly.
Expone
v. t.
• To expound; to explain; also, to expose; to imperil.
Exponent
n.
(Alg.) A number, letter, or any quantity written on the right hand of and above another quantity, and denoting how many times the latter is repeated as a factor to produce the power indicated
• One who, or that which, stands as an index or representative; as, the leader of a party is the exponent of its principles.
Exponential
a.
• Pertaining to exponents; involving variable exponents; as, an exponential expression; exponential calculus; an exponential function.
Export
v. t.
• To carry away; to remove.
• To carry or send abroad, or out of a country, especially to foreign countries, as merchandise or commodities in the way of commerce; — the opposite of import; as, to export grain, cotton, cattle, goods, etc.
n.
• The act of exporting; exportation; as, to prohibit the export of wheat or tobacco.
• That which is exported; a commodity conveyed from one country or State to another in the way of traffic; — used chiefly in the plural, exports.
Exportability
n.
• The quality or state of being suitable for exportation.
Exportable
a.
• Suitable for exportation; as, exportable products.
Exportation
n.
• The act of exporting; the act of conveying or sending commodities abroad or to another country, in the course of commerce.
• Commodity exported; an export.
• The act of carrying out.
Exporter
n.
• One who exports; the person who sends goods or commodities to a foreign country, in the way of commerce; — opposed to importer.
Exposal
n.
• Exposure.
Expose
n.
• A formal recital or exposition of facts; exposure, or revelation, of something which some one wished to keep concealed.
Expose
v. t.
• To set forth; to set out to public view; to exhibit; to show; to display; as, to expose goods for sale; to expose pictures to public inspection.
• To lay bare; to lay open to attack, danger, or anything objectionable; to render accessible to anything which may affect, especially detrimentally; to make liable; as, to expose one's self to the heat of the sun, or to cold, insult, danger, or ridicule; to expose an army to destruction or defeat.
• To deprive of concealment; to discover; to lay open to public inspection, or bring to public notice, as a thing that shuns publicity, something criminal, shameful, or the like; as, to expose the faults of a neighbor.
• To disclose the faults or reprehensible practices of; to lay open to general condemnation or contempt by making public the character or arts of; as, to expose a cheat, liar, or hypocrite.
Exposedness
n.
• The state of being exposed, laid open, or unprotected; as, an exposedness to sin or temptation.
Exposer
n.
• One who exposes or discloses.
Exposition
n.
• The act of exposing or laying open; a setting out or displaying to public view.
• The act of expounding or of laying open the sense or meaning of an author, or a passage; explanation; interpretation; the sense put upon a passage; a law, or the like, by an interpreter; hence, a work containing explanations or interpretations; a commentary.
• Situation or position with reference to direction of view or accessibility to influence of sun, wind, etc.; exposure; as, an easterly exposition; an exposition to the sun.
• A public exhibition or show, as of industrial and artistic productions; as, the Paris Exposition of 1878.
Expositive
a.
• Serving to explain; expository.
Expositor
n.
• One who, or that which, expounds or explains; an expounder; a commentator.
Expository
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, exposition; serving to explain; explanatory; illustrative; exegetical.
Expostulate
v. i.
• To reason earnestly with a person on some impropriety of his conduct, representing the wrong he has done or intends, and urging him to make redress or to desist; to remonstrate; — followed by with.
v. t.
• To discuss; to examine.
Expostulation
n.
• The act of expostulating or reasoning with a person in opposition to some impropriety of conduct; remonstrance; earnest and kindly protest; dissuasion.
Expostulator
n.
• One who expostulates.
Expostulatory
a.
• Containing expostulation or remonstrance; as, an expostulatory discourse or letter.
Exposture
n.
• Exposure.
Exposure
n.
• The act of exposing or laying open, setting forth, laying bare of protection, depriving of care or concealment, or setting out to reprobation or contempt.
• The state of being exposed or laid open or bare; openness to danger; accessibility to anything that may affect, especially detrimentally; as, exposure to observation, to cold to inconvenience.
• Position as to points of compass, or to influences of climate, etc. "Under a southern exposure.
(Photog.) The exposing of a sensitized plate to the action of light.
Expound
v. t.
• To lay open; to expose to view; to examine.
• To lay open the meaning of; to explain; to clear of obscurity; to interpret; as, to expound a text of Scripture, a law, a word, a meaning, or a riddle.
Expounder
n.
• One who expounds or explains; an interpreter.
Express
a.
• Exactly representing; exact.
• Directly and distinctly stated; declared in terms; not implied or left to inference; made unambiguous by intention and care; clear; not dubious; as, express consent; an express statement.
• Intended for a particular purpose; relating to an express; sent on a particular errand; dispatched with special speed; as, an express messenger or train. Also used adverbially.
n.
• A clear image or representation; an expression; a plain declaration.
• A messenger sent on a special errand; a courier; hence, a regular and fast conveyance; commonly, a company or system for the prompt and safe transportation of merchandise or parcels; also, a railway train for transporting passengers or goods with speed and punctuality.
• An express office.
• That which is sent by an express messenger or message.
v. t.
• To press or squeeze out; as, to express the juice of grapes, or of apples; hence, to extort; to elicit.
• To make or offer a representation of; to show by a copy or likeness; to represent; to resemble.
• To give a true impression of; to represent and make known; to manifest plainly; to show in general; to exhibit, as an opinion or feeling, by a look, gesture, and esp. by language; to declare; to utter; to tell.
• To make known the opinions or feelings of; to declare what is in the mind of; to show (one's self); to cause to appear; — used reflexively.
• To denote; to designate.
Expressage
n.
• The charge for carrying a parcel by express.
Expressible
a.
• Capable of being expressed, squeezed out, shown, represented, or uttered.
Expression
n.
• The act of expressing; the act of forcing out by pressure; as, the expression of juices or oils; also, of extorting or eliciting; as, a forcible expression of truth.
• The act of declaring or signifying; declaration; utterance; as, an expression of the public will.
• Lively or vivid representation of meaning, sentiment, or feeling, etc.; significant and impressive indication, whether by language, appearance, or gesture; that manner or style which gives life and suggestive force to ideas and sentiments; as, he reads with expression; her performance on the piano has expression.
• That which is expressed by a countenance, a posture, a work of art, etc.; look, as indicative of thought or feeling.
• A form of words in which an idea or sentiment is conveyed; a mode of speech; a phrase; as, a common expression; an odd expression.
(Math.) The representation of any quantity by its appropriate characters or signs.
Expressional
a.
• Of, or relating to, expression; phraseological; also, vividly representing or suggesting an idea sentiment.
Expressionless
a.
• Destitute of expression.
Expressive
a.
• Serving to express, utter, or represent; indicative; communicative; — followed by of; as, words expressive of his gratitude.
• Full of expression; vividly representing the meaning or feeling meant to be conveyed; significant; emphatic; as, expressive looks or words.
Expressly
adv.
• In an express manner; in direct terms; with distinct purpose; particularly; as, a book written expressly for the young.
Expressman
n.
• A person employed in the express business; also, the driver of a job wagon.
Expressness
n.
• The state or quality of being express; definiteness.
Expressure
n.
• The act of expressing; expression; utterance; representation.
Exprobrate
v. t.
• To charge upon with reproach; to upbraid.
Exprobration
n.
• Reproachful accusation; upbraiding.
Expropriate
v. t.
• To put out of one's possession; to surrender the ownership of; also, to deprive of possession or proprietary rights.
Expropriation
n.
• The act of expropriating; the surrender of a claim to exclusive property; the act of depriving of ownership or proprietary rights.
Expugn
v. t.
• To take by assault; to storm; to overcome; to vanquish; as, to expugn cities; to expugn a person by arguments.
Expugnable
a.
• Capable of being expugnded.
Expugnation
n.
• The act of taking by assault; conquest.
Expugner
n.
• One who expugns.
Expulse
v. t.
• To drive out; to expel.
Expulser
n.
• An expeller.
Expulsion
n.
• The act of expelling; a driving or forcing out; summary removal from membership, association, etc.
• The state of being expelled or driven out.
Expulsive
a.
• Having the power of driving out or away; serving to expel.
Expunction
n.
• The act of expunging or erasing; the condition of being expunged.
Expunge
v. t.
• To blot out, as with pen; to rub out; to efface designedly; to obliterate; to strike out wholly; as, to expunge words, lines, or sentences.
• To strike out; to wipe out or destroy; to annihilate; as, to expugne an offense.
Expurgate
v. t.
• To purify; to clear from anything noxious, offensive, or erroneous; to cleanse; to purge; as, to expurgate a book.
Expurgation
n.
• The act of expurgating, purging, or cleansing; purification from anything noxious, offensive, sinful, or erroneous.
Expurgator
n.
• One who expurgates or purifies.
Expurgatorial
a.
• Tending or serving to expurgate; expurgatory.
Expurgatorious
a.
• Expurgatory.
Expurgatory
a.
• Serving to purify from anything noxious or erroneous; cleansing; purifying.
Expurge
v. t.
• To purge away.
Exquire
v. t.
• To search into or out.
Exquisite
a.
• Carefully selected or sought out; hence, of distinguishing and surpassing quality; exceedingly nice; delightfully excellent; giving rare satisfaction; as, exquisite workmanship.
• Exceeding; extreme; keen; — used in a bad or a good sense; as, exquisite pain or pleasure.
• Of delicate perception or close and accurate discrimination; not easy to satisfy; exact; nice; fastidious; as, exquisite judgment, taste, or discernment.
n.
• One who manifests an exquisite attention to external appearance; one who is overnice in dress or ornament; a fop; a dandy.
Exquisitely
adv.
• In an exquisite manner or degree; as, lace exquisitely wrought.
Exquisiteness
n.
• Quality of being exquisite.
Exquisitive
a.
• Eager to discover or learn; curious.
Exrable
a.
• Capable of being moved by entreaty; pitiful; tender.
Exrerience
v. t.
• To make practical acquaintance with; to try personally; to prove by use or trial; to have trial of; to have the lot or fortune of; to have befall one; to be affected by; to feel; as, to experience pain or pleasure; to experience poverty; to experience a change of views.
• To exercise; to train by practice.
Exsanguine
a.
• Bloodless.
Exsanguineous
a.
• Destitute of blood; anaemic; exsanguious.
Exsanguinity
n.
(Med.) Privation or destitution of blood; — opposed to plethora.
Exsanguious
a.
• Destitute of blood.
(Zool.) Destitute of true, or red, blood, as insects.
Exscind
v. t.
• To cut off; to separate or expel from union; to extirpate.
Exscribe
v. t.
• To copy; to transcribe.
Exscript
n.
• A copy; a transcript.
Exscriptural
a.
• Not in accordance with the doctrines of Scripture; unscriptural.
Exscutellate
a.
(Zool.) Without, or apparently without, a scutellum; — said of certain insects.
Exsect
v. t.
• A cutting out or away.
(Surg.) The removal by operation of a portion of a limb; particularly, the removal of a portion of a bone in the vicinity of a joint; the act or process of cutting out.
Exsertile
a.
(Biol.) Capable of being thrust out or protruded.
Exsiccant
a.
• Having the quality of drying up; causing a drying up.
n.
(Med.) An exsiccant medicine.
Exsiccate
v. t.
• To exhaust or evaporate moisture from; to dry up.
Exsiccation
n.
• The act of operation of drying; evaporation or expulsion of moisture; state of being dried up; dryness.
Exsiccative
a.
• Tending to make dry; having the power of drying.
Exsiccator
n.
(Chem.) An apparatus for drying substances or preserving them from moisture; a desiccator; also, less frequently, an agent employed to absorb moisture, as calcium chloride, or concentrated sulphuric acid.
Exsiliency
n.
• A leaping out.
Exsolution
n.
• Relaxation.
Exspoliation
n.
• Spoliation.
Exspuition
n.
• A discharge of saliva by spitting.
Exsputory
a.
• Spit out, or as if spit out.
Exstipulate
a.
(Bot.) Having no stipules.
Exstrophy
n.
(Med.) The eversion or turning out of any organ, or of its inner surface; as, exstrophy of the eyelid or of the bladder.
Exsuccous
a.
• Destitute of juice; dry; sapless. Latham.
Exsuction
n.
• The act of sucking out.
Exsudation
n.
• Exudation.
Exsufflate
v. t.
(Eccles.) To exorcise or renounce by blowing.
Exsufflation
n.
• A blast from beneath.
(Eccles.) A kind of exorcism by blowing with the breath.
(Physiol.) A strongly forced expiration of air from the lungs.
Exsufflicate
a.
• Empty; frivolous.
Exsuscitate
v. t.
• To rouse; to excite.
Exsuscitation
n.
• A stirring up; a rousing.
Extance
n.
• Outward existence.
Extancy
n.
• The state of rising above others; a projection.
Extant
a.
• Standing out or above any surface; protruded.
• Still existing; not destroyed or lost; outstanding.
• Publicly known; conspicuous.
Extemporal
a.
• Extemporaneous; unpremeditated.
Extemporanean
a.
• Extemporaneous.
Extemporaneous
a.
• Composed, performed, or uttered on the spur of the moment, or without previous study; unpremeditated; off-hand; extempore; extemporary; as, an extemporaneous address or production.
Extemporarily
adv.
• Extemporaneously.
Extemporary
a.
• Extemporaneous.
• Made for the occasion; for the time being.
Extempore
adv.
• Without previous study or meditation; without preparation; on the spur of the moment; suddenly; extemporaneously; as, to write or speak extempore.
a.
• Done or performed extempore.
n.
• Speaking or writing done extempore.
Extemporiness
n.
• The quality of being done or devised extempore
Extemporization
n.
• The act of extemporizing; the act of doing anything extempore.
Extemporize
v. i.
• To speak extempore; especially, to discourse without special preparation; to make an offhand address.
v. t.
• To do, make, or utter extempore or off-hand; to prepare in great haste, under urgent necessity, or with scanty or unsuitable materials; as, to extemporize a dinner, a costume, etc.
Extemporizer
n.
• One who extemporizes.
Extend
v. t.
• To stretch out; to prolong in space; to carry forward or continue in length; as, to extend a line in surveying; to extend a cord across the street.
• To enlarge, as a surface or volume; to expand; to spread; to amplify; as, to extend metal plates by hammering or rolling them.
• To enlarge; to widen; to carry out further; as, to extend the capacities, the sphere of usefulness, or commerce; to extend power or influence; to continue, as time; to lengthen; to prolong; as, to extend the time of payment or a season of trail.
• To hold out or reach forth, as the arm or hand.
• To bestow; to offer; to impart; to apply; as, to extend sympathy to the suffering.
• To increase in quantity by weakening or adulterating additions; as, to extend liquors.
(Eng. Law) To value, as lands taken by a writ of extent in satisfaction of a debt; to assign by writ of extent.
Extendant
a.
(Her.) Displaced.
Extendedly
adv.
• In an extended manner.
Extender
n.
• One who, or that which, extends or stretches anything.
Extendible
a.
• Capable of being extended, susceptible of being stretched, extended, enlarged, widened, or expanded.
(Law) Liable to be taken by a writ of extent.
Extendlessness
n.
• Unlimited extension.
Extense
a.
• Outreaching; expansive; extended, superficially or otherwise.
Extensibility
n.
• The quality of being extensible; the capacity of being extended; as, the extensibility of a fiber, or of a plate of metal.
Extensible
a.
• Capable of being extended, whether in length or breadth; susceptible of enlargement; extensible; extendible; — the opposite of contractible or compressible.
Extensibleness
n.
• Extensibility.
Extensile
a.
• Suited for, or capable of, extension; extensible.
Extension
n.
• The act of extending or the state of being extended; a stretching out; enlargement in breadth or continuation of length; increase; augmentation; expansion.
(Physics) That property of a body by which it occupies a portion of space.
(Logic & Metaph.) Capacity of a concept or general term to include a greater or smaller number of objects; — correlative of intension.
(Surg.) The operation of stretching a broken bone so as to bring the fragments into the same straight line.
(Physiol.) The straightening of a limb, in distinction from flexion.
(Com.) A written engagement on the part of a creditor, allowing a debtor further time to pay a debt.
Extensional
a.
• Having great extent.
Extensionist
n.
• One who favors or advocates extension.
Extensive
a.
• Having wide extent; of much superficial extent; expanded; large; broad; wide; comprehensive; as, an extensive farm; an extensive lake; an extensive sphere of operations; extensive benevolence; extensive greatness.
• Capable of being extended.
Extensively
adv.
• To a great extent; widely; largely; as, a story is extensively circulated.
Extensiveness
n.
• The state of being extensive; wideness; largeness; extent; diffusiveness.
Extensometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring the extension of a body, especially for measuring the elongation of bars of iron, steel, or other material, when subjected to a tensile force.
Extensor
n.
(Anat.) A muscle which serves to extend or straighten any part of the body, as an arm or a finger; — opposed to flexor.
Extensure
n.
• Extension.
Extent
a.
• Extended.
n.
• Space or degree to which a thing is extended; hence, superficies; compass; bulk; size; length; as, an extent of country or of line; extent of information or of charity.
• Degree; measure; proportion.
(Eng. Law) A peculiar species of execution upon debts due to the crown, under which the lands and goods of the debtor may be seized to secure payment.
• A process of execution by which the lands and goods of a debtor are valued and delivered to the creditor.
Extenuate
v. t.
• To make thin or slender; to draw out so as to lessen the thickness.
• To lessen; to palliate; to lessen or weaken the force of; to diminish the conception of, as crime, guilt, faults, ills, accusations, etc.; — opposed to aggravate.
• To lower or degrade; to detract from.
v. i.
• To become thinner; to make excuses; to advance palliating considerations.
a.
• Thin; slender.
Extenuation
n.
• The act of axtenuating or the state of being extenuated; the act of making thin, slender, or lean, or of palliating; diminishing, or lessening; palliation, as of a crime; mitigation, as of punishment.
Extenuator
n.
• One who extenuates.
Extenuatory
a.
• Tending to extenuate or palliate.
Exterior
a.
• External; outward; pertaining to that which is external; — opposed to interior; as, the exterior part of a sphere.
• External; on the outside; without the limits of; extrinsic; as, an object exterior to a man, opposed to what is within, or in his mind.
• Relating to foreign nations; foreign; as, the exterior relations of a state or kingdom.
n.
• The outward surface or part of a thing; that which is external; outside.
• Outward or external deportment, form, or ceremony; visible act; as, the exteriors of religion.
Exteriority
n.
• Surface; superficies; externality.
Exteriorly
adv.
• Outwardly; externally; on the exterior.
Exterminate
v. t.
• To drive out or away; to expel.
• To destroy utterly; to cut off; to extirpate; to annihilate; to root out; as, to exterminate a colony, a tribe, or a nation; to exterminate error or vice.
(Math.) To eliminate, as unknown quantities.
Extermination
n.
• The act of exterminating; total destruction; eradication; excision; as, the extermination of inhabitants or tribes, of error or vice, or of weeds from a field.
(Math.) Elimination.
Exterminator
n.
• One who, or that which, exterminates.
Exterminatory
a.
• Of or pertaining to extermination; tending to exterminate.
Extermine
v. t.
• To exterminate; to destroy.
Extern
a.
• External; outward; not inherent.
n.
• A pupil in a seminary who lives without its walls; a day scholar.
• Outward form or part; exterior.
External
a.
• Outward; exterior; relating to the outside, as of a body; being without; acting from without; — opposed to internal; as, the external form or surface of a body.
• Outside of or separate from ourselves; (Metaph.) separate from the perceiving mind.
• Outwardly perceptible; visible; physical or corporeal, as distinguished from mental or moral.
• Not intrinsic nor essential; accidental; accompanying; superficial.
• Foreign; relating to or connected with foreign nations; as, external trade or commerce; the external relations of a state or kingdom.
(Anat.) Away from the mesial plane of the body; lateral.
n.
• Something external or without; outward part; that which makes a show, rather than that which is intrinsic; visible form; — usually in the plural.
Externalism
n.
• The quality of being manifest to the senses; external acts or appearances; regard for externals.
(Metaph.) That philosophy or doctrine which recognizes or deals only with externals, or objects of sense perception; positivism; phenomenalism.
Externalistic
a.
• Pertaining to externalism
Externality
n.
• State of being external; exteriority
(Metaph.) separation from the perceiving mind.
Externalize
v. t.
• To make external; to manifest by outward form.
Externally
adv.
• In an external manner; outwardly; on the outside; in appearance; visibly.
Externe
n.
(med.) An officer in attendance upon a hospital, but not residing in it; esp., one who cares for the out-patients.
Exterraneous
a.
• Foreign; belonging to, or coming from, abroad.
Exterritorial
a.
• Beyond the territorial limits; foreign to, or exempt from, the territorial jurisdiction.
Exterritoriality
n.
• The state of being beyond the limits of a country.
• The state of being free from the jurisdiction of a country when within its territorial limits.
Extersion
n.
• The act of wiping or rubbing out.
Extill
v. i.
• To drop or distill.
Extillation
n.
• Distillation.
Extimulate
v. t.
• To stimulate.
Extimulation
n.
• Stimulation.
Extinct
a.
• Extinguished; put out; quenched; as, a fire, a light, or a lamp, is extinct; an extinct volcano.
• Without a survivor; without force; dead; as, a family becomes extinct; an extinct feud or law.
v. t.
• To cause to be extinct.
Extinction
n.
• The act of extinguishing or making extinct; a putting an end to; the act of putting out or destroying light, fire, life, activity, influence, etc.
• State of being extinguished or of ceasing to be; destruction; suppression; as, the extinction of life, of a family, of a quarrel, of claim.
Extine
n.
(bot.) The outer membrane of the grains of pollen of flowering plants.
Extinguish
v. t.
• To quench; to put out, as a light or fire; to stifle; to cause to die out; to put an end to; to destroy; as, to extinguish a flame, or life, or love, or hope, a pretense or a right.
• To obscure; to eclipse, as by superior splendor.
Extinguishable
a.
• Capable of being quenched, destroyed, or suppressed.
Extinguisher
n.
• One who, or that which, extinguishes; esp., a hollow cone or other device for extinguishing a flame, as of a torch or candle.
Extinguishment
n.
• The act of extinguishing, putting out, or quenching, or the state of being extinguished; extinction; suppression; destruction; nullification; as, the extinguishment of fire or flame, of discord, enmity, or jealousy, or of love or affection.
(Law) The annihilation or extinction of a right or obligation.
Extirp
v. t.
• To extirpate
Extirpable
a.
• Capable of being extirpated or eradicated; as, an extirpable plant.
Extirpate
v. t.
• To pluck up by the stem or root; to root out; to eradicate, literally or figuratively; to destroy wholly; as, to extirpate weeds; to extirpate a tumor; to extirpate a sect; to extirpate error or heresy.
Extirpation
n.
• The act of extirpating or rooting out, or the state of being extirpated; eradication; excision; total destruction; as, the extirpation of weeds from land, of evil from the heart, of a race of men, of heresy.
Extirpative
a.
• Capable of rooting out, or tending to root out.
Extirpator
n.
• One who extirpates or roots out; a destroyer.
Extirpatory
a.
• Extirpative.
Extirper
n.
• Extirpator.
Extispicious
a.
• Relating to the inspection of entrails for prognostication.
Extogenous
a.
(Biol.) Exogenous.
Extol
v. t.
• To place on high; to lift up; to elevate.
• To elevate by praise; to eulogize; to praise; to magnify; as, to extol virtue; to extol an act or a person.
Extoller
n.
• One who extols; one who praises.
Extolment
n.
• Praise.
Extorsive
a.
• Serving or tending to extort. Johnson.
Extort
v. t.
• To wrest from an unwilling person by physical force, menace, duress, torture, or any undue or illegal exercise of power or ingenuity; to wrench away (from); to tear away; to wring (from); to exact; as, to extort contributions from the vanquished; to extort confessions of guilt; to extort a promise; to extort payment of a debt.
(Law) To get by the offense of extortion.
v. i.
• To practice extortion.
p. p. & a.
• Extorted.
Extorter
n.
• One who practices extortion.
Extortion
n.
• The act of extorting; the act or practice of wresting anything from a person by force, by threats, or by any undue exercise of power; undue exaction; overcharge.
(Law) The offense committed by an officer who corruptly claims and takes, as his fee, money, or other thing of value, that is not due, or more than is due, or before it is due.
• That which is extorted or exacted by force.
Extortionary
a.
• Extortionate.
Extortionate
a.
• Characterized by extortion; oppressive; hard.
Extortioner
n
• , One who practices extortion.
Extortious
a.
• Extortionate. "Extortious cruelties." Bp. Hall
Extra
a.
• Beyond what is due, usual, expected, or necessary; additional; supernumerary; also, extraordinarily good; superior; as, extra work; extra pay.
n.
• Something in addition to what is due, expected, or customary; something in addition to the regular charge or compensation, or for which an additional charge is made; as, at European hotels lights are extras.
Extraarticular
a.
(Anat.) Situated outside of a joint.
Extrabranchial
a.
(Anat.) Outside of the branchial arches; — said of the cartilages thus placed in some fishes.
Extracapsular
a.
(Anat.) Situated outside of a capsule, esp. outside the capsular ligament of a joint.
Extract
v. t.
• To draw out or forth; to pull out; to remove forcibly from a fixed position, as by traction or suction, etc.; as, to extract a tooth from its socket, a stump from the earth, a splinter from the finger.
• To withdraw by expression, distillation, or other mechanical or chemical process; as, to extract an essence. Cf. Abstract, v. t., 6.
n.
• That which is extracted or drawn out.
• A portion of a book or document, separately transcribed; a citation; a quotation.
• A decoction, solution, or infusion made by drawing out from any substance that which gives it its essential and characteristic virtue; essence; as, extract of beef; extract of dandelion; also, any substance so extracted, and characteristic of that from which it is obtained; as, quinine is the most important extract of Peruvian bark.
(Med.) A solid preparation obtained by evaporating a solution of a drug, etc., or the fresh juice of a plant; — distinguished from an abstract.
(Old Chem.) A peculiar principle once erroneously supposed to form the basis of all vegetable extracts; — called also the extractive principle.
• Extraction; descent.
(Scots Law) A draught or copy of writing; certified copy of the proceedings in an action and the judgement therein, with an order for execution.
Extractiform
a.
(Chem.) Having the form, appearance, or nature, of an extract.
Extraction
n.
• The act of extracting, or drawing out; as, the extraction of a tooth, of a bone or an arrow from the body, of a stump from earth, of a passage from a book, of an essence or tincture.
• Derivation from a stock or family; lineage; descent; birth; the stock from which one has descended.
• That which is extracted; extract; essence.
Extractive
a.
• Capable of being extracted.
• Tending or serving to extract or draw out.
n.
• Anything extracted; an extract.
(Chem.) A chemical principle once supposed to exist in all extracts
• Any one of a large class of substances obtained by extraction, and consisting largely of nitrogenous hydrocarbons, such as xanthin, hypoxanthin, and creatin extractives from muscle tissue.
Extractor
n.
• One who, or that which, extracts
(Surg.) A forceps or instrument for extracting substances
(Breech-loading Firearms) A device for withdrawing a cartridge or spent cartridge shell from the chamber of the barrel.
Extradictionary
a.
• Consisting not in words, but in realities.
Extraditable
a.
• Subject, or liable, to extradition, as a fugitive from justice.
• Making liable to extradition; as, extraditable offenses.
Extradite
v. t.
• To deliver up by one government to another, as a fugitive from justice.
Extradition
n.
• The surrender or delivery of an alleged criminal by one State or sovereignty to another having jurisdiction to try charge.
Extrados
n.
(Arch.) The exterior curve of an arch; esp., the upper curved face of the whole body of voussoirs.
Extradotal
a.
• Forming no part of the dowry; as, extradotal property.
Extrafoliaceous
a.
(Bot.) Away from the leaves, or inserted in a different place from them; as, extrafoliaceous prickles.
Extraforaneous
a.
• Pertaining to that which is out of doors.
Extrageneous
a.
• Belonging to another race or kind.
Extrajudicial
a.
• Out of or beyond the proper authority of a court or judge; beyond jurisdiction; not legally required. "An extrajudicial opinion." Hallam.
Extralimitary
a.
• Being beyond the limit or bounds; as, extraliminary land.
Extralogical
a.
• Lying outside of the domain of logic.
Extramission
n.
• A sending out; emission.
Extramundane
a.
• Beyond the material world.
Extramural
a.
• Outside of the walls, as of a fortified or walled city.
Extraneity
n.
• State of being without or beyond a thing; foreignness.
Extraneous
a.
• Not belonging to, or dependent upon, a thing; without or beyond a thing; not essential or intrinsic; foreign; as, to separate gold from extraneous matter.
Extraordinarily
adv.
• In an extraordinary manner or degree.
Extraordinariness
n.
• The quality of being extraordinary.
Extraordinary
a.
• Beyond or out of the common order or method; not usual, customary, regular, or ordinary; as, extraordinary evils; extraordinary remedies.
• Exceeding the common degree, measure. or condition; hence, remarkable; uncommon; rare; wonderful; as, extraordinary talents or grandeur.
• Employed or sent upon an unusual or special service; as, an ambassador extraordinary.
n.
• That which is extraordinary; — used especially in the plural; as, extraordinaries excepted, there is nothing to prevent success.
Extraparochial
a.
• Beyond the limits of a parish.
Extraphysical
a.
• Not subject to physical laws or methods.
Extraprofessional
a.
• Foreign to a profession; not within the ordinary limits of professional duty or business.
Extraprovincial
a.
• Not within of pertaining to the same province or jurisdiction.
Extraregular
a.
• Not comprehended within a rule or rules.
Extrastapedial
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to a part of the columella of the ear, which, in many animals, projects beyond the connection with the stapes.
n.
• The extrastapedial part of columella.
Extraterritorial
a.
• Beyond the limits of a territory or particular jurisdiction; exterritorial.
Extraterritoriality
n.
• The state of being beyond the limits of a particular territory
(Internat. Law) a fiction by which a public minister, though actually in a foreign country, is supposed still to remain within the territory of his own sovereign or nation.
Extratropical
a.
• Beyond or outside of the tropics.
Extraught
p. p.
• Extracted; descended.
Extravagance
n.
• A wandering beyond proper limits; an excursion or sally from the usual way, course, or limit.
• The state of being extravagant, wild, or prodigal beyond bounds of propriety or duty; want of moderation; excess; especially, undue expenditure of money; vaid and superfluous expense; prodigality; as, extravagance of anger, love, expression, imagination, demands.
Extravagancy
n.
• Extravagance.
Extravagant
a.
• Wandering beyond one's bounds; roving; hence, foreign.
• Exceeding due bounds; wild; excessive; unrestrained; as, extravagant acts, wishes, praise, abuse.
• Profuse in expenditure; prodigal; wasteful; as, an extravagant man.
n.
• One who is confined to no general rule.
(Eccl. Hist.) Certain constitutions or decretal epistles, not at first included with others, but subsequently made a part of the canon law.
Extravagantly
adv.
• In an extravagant manner; wildly; excessively; profusely.
Extravagantness
n.
• The state of being extravagant or in excess; excess; extravagance.
Extravaganza
n.
• A composition, as in music, or in the drama, designed to produce effect by its wild irregularity; esp., a musical caricature.
• An extravagant flight of sentiment or language.
Extravagate
v. i.
• To rove.
Extravagation
n.
• A wandering beyond limits; excess.
Extravasate
v. t.
• To force or let out of the proper vessels or arteries, as blood.
Extravasation
n.
• The act of forcing or letting out of its proper vessels or ducts, as a fluid; effusion; as, an extravasation of blood after a rupture of the vessels.
Extravascular
a.
(Anat.) Outside the vessels; — said of the substance of all the tissues.
• Destitute of vessels; non-vascular.
Extravenate
a.
• Let out of the veins.
Extraversion
n.
• The act of throwing out; the state of being turned or thrown out.
Extreat
n.
• Extraction.
Extreme
a.
• At the utmost point, edge, or border; outermost; utmost; farthest; most remote; at the widest limit.
• Last; final; conclusive; — said of time; as, the extreme hour of life.
• The best of worst; most urgent; greatest; highest; immoderate; excessive; most violent; as, an extreme case; extreme folly.
• Radical; ultra; as, extreme opinions.
(Mus.) Extended or contracted as much as possible; — said of intervals; as, an extreme sharp second; an extreme flat forth.
n.
• The utmost point or verge; that part which terminates a body; extremity.
• Utmost limit or degree that is supposable or tolerable; hence, furthest degree; any undue departure from the mean; — often in the plural: things at an extreme distance from each other, the most widely different states, etc.; as, extremes of heat and cold, of virtue and vice; extremes meet.
• An extreme state or condition; hence, calamity, danger, distress, etc.
(Logic) Either of the extreme terms of a syllogism, the middle term being interposed between them.
(Math.) The first or the last term of a proportion or series.
Extremeless
a.
• Having no extremes; infinite.
Extremely
adv.
• In an extreme manner or state; in the utmost degree; to the utmost point; exceedingly; as, extremely hot or cold.
Extremist
n.
• A supporter of extreme doctrines or practice; one who holds extreme opinions.
Extremity
n.
• The extreme part; the utmost limit; the farthest or remotest point or part; as, the extremities of a country.
(Zool.) One of locomotive appendages of an animal; a limb; a leg or an arm of man.
• The utmost point; highest degree; most aggravated or intense form.
• The highest degree of inconvenience, pain, or suffering; greatest need or peril; extreme need; necessity.
Extricable
a.
• Capable of being extricated.
Extricate
v. t.
• To free, as from difficulties or perplexities; to disentangle; to disembarrass; as, to extricate a person from debt, peril, etc.
• To cause to be emitted or evolved; as, to extricate heat or moisture.
Extrication
n.
• The act or process of extricating or disentangling; a freeing from perplexities; disentanglement.
• The act of sending out or evolving.
Extrinsic
a.
• Not contained in or belonging to a body; external; outward; unessential; — opposed to intrinsic.
(Anat.) Attached partly to an organ or limb and partly to some other part — said of certain groups of muscles. Opposed to intrinsic.
Extrinsical
a.
• Extrinsic.
Extroitive
a.
• Seeking or going out after external objects.
Extrorsal
a.
(Bot.) Extrorse.
Extrorse
a.
(Bot.) Facing outwards, or away from the axis of growth; — said esp. of anthers occupying the outer side of the filament.
Extroversion
n.
• The condition of being turned wrong side out; as, extroversion of the bladder.
Extruct
v. t.
• To construct.
Extruction
n.
• A building up; construction.
Extructive
a.
• Constructive.
Extructor
n.
• A builder.
Extrude
v. t.
• To thrust out; to force, press, or push out; to expel; to drive off or away.
Extrusion
n.
• The act of thrusting or pushing out; a driving out; expulsion.
Extuberance
n.
• A swelling or rising; protuberance.
Extuberancy
n.
• Extuberance.
Extuberant
a.
• Swollen out; protuberant.
Extuberate
v. i.
• To swell out.
Extuberation
n.
• Protuberance.
Extumescence
n.
• A swelling or rising.
Exuberance
n.
• The state of being exuberant; an overflowing quantity; a copious or excessive production or supply; superabundance; richness; as, an exuberance of joy, of fancy, or of foliage.
Exuberancy
• , . Exuberance.
Exuberant
a.
• Characterized by abundance or superabundance; plenteous; rich; overflowing; copious or excessive in production; as, exuberant goodness; an exuberant intellect; exuberant foliage.
Exuberate
v. i.
• To abound; to be in great abundance.
Exudate
v. t. & i.
• To exude.
Exudation
n.
• The act of exuding; sweating; a discharge of humors, moisture, juice, or gum, as through pores or incisions; also, the substance exuded.
Exude
v. t.
• To discharge through pores or incisions, as moisture or other liquid matter; to give out.
v. i.
• To flow from a body through the pores, or by a natural discharge, as juice.
Exulcerate
v. t. & i.
• To ulcerate.
• To corrode; to fret; to chafe; to inflame.
a.
• Very sore; ulcerated.
Exulceration
n.
• Ulceration.
• A fretting; a festering; soreness.
Exulcerative
a.
• Tending to cause ulcers; exulceratory.
Exulceratory
a.
• Having a tendency to form ulcers; rendering ulcerous.
Exult
v. i.
• To be in high spirits; figuratively, to leap for joy; to rejoice in triumph or exceedingly; to triumph; as, an exulting heart.
Exultant
a.
• Inclined to exult; characterized by, or expressing, exultation; rejoicing triumphantly.
Exultation
n.
• The act of exulting; lively joy at success or victory, or at any advantage gained; rapturous delight; triumph.
Exulting
a.
• Rejoicing triumphantly or exceedingly; exultant.
Exundate
v. i.
• To overflow; to inundate.
Exundation
n.
• An overflow, or overflowing abundance.
Exungulate
v. t.
• To pare off, as nails, the hoof, etc.
Exuperable
a.
• Surmountable; superable.
Exuperance
n.
• Superiority; superfluity.
Exuperant
a.
• Surpassing; exceeding; surmounting.
Exuperate
v. t.
• To excel; to surmount.
Exuperation
n.
• The act of rising or coming into view.
Exurgent
a.
• Arising; coming to light.
Exustion
n.
• The act or operation of burning up.
Exutory
n.
(Med.) An issue.
Exuvia
• n. sing. of Exuviae.
Exuviability
n.
• Capability of shedding the skin periodically.
Exuviable
a.
• Capable of being cast off in the form of exuviae.
Exuviae
n. pl.
(Zool) Cast skins, shells, or coverings of animals; any parts of animals which are shed or cast off, as the skins of snakes, the shells of lobsters, etc.
(Geol.) The fossil shells and other remains which animals have left in the strata of the earth.
Exuvial
a.
• Of or pertaining to exuviae.
Exuviate
v. i.
(Zool.) To shed an old covering or condition preliminary to taking on a new one; to molt.
Exuviation
n.
(Zool.) The rejecting or casting off of some part, more particularly, the outer cuticular layer, as the shells of crustaceans, skins of snakes, etc.; molting; ecdysis.
Ey
n.
• An island.
interj.
• An interj. of wonder or inquiry.
Eyas
n.
(Zool.) A nesting or unfledged Lird; in falconry, a young hawk from the nest, not able to pry for itself.
a.
• Jnfledged, or newly fledged.
Eyasmusket
n.
• An unfledged or young male sparrow hawk.
Eye
n.
(Zool.) A brood; as, an eye of pheasants.
n.
• The organ of sight or vision. In man, and the vertebrates generally, it is properly the movable ball or globe in the orbit, but the term often includes the adjacent parts. In most invertebrates the years are immovable ocelli, or compound eyes made up of numerous ocelli.
• The faculty of seeing; power or range of vision; hence, judgment or taste in the use of the eye, and in judging of objects; as, to have the eye of sailor; an eye for the beautiful or picturesque.
• The action of the organ of sight; sight, look; view; ocular knowledge; judgment; opinion.
• The space commanded by the organ of sight; scope of vision; hence, face; front; the presence of an object which is directly opposed or confronted; immediate presence.
• Observation; oversight; watch; inspection; notice; attention; regard.
• That which resembles the organ of sight, in form, position, or appearance
(Zool.) The spots on a feather, as of peacock
• The scar to which the adductor muscle is attached in oysters and other bivalve shells; also, the adductor muscle itself, esp. when used as food, as in the scallop.
• The bud or sprout of a plant or tuber; as the eye of a potato
• The center of a target; the bull's-eye
• A small loop to receive a hook; as hooks and eyes on a dress
• The hole through the head of a needle
• A loop forming part of anything, or a hole through anything, to receive a rope, hook, pin, shaft, etc.; as an eye at the end of a tie bar in a bridge truss; as an eye through a crank; an eye at the end of rope.
• The hole through the upper millstone.
• That which resembles the eye in relative importance or beauty
• Tinge; shade of color.
v. t.
• To fix the eye on; to look on; to view; to observe; particularly, to observe or watch narrowly, or with fixed attention; to hold in view
v. i.
• To appear; to look.
Eyeball
n.
• The ball or globe of the eye.
Eyebar
n.
(Engin.) A bar with an eye at one or both ends.
Eyebeam
n.
• A glance of the eye.
Eyebolt
n.
(Mach.) A bolt which a looped head, or an opening in the head.
Eyebright
n.
(Bot.) A small annual plant (Euphrasia officinalis), formerly much used as a remedy for diseases of the eye.
Eyebrow
n.
• The brow or hairy arch above the eye.
Eyecup
n.
• A small oval porcelain or glass cup, having a rim curved to fit the orbit of the eye. it is used in the application of liquid remedies to eyes; — called also eyeglass.
Eyed
a.
• Heaving (such or so many) eyes; — used in composition; as sharp-eyed; dull-eyed; sad-eyed; ox-eyed Juno; myriad-eyed.
Eyedrop
n.
• A tear.
Eyeflap
n.
• A blinder on a horse's bridle.
Eyeful
a.
• Filling or satisfying the eye; visible; remarkable.
Eyeglance
n.
• A glance of eye.
Eyeglass
n.
• A lens of glass to assist the sight. Eyeglasses are used singly or in pairs.
• Eyepiece of a telescope, microscope, etc.
• The retina.
• A glass eyecup.
Eyehgt
n.
• An island.
Eyehole
n.
• A circular opening to recive a hook, cord, ring, or rope; an eyelet.
Eyelash
n.
• The fringe of hair that edges the eyelid; — usually in the pl.
• A hair of the fringe on the edge of the eyelid.
Eyeless
a.
• Without eyes; blind.
Eyelet
n.
• A small hole or perforation to receive a cord or fastener, as in garments, sails, etc.
• A metal ring or grommet, or short metallic tube, the ends of which can be bent outward and over to fasten it in place; — used to line an eyelet hole.
Eyeleteer
n.
• A small, sharp-pointed instrument used in piercing eyelet holes; a stiletto.
Eyelid
n.
(Anat.) The cover of the eye; that portion of movable skin with which an animal covers or uncovers the eyeball at pleasure.
Eyen
n. pl.
• Eyes.
Eyepiece
n.
(Opt.) The lens, or combination of lenses, at the eye end of a telescope or other optical instrument, through which the image formed by the mirror or object glass is viewed.
Eyer
n.
• One who eyes another.
Eyesaint
n.
• An object of interest to the eye; one wirehaired with the eyes.
Eyesalve
n.
• Ointment for the eye.
Eyeservant
n.
• A servant who attends faithfully to his duty only when watched.
Eyeservice
n.
• Service performed only under inspection, or the eye of an employer.
Eyeshot
n.
• Range, reach, or glance of the eye; view; sight; as, to be out of eyeshot.
Eyesight
n.
• Sight of the eye; the sense of seeing; view; observation.
Eyesore
n.
• Something offensive to the eye or sight; a blemish.
Eyesplice
n.
(Naut.) A splice formed by bending a rope's and back, and fastening it into the rope, forming a loop or eye.
Eyespot
n.
(Zool.) A simple visual organ found in many invertebrates, consisting of pigment cells covering a sensory nerve termination.
• An eyelike spot of color.
Eyespotted
a.
• Marked with spots like eyes.
Eyestalk
n.
(Zool.) One of the movable peduncles which, in the decapod Crustacea, bear the eyes at the tip.
Eyestone
n.
• A small, lenticular, calcareous body, esp. an operculum of a small shell of the family Tubinid, used to remove a foreign sub stance from the eye. It is rut into the inner corner of the eye under the lid, and allowed to work its way out at the outer corner, bringing with the substance.
(Min.) Eye agate.
Eyestring
n.
• The tendon by which the eye is moved.
Eyet
n.
• An island.
Eyetooth
n.
(Anat.) A canine tooth of the upper jaw.
Eyewater
n.
(Med.) A wash or lotion for application to the eyes.
Eyewink
n.
• A wink; a token. Shak.
Eyewinker
n.
• An eyelash.
Eyewitness
n.
• One who sees a thing done; one who has ocular view anything.
Eyghen
n. pl.
• Eyes.
Eyle
v. t.& i.
• To ail.
Eyot
n.
• A little island in a river or lake.
Eyr
n.
• Air.
Eyra
n.
(Zool.) A wild cat (Felis eyra) ranging from southern Brazil to Texas. It is reddish yellow and about the size of the domestic cat, but with a more slender body and shorter legs.
Eyre
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A journey in circuit of certain judges called justices in eyre (or in itinere).
Eyreach
n.
• The range or reach of the eye; eyeshot.
Eysell
n.
• Same as Eisel.

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