Dictionary Of The English Language "E"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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E is the fifth letter of the English alphabet. It derives its form, name, and value from the Latin, the form and value being further derived from the Greek, into which it came from the Phoenician, and ultimately, probably, from the Egyptian. Its etymological relations are closest with the vowels i, a, and o, as illustrated by to fall, to fell; man, pl. men; drink, drank, drench; dint, dent; doom, deem; goose, pl. geese; beef, OF. boef, L. bos; and E. cheer, OP. chiere, LL. cara. The letter e has in English several vowel sounds, the two principal being its long or name sound, as in eve, me, and the short, as in end, best. Usually at the end of words it is silent, but serves to indicate that the preceding vowel has its long sound, where otherwise it would be short, as in mane, cane, mete, which without the final e would be pronounced man, can, met. After c and g, the final e indicates that these letters are to be pronounced as, s and j, respectively, as in lace, rage.
Each
a. or a. pron.
• Every one of the two or more individuals composing a number of objects, considered separately from the rest. It is used either with or without a following noun; as, each of you or each one of you.
• Every; — sometimes used interchangeably with every.
Eachwhere
adv.
• Everywhere.
Eager
a.
• Sharp; sour; acid.
• Sharp; keen; bitter; severe.
• Excited by desire in the pursuit of any object; ardent to pursue, perform, or obtain; keenly desirous; hotly longing; earnest; zealous; impetuous; vehement; as, the hounds were eager in the chase.
• Brittle; inflexible; not ductile.
n.
• Same as Eagre.
Eagerly
adv.
• In an eager manner.
Eagerness
n.
• The state or quality of being eager; ardent desire.
• Tartness; sourness.
Eagle
n.
(Zool.) Any large, rapacious bird of the Falcon family, esp. of the genera Aquila and Haliaeetus. The eagle is remarkable for strength, size, graceful figure, keenness of vision, and extraordinary flight. The most noted species are the golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetus); the imperial eagle of Europe (A. mogilnik or imperialis); the American bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus); the European sea eagle (H. albicilla); and the great harpy eagle (Thrasaetus harpyia). The figure of the eagle, as the king of birds, is commonly used as an heraldic emblem, and also for standards and emblematic devices.
• A gold coin of the United States, of the value of ten dollars.
(Astron.) A northern constellation, containing Altair, a star of the first magnitude.
• The figure of an eagle borne as an emblem on the standard of the ancient Romans, or so used upon the seal or standard of any people.
Eagless
n.
(Zool.) A female or hen eagle.
Eaglestone
n.
(Min.) A concretionary nodule of clay ironstone, of the size of a walnut or larger, so called by the ancients, who believed that the eagle transported these stones to her nest to facilitate the laying of her eggs; aetites.
Eaglet
n.
(Zool.) A young eagle, or a diminutive eagle.
Eaglewood
n.
• A kind of fragrant wood.
Eagre
n.
• A wave, or two or three successive waves, of great height and violence, at flood tide moving up an estuary or river; — commonly called the bore.
Eale
n.
• Ale.
Eame
n.
• Uncle.
Ean
v. t. & i.
• To bring forth, as young; to yean.
Eanling
n.
• A lamb just brought forth; a yeanling.
Ear
n.
• The organ of hearing; the external ear.
• The sense of hearing; the perception of sounds; the power of discriminating between different tones; as, a nice ear for music; — in the singular only.
• That which resembles in shape or position the ear of an animal; any prominence or projection on an object, — usually one for support or attachment; a lug; a handle; as, the ears of a tub, a skillet, or dish. The ears of a boat are outside kneepieces near the bow.
(Arch.) Same as Acroterium
• Same as Crossette.
• Privilege of being kindly heard; favor; attention.
v. t.
• To take in with the ears; to hear.
n.
• The spike or head of any cereal (as, wheat, rye, barley, Indian corn, etc.), containing the kernels.
v. i.
• To put forth ears in growing; to form ears, as grain; as, this corn ears well.
v. t.
• To plow or till; to cultivate.
Earable
a.
• Arable; tillable.
Earache
n.
• Ache or pain in the ear.
Earal
a.
• Receiving by the ear.
Earcap
n.
• A cap or cover to protect the ear from cold.
Earcockle
n.
(Bot.) A disease in wheat, in which the blackened and contracted grain, or ear, is filled with minute worms.
Eardrop
n.
• A pendant for the ear; an earring; as, a pair of eardrops.
(Bot.) A species of primrose.
Eardrum
n.
(Anat.) The tympanum.
Eared
a.
• Having (such or so many) ears; — used in composition; as, long-eared-eared; sharp-eared; full-eared; ten-eared.
(Zool.) Having external ears; having tufts of feathers resembling ears.
Eariness
n.
• Fear or timidity, especially of something supernatural.
Earing
n.
(Naut.) A line used to fasten the upper corners of a sail to the yard or gaff; — also called head earing
• A line for hauling the reef cringle to the yard; — also called reef earing
• A line fastening the corners of an awning to the rigging or stanchions.
n.
• Coming into ear, as corn.
n.
• A plowing of land.
Earl
n.
• A nobleman of England ranking below a marquis, and above a viscount. The rank of an earl corresponds to that of a count (comte) in France, and graf in Germany. Hence the wife of an earl is still called countess.
n.
(Zool.) The needlefish.
Earlap
n.
• The lobe of the ear.
Earldom
n.
• The jurisdiction of an earl; the territorial possessions of an earl.
• The status, title, or dignity of an earl.
Earldorman
n.
• Alderman.
Earlduck
n.
(Zool.) The red-breasted merganser (Merganser serrator).
Earless
a.
• Without ears; hence, deaf or unwilling to hear.
Earlet
n.
• An earring.
Earliness
n.
• The state of being early or forward; promptness.
Earlock
n.
• A lock or curl of hair near the ear; a lovelock.
Early
adv.
• Soon; in good season; seasonably; betimes; as, come early.
a.
• In advance of the usual or appointed time; in good season; prior in time; among or near the first; — opposed to late; as, the early bird; an early spring; early fruit.
• Coming in the first part of a period of time, or among the first of successive acts, events, etc.
Earmark
n.
• A mark on the ear of sheep, oxen, dogs, etc., as by cropping or slitting.
• A mark for identification; a distinguishing mark.
v. t.
• To mark, as sheep, by cropping or slitting the ear.
Earn
v. t.
• To merit or deserve, as by labor or service; to do that which entitles one to (a reward, whether the reward is received or not).
• To acquire by labor, service, or performance; to deserve and receive as compensation or wages; as, to earn a good living; to earn honors or laurels.
v. t. & i.
• To grieve.
v. i.
• To long; to yearn.
v. i.
• To curdle, as milk.
Earnest
n.
• Seriousness; reality; fixed determination; eagerness; intentness.
a.
• Ardent in the pursuit of an object; eager to obtain or do; zealous with sincerity; with hearty endeavor; heartfelt; fervent; hearty; — used in a good sense; as, earnest prayers.
• Intent; fixed closely; as, earnest attention.
• Serious; important.
v. t.
• To use in earnest.
n.
• Something given, or a part paid beforehand, as a pledge; pledge; handsel; a token of what is to come.
(Law) Something of value given by the buyer to the seller, by way of token or pledge, to bind the bargain and prove the sale.
Earnestful
a.
• Serious.
Earnestly
adv.
• In an earnest manner.
Earnestness
n.
• The state or quality of being earnest; intentness; anxiety.
Earnful
a.
• Full of anxiety or yearning.
Earning
n.
• That which is earned; wages gained by work or services; money earned; — used commonly in the plural.
Earpick
n.
• An instrument for removing wax from the ear.
Earreach
n.
• Earshot.
Earring
n.
• An ornament consisting of a ring passed through the lobe of the ear, with or without a pendant.
Earshot
n.
• Reach of the ear; distance at which words may be heard.
Earshrift
n.
• A nickname for auricular confession; shrift.
Earsore
n.
• An annoyance to the ear.
Earth
n.
• The globe or planet which we inhabit; the world, in distinction from the sun, moon, or stars. Also, this world as the dwelling place of mortals, in distinction from the dwelling place of spirits.
• The solid materials which make up the globe, in distinction from the air or water; the dry land.
• The softer inorganic matter composing part of the surface of the globe, in distinction from the firm rock; soil of all kinds, including gravel, clay, loam, and the like; sometimes, soil favorable to the growth of plants; the visible surface of the globe; the ground; as, loose earth; rich earth.
• A part of this globe; a region; a country; land.
• Worldly things, as opposed to spiritual things; the pursuits, interests, and allurements of this life.
• The people on the globe.
(Chem.) Any earthy-looking metallic oxide, as alumina, glucina, zirconia, yttria, and thoria.
• A similar oxide, having a slight alkaline reaction, as lime, magnesia, strontia, baryta.
• A hole in the ground, where an animal hides himself; as, the earth of a fox.
v. t.
• To hide, or cause to hide, in the earth; to chase into a burrow or den.
• To cover with earth or mold; to inter; to bury; — sometimes with up.
v. i.
• To burrow.
n.
• A plowing.
Earthbag
n.
(Mil.) A bag filled with earth, used commonly to raise or repair a parapet.
Earthbank
n.
• A bank or mound of earth.
Earthboard
n.
(Agric.) The part of a plow, or other implement, that turns over the earth; the moldboard.
Earthborn
a.
• Born of the earth; terrigenous; springing originally from the earth; human.
• Relating to, or occasioned by, earthly objects.
Earthbred
a.
• Low; grovelling; vulgar.
Earthdin
n.
• An earthquake.
Earthdrake
n.
• A mythical monster of the early Anglo-Saxon literature; a dragon.
Earthen
a.
• Made of earth; made of burnt or baked clay, or other like substances; as, an earthen vessel or pipe.
Earthenware
n.
• Vessels and other utensils, ornaments, or the like, made of baked clay.
Earthfork
n.
• A pronged fork for turning up the earth.
Earthiness
n.
• The quality or state of being earthy, or of containing earth; hence, grossness.
Earthliness
n.
• The quality or state of being earthly; worldliness; grossness; perishableness.
Earthling
n.
• An inhabitant of the earth; a mortal.
Earthly
a.
• Pertaining to the earth; belonging to this world, or to man's existence on the earth; not heavenly or spiritual; carnal; worldly; as, earthly joys; earthly flowers; earthly praise.
• Of all things on earth; possible; conceivable.
• Made of earth; earthy.
adv.
• In the manner of the earth or its people; worldly.
Earthmad
n.
(Zool.) The earthworm.
Earthnut
n.
(Bot.) A name given to various roots, tubers, or pods grown under or on the ground
• The esculent tubers of the umbelliferous plants Bunium flexuosum and Carum Bulbocastanum
• The peanut.
Earthpea
n.
(Bot.) A species of pea (Amphicarpaea monoica). It is a climbing leguminous plant, with hairy underground pods.
Earthquake
n.
• A shaking, trembling, or concussion of the earth, due to subterranean causes, often accompanied by a rumbling noise. The wave of shock sometimes traverses half a hemisphere, destroying cities and many thousand lives; — called also earthdin, earthquave, and earthshock.
a.
• Like, or characteristic of, an earthquake; loud; starling.
Earthquave
n.
• An earthquake.
Earthshock
n.
• An earthquake.
Earthstar
n.
(Bot.) A curious fungus of the genus Geaster, in which the outer coating splits into the shape of a star, and the inner one forms a ball containing the dustlike spores.
Earthwork
n.
(Mil.) Any construction, whether a temporary breastwork or permanent fortification, for attack or defense, the material of which is chiefly earth.
(Engin.) The operation connected with excavations and embankments of earth in preparing foundations of buildings, in constructing canals, railroads, etc.
• An embankment or construction made of earth.
Earthworm
n.
(Zool.) Any worm of the genus Lumbricus and allied genera, found in damp soil. One of the largest and most abundant species in Europe and America is L. terrestris; many others are known; — called also angleworm and dewworm.
• A mean, sordid person; a niggard.
Earthy
a.
• Consisting of, or resembling, earth; terrene; earthlike; as, earthy matter.
• Of or pertaining to the earth or to, this world; earthly; terrestrial; carnal.
• Gross; low; unrefined.
(Min.) Without luster, or dull and roughish to the touch; as, an earthy fracture.
Earwax
n.
(Anat.) See Cerumen.
Earwig
n.
(Zool.) Any insect of the genus Forticula and related genera, belonging to the order Euplexoptera.
(Zool.) In America, any small chilopodous myriapod, esp. of the genus Geophilus.
• A whisperer of insinuations; a secret counselor.
v. t.
• To influence, or attempt to influence, by whispered insinuations or private talk.
Earwitness
n.
• A witness by means of his ears; one who is within hearing and does hear; a hearer.
Ease
n.
• Satisfaction; pleasure; hence, accommodation; entertainment.
• Freedom from anything that pains or troubles; as: (a) Relief from labor or effort; rest; quiet; relaxation; as, ease of body.
• Freedom from care, solicitude, or anything that annoys or disquiets; tranquillity; peace; comfort; security; as, ease of mind
• Freedom from constraint, formality, difficulty, embarrassment, etc.; facility; liberty; naturalness; — said of manner, style, etc.; as, ease of style, of behavior, of address.
v. t. & i.
• To free from anything that pains, disquiets, or oppresses; to relieve from toil or care; to give rest, repose, or tranquility to; — often with of; as, to ease of pain; ease the body or mind.
• To render less painful or oppressive; to mitigate; to alleviate.
• To release from pressure or restraint; to move gently; to lift slightly; to shift a little; as, to ease a bar or nut in machinery.
• To entertain; to furnish with accommodations.
Easeful
a.
• Full of ease; suitable for affording ease or rest; quiet; comfortable; restful.
Easel
n.
• A frame (commonly) of wood serving to hold a canvas upright, or nearly upright, for the painter's convenience or for exhibition.
Easeless
a.
• Without ease.
Easement
n.
• That which gives ease, relief, or assistance; convenience; accommodation.
(Law) A liberty, privilege, or advantage, which one proprietor has in the estate of another proprietor, distinct from the ownership of the soil, as a way, water course, etc. It is a species of what the civil law calls servitude.
(Arch.) A curved member instead of an abrupt change of direction, as in a baseboard, hand rail, etc.
Easily
adv.
• With ease; without difficulty or much effort; as, this task may be easily performed; that event might have been easily foreseen.
• Without pain, anxiety, or disturbance; as, to pass life well and easily.
• Readily; without reluctance; willingly.
• Smoothly; quietly; gently; gracefully; without umult or discord.
• Without shaking or jolting; commodiously; as, a carriage moves easily.
Easiness
n.
• The state or condition of being easy; freedom from distress; rest.
• Freedom from difficulty; ease; as the easiness of a task.
• Freedom from emotion; compliance; disposition to yield without opposition; unconcernedness.
• Freedom from effort, constraint, or formality; — said of style, manner, etc.
• Freedom from jolting, jerking, or straining.
East
n.
• The point in the heavens where the sun is seen to rise at the equinox, or the corresponding point on the earth; that one of the four cardinal points of the compass which is in a direction at right angles to that of north and south, and which is toward the right hand of one who faces the north; the point directly opposite to the west.
• The eastern parts of the earth; the regions or countries which lie east of Europe; the orient. In this indefinite sense, the word is applied to Asia Minor, Syria, Chaldea, Persia, India, China, etc.; as, the riches of the East; the diamonds and pearls of the East; the kings of the East.
(U. S. Hist. and Geog.) Formerly, the part of the United States east of the Alleghany Mountains, esp. the Eastern, or New England, States; now, commonly, the whole region east of the Mississippi River, esp. that which is north of Maryland and the Ohio River; — usually with the definite article; as, the commerce of the East is not independent of the agriculture of the West.
a.
• Toward the rising sun; or toward the point where the sun rises when in the equinoctial; as, the east gate; the east border; the east side; the east wind is a wind that blows from the east.
adv.
• Eastward.
v. i.
• To move toward the east; to veer from the north or south toward the east; to orientate.
Easter
n.
• An annual church festival commemorating Christ's resurrection, and occurring on Sunday, the second day after Good Friday. It corresponds to the pasha or passover of the Jews, and most nations still give it this name under the various forms of pascha, pasque, paque, or pask.
• The day on which the festival is observed; Easter day.
v. i.
(Naut.) To veer to the east; — said of the wind.
Easterling
n.
• A native of a country eastward of another; — used, by the English, of traders or others from the coasts of the Baltic.
• A piece of money coined in the east by Richard II. of England.
(Zool.) The smew.
a.
• Relating to the money of the Easterlings, or Baltic traders.
Easterly
a.
• Coming from the east; as, it was easterly wind.
• Situated, directed, or moving toward the east; as, the easterly side of a lake; an easterly course or voyage.
adv.
• Toward, or in the direction of, the east.
Eastern
a.
• Situated or dwelling in the east; oriental; as, an eastern gate; Eastern countries.
• Going toward the east, or in the direction of east; as, an eastern voyage.
Easternmost
a.
• Most eastern.
Easting
n.
(Naut. & Surv.) The distance measured toward the east between two meridians drawn through the extremities of a course; distance of departure eastward made by a vessel.
Easy
a.
• At ease; free from pain, trouble, or constraint; as: (a) Free from pain, distress, toil, exertion, and the like; quiet; as, the patient is easy. (b) Free from care, responsibility, discontent, and the like; not anxious; tranquil; as, an easy mind. (c) Free from constraint, harshness, or formality; unconstrained; smooth; as, easy manners; an easy style.
• Not causing, or attended with, pain or disquiet, or much exertion; affording ease or rest; as, an easy carriage; a ship having an easy motion; easy movements, as in dancing.
• Not difficult; requiring little labor or effort; slight; inconsiderable; as, an easy task; an easy victory.
• Causing ease; giving freedom from care or labor; furnishing comfort; commodious; as, easy circumstances; an easy chair or cushion.
• Not making resistance or showing unwillingness; tractable; yielding; complying; ready.
• Moderate; sparing; frugal.
(Com.) Not straitened as to money matters; as, the market is easy; — opposed to tight.
Eat
v. t.
• To chew and swallow as food; to devour; — said especially of food not liquid; as, to eat bread.
• To corrode, as metal, by rust; to consume the flesh, as a cancer; to waste or wear away; to destroy gradually; to cause to disappear.
v. i.
• To take food; to feed; especially, to take solid, in distinction from liquid, food; to board.
• To taste or relish; as, it eats like tender beef.
• To make one's way slowly.
Eatable
a.
• Capable of being eaten; fit to be eaten; proper for food; esculent; edible.
n.
• Something fit to be eaten.
Eatage
n.
• Eatable growth of grass for horses and cattle, esp. that of aftermath.
Eater
n.
• One who, or that which, eats.
Eath
a. & adv.
• Easy or easily.
Eating
n.
• The act of tasking food; the act of consuming or corroding.
• Something fit to be eaten; food; as, a peach is good eating.
Eavedrop
n.
• A drop from the eaves; eavesdrop.
Eaves
n. pl.
(Arch.) The edges or lower borders of the roof of a building, which overhang the walls, and cast off the water that falls on the roof.
• Brow; ridge.
• Eyelids or eyelashes.
Eavesdrop
v. i.
• To stand under the eaves, near a window or at the door, of a house, to listen and learn what is said within doors; hence, to listen secretly to what is said in private.
n.
• The water which falls in drops from the eaves of a house.
Eavesdropper
n.
• One who stands under the eaves, or near the window or door of a house, to listen; hence, a secret listener.
Eavesdropping
n.
(Law) The habit of lurking about dwelling houses, and other places where persons meet fro private intercourse, secretly listening to what is said, and then tattling it abroad. The offense is indictable at common law.
Ebb
n.
(Zool.) The European bunting.
n.
• The reflux or flowing back of the tide; the return of the tidal wave toward the sea; — opposed to flood; as, the boats will go out on the ebb.
• The state or time of passing away; a falling from a better to a worse state; low state or condition; decline; decay.
v. i.
• To flow back; to return, as the water of a tide toward the ocean; — opposed to flow.
• To return or fall back from a better to a worse state; to decline; to decay; to recede.
v. t.
• To cause to flow back.
a.
• Receding; going out; falling; shallow; low.
Ebionite
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of a sect of heretics, in the first centuries of the church, whose doctrine was a mixture of Judaism and Christianity. They denied the divinity of Christ, regarding him as an inspired messenger, and rejected much of the New Testament.
Ebionitism
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) The system or doctrine of the Ebionites.
Eblis
n.
(Moham. Myth.) The prince of the evil spirits; Satan.
Ebon
a.
• Consisting of ebony.
• Like ebony, especially in color; black; dark.
n.
• Ebony.
Ebonist
n.
• One who works in ebony.
Ebonite
n.
(Chem.) A hard, black variety of vulcanite. It may be cut and polished, and is used for many small articles, as combs and buttons, and for insulating material in electric apparatus.
Ebonize
v. t.
• To make black, or stain black, in imitation of ebony; as, to ebonize wood.
Ebony
n.
• A hard, heavy, and durable wood, which admits of a fine polish or gloss. The usual color is black, but it also occurs red or green.
a.
• Made of ebony, or resembling ebony; black; as, an ebony countenance.
Ebracteate
a.
(Bot.) Without bracts.
Ebracteolate
a.
(Bot.) Without bracteoles, or little bracts; — said of a pedicel or flower stalk.
Ebrauke
a.
• Hebrew.
Ebriety
n.
• Drunkenness; intoxication by spirituous liquors; inebriety.
Ebrillade
n.
(Man.) A bridle check; a jerk of one rein, given to a horse when he refuses to turn.
Ebriosity
n.
• Addiction to drink; habitual drunkenness.
Ebrious
a.
• Inclined to drink to excess; intoxicated; tipsy.
Ebulliate
v. i.
• To boil or bubble up.
Ebullient
a.
• Boiling up or over; hence, manifesting exhilaration or excitement, as of feeling; effervescing.
Ebullioscope
n.
(Phys. Chem.) An instrument for observing the boiling point of liquids, especially for determining the alcoholic strength of a mixture by the temperature at which it boils.
Ebullition
n.
• A boiling or bubbling up of a liquid; the motion produced in a liquid by its rapid conversion into vapor.
• Effervescence occasioned by fermentation or by any other process which causes the liberation of a gas or an aeriform fluid, as in the mixture of an acid with a carbonated alkali.
• A sudden burst or violent display; an outburst; as, an ebullition of anger or ill temper.
Eburin
n.
• A composition of dust of ivory or of bone with a cement; — used for imitations of valuable stones and in making moldings, seals, etc.
Eburnation
n.
(Med.) A condition of bone cartilage occurring in certain diseases of these tissues, in which they acquire an unnatural density, and come to resemble ivory.
Eburnean
a.
• Made of or relating to ivory.
Eburnification
n.
• The conversion of certain substances into others which have the appearance or characteristics of ivory.
Eburnine
a.
• Of or pertaining to ivory.
Ecardines
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of Brachiopoda; the Lyopomata.
Ecaudate
a.
(Bot.) Without a tail or spur.
(Zool.) Tailless.
Ecballium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of cucurbitaceous plants consisting of the single species Ecballium agreste (or Elaterium), the squirting cucumber. Its fruit, when ripe, bursts and violently ejects its seeds, together with a mucilaginous juice, from which elaterium, a powerful cathartic medicine, is prepared.
Ecbasis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure in which the orator treats of things according to their events consequences.
Ecbatic
a.
(Gram.) Denoting a mere result or consequence, as distinguished from telic, which denotes intention or purpose; thus the phrase , if rendered "so that it was fulfilled," is ecbatic; if rendered "in order that it might be." etc., is telic.
Ecbole
n.
(Rhet.) A digression in which a person is introduced speaking his own words.
Ecbolic
n.
(Med.) A drug, as ergot, which by exciting uterine contractions promotes the expulsion of the contents of the uterus.
Ecboline
n.
(Chem.) An alkaloid constituting the active principle of ergot; — so named from its power of producing abortion.
Eccaleobion
n.
• A contrivance for hatching eggs by artificial heat.
Eccentric
a.
• Deviating or departing from the center, or from the line of a circle; as, an eccentric or elliptical orbit; pertaining to deviation from the center or from true circular motion.
• Not having the same center; — said of circles, ellipses, spheres, etc., which, though coinciding, either in whole or in part, as to area or volume, have not the same center; — opposed to concentric.
(Mach.) Pertaining to an eccentric; as, the eccentric rod in a steam engine.
• Not coincident as to motive or end.
• Deviating from stated methods, usual practice, or established forms or laws; deviating from an appointed sphere or way; departing from the usual course; irregular; anomalous; odd; as, eccentric conduct.
n.
• A circle not having the same center as another contained in some measure within the first.
• One who, or that which, deviates from regularity; an anomalous or irregular person or thing.
(Astron.) In the Ptolemaic system, the supposed circular orbit of a planet about the earth, but with the earth not in its center.
• A circle described about the center of an elliptical orbit, with half the major axis for radius.
(Mach.) A disk or wheel so arranged upon a shaft that the center of the wheel and that of the shaft do not coincide. It is used for operating valves in steam engines, and for other purposes. The motion derived is precisely that of a crank having the same throw.
Eccentrically
adv.
• In an eccentric manner.
Eccentricity
n.
• The state of being eccentric; deviation from the customary line of conduct; oddity.
(Math.) The ratio of the distance between the center and the focus of an ellipse or hyperbola to its semi-transverse axis.
(Astron.) The ratio of the distance of the center of the orbit of a heavenly body from the center of the body round which it revolves to the semi-transverse axis of the orbit.
(Mech.) The distance of the center of figure of a body, as of an eccentric, from an axis about which it turns; the throw.
Ecchymose
v. t.
(Med.) To discolor by the production of an ecchymosis, or effusion of blood, beneath the skin; — chiefly used in the passive form; as, the parts were much ecchymosed.
Ecchymosis
n.
(Med.) A livid or black and blue spot, produced by the extravasation or effusion of blood into the areolar tissue from a contusion.
Ecchymotic
a.
• Pertaining to ecchymosis.
Eccle
n.
(Zool.) The European green woodpecker; — also called ecall, eaquall, yaffle.
Ecclesia
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The public legislative assembly of the Athenians.
(Eccl.) A church, either as a body or as a building.
Ecclesial
a.
• Ecclesiastical.
Ecclesiarch
n.
• An official of the Eastern Church, resembling a sacrist in the Western Church.
Ecclesiast
n.
• An ecclesiastic.
• The Apocryphal book of Ecclesiasticus.
Ecclesiastes
n.
• One of the canonical books of the Old Testament.
Ecclesiastic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the church.
n.
• A person in holy orders, or consecrated to the service of the church and the ministry of religion; a clergyman; a priest.
Ecclesiastical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the church; relating to the organization or government of the church; not secular; as, ecclesiastical affairs or history; ecclesiastical courts.
Ecclesiastically
adv.
• In an ecclesiastical manner; according ecclesiastical rules.
Ecclesiasticism
n.
• Strong attachment to ecclesiastical usages, forms, etc.
Ecclesiasticus
n.
• A book of the Apocrypha.
Ecclesiological
a.
• Belonging to ecclesiology.
Ecclesiologist
n.
• One versed in ecclesiology.
Ecclesiology
n.
• The science or theory of church building and decoration.
Eccoriate
v. t.
• To strip or wear off the skin of; to abrade; to gall; to break and remove the cuticle of, in any manner, as by rubbing, beating, or by the action of acrid substances.
Eccritic
n.
(Med.) A remedy which promotes discharges, as an emetic, or a cathartic.
Ecdysis
n.
(Biol.) The act of shedding, or casting off, an outer cuticular layer, as in the case of serpents, lobsters, etc.; a coming out; as, the ecdysis of the pupa from its shell; exuviation.
Ecgonine
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, crystalline, nitrogenous base, obtained by the decomposition of cocaine.
Eche
a. or a. pron.
• Each.
Echelon
n.
(Mil.) An arrangement of a body of troops when its divisions are drawn up in parallel lines each to the right or the left of the one in advance of it, like the steps of a ladder in position for climbing. Also used adjectively; as, echelon distance.
(Naval) An arrangement of a fleet in a wedge or form.
v. t.
(Mil.) To place in echelon; to station divisions of troops in echelon.
v. i.
• To take position in echelon.
Echidna
n.
(Gr. Myth.) A monster, half maid and half serpent.
(Zool.) A genus of Monotremata found in Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea. They are toothless and covered with spines; — called also porcupine ant-eater, and Australian ant-eater.
Echidnine
n.
(Chem.) The clear, viscid fluid secreted by the poison glands of certain serpents; also, a nitrogenous base contained in this, and supposed to be the active poisonous principle of the virus.
Echinid
a. & n.
(Zool.) Same as Echinoid.
Echinidan
n.
(Zool.) One the Echinoidea.
Echinital
a.
• Of, or like, an echinite.
Echinite
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil echinoid.
Echinococcus
n.
(Zool.) A parasite of man and of many domestic and wild animals, forming compound cysts or tumors (called hydatid cysts) in various organs, but especially in the liver and lungs, which often cause death. It is the larval stage of the Taenia echinococcus, a small tapeworm peculiar to the dog.
Echinoderm
n.
(Zool.) One of the Echinodermata.
Echinodermal
a.
(Zool.) Relating or belonging to the echinoderms.
Echinodermata
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the grand divisions of the animal kingdom. By many writers it was formerly included in the Radiata.
Echinodermatous
a.
(Zool.) Relating to Echinodermata; echinodermal.
Echinoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Echinoidea.
n.
• One of the Echinoidea.
Echinoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) The class Echinodermata which includes the sea urchins. They have a calcareous, usually more or less spheroidal or disk-shaped, composed of many united plates, and covered with movable spines.
Echinozoa
n. pl.
(Zool.) The Echinodermata.
Echinulate
a.
(Bot. & Zool.) Set with small spines or prickles.
Echinus
n.
(Zool.) A hedgehog.
(Zool.) A genus of echinoderms, including the common edible sea urchin of Europe.
(Arch.) The rounded molding forming the bell of the capital of the Grecian Doric style, which is of a peculiar elastic curve.
• The quarter-round molding (ovolo) of the Roman Doric style.
• A name sometimes given to the egg and anchor or egg and dart molding, because that ornament is often identified with Roman Doric capital. The name probably alludes to the shape of the shell of the sea urchin.
Echiuroidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Annelida which includes the genus Echiurus and allies. They are often classed among the Gephyrea, and called the armed Gephyreans.
Echo
n.
• A sound reflected from an opposing surface and repeated to the ear of a listener; repercussion of sound; repetition of a sound.
• Fig.: Sympathetic recognition; response; answer.
(Myth. & Poetic) A wood or mountain nymph, regarded as repeating, and causing the reverberation of them.
(Gr. Myth.) A nymph, the daughter of Air and Earth, who, for love of Narcissus, pined away until nothing was left of her but her voice
v. t.
• To send back (a sound); to repeat in sound; to reverberate.
• To repeat with assent; to respond; to adopt.
v. i.
• To give an echo; to resound; to be sounded back; as, the hall echoed with acclamations.
Echoer
n.
• One who, or that which, echoes.
Echoless
a.
• Without echo or response.
Echometer
n.
(Mus) A graduated scale for measuring the duration of sounds, and determining their different, and the relation of their intervals.
Echometry
n.
• The art of measuring the duration of sounds or echoes.
• The art of constructing vaults to produce echoes.
Echoscope
n.
(Med.) An instrument for intensifying sounds produced by percussion of the thorax.
Eclaircise
v. t.
• To make clear; to clear up what is obscure or not understood; to explain.
Eclaircissement
n.
• The clearing up of anything which is obscure or not easily understood; an explanation.
Eclampsia
n.
(Med.) A fancied perception of flashes of light, a symptom of epilepsy; hence, epilepsy itself; convulsions.
Eclampsy
n.
(Med.) Same as Eclampsia.
Eclat
n.
• Brilliancy of success or effort; splendor; brilliant show; striking effect; glory; renown.
• Demonstration of admiration and approbation; applause.
Eclectic
a.
• Selecting; choosing (what is true or excellent in doctrines, opinions, etc.) from various sources or systems; as, an eclectic philosopher.
• Consisting, or made up, of what is chosen or selected; as, an eclectic method; an eclectic magazine.
n.
• One who follows an eclectic method.
Eclectically
adv.
• In an eclectic manner; by an eclectic method.
Eclecticism
n.
• Theory or practice of an eclectic.
Eclegm
n.
(Med.) A medicine made by mixing oils with sirups.
Eclipse
n.
(Astron.) An interception or obscuration of the light of the sun, moon, or other luminous body, by the intervention of some other body, either between it and the eye, or between the luminous body and that illuminated by it. A lunar eclipse is caused by the moon passing through the earth's shadow; a solar eclipse, by the moon coming between the sun and the observer. A satellite is eclipsed by entering the shadow of its primary. The obscuration of a planet or star by the moon or a planet, though of the nature of an eclipse, is called an occultation. The eclipse of a small portion of the sun by Mercury or Venus is called a transit of the planet.
• The loss, usually temporary or partial, of light, brilliancy, luster, honor, consciousness, etc.; obscuration; gloom; darkness.
v. t.
• To cause the obscuration of; to darken or hide; — said of a heavenly body; as, the moon eclipses the sun.
• To obscure, darken, or extinguish the beauty, luster, honor, etc., of; to sully; to cloud; to throw into the shade by surpassing.
v. i.
• To suffer an eclipse.
Ecliptic
n.
(Astron.) A great circle of the celestial sphere, making an angle with the equinoctial of about 23° 28'. It is the apparent path of the sun, or the real path of the earth as seen from the sun.
(Geog.) A great circle drawn on a terrestrial globe, making an angle of 23° 28' with the equator; — used for illustrating and solving astronomical problems.
a.
• Pertaining to the ecliptic; as, the ecliptic way.
• Pertaining to an eclipse or to eclipses.
Eclogite
n.
(Min.) A rock consisting of granular red garnet, light green smaragdite, and common hornblende; — so called in reference to its beauty.
Eclogue
n.
• A pastoral poem, in which shepherds are introduced conversing with each other; a bucolic; an idyl; as, the Ecloques of Virgil, from which the modern usage of the word has been established.
Economically
adv.
• With economy; with careful management; with prudence in expenditure.
Economics
n.
• The science of household affairs, or of domestic management.
• Political economy; the science of the utilities or the useful application of wealth or material resources.
Economist
n.
• One who economizes, or manages domestic or other concerns with frugality; one who expends money, time, or labor, judiciously, and without waste.
• One who is conversant with political economy; a student of economics.
Economization
n.
• The act or practice of using to the best effect.
Economize
v. t.
• To manage with economy; to use with prudence; to expend with frugality; as, to economize one's income.
v. i.
• To be prudently sparing in expenditure; to be frugal and saving; as, to economize in order to grow rich.
Economizer
n.
• One who, or that which, economizes.
• Specifically: (Steam Boilers) An arrangement of pipes for heating feed water by waste heat in the gases passing to the chimney.
Economy
n.
• The management of domestic affairs; the regulation and government of household matters; especially as they concern expense or disbursement; as, a careful economy.
• Orderly arrangement and management of the internal affairs of a state or of any establishment kept up by production and consumption; esp., such management as directly concerns wealth; as, political economy.
• The system of rules and regulations by which anything is managed; orderly system of regulating the distribution and uses of parts, conceived as the result of wise and economical adaptation in the author, whether human or divine; as, the animal or vegetable economy; the economy of a poem; the Jewish economy.
• Thrifty and frugal housekeeping; management without loss or waste; frugality in expenditure; prudence and disposition to save; as, a housekeeper accustomed to economy but not to parsimony.
Ecostate
a.
(Bot.) Having no ribs or nerves; — said of a leaf.
Ecphasis
n.
(Rhet.) An explicit declaration.
Ecphonema
n.
(Rhet.) A breaking out with some interjectional particle.
Ecphoneme
n.
• A mark (!) used to indicate an exclamation.
Ecphonesis
n.
(Rhet.) An animated or passionate exclamation.
Ecphractic
a.
(Med.) Serving to dissolve or attenuate viscid matter, and so to remove obstructions; deobstruent.
n.
• An ecphractic medicine.
Ecstasy
n.
• The state of being beside one's self or rapt out of one's self; a state in which the mind is elevated above the reach of ordinary impressions, as when under the influence of overpowering emotion; an extraordinary elevation of the spirit, as when the soul, unconscious of sensible objects, is supposed to contemplate heavenly mysteries.
• Excessive and overmastering joy or enthusiasm; rapture; enthusiastic delight.
• Violent distraction of mind; violent emotion; excessive grief of anxiety; insanity; madness.
(Med.) A state which consists in total suspension of sensibility, of voluntary motion, and largely of mental power. The body is erect and inflexible; the pulsation and breathing are not affected.
v. t.
• To fill ecstasy, or with rapture or enthusiasm.
Ecstatic
a.
• Pertaining to, or caused by, ecstasy or excessive emotion; of the nature, or in a state, of ecstasy; as, ecstatic gaze; ecstatic trance.
• Delightful beyond measure; rapturous; ravishing; as, ecstatic bliss or joy.
n.
• An enthusiast.
Ecstatical
a.
• Ecstatic.
• Tending to external objects.
Ecstatically
adv.
• Rapturously; ravishingly.
Ectad
adv.
(Anat.) Toward the outside or surface; — opposed to entad.
Ectal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or situated near, the surface; outer; — opposed to ental.
Ectasia
n.
(Med.) A dilatation of a hollow organ or of a canal.
Ectasis
n.
(Pros.) The lengthening of a syllable from short to long.
Ectental
a.
(Biol.) Relating to, or connected with, the two primitive germ layers, the ectoderm and ectoderm; as, the "ectental line" or line of juncture of the two layers in the segmentation of the ovum.
Ecteron
n.
(Anat.) The external layer of the skin and mucous membranes; epithelium; ecderon.
Ectethmoid
a.
(Anat.) External to the ethmoid; prefrontal.
Ecthlipsis
n.
• The dropping out or suppression from a word of a consonant, with or without a vowel.
(Lat. Pros.) The elision of a final m, with the preceding vowel, before a word beginning with a vowel.
Ecthoreum
n.
(Zool.) The slender, hollow thread of a nettling cell or cnida.
Ecthyma
n.
(Med.) A cutaneous eruption, consisting of large, round pustules, upon an indurated and inflamed base.
Ectoblast
n.
(Biol.) The outer layer of the blastoderm; the epiblast; the ectoderm
• The outer envelope of a cell; the cell wall.
Ectobronchium
n.
(Anat.) One of the dorsal branches of the main bronchi in the lungs of birds.
Ectocyst
n.
(Zool.) The outside covering of the Bryozoa.
Ectoderm
n.
(Biol.) The outer layer of the blastoderm; epiblast
• The external skin or outer layer of an animal or plant, this being formed in an animal from the epiblast.
Ectolecithal
a.
(Biol.) Having the food yolk, at the commencement of segmentation, in a peripheral position, and the cleavage process confined to the center of the egg; as, ectolecithal ova.
Ectomere
n.
(Biol.) The more transparent cells, which finally become external, in many segmenting ova, as those of mammals.
Ectoparasite
n.
(Zool.) Any parasite which lives on the exterior of animals; — opposed to endoparasite.
Ectopia
n.
(Med.) A morbid displacement of parts, especially such as is congenial; as, ectopia of the heart, or of the bladder.
Ectopic
a.
(Med.) Out of place; congenitally displaced; as, an ectopic organ.
Ectoplasm
n.
(Biol.) The outer transparent layer of protoplasm in a developing ovum
• The outer hyaline layer of protoplasm in a vegetable cell
• The ectosarc of protozoan.
Ectoplastic
a.
• Pertaining to, or composed of, ectoplasm.
Ectoprocta
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of Bryozoa in which the anus lies outside the circle of tentacles.
Ectopy
n.
(Med.) Same as Ectopia.
Ectorganism
n.
(Biol.) An external parasitic organism.
Ectosarc
n.
(Biol.) The semisolid external layer of protoplasm in some unicellular organisms, as the amoeba; ectoplasm; exoplasm.
Ectosteal
a.
(Physiol.) Of or pertaining to ectostosis; as, ectosteal ossification.
Ectostosis
n.
(Physiol.) A process of bone formation in which ossification takes place in the perichondrium and either surrounds or gradually replaces the cartilage.
Ectropion
n.
(Med.) An unnatural eversion of the eyelids.
Ectropium
n.
(Med.) Same as Ectropion.
Ectrotic
a.
(Med.) Having a tendency to prevent the development of anything, especially of a disease.
Ectypal
a.
• Copied, reproduced as a molding or cast, in contradistinction from the original model.
Ectype
n.
(Classical Archaeol.) A copy, as in pottery, of an artist's original work. Hence:
• A work sculptured in relief, as a cameo, or in bas-relief (in this sense used loosely).
• A copy from an original; a type of something that has previously existed.
Ectypography
n.
• A method of etching in which the design upon the plate is produced in relief.
Ecurie
n.
• A stable.
Eczema
n.
(Med.) An inflammatory disease of the skin, characterized by the presence of redness and itching, an eruption of small vesicles, and the discharge of a watery exudation, which often dries up, leaving the skin covered with crusts; — called also tetter, milk crust, and salt rheum.
Eczematous
a.
(Med.) Pertaining to eczema; having the characteristic of eczema.
Edacious
a.
• Given to eating; voracious; devouring.
Edacity
n.
• Greediness; voracity; ravenousness; rapacity.
Edda
n.
• The religious or mythological book of the old Scandinavian tribes of German origin, containing two collections of Sagas (legends, myths) of the old northern gods and heroes.
Edder
n.
(Zool.) An adder or serpent.
n.
• Flexible wood worked into the top of hedge stakes, to bind them together.
v. t.
• To bind the top interweaving edder; as, to edder a hedge.
Eddish
n.
• Aftermath; also, stubble and stubble field.
Eddoes
n. pl.
(Bot.) The tubers of Colocasia antiquorum.
Eddy
n.
• A current of air or water running back, or in a direction contrary to the main current.
• A current of water or air moving in a circular direction; a whirlpool.
v. i.
• To move as an eddy, or as in an eddy; to move in a circle.
v. t.
• To collect as into an eddy.
Edelweiss
n.
(Bot.) A little, perennial, white, woolly plant (Leontopodium alpinum), growing at high elevations in the Alps.
Edema
n.
(Med.) Same as oedema.
Eden
n.
• The garden where Adam and Eve first dwelt; hence, a delightful region or residence.
Edenic
a.
• Of or pertaining to Eden; paradisaic.
Edenite
n.
(Min.) A variety of amphibole.
Edenized
a.
• Admitted to a state of paradisaic happiness.
Edental
n.
(Zool.) One of the Edentata.
Edentata
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of mammals including the armadillos, sloths, and anteaters; — called also Bruta. The incisor teeth are rarely developed, and in some groups all the teeth are lacking.
Edentate
a.
• Destitute of teeth; as, an edentate quadruped; an edentate leaf.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Edentata.
n.
(Zool.) One of the Edentata.
Edentated
a.
• Same as Edentate, a.
Edentation
n.
• A depriving of teeth.
Edentulous
a.
• Toothless.
Edge
n.
• The thin cutting side of the blade of an instrument; as, the edge of an ax, knife, sword, or scythe. Hence, figuratively, that which cuts as an edge does, or wounds deeply, etc.
• Any sharp terminating border; a margin; a brink; extreme verge; as, the edge of a table, a precipice.
• Sharpness; readiness of fitness to cut; keenness; intenseness of desire.
• The border or part adjacent to the line of division; the beginning or early part; as, in the edge of evening.
v. t.
• To furnish with an edge as a tool or weapon; to sharpen.
• To shape or dress the edge of, as with a tool.
• To furnish with a fringe or border; as, to edge a dress; to edge a garden with box.
• To make sharp or keen, figuratively; to incite; to exasperate; to goad; to urge or egg on.
• To move by little and little or cautiously, as by pressing forward edgewise; as, edging their chairs forwards.
v. i.
• To move sideways; to move gradually; as, edge along this way.
• To sail close to the wind.
Edgebone
n.
• Same as Aitchbone.
Edgeless
a.
• Without an edge; not sharp; blunt; obtuse; as, an edgeless sword or weapon.
Edgelong
adv.
• In the direction of the edge.
Edgeshot
a.
(Carp.) Having an edge planed, — said of a board.
Edging
n.
• That which forms an edge or border, as the fringe, trimming, etc., of a garment, or a border in a garden.
• The operation of shaping or dressing the edge of anything, as of a piece of metal.
Edgingly
adv.
• Gradually; gingerly.
Edgy
a.
• Easily irritated; sharp; as, an edgy temper.
(Fine Arts) Having some of the forms, such as drapery or the like, too sharply defined.
Edh
n.
• The name of the Anglo-Saxon letter &edh;, capital form th in a similar word: &omac;&edh;er, other, d⊚&edh;, doth."
Edibility
n.
• Suitableness for being eaten; edibleness.
Edible
a.
• Fit to be eaten as food; eatable; esculent; as, edible fishes.
n.
• Anything edible.
Edibleness
n.
• Suitableness for being eaten.
Edict
n.
• A public command or ordinance by the sovereign power; the proclamation of a law made by an absolute authority, as if by the very act of announcement; a decree; as, the edicts of the Roman emperors; the edicts of the French monarch.
Edictal
a.
• Relating to, or consisting of, edicts; as, the Roman edictal law.
Edificant
a.
• Building; constructing.
Edification
n.
• The act of edifying, or the state of being edified; a building up, especially in a moral or spiritual sense; moral, intellectual, or spiritual improvement; instruction.
• A building or edifice.
Edificatory
a.
• Tending to edification.
Edifice
n.
• A building; a structure; an architectural fabric; — chiefly applied to elegant houses, and other large buildings; as, a palace, a church, a statehouse.
Edificial
a.
• Pertaining to an edifice; structural.
Edifier
n.
• One who builds.
• One who edifies, builds up, or strengthens another by moral or religious instruction.
Edify
v. i.
• To build; to construct.
• To instruct and improve, especially in moral and religious knowledge; to teach.
• To teach or persuade.
v. i.
• To improve.
Edifying
a.
• Instructing; improving; as, an edifying conversation.
Edileship
n.
• The office of aedile.
Edingtonite
n.
(Min.) A grayish white zeolitic mineral, in tetragonal crystals. It is a hydrous silicate of alumina and baryta.
Edit
v. t.
• To superintend the publication of; to revise and prepare for publication; to select, correct, arrange, etc., the matter of, for publication; as, to edit a newspaper.
Edition
n.
• A literary work edited and published, as by a certain editor or in a certain manner; as, a good edition of Chaucer; Chalmers' edition of Shakespeare.
• The whole number of copies of a work printed and published at one time; as, the first edition was soon sold.
Editioner
n.
• An editor.
Editor
n.
• One who edits; esp., a person who prepares, superintends, revises, and corrects a book, magazine, or newspaper, etc., for publication.
Editorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to an editor; written or sanctioned by an editor; as, editorial labors; editorial remarks.
n.
• A leading article in a newspaper or magazine; an editorial article; an article published as an expression of the views of the editor.
Editorially
adv.
• In the manner or character of an editor or of an editorial article.
Editorship
n.
• The office or charge of an editor; care and superintendence of a publication.
Editress
n.
• A female editor.
Edituate
v. t.
• To guard as a churchwarden does.
Edomite
n.
• One of the descendants of Esau or Edom, the brother of Jacob; an Idumean.
Edriophthalma
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of Crustacea in which the eyes are without stalks; the Arthrostraca.
Edriophthalmous
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the Edriophthalma.
Educability
n.
• Capability of being educated.
Educable
a.
• Capable of being educated.
Educate
v. t.
• To bring or guide the powers of, as a child; to develop and cultivate, whether physically, mentally, or morally, but more commonly limited to the mental activities or senses; to expand, strengthen, and discipline, as the mind, a faculty, etc.,; to form and regulate the principles and character of; to prepare and fit for any calling or business by systematic instruction; to cultivate; to train; to instruct; as, to educate a child; to educate the eye or the taste.
Educated
a.
• Formed or developed by education; as, an educated man.
Education
n.
• The act or process of educating; the result of educating, as determined by the knowledge skill, or discipline of character, acquired; also, the act or process of training by a prescribed or customary course of study or discipline; as, an education for the bar or the pulpit; he has finished his education.
Educational
a.
• Of or pertaining to education.
Educationist
n.
• One who is versed in the theories of, or who advocates and promotes, education.
Educative
a.
• Tending to educate; that gives education; as, an educative process; an educative experience.
Educator
n.
• One who educates; a teacher.
Educe
v. t.
• To bring or draw out; to cause to appear; to produce against counter agency or influence; to extract; to evolve; as, to educe a form from matter.
Educible
a.
• Capable of being educed.
Educt
n.
• That which is educed, as by analysis.
Eduction
n.
• The act of drawing out or bringing into view.
Eductive
a.
• Tending to draw out; extractive.
Eductor
n.
• One who, or that which, brings forth, elicits, or extracts.
Edulcorant
a.
• Having a tendency to purify or to sweeten by removing or correcting acidity and acrimony.
n.
• An edulcorant remedy.
Edulcorate
v. t.
• To render sweet; to sweeten; to free from acidity.
(Chem.) To free from acids, salts, or other soluble substances, by washing; to purify.
Edulcoration
n.
• The act of sweetening or edulcorating.
(Chem.) The act of freeing from acids or any soluble substances, by affusions of water.
Edulcorative
a.
• Tending to weeten or purify by affusions of water.
Edulcorator
n.
• A contrivance used to supply small quantities of sweetened liquid, water, etc., to any mixture, or to test tubes, etc.; a dropping bottle.
Edulious
a.
• Edible.
Eel
n.
(Zool.) An elongated fish of many genera and species. The common eels of Europe and America belong to the genus Anguilla. The electrical eel is a species of Gymnotus. The so called vinegar eel is a minute nematode worm.
Eelbuck
n.
• An eelpot or eel basket.
Eelfare
n.
(Zool.) A brood of eels.
Eelgrass
n.
(Bot.) A plant (Zostera marina), with very long and narrow leaves, growing abundantly in shallow bays along the North Atlantic coast.
Eelpot
n.
• A boxlike structure with funnel-shaped traps for catching eels; an eelbuck.
Eelpout
n.
(Zool.) A European fish (Zoarces viviparus), remarkable for producing living young; — called also greenbone, guffer, bard, and Maroona eel. Also, an American species (Z. anguillaris), — called also mutton fish, and, erroneously, congo eel, ling, and lamper eel. Both are edible, but of little value.
• A fresh-water fish, the burbot.
Eelspear
n.
• A spear with barbed forks for spearing eels.
Een
n.
• The old plural of Eye.
Eerily
adv.
• In a strange, unearthly way.
Eerisome
a.
• Causing fear; eerie.
Eet
obs. imp.
• of Eat.
Effable
a.
• Capable of being uttered or explained; utterable.
Efface
v. t.
• To cause to disappear (as anything impresses or inscribed upon a surface) by rubbing out, striking out, etc.; to erase; to render illegible or indiscernible; as, to efface the letters on a monument, or the inscription on a coin.
• To destroy, as a mental impression; to wear away.
Effaceable
a.
• Capable of being effaced.
Effacement
n.
• The act if effacing; also, the result of the act.
Effascinate
v. t.
• To charm; to bewitch.
Effascination
n.
• A charming; state of being bewitched or deluded.
Effect
n.
• Execution; performance; realization; operation; as, the law goes into effect in May.
• Manifestation; expression; sign.
• In general: That which is produced by an agent or cause; the event which follows immediately from an antecedent, called the cause; result; consequence; outcome; fruit; as, the effect of luxury.
• Impression left on the mind; sensation produced.
• Power to produce results; efficiency; force; importance; account; as, to speak with effect.
• Consequence intended; purpose; meaning; general intent; — with to.
• The purport; the sum and substance.
• Reality; actual meaning; fact, as distinguished from mere appearance.
• Goods; movables; personal estate; — sometimes used to embrace real as well as personal property; as, the people escaped from the town with their effects.
v. t.
• To produce, as a cause or agent; to cause to be.
• To bring to pass; to execute; to enforce; to achieve; to accomplish.
Effecter
n.
• One who effects.
Effectible
a.
• Capable of being done or achieved; practicable; feasible.
Effection
n.
• Creation; a doing.
Effective
a.
• Having the power to produce an effect or effects; producing a decided or decisive effect; efficient; serviceable; operative; as, an effective force, remedy, speech; the effective men in a regiment.
n.
• That which produces a given effect; a cause.
• One who is capable of active service.
(Com.) Specie or coin, as distinguished from paper currency; — a term used in many parts of Europe.
Effectively
adv.
• With effect; powerfully; completely; thoroughly.
Effectiveness
n.
• The quality of being effective.
Effectless
a.
• Without effect or advantage; useless; bootless.
Effector
n.
• An effecter.
Effectual
a.
• Producing, or having adequate power or force to produce, an intended effect; adequate; efficient; operative; decisive.
Effectually
adv.
• With effect; efficaciously.
• Actually; in effect.
Effectualness
n.
• The quality of being effectual.
Effectuate
v. t.
• To bring to pass; to effect; to achieve; to accomplish; to fulfill.
Effectuation
n.
• Act of effectuating.
Effectuously
adv.
• Effectively.
Effeminacy
n.
• Characteristic quality of a woman, such as softness, luxuriousness, delicacy, or weakness, which is unbecoming a man; womanish delicacy or softness; — used reproachfully of men.
Effeminate
a.
• Having some characteristic of a woman, as delicacy, luxuriousness, etc.; soft or delicate to an unmanly degree; womanish; weak.
• Womanlike; womanly; tender; — in a good sense.
v. t.
• To make womanish; to make soft and delicate; to weaken.
v. i.
• To grow womanish or weak.
Effeminately
adv.
• In an effeminate or womanish manner; weakly; softly; delicately.
• By means of a woman; by the power or art of a woman.
Effeminateness
n.
• The state of being effeminate; unmanly softness.
Effemination
n.
• Effeminacy; womanishness.
Effeminize
v. t.
• To make effeminate.
Effendi
n.
• Master; sir; — a title of a Turkish state official and man of learning, especially one learned in the law.
Efferent
a.
(Physiol.) Conveying outward, or discharging; — applied to certain blood vessels, lymphatics, nerves, etc.
• Conveyed outward; as, efferent impulses, i. e., such as are conveyed by the motor or efferent nerves from the central nervous organ outwards; — opposed to afferent.
n.
• An efferent duct or stream.
Efferous
a.
• Like a wild beast; fierce.
Effervesce
v. i.
• To be in a state of natural ebullition; to bubble and hiss, as fermenting liquors, or any fluid, when some part escapes in a gaseous form.
• To exhibit, in lively natural expression, feelings that can not be repressed or concealed; as, to effervesce with joy or merriment.
Effervescent
a.
• Gently boiling or bubbling, by means of the disengagement of gas
Effervescible
a.
• Capable of effervescing.
Effervescive
a.
• Tending to produce effervescence.
Effet
n.
(Zool.) The common newt; — called also asker, eft, evat, and ewt.
Effete
a.
• No longer capable of producing young, as an animal, or fruit, as the earth; hence, worn out with age; exhausted of energy; incapable of efficient action; no longer productive; barren; sterile.
Efficacious
a.
• Possessing the quality of being effective; productive of, or powerful to produce, the effect intended; as, an efficacious law.
Efficacity
n.
• Efficacy.
Efficacy
n.
• Power to produce effects; operation or energy of an agent or force; production of the effect intended; as, the efficacy of medicine in counteracting disease; the efficacy of prayer.
Efficient
a.
• Causing effects; producing results; that makes the effect to be what it is; actively operative; not inactive, slack, or incapable; characterized by energetic and useful activity; as, an efficient officer, power.
n.
• An efficient cause; a prime mover.
Efficiently
adv.
• With effect; effectively.
Effierce
v. t.
• To make fierce.
Effigial
a.
• Relating to an effigy.
Effigiate
v. t.
• To form as an effigy; hence, to fashion; to adapt.
Effigiation
n.
• The act of forming in resemblance; an effigy.
Effigy
n.
• The image, likeness, or representation of a person, whether a full figure, or a part; an imitative figure; — commonly applied to sculptured likenesses, as those on monuments, or to those of the heads of princes on coins and medals, sometimes applied to portraits.
Efflagitate
v. t.
• To ask urgently.
Efflate
v. t.
• To fill with breath; to puff up.
Efflation
n.
• The act of filling with wind; a breathing or puffing out; a puff, as of wind.
Effloresce
v. i.
• To blossom forth.
(Chem.) To change on the surface, or throughout, to a whitish, mealy, or crystalline powder, from a gradual decomposition, esp. from the loss of water, on simple exposure to the air; as, Glauber's salts, and many others, effloresce.
• To become covered with a whitish crust or light crystallization, from a slow chemical change between some of the ingredients of the matter covered and an acid proceeding commonly from an external source; as, the walls of limestone caverns sometimes effloresce with nitrate of calcium in consequence of the action in consequence of nitric acid formed in the atmosphere.
Efflorescence
n.
(Bot.) Flowering, or state of flowering; the blooming of flowers; blowth.
(Med.) A redness of the skin; eruption, as in rash, measles, smallpox, scarlatina, etc.
(Chem.) The formation of the whitish powder or crust on the surface of efflorescing bodies, as salts, etc.
• The powder or crust thus formed.
Efflorescency
n.
• The state or quality of being efflorescent; efflorescence.
Efflorescent
a.
• That effloresces, or is liable to effloresce on exposure; as, an efflorescent salt.
• Covered with an efflorescence.
Efflower
v. t.
(Leather Making) To remove the epidermis of (a skin) with a concave knife, blunt in its middle part, — as in making chamois leather.
Effluence
n.
• A flowing out, or emanation.
• That which flows or issues from any body or substance; issue; efflux.
Effluency
n.
• Effluence.
Effluent
a.
• Flowing out; as, effluent beams.
n.
(Geog.) A stream that flows out of another stream or lake.
Effluviable
a.
• Capable of being given off as an effluvium.
Effluvial
a.
• Belonging to effluvia.
Effluviate
v. i.
• To give forth effluvium.
Effluvium
n.
• Subtile or invisible emanation; exhalation perceived by the sense of smell; especially, noisome or noxious exhalation; as, the effluvium from diseased or putrefying bodies, or from ill drainage.
Efflux
n.
• The act or process of flowing out, or issuing forth; effusion; outflow; as, the efflux of matter from an ulcer; the efflux of men's piety.
• That which flows out; emanation; effluence.
v. i.
• To run out; to flow forth; to pass away.
Effluxion
n.
• The act of flowing out; effusion.
• That which flows out; effluvium; emanation.
Effodient
a.
• Digging up.
Efforce
v. t.
• To force; to constrain; to compel to yield.
Efform
v. t.
• To form; to shape.
Efformation
n.
• The act of giving shape or form.
Effort
n.
• An exertion of strength or power, whether physical or mental, in performing an act or aiming at an object; more or less strenuous endeavor; struggle directed to the accomplishment of an object; as, an effort to scale a wall.
(Mech.) A force acting on a body in the direction of its motion.
v. t.
• To stimulate.
Effortless
a.
• Making no effort.
Effossion
n.
• A digging out or up.
Effranchise
v. t.
• To enfranchise.
Effray
v. t.
• To frighten; to scare.
Effrayable
a.
• Frightful.
Effrenation
n.
• Unbridled license; unruliness.
Effront
v. t.
• To give assurance to.
Effrontery
n.
• Impudence or boldness in confronting or in transgressing the bounds of duty or decorum; insulting presumptuousness; shameless boldness; barefaced assurance.
Effrontit
a.
• Marked by impudence.
Effrontuously
adv.
• Impudently.
Effulge
v. t.
• To cause to shine with abundance of light; to radiate; to beam.
v. i.
• To shine forth; to beam.
Effulgence
n.
• The state of being effulgent; extreme brilliancy; a flood of light; great luster or brightness; splendor.
Effulgent
a.
• Diffusing a flood of light; shining; luminous; beaming; bright; splendid.
Effulgently
adv.
• In an effulgent manner.
Effumability
n.
• The capability of flying off in fumes or vapor.
Effume
v. t.
• To breathe or puff out.
Effund
v. t.
• To pour out.
Effuse
a.
• Poured out freely; profuse.
• Disposed to pour out freely; prodigal.
(Bot.) Spreading loosely, especially on one side; as, an effuse inflorescence.
(Zool.) Having the lips, or edges, of the aperture abruptly spreading; — said of certain shells.
n.
• Effusion; loss.
v. t.
• To pour out like a stream or freely; to cause to exude; to shed.
v. i.
• To emanate; to issue.
Effusion
n.
• The act of pouring out; as, effusion of water, of blood, of grace, of words, and the like.
• That which is poured out, literally or figuratively.
(Pathol.) The escape of a fluid out of its natural vessel, either by rupture of the vessel, or by exudation through its walls. It may pass into the substance of an organ, or issue upon a free surface.
• The liquid escaping or exuded.
Effusive
a.
• Pouring out; pouring forth freely.
Eft
n.
(Zool.) A European lizard of the genus Seps
• A salamander, esp. the European smooth newt (Triton punctatus).
adv.
• Again; afterwards; soon; quickly.
Egad
interj.
• An exclamation expressing exultation or surprise, etc.
Egal
a.
• Equal; impartial.
Egality
n.
• Equality.
Egence
n.
• The state of needing, or of suffering a natural want.
Eger
n.
• An impetuous flood; a bore.
Egerminate
v. i.
• To germinate.
Egest
v. t.
(Physiol.) To cast or throw out; to void, as excrement; to excrete, as the indigestible matter of the food; in an extended sense, to excrete by the lungs, skin, or kidneys.
Egesta
n. pl.
(Physiol.) That which is egested or thrown off from the body by the various excretory channels; excrements; — opposed to ingesta.
Egestion
n.
• Act or process of egesting; a voiding.
Egg
n.
(Popularly) The oval or roundish body laid by domestic poultry and other birds, tortoises, etc. It consists of a yolk, usually surrounded by the "white" or albumen, and inclosed in a shell or strong membrane.
(Biol.) A simple cell, from the development of which the young of animals are formed; ovum; germ cell.
• Anything resembling an egg in form.
v. t.
• To urge on; to instigate; to incite
Eggar
n.
(Zool.) Any bombycid moth of the genera Eriogaster and Lasiocampa; as, the oak eggar (L. roboris) of Europe.
Eggement
n.
• Instigation; incitement.
Egger
n.
• One who gathers eggs; an eggler.
n.
• One who eggs or incites.
Eggery
n.
• A place where eggs are deposited (as by sea birds) or kept; a nest of eggs.
Egghot
n.
• A kind of posset made of eggs, brandy, sugar, and ale.
Eggler
n.
• One who gathers, or deals in, eggs.
Eggnog
n.
• A drink consisting of eggs beaten up with sugar, milk, and (usually) wine or spirits.
Eggplant
n.
(Bot.) A plant (Solanum Melongena), of East Indian origin, allied to the tomato, and bearing a large, smooth, edible fruit, shaped somewhat like an egg; mad-apple.
Eggshell
n.
• The shell or exterior covering of an egg. Also used figuratively for anything resembling an eggshell.
(Zool.) A smooth, white, marine, gastropod shell of the genus Ovulum, resembling an egg in form.
Eghen
n. pl.
• Eyes.
Egilopical
a.
(Med.) Pertaining to, of the nature of, or affected with, an aegilops, or tumor in the corner of the eye.
Eglantine
n.
(Bot.) A species of rose (Rosa Eglanteria), with fragrant foliage and flowers of various colors
• The sweetbrier (R. rubiginosa).
Eglatere
n.
• Eglantine.
Egling
n.
(Zool.) The European perch when two years old.
Eglomerate
v. t.
• To unwind, as a thread from a ball.
Ego
n.
(Met.) The conscious and permanent subject of all psychical experiences, whether held to be directly known or the product of reflective thought; — opposed to non-ego.
Egoical
a.
• Pertaining to egoism.
Egoism
n.
(Philos.) The doctrine of certain extreme adherents or disciples of Descartes and Johann Gottlieb Fichte, which finds all the elements of knowledge in the ego and the relations which it implies or provides for.
• Excessive love and thought of self; the habit of regarding one's self as the center of every interest; selfishness; — opposed to altruism.
Egoist
n.
• One given overmuch to egoism or thoughts of self.
(Philos.) A believer in egoism.
Egoistically
adv.
• In an egoistic manner.
Egoity
n.
• Personality.
Egomism
n.
• Egoism.
Egophonic
a.
• Belonging to, or resembling, egophony.
Egophony
n.
(Med.) The sound of a patient's voice so modified as to resemble the bleating of a goat, heard on applying the ear to the chest in certain diseases within its cavity, as in pleurisy with effusion.
Egotheism
n.
• The deification of self.
Egotism
n.
• The practice of too frequently using the word I; hence, a speaking or writing overmuch of one's self; self-exaltation; self-praise; the act or practice of magnifying one's self or parading one's own doings. The word is also used in the sense of egoism.
Egotist
n.
• One addicted to egotism; one who speaks much of himself or magnifies his own achievements or affairs.
Egotistically
adv.
• With egotism.
Egotize
v. i.
• To talk or write as an egotist.
Egranulose
a.
(Bot.) Having no granules, as chlorophyll in certain conditions.
Egregious
a.
• Surpassing; extraordinary; distinguished (in a bad sense); — formerly used with words importing a good quality, but now joined with words having a bad sense; as, an egregious rascal; an egregious ass; an egregious mistake.
Egregiously
adv.
• Greatly; enormously; shamefully; as, egregiously cheated.
Egregiousness
n.
• The state of being egregious.
Egremoin
n.
• Agrimony (Agrimonia Eupatoria).
Egress
n.
• The act of going out or leaving, or the power to leave; departure.
(Astron.) The passing off from the sun's disk of an inferior planet, in a transit.
v. i.
• To go out; to depart; to leave.
Egression
n.
• The act of going; egress.
Egressor
n.
• One who goes out.
Egret
n.
(Zool.) The name of several species of herons which bear plumes on the back. They are generally white. Among the best known species are the American egret (Ardea, or Herodias, egretta); the great egret (A. alba); the little egret (A. garzetta), of Europe; and the American snowy egret (A. candidissima).
• A plume or tuft of feathers worn as a part of a headdress, or anything imitating such an ornament; an aigrette.
(Bot.) The flying feathery or hairy crown of seeds or achenes, as the down of the thistle.
(Zool.) A kind of ape.
Egrette
n.
• Same as Egret, n., 2.
Egrimony
(Bot.) The herb agrimony.
n.
• Sorrow.
Egriot
n.
• A kind of sour cherry.
Egritude
n.
• Sickness; ailment; sorrow.
Egyptian
a.
• Pertaining to Egypt, in Africa.
n.
• A native, or one of the people, of Egypt; also, the Egyptian language.
• A gypsy.
Egyptize
v. t.
• To give an Egyptian character or appearance to.
Egyptological
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or devoted to, Egyptology.
Egyptology
n.
• The science or study of Egyptian antiquities, esp. the hieroglyphics.
Eh
interj.
• An expression of inquiry or slight surprise.
Ehlite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a green color and pearly luster; a hydrous phosphate of copper.
Eider
n.
(Zool.) Any species of sea duck of the genus Somateria, esp. Somateria mollissima, which breeds in the northern parts of Europe and America, and lines its nest with fine down (taken from its own body) which is an article of commerce; — called also eider duck. The American eider (S. Dresseri), the king eider (S. spectabilis), and the spectacled eider (Arctonetta Fischeri) are related species.
Eidograph
n.
• An instrument for copying drawings on the same or a different scale; a form of the pantograph.
Eidolon
n.
• An image or representation; a form; a phantom; an apparition.
Eigh
interj.
• An exclamation expressing delight.
Eight
n.
• An island in a river; an ait.
a.
• Seven and one; as, eight years.
n.
• The number greater by a unit than seven; eight units or objects.
• A symbol representing eight units, as 8 or viii.
Eighteen
a.
• Eight and ten; as, eighteen pounds.
n.
• The number greater by a unit than seventeen; eighteen units or objects.
• A symbol denoting eighteen units, as 18 or xviii.
Eighteenth
a.
• Next in order after the seventeenth.
• Consisting of one of eighteen equal parts or divisions of a thing.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by eighteen; one of eighteen equal parts or divisions.
• The eighth after the tenth.
Eightetethe
a.
• Eighteenth.
Eightfold
a.
• Eight times a quantity.
Eighth
a.
• Next in order after the seventh.
• Consisting of one of eight equal divisions of a thing.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by eight; one of eight equal parts; an eighth part.
(Mus.) The interval of an octave.
Eighthly
adv.
• As the eighth in order.
Eightieth
a.
• The next in order after seventy-ninth.
• Consisting of one of eighty equal parts or divisions.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by eighty; one of eighty equal parts.
Eightling
n.
(Crystallog.) A compound or twin crystal made up of eight individuals.
Eightscore
a. & n.
• Eight times twenty; a hundred and sixty.
Eighty
a.
• Eight times ten; fourscore.
n.
• The sum of eight times ten; eighty units or objects.
• A symbol representing eighty units, or ten eight times repeated, as 80 or lxxx.
Eigne
a.
(Law) Eldest; firstborn.
• Entailed; belonging to the eldest son.
Eikon
n.
• An image or effigy; — used rather in an abstract sense, and rarely for a work of art.
Eikosane
n.
(Chem.) A solid hydrocarbon, C20H42, of the paraffine series, of artificial production, and also probably occurring in petroleum.
Eikosylene
n.
(Chem.) A liquid hydrocarbon, C20H38, of the acetylene series, obtained from brown coal.
Eild
n.
• Age.
Eire
n.
• Air.
Eirenarch
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A justice of the peace; irenarch.
Eisel
n.
• Vinegar; verjuice.
Eisteddfod
n.
• Am assembly or session of the Welsh bards; an annual congress of bards, minstrels and literati of Wales, — being a patriotic revival of the old custom.
Either
a. & pron.
• One of two; the one or the other; — properly used of two things, but sometimes of a larger number, for any one.
• Each of two; the one and the other; both; — formerly, also, each of any number.
conj. Either
• precedes two, or more, coordinate words or phrases, and is introductory to an alternative. It is correlative to or.
Ejaculate
v. t.
• To throw out suddenly and swiftly, as if a dart; to dart; to eject.
• To throw out, as an exclamation; to utter by a brief and sudden impulse; as, to ejaculate a prayer.
v. i.
• To utter ejaculations; to make short and hasty exclamations.
Ejaculation
n.
• The act of throwing or darting out with a sudden force and rapid flight.
• The uttering of a short, sudden exclamation or prayer, or the exclamation or prayer uttered.
(Physiol.) The act of ejecting or suddenly throwing, as a fluid from a duct.
Ejaculator
n.
(Anat.) A muscle which helps ejaculation.
Ejaculatory
a.
• Casting or throwing out; fitted to eject; as, ejaculatory vessels.
• Suddenly darted out; uttered in short sentences; as, an ejaculatory prayer or petition.
• Sudden; hasty.
Eject
v. t.
• To expel; to dismiss; to cast forth; to thrust or drive out; to discharge; as, to eject a person from a room; to eject a traitor from the country; to eject words from the language.
(Law) To cast out; to evict; to dispossess; as, to eject tenants from an estate.
Ejection
n.
• The act of ejecting or casting out; discharge; expulsion; evacuation.
(Physiol.) The act or process of discharging anything from the body, particularly the excretions.
• The state of being ejected or cast out; dispossession; banishment.
Ejectment
n.
• A casting out; a dispossession; an expulsion; ejection; as, the ejectment of tenants from their homes.
(Law) A species of mixed action, which lies for the recovery of possession of real property, and damages and costs for the wrongful withholding of it.
Ejector
n.
• One who, or that which, ejects or dispossesses.
(Mech.) A jet jump for lifting water or withdrawing air from a space.
Ejoo
n.
• Gomuti fiber.
Ejulation
n.
• A wailing; lamentation.
Ekaluminium
n.
(Chem.) The name given to a hypothetical element, — later discovered and called gallium.
Ekasilicon
n.
(Chem.) The name of a hypothetical element predicted and afterwards discovered and named germanium; — so called because it was a missing analogue of the silicon group.
Eke
v. t.
• To increase; to add to; to augment; — now commonly used with out, the notion conveyed being to add to, or piece out by a laborious, inferior, or scanty addition; as, to eke out a scanty supply of one kind with some other.
adv.
• In addition; also; likewise.
n.
• An addition.
Ekebergite
n.
(Min.) A variety of scapolite.
Ekename
n.
• An additional or epithet name; a nickname.
Eking
n.
(Shipbuilding) A lengthening or filling piece to make good a deficiency in length.
• The carved work under the quarter piece at the aft part of the quarter gallery.
Elaborate
a.
• Wrought with labor; finished with great care; studied; executed with exactness or painstaking; as, an elaborate discourse; an elaborate performance; elaborate research.
v. t.
• To produce with labor
• To perfect with painstaking; to improve or refine with labor and study, or by successive operations; as, to elaborate a painting or a literary work.
Elaboration
n.
• The act or process of producing or refining with labor; improvement by successive operations; refinement.
(Physiol.) The natural process of formation or assimilation, performed by the living organs in animals and vegetables, by which a crude substance is changed into something of a higher order; as, the elaboration of food into chyme; the elaboration of chyle, or sap, or tissues.
Elaborative
a.
• Serving or tending to elaborate; constructing with labor and minute attention to details.
Elaborator
n.
• One who, or that which, elaborates.
Elaboratory
a.
• Tending to elaborate.
n.
• A laboratory.
Elaeagnus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs or small trees, having the foliage covered with small silvery scales; oleaster.
Elaeis
n.
(Bot.) A genus of palms.
Elaeolite
n.
(Min.) A variety of hephelite, usually massive, of greasy luster, and gray to reddish color.
Elaeoptene
n.
(Chem.) The more liquid or volatile portion of certain oily substance, as distinguished from stearoptene, the more solid parts.
Elaidate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of elaidic acid.
Elaidic
a.
• Relating to oleic acid, or elaine.
Elaidin
n.
(Chem.) A solid isomeric modification of olein.
Elaiodic
a.
(Chem.) Derived from castor oil; ricinoleic; as, elaiodic acid.
Elaiometer
n.
(Chem.) An apparatus for determining the amount of oil contained in any substance, or for ascertaining the degree of purity of oil.
Elamite
n.
• A dweller in Flam (or Susiana), an ancient kingdom of Southwestern Asia, afterwards a province of Persia.
Elamping
a.
• Shining.
Elance
v. t.
• To throw as a lance; to hurl; to dart.
Eland
n.
(Zool.) A species of large South African antelope (Oreas canna). It is valued both for its hide and flesh, and is rapidly disappearing in the settled districts; — called also Cape elk.
(Zool.) The elk or moose.
Elanet
n.
(Zool.) A kite of the genus Elanus.
Elaphine
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to, resembling, or characteristic of, the stag, or Cervus elaphus.
Elaphure
n.
(Zool.) A species of deer (Elaphurus Davidianus) found in china. It about four feet high at the shoulder and has peculiar antlers.
Elapidation
n.
• A clearing away of stones.
Elapine
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the Elapidae, a family of poisonous serpents, including the cobras.
Elaps
n.
(Zool.) A genus of venomous snakes found both in America and the Old World. Many species are known.
Elapse
v. i.
• To slip or glide away; to pass away silently, as time; — used chiefly in reference to time.
Elapsion
n.
• The act of elapsing.
Elaqueate
v. t.
• To disentangle.
Elasipoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of holothurians mostly found in the deep sea. They are remarkable for their bilateral symmetry and curious forms.
Elasmobranch
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Elasmobranchii.
n.
• One of the Elasmobranchii.
Elasmobranchiate
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to Elasmobranchii.
n.
• One of the Elasmobranchii.
Elasmobranchii
n. pl.
(Zool.) A subclass of fishes, comprising the sharks, the rays, and the Chimaera. The skeleton is mainly cartilaginous.
Elasmosaurus
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct, long-necked, marine, cretaceous reptile from Kansas, allied to Plesiosaurus.
Elastic
a.
• Springing back; having a power or inherent property of returning to the form from which a substance is bent, drawn, pressed, or twisted; springy; having the power of rebounding; as, a bow is elastic; the air is elastic; India rubber is elastic.
• Able to return quickly to a former state or condition, after being depressed or overtaxed; having power to recover easily from shocks and trials; as, elastic spirits; an elastic constitution.
n.
• An elastic woven fabric, as a belt, braces or suspenders, etc., made in part of India rubber.
Elastical
a.
• Elastic.
Elastically
adv.
• In an elastic manner; by an elastic power; with a spring.
Elasticity
n.
• The quality of being elastic; the inherent property in bodies by which they recover their former figure or dimensions, after the removal of external pressure or altering force; springiness; tendency to rebound; as, the elasticity of caoutchouc; the elasticity of the air.
• Power of resistance to, or recovery from, depression or overwork.
Elasticness
n.
• The quality of being elastic; elasticity.
Elastin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A nitrogenous substance, somewhat resembling albumin, which forms the chemical basis of elastic tissue. It is very insoluble in most fluids, but is gradually dissolved when digested with either pepsin or trypsin.
Elate
a.
• Lifted up; raised; elevated.
• Having the spirits raised by success, or by hope; flushed or exalted with confidence; elated; exultant.
v. t.
• To raise; to exalt.
• To exalt the spirit of; to fill with confidence or exultation; to elevate or flush with success; to puff up; to make proud.
Elatedly
adv.
• With elation.
Elatedness
n.
• The state of being elated.
Elater
n.
• One who, or that which, elates.
n.
(Bot.) An elastic spiral filament for dispersing the spores, as in some liverworts.
(Zool.) Any beetle of the family Elateridae, having the habit, when laid on the back, of giving a sudden upward spring, by a quick movement of the articulation between the abdomen and thorax; — called also click beetle, spring beetle, and snapping beetle.
(Zool.) The caudal spring used by Podura and related insects for leaping.
n.
(Chem.) The active principle of elaterium, being found in the juice of the wild or squirting cucumber (Ecballium agreste, formerly Motordica Elaterium) and other related species. It is extracted as a bitter, white, crystalline substance, which is a violent purgative.
Elaterite
n.
(Min.) A mineral resin, of a blackish brown color, occurring in soft, flexible masses; — called also mineral caoutchouc, and elastic bitumen.
Elaterium
n.
• A cathartic substance obtained, in the form of yellowish or greenish cakes, as the dried residue of the juice of the wild or squirting cucumber (Ecballium agreste, formerly called Momordica Elaterium).
Elaterometer
n.
• Same as Elatrometer.
Elatery
n.
• Acting force; elasticity.
Elation
n.
• A lifting up by success; exaltation; inriation with pride of prosperity.
Elative
a.
(Gram.) Raised; lifted up; — a term applied to what is also called the absolute superlative, denoting a high or intense degree of a quality, but not excluding the idea that an equal degree may exist in other cases.
Elatrometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the degree of rarefaction of air contained in the receiver of an air pump.
Elayl
n.
(Chem.) Olefiant gas or ethylene; — so called by Berzelius from its forming an oil combining with chlorine.
Elbow
n.
• The joint or bend of the arm; the outer curve in the middle of the arm when bent.
• Any turn or bend like that of the elbow, in a wall, building, and the like; a sudden turn in a line of coast or course of a river; also, an angular or jointed part of any structure, as the raised arm of a chair or sofa, or a short pipe fitting, turning at an angle or bent.
(Arch.) A sharp angle in any surface of wainscoting or other woodwork; the upright sides which flank any paneled work, as the sides of windows, where the jamb makes an elbow with the window back.
v. t.
• To push or hit with the elbow, as when one pushes by another.
v. i.
• To jut into an angle; to project or to bend after the manner of an elbow.
• To push rudely along; to elbow one's way.
Elbowboard
n.
• The base of a window casing, on which the elbows may rest.
Elbowchair
n.
• A chair with arms to support the elbows; an armchair.
Elbowroom
n.
• Room to extend the elbows on each side; ample room for motion or action; free scope.
Elcaja
n.
(Bot.) An Arabian tree (Trichilia emetica). The fruit, which is emetic, is sometimes employed in the composition of an ointment for the cure of the itch.
Elcesaite
n.
(Eccl.) One of a sect of Asiatic Gnostics of the time of the Emperor Trajan.
Eld
a.
• Old.
n.
• Age; esp., old age.
• Old times; former days; antiquity.
v. i.
• To age; to grow old.
v. t.
• To make old or ancient.
Elder
a.
• Older; more aged, or existing longer.
• Born before another; prior in years; senior; earlier; older; as, his elder brother died in infancy; — opposed to younger, and now commonly applied to a son, daughter, child, brother, etc.
n.
• One who is older; a superior in age; a senior.
• An aged person; one who lived at an earlier period; a predecessor.
• A person who, on account of his age, occupies the office of ruler or judge; hence, a person occupying any office appropriate to such as have the experience and dignity which age confers; as, the elders of Israel; the elders of the synagogue; the elders in the apostolic church.
(M. E. Ch.) A clergyman authorized to administer all the sacraments; as, a traveling elder.
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs (Sambucus) having broad umbels of white flowers, and small black or red berries.
Elderish
a.
• Somewhat old; elderly.
Elderly
a.
• Somewhat old; advanced beyond middle age; bordering on old age; as, elderly people.
Eldern
a.
• Made of elder.
Eldership
n.
• The state of being older; seniority.
• Office of an elder; collectively, a body of elders.
Elderwort
n.
(Bot.) Danewort.
Eldest
a.
• Oldest; longest in duration.
• Born or living first, or before the others, as a son, daughter, brother, etc.; first in origin.
Elding
n.
• Fuel.
Eldritch
a.
• Hideous; ghastly; as, an eldritch shriek or laugh.
Eleatic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a certain school of Greek philosophers who taught that the only certain science is that which owes nothing to the senses, and all to the reason.
n.
• A philosopher of the Eleatic school.
Eleaticism
n.
• The Eleatic doctrine.
Elecampane
n.
(Bot.) A large, coarse herb (Inula Helenium), with composite yellow flowers. The root, which has a pungent taste, is used as a tonic, and was formerly of much repute as a stomachic.
• A sweetmeat made from the root of the plant.
Elect
a.
• Chosen; taken by preference from among two or more.
(Theol.) Chosen as the object of mercy or divine favor; set apart to eternal life.
• Chosen to an office, but not yet actually inducted into it; as, bishop elect; governor or mayor elect.
n.
• One chosen or set apart.
(Theol.) Those who are chosen for salvation.
v. t.
• To pick out; to select; to choose.
• To select or take for an office; to select by vote; as, to elect a representative, a president, or a governor.
(Theol.) To designate, choose, or select, as an object of mercy or favor.
Electant
n.
• One who has the power of choosing; an elector.
Election
n.
• The act of choosing; choice; selection.
• The act of choosing a person to fill an office, or to membership in a society, as by ballot, uplifted hands, or viva voce; as, the election of a president or a mayor.
• Power of choosing; free will; liberty to choose or act.
• Discriminating choice; discernment.
(Theol.) Divine choice; predestination of individuals as objects of mercy and salvation; — one of the "five points" of Calvinism.
(Law) The choice, made by a party, of two alternatives, by taking one of which, the chooser is excluded from the other.
• Those who are elected.
Electioneer
v. i.
• To make interest for a candidate at an election; to use arts for securing the election of a candidate.
Electioneerer
n.
• One who electioneers.
Elective
a.
• Exerting the power of choice; selecting; as, an elective act.
• Pertaining to, or consisting in, choice, or right of choosing; electoral.
• Dependent on choice; bestowed or passing by election; as, an elective study; an elective office.
n.
• In an American college, an optional study or course of study.
Electively
adv.
• In an elective manner; by choice.
Elector
n.
• One who elects, or has the right of choice; a person who is entitled to take part in an election, or to give his vote in favor of a candidate for office.
• Hence, specifically, in any country, a person legally qualified to vote.
• In the old German empire, one of the princes entitled to choose the emperor.
• One of the persons chosen, by vote of the people in the United States, to elect the President and Vice President.
a.
• Pertaining to an election or to electors.
Electorality
n.
• The territory or dignity of an elector; electorate.
Electorate
n.
• The territory, jurisdiction, or dignity of an elector, as in the old German empire.
• The whole body of persons in a nation or state who are entitled to vote in an election, or any distinct class or division of them.
Electoress
n.
• An electress.
Electorial
a.
• Electoral.
Electorship
n.
• The office or status of an elector.
Electrepeter
n.
• An instrument used to change the direction of electric currents; a commutator.
Electress
n.
• The wife or widow of an elector in the old German empire.
Electric
n.
(Physics) A nonconductor of electricity, as amber, glass, resin, etc., employed to excite or accumulate electricity.
Electrically
adv.
• In the manner of electricity, or by means of it; thrillingly.
Electricalness
a.
• The state or quality of being electrical.
Electrician
n.
• An investigator of electricity; one versed in the science of electricity.
Electricity
n.
• A power in nature, a manifestation of energy, exhibiting itself when in disturbed equilibrium or in activity by a circuit movement, the fact of direction in which involves polarity, or opposition of properties in opposite directions; also, by attraction for many substances, by a law involving attraction between surfaces of unlike polarity, and repulsion between those of like; by exhibiting accumulated polar tension when the circuit is broken; and by producing heat, light, concussion, and often chemical changes when the circuit passes between the poles or through any imperfectly conducting substance or space. It is generally brought into action by any disturbance of molecular equilibrium, whether from a chemical, physical, or mechanical, cause.
• The science which unfolds the phenomena and laws of electricity; electrical science.
• Fig.: Electrifying energy or characteristic.
Electrifiable
a.
• Capable of receiving electricity, or of being charged with it.
Electrification
n.
(Physics) The act of electrifying, or the state of being charged with electricity.
Electrify
v. t.
• To communicate electricity to; to charge with electricity; as, to electrify a jar.
• To cause electricity to pass through; to affect by electricity; to give an electric shock to; as, to electrify a limb, or the body.
• To excite suddenly and violently, esp. by something highly delightful or inspiriting; to thrill; as, this patriotic sentiment electrified the audience.
v. i.
• To become electric.
Electrine
a.
• Belonging to, or made of, amber.
• Made of electrum, an alloy used by the ancients.
Electrition
n.
(Physiol.) The recognition by an animal body of the electrical condition of external objects.
Electrization
n.
• The act of electrizing; electrification.
Electrize
v. t.
• To electricity.
Electrizer
n.
• One who, or that which, electrizes.
Electro
n.
• An electrotype.
Electrocute
v. t.
• To execute or put to death by electricity. — E*lec`tro*cu"tion, n.
Electrode
n.
(Elec.) The path by which electricity is conveyed into or from a solution or other conducting medium; esp., the ends of the wires or conductors, leading from source of electricity, and terminating in the medium traversed by the current.
Electrogenesis
n.
(Physiol.) Same as Electrogeny.
Electrogenic
a.
(Physiol.) Of or pertaining to electrogenesis; as, an electrogenic condition.
Electrogeny
n.
(Physiol.) A term sometimes applied to the effects (tetanus) produced in the muscles of the limbs, when a current of electricity is passed along the spinal cord or nerves.
Electrograph
n.
• A mark, record, or tracing, made by the action of electricity.
Electrolier
n.
• A branching frame, often of ornamental design, to support electric illuminating lamps.
Electrology
n.
• That branch of physical science which treats of the phenomena of electricity and its properties.
Electrolysis
n.
(Physics & Chem.) The act or process of chemical decomposition, by the action of electricity; as, the electrolysis of silver or nickel for plating; the electrolysis of water.
Electrolyte
n.
(Physics & Chem.) A compound decomposable, or subjected to decomposition, by an electric current.
Electrolyzable
a.
• Capable of being electrolyzed, or decomposed by electricity.
Electrolyzation
n.
• The act or the process of electrolyzing.
Electrolyze
v. t.
• To decompose by the direct action of electricity.
Electrometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the quantity or intensity of electricity; also, sometimes, and less properly, applied to an instrument which indicates the presence of electricity (usually called an electroscope).
Electromotor
n.
(Physics) A mover or exciter of electricity; as apparatus for generating a current of electricity.
(Mech.) An apparatus or machine for producing motion and mechanical effects by the action of electricity; an electro-magnetic engine.
Electron
n.
• Amber; also, the alloy of gold and silver, called electrum.
Electropathy
n.
(Med.) The treatment of disease by electricity.
Electrophone
n.
(Physics) An instrument for producing sound by means of electric currents.
Electrophorus
n.
(Physics) An instrument for exciting electricity, and repeating the charge indefinitely by induction, consisting of a flat cake of resin, shelllac, or ebonite, upon which is placed a plate of metal.
Electroplate
v. t.
(Mech.) To plate or cover with a coating of metal, usually silver, nickel, or gold, by means of electrolysis.
Electroplater
n.
• One who electroplates.
Electroplating
n.
• The art or process of depositing a coating (commonly) of silver, gold, or nickel on an inferior metal, by means of electricity.
Electroscope
n.
(Physics) An instrument for detecting the presence of electricity, or changes in the electric state of bodies, or the species of electricity present, as by means of pith balls, and the like.
Electroscopic
a.
• Relating to, or made by means of, the electroscope.
Electrostatic
a.
• Pertaining to electrostatics.
Electrostatics
n.
(Physics) That branch of science which treats of statical electricity or electric force in a state of rest.
Electrotonic
a.
(Physics) Of or pertaining to electrical tension; — said of a supposed peculiar condition of a conducting circuit during its exposure to the action of another conducting circuit traversed by a uniform electric current when both circuits remain stationary.
(Physiol.) Relating to electrotonus; as, the electrotonic condition of a nerve.
Electrotonize
v. t.
(Physiol.) To cause or produce electrotonus.
Electrotonous
a.
• Electrotonic.
Electrotonus
n.
(Physiol.) The modified condition of a nerve, when a constant current of electricity passes through any part of it.
Electrotype
n.
• A facsimile plate made by electrotypy for use in printing; also, an impression or print from such plate. Also used adjectively.
v. t.
• To make facsimile plates of by the electrotype process; as to electrotype a page of type, a book, etc.
Electrotyper
n.
• One who electrotypes.
Electrotypic
a.
• Pertaining to, or effected by means of, electrotypy.
Electrotyping
n.
• The act or the process of making electrotypes.
Electrotypy
n.
• The process of producing electrotype plates.
Electrum
n.
• Amber.
• An alloy of gold and silver, of an amber color, used by the ancients.
• German-silver plate.
Electuary
n.
(Med.) A medicine composed of powders, or other ingredients, incorporated with some convserve, honey, or sirup; a confection.
Eleemosynarily
adv.
• In an eleemosynary manner; by charity; charitably.
Eleemosynary
a.
• Relating to charity, alms, or almsgiving; intended for the distribution of charity; as, an eleemosynary corporation.
• Given in charity or alms; having the nature of alms; as, eleemosynary assistance.
• Supported by charity; as, eleemosynary poor.
n.
• One who subsists on charity; a dependent.
Elegant
a.
• Very choice, and hence, pleasing to good taste; characterized by grace, propriety, and refinement, and the absence of every thing offensive; exciting admiration and approbation by symmetry, completeness, freedom from blemish, and the like; graceful; tasteful and highly attractive; as, elegant manners; elegant style of composition; an elegant speaker; an elegant structure.
• Exercising a nice choice; discriminating beauty or sensitive to beauty; as, elegant taste.
Elegantly
adv.
• In a manner to please nice taste; with elegance; with due symmetry; richly.
Elegiac
a.
• Belonging to elegy, or written in elegiacs; plaintive; expressing sorrow or lamentation; as, an elegiac lay; elegiac strains.
• Used in elegies; as, elegiac verse; the elegiac distich or couplet, consisting of a dactylic hexameter and pentameter.
n.
• Elegiac verse.
Elegiacal
a.
• Elegiac.
Elegiast
n.
• One who composes elegies.
Elegiographer
n.
• An elegist.
Elegist
n.
• A write of elegies.
Elegit
n.
(Law) A judicial writ of execution, by which a defendant's goods are appraised and delivered to the plaintiff, and, if no sufficient to satisfy the debt, all of his lands are delivered, to be held till the debt is paid by the rents and profits, or until the defendant's interest has expired.
Elegize
v. t.
• To lament in an elegy; to celebrate in elegiac verse; to bewail.
Elegy
n.
• A mournful or plaintive poem; a funereal song; a poem of lamentation.
Eleidin
n.
(Biol.) Lifeless matter deposited in the form of minute granules within the protoplasm of living cells.
Element
n.
• One of the simplest or essential parts or principles of which anything consists, or upon which the constitution or fundamental powers of anything are based.
• One of the ultimate, undecomposable constituents of any kind of matter. Specifically: (Chem.) A substance which cannot be decomposed into different kinds of matter by any means at present employed; as, the elements of water are oxygen and hydrogen.
• One of the ultimate parts which are variously combined in anything; as, letters are the elements of written language; hence, also, a simple portion of that which is complex, as a shaft, lever, wheel, or any simple part in a machine; one of the essential ingredients of any mixture; a constituent part; as, quartz, feldspar, and mica are the elements of granite.
• One out of several parts combined in a system of aggregation, when each is of the nature of the whole; as, a single cell is an element of the honeycomb
(Anat.) One of the smallest natural divisions of the organism, as a blood corpuscle, a muscular fiber.
(Biol.) One of the simplest essential parts, more commonly called cells, of which animal and vegetable organisms, or their tissues and organs, are composed.
(Math.) An infinitesimal part of anything of the same nature as the entire magnitude considered; as, in a solid an element may be infinitesimal portion between any two planes that are separated and indefinitely small distance
• Sometimes a curve, or surface, or volume is considered as described by a moving point, or curve, or surface, the latter being at any instant called an element of the former
• One of the terms in an algebraic expression.
• One of the necessary data or values upon which a system of calculations depends, or general conclusions are based; as, the elements of a planet's orbit.
• The simplest or fundamental principles of any system in philosophy, science, or art; rudiments; as, the elements of geometry, or of music.
• Any outline or sketch, regarded as containing the fundamental ideas or features of the thing in question; as, the elemental of a plan.
• One of the simple substances, as supposed by the ancient philosophers; one of the imaginary principles of matter
• The whole material composing the world.
(Eccl.) The bread and wine used in the eucharist or Lord's supper.
v. t.
• To compound of elements or first principles.
• To constitute; to make up with elements.
Elemental
a.
• Pertaining to the elements, first principles, and primary ingredients, or to the four supposed elements of the material world; as, elemental air.
• Pertaining to rudiments or first principles; rudimentary; elementary.
Elementalism
a.
• The theory that the heathen divinities originated in the personification of elemental powers.
Elementality
n.
• The condition of being composed of elements, or a thing so composed.
Elementally
adv.
• According to elements; literally; as, the words, "Take, eat; this is my body," elementally understood.
Elementar
a.
• Elementary.
Elementariness
n.
• The state of being elementary; original simplicity; uncompounded state.
Elementarity
n.
• Elementariness.
Elementary
a.
• Having only one principle or constituent part; consisting of a single element; simple; uncompounded; as, an elementary substance.
• Pertaining to, or treating of, the elements, rudiments, or first principles of anything; initial; rudimental; introductory; as, an elementary treatise.
• Pertaining to one of the four elements, air, water, earth, fire.
Elementation
n.
• Instruction in the elements or first principles.
Elementoid
a.
• Resembling an element.
Elemi
n.
• A fragrant gum resin obtained chiefly tropical trees of the genera Amyris and Canarium. A. elemifera yields Mexican elemi; C. commune, the Manila elemi. It is used in the manufacture of varnishes, also in ointments and plasters.
Elemin
n.
(Chem.) A transparent, colorless oil obtained from elemi resin by distillation with water; also, a crystallizable extract from the resin.
Elench
n.
(Logic) That part of an argument on which its conclusiveness depends; that which convinces of refutes an antagonist; a refutation.
• A specious but fallacious argument; a sophism.
Elenchical
a.
• Pertaining to an elench.
Elenchically
adv.
• By means of an elench.
Elenchize
v. i.
• To dispute.
Elenchus
n.
• Same as Elench.
Elenge
a.
• Sorrowful; wretched; full of trouble.
Elengeness
n.
• Loneliness; misery.
Elephansy
n.
• Elephantiasis.
Elephant
n.
(Zool.) A mammal of the order Proboscidia, of which two living species, Elephas Indicus and E. Africanus, and several fossil species, are known. They have a proboscis or trunk, and two large ivory tusks proceeding from the extremity of the upper jaw, and curving upwards. The molar teeth are large and have transverse folds. Elephants are the largest land animals now existing.
• Ivory; the tusk of the elephant.
Elephantiac
a.
(Med.) Affected with elephantiasis; characteristic of elephantiasis.
Elephantiasis
n.
(Med.) A disease of the skin, in which it become enormously thickened, and is rough, hard, and fissured, like an elephant's hide.
Elephantine
a.
• Pertaining to the elephant, or resembling an elephant (commonly, in size); hence, huge; immense; heavy; as, of elephantine proportions; an elephantine step or tread.
Eleusinian
a.
• Pertaining to Eleusis, in Greece, or to secret rites in honor of Ceres, there celebrated; as, Eleusinian mysteries or festivals.
Eleutheromania
n.
• A mania or frantic zeal for freedom.
Eleutheromaniac
a.
• Mad for freedom.
Elevate
a.
• Elevated; raised aloft.
v. t.
• To bring from a lower place to a higher; to lift up; to raise; as, to elevate a weight, a flagstaff, etc.
• To raise to a higher station; to promote; as, to elevate to an office, or to a high social position.
• To raise from a depressed state; to animate; to cheer; as, to elevate the spirits.
• To exalt; to ennoble; to dignify; as, to elevate the mind or character.
• To raise to a higher pitch, or to a greater degree of loudness; — said of sounds; as, to elevate the voice.
• To intoxicate in a slight degree; to render tipsy.
• To lessen; to detract from; to disparage.
Elevated
a.
• Uplifted; high; lofty; also, animated; noble; as, elevated thoughts.
Elevatedness
n.
• The quality of being elevated.
Elevation
n.
• The act of raising from a lower place, condition, or quality to a higher; — said of material things, persons, the mind, the voice, etc.; as, the elevation of grain; elevation to a throne; elevation of mind, thoughts, or character.
• Condition of being elevated; height; exaltation.
• That which is raised up or elevated; an elevated place or station; as, an elevation of the ground; a hill.
(Astron.) The distance of a celestial object above the horizon, or the arc of a vertical circle intercepted between it and the horizon; altitude; as, the elevation of the pole, or of a star.
(Dialing) The angle which the style makes with the substylar line.
(Gunnery) The movement of the axis of a piece in a vertical plane; also, the angle of elevation, that is, the angle between the axis of the piece and the line o sight; — distinguished from direction.
(Drawing) A geometrical projection of a building, or other object, on a plane perpendicular to the horizon; orthographic projection on a vertical plane; — called by the ancients the orthography.
Elevator
n.
• One who, or that which, raises or lifts up anything
• A mechanical contrivance, usually an endless belt or chain with a series of scoops or buckets, for transferring grain to an upper loft for storage
• A cage or platform and the hoisting machinery in a hotel, warehouse, mine, etc., for conveying persons, goods, etc., to or from different floors or levels; — called in England a lift; the cage or platform itself
• A building for elevating, storing, and discharging, grain
(Anat.) A muscle which serves to raise a part of the body, as the leg or the eye
(Surg.) An instrument for raising a depressed portion of a bone.
Elevatory
a.
• Tending to raise, or having power to elevate; as, elevatory forces.
Eleven
a.
• Ten and one added; as, eleven men.
n.
• The sum of ten and one; eleven units or objects.
• A symbol representing eleven units, as 11 or xi.
(Cricket & American Football) The eleven men selected to play on one side in a match, as the representatives of a club or a locality; as, the all-England eleven.
Eleventh
a.
• Next after the tenth; as, the eleventh chapter.
• Constituting one of eleven parts into which a thing is divided; as, the eleventh part of a thing.
(Mus.) Of or pertaining to the interval of the octave and the fourth.
n.
• The quotient of a unit divided by eleven; one of eleven equal parts.
(Mus.) The interval consisting of ten conjunct degrees; the interval made up of an octave and a fourth.
Elextrometry
n.
(Physics) The art or process of making electrical measurements.
Elf
n.
• An imaginary supernatural being, commonly a little sprite, much like a fairy; a mythological diminutive spirit, supposed to haunt hills and wild places, and generally represented as delighting in mischievous tricks.
• A very diminutive person; a dwarf.
v. t.
• To entangle mischievously, as an elf might do.
Elfin
a.
• Relating to elves.
n.
• A little elf or urchin.
Elfish
a.
• Of or relating to the elves; elflike; implike; weird; scarcely human; mischievous, as though caused by elves.
Elfishly
adv.
• In an elfish manner.
Elfishness
n.
• The quality of being elfish.
Elfkin
n.
• A little elf.
Elfland
n.
• Fairyland.
Elflock
n.
• Hair matted, or twisted into a knot, as if by elves.
Elicit
a.
• Elicited; drawn out; made real; open; evident.
v. t.
• To draw out or entice forth; to bring to light; to bring out against the will; to deduce by reason or argument; as, to elicit truth by discussion.
Elicitate
v. t.
• To elicit.
Elicitation
n.
• The act of eliciting.
Elide
v. t.
• To break or dash in pieces; to demolish; as, to elide the force of an argument.
(Gram.) To cut off, as a vowel or a syllable, usually the final one; to subject to elision.
Eligibility
n.
• The quality of being eligible; eligibleness; as, the eligibility of a candidate; the eligibility of an offer of marriage.
Eligible
a.
• That may be selected; proper or qualified to be chosen; legally qualified to be elected and to hold office.
• Worthy to be chosen or selected; suitable; desirable; as, an eligible situation for a house.
Eligibleness
n.
• The quality worthy or qualified to be chosen; suitableness; desirableness.
Eligibly
adv.
• In an eligible manner.
Elimate
v. t.
• To render smooth; to polish.
Eliminant
n.
(Math.) The result of eliminating n variables between n homogeneous equations of any degree; — called also resultant.
Eliminate
v. t.
• To put out of doors; to expel; to discharge; to release; to set at liberty.
(Alg.) To cause to disappear from an equation; as, to eliminate an unknown quantity.
• To set aside as unimportant in a process of inductive inquiry; to leave out of consideration.
• To obtain by separating, as from foreign matters; to deduce; as, to eliminate an idea or a conclusion.
(Physiol.) To separate; to expel from the system; to excrete; as, the kidneys eliminate urea, the lungs carbonic acid; to eliminate poison from the system.
Elimination
n.
• The act of expelling or throwing off
(Physiol.) the act of discharging or excreting waste products or foreign substances through the various emunctories.
(Alg.) Act of causing a quantity to disappear from an equation; especially, in the operation of deducing from several equations containing several unknown quantities a less number of equations containing a less number of unknown quantities.
• The act of obtaining by separation, or as the result of eliminating; deduction. [See Eliminate, 4.]
Eliminative
a.
(Physiol.) Relating to, or carrying on, elimination.
Elinguate
v. t.
• To deprive of the tongue.
Elinguation
n.
(O. Eng. Law) Punishment by cutting out the tongue.
Elinguid
a.
• Tongue-tied; dumb.
Eliquament
n.
• A liquid obtained from fat, or fat fish, by pressure.
Eliquation
n.
(Metallurgy) The process of separating a fusible substance from one less fusible, by means of a degree of heat sufficient to melt the one and not the other, as an alloy of copper and lead; liquation.
Elison
n.
• Division; separation.
(Gram.) The cutting off or suppression of a vowel or syllable, for the sake of meter or euphony; esp., in poetry, the dropping of a final vowel standing before an initial vowel in the following word, when the two words are drawn together.
Elisor
n.
(Eng. Law) An elector or chooser; one of two persons appointed by a court to return a jury or serve a writ when the sheriff and the coroners are disqualified.
Elix
v. t.
• To extract.
Elixate
v. t.
• To boil; to seethe; hence, to extract by boiling or seething.
Elixation
n.
• A seething; digestion.
Elixir
n.
(Med.) A tincture with more than one base; a compound tincture or medicine, composed of various substances, held in solution by alcohol in some form.
(Alchemy) An imaginary liquor capable of transmuting metals into gold; also, one for producing life indefinitely; as, elixir vitae, or the elixir of life.
• The refined spirit; the quintessence.
• Any cordial or substance which invigorates.
Elizabethan
a.
• Pertaining to Queen Elizabeth or her times, esp. to the architecture or literature of her reign; as, the Elizabethan writers, drama, literature.
n.
• One who lived in England in the time of Queen Elizabeth.
Elk
n.
(Zool.) A large deer, of several species. The European elk (Alces machlis or Cervus alces) is closely allied to the American moose. The American elk, or wapiti (Cervus Canadensis), is closely related to the European stag.
Elknut
n.
(Bot.) The buffalo nut.
Elkwood
n.
• The soft, spongy wood of a species of Magnolia (M. Umbrella).
Ell
n.
• A measure for cloth; — now rarely used. It is of different lengths in different countries; the English ell being 45 inches, the Dutch or Flemish ell 27, the Scotch about 37.
Ellachick
n.
(Zool.) A fresh-water tortoise (Chelopus marmoratus) of California; — used as food.
Ellagic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, gallnuts or gallic acid; as, ellagic acid.
Ellebore
n.
• Hellebore.
Elleck
n.
(Zool.) The red gurnard or cuckoo fish.
Ellipse
n.
(Geom.) An oval or oblong figure, bounded by a regular curve, which corresponds to an oblique projection of a circle, or an oblique section of a cone through its opposite sides. The greatest diameter of the ellipse is the major axis, and the least diameter is the minor axis.
(Gram.) Omission.
• The elliptical orbit of a planet.
Ellipsis
n.
(Gram.) Omission; a figure of syntax, by which one or more words, which are obviously understood, are omitted; as, the virtues I admire, for, the virtues which I admire.
(Geom.) An ellipse.
Ellipsograph
n.
• An instrument for describing ellipses; — called also trammel.
Ellipsoid
n.
(Geom.) A solid, all plane sections of which are ellipses or circles.
Elliptically
adv.
• In the form of an ellipse.
• With a part omitted; as, elliptically expressed.
Ellipticity
n.
• Deviation of an ellipse or a spheroid from the form of a circle or a sphere; especially, in reference to the figure of the earth, the difference between the equatorial and polar semidiameters, divided by the equatorial; thus, the ellipticity of the earth is
Elliptograph
n.
• Same as Ellipsograph.
Ellwand
n.
• Formerly, a measuring rod an ell long.
Elm
n.
(Bot.) A tree of the genus Ulmus, of several species, much used as a shade tree, particularly in America. The English elm is Ulmus campestris; the common American or white elm is U. Americana; the slippery or red elm, U. fulva.
Elmen
a.
• Belonging to elms.
Elmy
a.
• Abounding with elms.
Elocation
n.
• A removal from the usual place of residence.
• Departure from the usual state; an ecstasy.
Elocular
a.
• Having but one cell, or cavity; not divided by a septum or partition.
Elocution
n.
• Utterance by speech.
• Oratorical or expressive delivery, including the graces of intonation, gesture, etc.; style or manner of speaking or reading in public; as, clear, impressive elocution.
• Suitable and impressive writing or style; eloquent diction.
Elocutionary
a.
• Pertaining to elocution.
Elocutionist
n.
• One who is versed in elocution; a teacher of elocution.
Elocutive
a.
• Pertaining to oratorical expression.
Elodian
n.
(Zool.) One of a tribe of tortoises, including the terrapins, etc., in which the head and neck can be withdrawn.
Elogist
n.
• One who pronounces an eloge.
Elohim
n.
• One of the principal names by which God is designated in the Hebrew Scriptures.
Elohist
n.
• The writer, or one of the writers, of the passages of the Old Testament, notably those of Elohim instead of Jehovah, as the name of the Supreme Being; — distinguished from Jehovist.
Elohistic
a.
• Relating to Elohim as a name of God; — said of passages in the Old Testament.
Eloign
v. t.
• To remove afar off; to withdraw.
(Law) To convey to a distance, or beyond the jurisdiction, or to conceal, as goods liable to distress.
Eloignate
v. t.
• To remove.
Eloignment
n.
• Removal to a distance; withdrawal.
Elong
v. t.
• To lengthen out; to prolong.
• To put away; to separate; to keep off.
Elongate
v. t.
• To lengthen; to extend; to stretch; as, to elongate a line.
• To remove further off.
v. i.
• To depart to, or be at, a distance; esp., to recede apparently from the sun, as a planet in its orbit.
a.
• Drawn out at length; elongated; as, an elongate leaf.
Elongation
n.
• The act of lengthening, or the state of being lengthened; protraction; extension.
• That which lengthens out; continuation.
• Removal to a distance; withdrawal; a being at a distance; distance.
(Astron.) The angular distance of a planet from the sun; as, the elongation of Venus or Mercury.
Elope
v. i.
• To run away, or escape privately, from the place or station to which one is bound by duty; — said especially of a woman or a man, either married or unmarried, who runs away with a paramour or a sweetheart.
Elopement
n.
• The act of eloping; secret departure; — said of a woman and a man, one or both, who run away from their homes for marriage or for cohabitation.
Eloper
n.
• One who elopes.
Elops
n.
(Zool.) A genus of fishes.
• A mythical serpent.
Eloquence
n.
• Fluent, forcible, elegant, and persuasive speech in public; the power of expressing strong emotions in striking and appropriate language either spoken or written, thereby producing conviction or persuasion.
• Fig.: Whatever produces the effect of moving and persuasive speech.
• That which is eloquently uttered or written.
Eloquent
a.
• Having the power of expressing strong emotions or forcible arguments in an elevated, impassioned, and effective manner; as, an eloquent orator or preacher.
• Adapted to express strong emotion or to state facts arguments with fluency and power; as, an eloquent address or statement; an eloquent appeal to a jury.
Eloquently
adv.
• In an eloquent manner.
Else
a. & pron.
• Other; one or something beside; as, Who else is coming? What else shall I give? Do you expect anything else?
adv. & conj.
• Besides; except that mentioned; in addition; as, nowhere else; no one else.
• Otherwise; in the other, or the contrary, case; if the facts were different.
Elsewhere
adv.
• In any other place; as, these trees are not to be found elsewhere.
• In some other place; in other places, indefinitely; as, it is reported in town and elsewhere.
Elsewhither
adv.
• To some, or any, other place; as, you will have to go elsewhither for it. R. of Gloucester.
Elsewise
adv.
• Otherwise.
Elsin
n.
• A shoemaker's awl.
Elucidate
v. t.
• To make clear or manifest; to render more intelligible; to illustrate; as, an example will elucidate the subject.
Elucidation
n.
• A making clear; the act of elucidating or that which elucidates, as an explanation, an exposition, an illustration; as, one example may serve for further elucidation of the subject.
Elucidative
a.
• Making clear; tending to elucidate; as, an elucidative note.
Elucidator
n.
• One who explains or elucidates; an expositor.
Elucidatory
a.
• Tending to elucidate; elucidative.
Eluctate
v. i.
• To struggle out; — with out.
Eluctation
n.
• A struggling out of any difficulty.
Elude
v. t.
• To avoid slyly, by artifice, stratagem, or dexterity; to escape from in a covert manner; to mock by an unexpected escape; to baffle; as, to elude an officer; to elude detection, inquiry, search, comprehension; to elude the force of an argument or a blow.
Eludible
a.
• Capable of being eluded; evadible.
Elul
n.
• The sixth month of the Jewish year, by the sacred reckoning, or the twelfth, by the civil reckoning, corresponding nearly to the month of September.
Elumbated
a.
• Weak or lame in the loins.
Elusion
n.
• Act of eluding; adroit escape, as by artifice; a mockery; a cheat; trickery.
Elusive
a.
• Tending to elude; using arts or deception to escape; adroitly escaping or evading; eluding the grasp; fallacious.
Elusory
a.
• Tending to elude or deceive; evasive; fraudulent; fallacious; deceitful; deceptive.
Elute
v. t.
• To wash out.
Elutriate
v. t.
• To wash or strain out so as to purify; as, to elutriate the blood as it passes through the lungs; to strain off or decant, as a powder which is separated from heavier particles by being drawn off with water; to cleanse, as by washing.
Elutriation
n.
• The process of elutriating; a decanting or racking off by means of water, as finer particles from heavier.
Eluxate
v. t.
• To dislocate; to luxate.
Eluxation
n.
• Dislocation; luxation.
Elvan
a.
• Pertaining to elves; elvish.
(Mining) Of or pertaining to certain veins of feldspathic or porphyritic rock crossing metalliferous veins in the mining districts of Cornwall; as, an elvan course.
Elve
n.
• An old form of Elf.
Elver
n.
(Zool.) A young eel; a young conger or sea eel; — called also elvene.
Elves
n.
Elvish
a.
• Pertaining to elves; implike; mischievous; weird; also, vacant; absent in demeanor.
• Mysterious; also, foolish.
Elvishly
adv.
• In an elvish manner.
Elysian
a.
• Pertaining, or the abode of the blessed after death; hence, yielding the highest pleasures; exceedingly delightful; beatific.
Elysium
n.
(Anc. Myth.) A dwelling place assigned to happy souls after death; the seat of future happiness; Paradise.
• Hence, any delightful place.
Elytriform
a.
(Zool.) Having the form, or structure, of an elytron.
Elytroid
a.
(Zool.) Resembling a beetle's wing case.
Elzevir
a.
(Bibliog.) Applied to books or editions (esp. of the Greek New Testament and the classics) printed and published by the Elzevir family at Amsterdam, Leyden, etc., from about 1592 to 1680; also, applied to a round open type introduced by them.
Em
n.
(Print.) The portion of a line formerly occupied by the letter m, then a square type, used as a unit by which to measure the amount of printed matter on a page; the square of the body of a type.
Emacerate
v. t. & i.
• To make lean or to become lean; to emaciate.
Emaceration
n.
• Emaciation.
Emaciate
v. i.
• To lose flesh gradually and become very lean; to waste away in flesh.
v. t.
• To cause to waste away in flesh and become very lean; as, his sickness emaciated him.
a.
• Emaciated.
Emaciation
n.
• The act of making very lean.
• The state of being emaciated or reduced to excessive leanness; an excessively lean condition.
Emaculate
v. t.
• To clear from spots or stains, or from any imperfection.
Emaculation
n.
• The act of clearing from spots.
Emanant
a.
• Issuing or flowing forth; emanating; passing forth into an act, or making itself apparent by an effect; — said of mental acts; as, an emanant volition.
Emanate
v. i.
• To issue forth from a source; to flow out from more or less constantly; as, fragrance emanates from flowers.
• To proceed from, as a source or fountain; to take origin; to arise, to originate.
a.
• Issuing forth; emanant.
Emanation
n.
• The act of flowing or proceeding from a fountain head or origin.
• That which issues, flows, or proceeds from any object as a source; efflux; an effluence; as, perfume is an emanation from a flower.
Emanative
a.
• Issuing forth; effluent.
Emanatively
adv.
• By an emanation.
Emanatory
a.
• Emanative; of the nature of an emanation.
Emancipate
v. t.
• To set free from the power of another; to liberate; as: (a) To set free, as a minor from a parent; as, a father may emancipate a child. (b) To set free from bondage; to give freedom to; to manumit; as, to emancipate a slave, or a country.
• To free from any controlling influence, especially from anything which exerts undue or evil influence; as, to emancipate one from prejudices or error
a.
• Set at liberty.
Emancipation
n.
• The act of setting free from the power of another, from slavery, subjection, dependence, or controlling influence; also, the state of being thus set free; liberation; as, the emancipation of slaves; the emancipation of minors; the emancipation of a person from prejudices; the emancipation of the mind from superstition; the emancipation of a nation from tyranny or subjection.
Emancipationist
n.
• An advocate of emancipation, esp. the emancipation of slaves.
Emancipator
n.
• One who emancipates.
Emancipatory
a.
• Pertaining to emancipation, or tending to effect emancipation.
Emancipist
n.
• A freed convict.
Emarginate
v. t.
• To take away the margin of.
Emarginately
adv.
• In an emarginate manner.
Emargination
n.
• The act of notching or indenting the margin, or the state of being so notched; also, a notch or shallow sinus in a margin.
Emasculate
v. t.
• To deprive of virile or procreative power; to castrate power; to castrate; to geld.
• To deprive of masculine vigor or spirit; to weaken; to render effeminate; to vitiate by unmanly softness.
a.
• Deprived of virility or vigor; unmanned; weak.
Emasculation
n.
• The act of depriving of virility, or the state of being so deprived; castration.
• The act of depriving, or state of being deprived, of vigor or strength; unmanly weakness.
Emasculator
n.
• One who, or that which, emasculates.
Emasculatory
a.
• Serving or tending to emasculate.
Embale
v. t.
• To make up into a bale or pack.
• To bind up; to inclose.
Emball
v. t.
• To encircle or embrace.
Embalm
v. t.
• To anoint all over with balm; especially, to preserve from decay by means of balm or other aromatic oils, or spices; to fill or impregnate (a dead body), with aromatics and drugs that it may resist putrefaction.
• To fill or imbue with sweet odor; to perfume.
• To preserve from decay or oblivion as if with balm; to perpetuate in remembrance.
Embalmer
n.
• One who embalms.
Embalmment
n.
• The act of embalming.
Embank
v. t.
• To throw up a bank so as to confine or to defend; to protect by a bank of earth or stone.
Embankment
n.
• The act of surrounding or defending with a bank.
• A structure of earth, gravel, etc., raised to prevent water from overflowing a level tract of country, to retain water in a reservoir, or to carry a roadway, etc.
Embar
v. t.
• To bar or shut in; to inclose securely, as with bars.
• To stop; to hinder by prohibition; to block up.
Embarcation
n.
• Same as Embarkation.
Embarge
v. t.
• To put in a barge.
Embargo
n.
• An edict or order of the government prohibiting the departure of ships of commerce from some or all of the ports within its dominions; a prohibition to sail.
v. t.
• To lay an embargo on and thus detain; to prohibit from leaving port; — said of ships, also of commerce and goods.
Embark
v. t.
• To cause to go on board a vessel or boat; to put on shipboard.
• To engage, enlist, or invest (as persons, money, etc.) in any affair; as, he embarked his fortune in trade.
v. i.
• To go on board a vessel or a boat for a voyage; as, the troops embarked for Lisbon.
• To engage in any affair.
Embarkation
n.
• The act of putting or going on board of a vessel; as, the embarkation of troops.
• That which is embarked; as, an embarkation of Jesuits.
Embarkment
n.
• Embarkation.
Embarrass
v. t.
• To hinder from freedom of thought, speech, or action by something which impedes or confuses mental action; to perplex; to discompose; to disconcert; as, laughter may embarrass an orator.
• To hinder from liberty of movement; to impede; to obstruct; as, business is embarrassed; public affairs are embarrassed.
(Com.) To involve in difficulties concerning money matters; to incumber with debt; to beset with urgent claims or demands; — said of a person or his affairs; as, a man or his business is embarrassed when he can not meet his pecuniary engagements.
n.
• Embarrassment.
Embarrassment
n.
• A state of being embarrassed; perplexity; impediment to freedom of action; entanglement; hindrance; confusion or discomposure of mind, as from not knowing what to do or to say; disconcertedness.
• Difficulty or perplexity arising from the want of money to pay debts.
Embase
v. t.
• To bring down or lower, as in position, value, etc.; to debase; to degrade; to deteriorate.
Embasement
n.
• Act of bringing down; depravation; deterioration.
Embassade
n.
• An embassy.
Embassador
n.
• Same as Ambassador.
Embassadorial
a.
• Same as Ambassadorial.
Embassadress
n.
• Same as Ambassadress.
Embassadry
n.
• Embassy.
Embassage
n.
• An embassy.
• Message; errand.
Embassy
n.
• The public function of an ambassador; the charge or business intrusted to an ambassador or to envoys; a public message to; foreign court concerning state affairs; hence, any solemn message.
• The person or persons sent as ambassadors or envoys; the ambassador and his suite; envoys.
• The residence or office of an ambassador.
Embastardize
v. t.
• To bastardize.
Embathe
v. t.
• To bathe; to imbathe.
Embattail
v. t.
• To furnish with battlements; to fortify as with battlements.
Embattle
v. t.
• To arrange in order of battle; to array for battle; also, to prepare or arm for battle; to equip as for battle.
v. i.
• To be arrayed for battle.
v. t.
• To furnish with battlements.
Embattled
a.
• Having indentations like a battlement.
(Her.) Having the edge broken like battlements; — said of a bearing such as a fess, bend, or the like.
• Having been the place of battle; as, an embattled plain or field.
Embattlement
n.
• An intended parapet; a battlement.
• The fortifying of a building or a wall by means of battlements.
Embay
v. t.
• To bathe; to soothe or lull as by bathing.
v. t.
• To shut in, or shelter, as in a bay.
Embayment
n.
• A bay.
Embeam
v. t.
• To make brilliant with beams.
Embed
v. t.
• To lay as in a bed; to lay in surrounding matter; to bed; as, to embed a thing in clay, mortar, or sand.
Embedment
n.
• The act of embedding, or the state of being embedded.
Embellish
v. t.
• To make beautiful or elegant by ornaments; to decorate; to adorn; as, to embellish a book with pictures, a garden with shrubs and flowers, a narrative with striking anecdotes, or style with metaphors.
Embellisher
n.
• One who embellishes.
Embellishment
n.
• The act of adorning, or the state of being adorned; adornment.
• That which adds beauty or elegance; ornament; decoration; as, pictorial embellishments.
Ember
n.
• A lighted coal, smoldering amid ashes; — used chiefly in the plural, to signify mingled coals and ashes; the smoldering remains of a fire.
a.
• Making a circuit of the year of the seasons; recurring in each quarter of the year; as, ember fasts.
Emberings
n. pl.
• Ember days.
Embetter
v. t.
• To make better.
Embezzle
v. t.
• To appropriate fraudulently to one's own use, as property intrusted to one's care; to apply to one's private uses by a breach of trust; as, to embezzle money held in trust.
• To misappropriate; to waste; to dissipate in extravagance.
Embezzlement
n.
• The fraudulent appropriation of property by a person to whom it has been intrusted; as, the embezzlement by a clerk of his employer's; embezzlement of public funds by the public officer having them in charge.
Embezzler
n.
• One who embezzles.
Embillow
v. i.
• To swell or heave like a of the sea.
Embiotocoid
a.
(Zool.) Belonging to, or resembling, the Embiotocidae.
n.
• One of a family of fishes (Embiotocidae) abundant on the coast of California, remarkable for being viviparous; — also called surf fishes and viviparous fishes.
Embitter
v. t.
• To make bitter or sad.
Embitterment
n.
• The act of embittering; also, that which embitters.
Emblanch
v. t.
• To whiten.
Emblaze
v. t.
• To adorn with glittering embellishments.
• To paint or adorn with armorial figures; to blazon, or emblazon.
Emblazon
v. t.
• To depict or represent; — said of heraldic bearings.
• To deck in glaring colors; to set off conspicuously; to display pompously; to decorate.
Emblazoner
n.
• One who emblazons; also, one who publishes and displays anything with pomp.
Emblazoning
n.
• The act or art of heraldic decoration; delineation of armorial bearings.
Emblazonment
n.
• An emblazoning.
Emblazonry
n.
• The act or art of an emblazoner; heraldic or ornamental decoration, as pictures or figures on shields, standards, etc.; emblazonment.
Emblem
n.
• Inlay; inlaid or mosaic work; something ornamental inserted in a surface.
• A visible sign of an idea; an object, or the figure of an object, symbolizing and suggesting another object, or an idea, by natural aptness or by association; a figurative representation; a typical designation; a symbol; as, a balance is an emblem of justice; a scepter, the emblem of sovereignty or power; a circle, the emblem of eternity.
• A picture accompanied with a motto, a set of verse, or the like, intended as a moral lesson or meditation.
v. t.
• To represent by an emblem; to symbolize.
Emblematiccize
v. t.
• To render emblematic; as, to emblematicize a picture.
Emblematist
n.
• A writer or inventor of emblems.
Emblematize
v. t.
• To represent by, or as by, an emblem; to symbolize.
Emblement
n.
(Law) The growing crop, or profits of a crop which has been sown or planted; — used especially in the plural. The produce of grass, trees, and the like, is not emblement.
Emblemize
v. t.
• To represent by an emblem; to emblematize.
Embloom
v. t.
• To emblossom.
Emblossom
v. t.
• To cover or adorn with blossoms.
Embodier
n.
• One who embodies.
Embodiment
n.
• The act of embodying; the state of being embodied.
• That which embodies or is embodied; representation in a physical body; a completely organized system, like the body; as, the embodiment of courage, or of courtesy; the embodiment of true piety.
Embody
v. t.
• To form into a body; to invest with a body; to collect into a body, a united mass, or a whole; to incorporate; as, to embody one's ideas in a treatise.
v. i.
• To unite in a body, a mass, or a collection; to coalesce.
Embogue
v. i.
• To disembogue; to discharge, as a river, its waters into the sea or another river.
Emboguing
n.
• The mouth of a river, or place where its waters are discharged.
Emboil
v. i.
• To boil with anger; to effervesce.
v. t.
• To cause to boil with anger; to irritate; to chafe.
Emboitement
n.
(Biol.) The hypothesis that all living things proceed from preexisting germs, and that these encase the germs of all future living things, inclosed one within another.
Embolden
v. t.
• To give boldness or courage to; to encourage.
Emboldener
n.
• One who emboldens.
Embolic
a.
• Embolismic.
(Med.) Pertaining to an embolism; produced by an embolism; as, an embolic abscess.
(Biol.) Pushing or growing in; — said of a kind of invagination.
Embolism
n.
• Intercalation; the insertion of days, months, or years, in an account of time, to produce regularity; as, the embolism of a lunar month in the Greek year.
• Intercalated time.
(Med.) The occlusion of a blood vessel by an embolus. Embolism in the brain often produces sudden unconsciousness and paralysis.
Embolismal
a.
• Pertaining to embolism; intercalary; as, embolismal months.
Embolite
n.
(Min.) A mineral consisting of both the chloride and the bromide of silver.
Embolus
n.
• Something inserted, as a wedge; the piston or sucker of a pump or syringe.
(Med.) A plug of some substance lodged in a blood vessel, being brought thither by the blood current. It consists most frequently of a clot of fibrin, a detached shred of a morbid growth, a globule of fat, or a microscopic organism.
Emboly
n.
(Biol.) Embolic invagination.
Embonpoint
n.
• Plumpness of person; — said especially of persons somewhat corpulent.
Emborder
v. t.
• To furnish or adorn with a border; to imborder.
Embosom
v. t.
• To take into, or place in, the bosom; to cherish; to foster.
• To inclose or surround; to shelter closely; to place in the midst of something.
Emboss
v. t.
• To arise the surface of into bosses or protuberances; particularly, to ornament with raised work.
• To raise in relief from a surface, as an ornament, a head on a coin, or the like.
v. t.
• To make to foam at the mouth, like a hunted animal.
v. t.
• To hide or conceal in a thicket; to imbosk; to inclose, shelter, or shroud in a wood.
• To surround; to ensheath; to immerse; to beset.
v. i.
• To seek the bushy forest; to hide in the woods.
Embossed
a.
• Formed or covered with bosses or raised figures.
• Having a part projecting like the boss of a shield.
• Swollen; protuberant.
Embosser
n.
• One who embosses.
Embossment
n.
• The act of forming bosses or raised figures, or the state of being so formed.
• A bosslike prominence; figure in relief; raised work; jut; protuberance; esp., a combination of raised surfaces having a decorative effect.
Embottle
v. t.
• To bottle.
Embouchure
n.
• The mouth of a river; also, the mouth of a cannon.
(Mus.) The mouthpiece of a wind instrument.
• The shaping of the lips to the mouthpiece; as, a flute player has a good embouchure.
Embow
v. t.
• To bend like a bow; to curve.
Embowel
v. t.
• To disembowel.
• To imbed; to hide in the inward parts; to bury.
Emboweler
n.
• One who takes out the bowels.
Embowelment
n.
• Disembowelment.
Embower
v. t.
• To cover with a bower; to shelter with trees.
v. i.
• To lodge or rest in a bower.
Embowl
v. t.
• To form like a bowl; to give a globular shape to.
Embox
v. t.
• To inclose, as in a box; to imbox.
Emboyssement
n.
• An ambush.
Embrace
v. t.
• To fasten on, as armor.
v. t.
• To clasp in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug.
• To cling to; to cherish; to love.
• To seize eagerly, or with alacrity; to accept with cordiality; to welcome.
• To encircle; to encompass; to inclose.
• To include as parts of a whole; to comprehend; to take in; as, natural philosophy embraces many sciences.
• To accept; to undergo; to submit to.
(Law) To attempt to influence corruptly, as a jury or court.
v. i.
• To join in an embrace.
n.
• Intimate or close encircling with the arms; pressure to the bosom; clasp; hug.
Embracement
n.
• A clasp in the arms; embrace.
• State of being contained; inclosure.
• Willing acceptance.
Embraceor
n.
(Law) One guilty of embracery.
Embracer
n.
• One who embraces.
Embracery
n.
(Law) An attempt to influence a court, jury, etc., corruptly, by promises, entreaties, money, entertainments, threats, or other improper inducements.
Embracive
a.
• Disposed to embrace; fond of caressing.
Embraid
v. t.
• To braid up, as hair.
• To upbraid.
Embranchment
n.
• The branching forth, as of trees.
Embrangle
v. t.
• To confuse; to entangle.
Embrasure
n.
• An embrace. "Our locked embrasures.
n.
(Arch.) A splay of a door or window.
(Fort.) An aperture with slant sides in a wall or parapet, through which cannon are pointed and discharged; a crenelle.
Embrave
v. t.
• To inspire with bravery.
• To decorate; to make showy and fine.
Embrawn
v. t.
• To harden.
Embread
v. t.
• To braid.
Embreathement
n.
• The act of breathing in; inspiration.
Embrew
v. t.
• To imbrue; to stain with blood.
Embright
v. t.
• To brighten.
Embrocate
v. t.
(Med.) To moisten and rub (a diseased part) with a liquid substance, as with spirit, oil, etc., by means of a cloth or sponge.
Embrocation
n.
(Med.) The act of moistening and rubbing a diseased part with spirit, oil, etc.
• The liquid or lotion with which an affected part is rubbed.
Embroider
v. t.
• To ornament with needlework; as, to embroider a scarf.
Embroiderer
n.
• One who embroiders.
Embroidery
n.
• Needlework used to enrich textile fabrics, leather, etc.; also, the art of embroidering.
• Diversified ornaments, especially by contrasted figures and colors; variegated decoration.
Embroil
v. t.
• To throw into confusion or commotion by contention or discord; to entangle in a broil or quarrel; to make confused; to distract; to involve in difficulties by dissension or strife.
• To implicate in confusion; to complicate; to jumble.
Embroiler
n.
• One who embroils.
Embroilment
n.
• The act of embroiling, or the condition of being embroiled; entanglement in a broil.
Embronze
v. t.
• To embody in bronze; to set up a bronze representation of, as of a person.
• To color in imitation of bronze.
Embrothel
v. t.
• To inclose in a brothel.
Embrown
v. t.
• To give a brown color to; to imbrown.
Embrute
v. t.
• To brutify; to imbrute.
Embryo
n.
(Biol.) The first rudiments of an organism, whether animal or plant
• The young of an animal in the womb, or more specifically, before its parts are developed and it becomes a fetus (see Fetus)
• The germ of the plant, which is inclosed in the seed and which is developed by germination.
a.
• Pertaining to an embryo; rudimentary; undeveloped; as, an embryo bud.
Embryogenic
a.
(Biol.) Pertaining to the development of an embryo.
Embryogeny
n.
(Biol.) The production and development of an embryo.
Embryogony
n.
(Biol.) The formation of an embryo.
Embryography
n.
(Biol.) The general description of embryos.
Embryologist
n.
• One skilled in embryology.
Embryology
n.
(Biol.) The science which relates to the formation and development of the embryo in animals and plants; a study of the gradual development of the ovum until it reaches the adult stage.
Embryonal
a.
(Biol.) Pertaining to an embryo, or the initial state of any organ; embryonic.
Embryonary
a.
(Biol.) Embryonic.
Embryonic
a.
(Biol.) Of or pertaining to an embryo; embryonal; rudimentary.
Embryoniferous
a.
(Biol.) Having an embryo.
Embryoniform
a.
(Biol.) Like an embryo in form.
Embryoplastic
n.
(Biol.) Relating to, or aiding in, the formation of an embryo; as, embryoplastic cells.
Embryotic
a.
(Biol.) Embryonic.
Embryotomy
n.
(Med.) The cutting a fetus into pieces within the womb, so as to effect its removal.
Embryotroph
n.
(Biol.) The material from which an embryo is formed and nourished.
Embryous
a.
• Embryonic; undeveloped.
Embulk
v. t.
• To enlarge in the way of bulk.
Emburse
v. t.
• To furnish with money; to imburse.
Embush
v. t.
• To place or hide in a thicket; to ambush.
Embushment
n.
• An ambush.
Embusy
v. t.
• To employ.
Eme
n.
• An uncle.
Emeer
n.
• Same as Emir.
Emend
v. t.
• To purge of faults; to make better; to correct; esp., to make corrections in (a literary work); to alter for the better by textual criticism, generally verbal.
Emendable
a.
• Corrigible; amendable.
Emendately
adv.
• Without fault; correctly.
Emendation
n.
• The act of altering for the better, or correcting what is erroneous or faulty; correction; improvement.
• Alteration by editorial criticism, as of a text so as to give a better reading; removal of errors or corruptions from a document; as, the book might be improved by judicious emendations.
Emendator
n.
• One who emends or critically edits.
Emendatory
a.
• Pertaining to emendation; corrective. "Emendatory criticism.
Emender
n.
• One who emends.
Emendicate
v. t.
• To beg.
Emerald
n.
(Min.) A precious stone of a rich green color, a variety of beryl.
(Print.) A kind of type, in size between minion and nonparel. It is used by English printers.
a.
• Of a rich green color, like that of the emerald.
Emeraldine
n.
• A green compound used as a dyestuff, produced from aniline blue when acted upon by acid.
Emeraud
n.
• An emerald.
Emerge
v. i.
• To rise out of a fluid; to come forth from that in which anything has been plunged, enveloped, or concealed; to issue and appear; as, to emerge from the water or the ocean; the sun emerges from behind the moon in an eclipse; to emerge from poverty or obscurity.
Emergence
n.
• The act of rising out of a fluid, or coming forth from envelopment or concealment, or of rising into view; sudden uprisal or appearance.
Emergency
n.
• Sudden or unexpected appearance; an unforeseen occurrence; a sudden occasion.
• An unforeseen occurrence or combination of circumstances which calls for immediate action or remedy; pressing necessity; exigency.
Emergent
a.
• Rising or emerging out of a fluid or anything that covers or conceals; issuing; coming to light.
• Suddenly appearing; arising unexpectedly; alling fro prompt action; urgent.
Emeril
n.
• Emery.
• A glazier's diamond.
Emerited
a.
• Considered as having done sufficient public service, and therefore honorably discharged.
Emeritus
a.
• Honorably discharged from the performance of public duty on account of age, infirmity, or long and faithful services; — said of an officer of a college or pastor of a church.
n.
• A veteran who has honorably completed his service.
Emersed
a.
(Bot.) Standing out of, or rising above, water.
Emersion
n.
• The act of emerging, or of rising out of anything; as, emersion from the sea; emersion from obscurity or difficulties.
(Astron.) The reappearance of a heavenly body after an eclipse or occultation; as, the emersion of the moon from the shadow of the earth; the emersion of a star from behind the moon.
Emery
n.
(Min.) Corundum in the form of grains or powder, used in the arts for grinding and polishing hard substances. Native emery is mixed with more or less magnetic iron.
Emesis
n.
(Med.) A vomiting.
Emetic
a.
(Med.) Inducing to vomit; exciting the stomach to discharge its contents by the mouth.
n.
• A medicine which causes vomiting.
Emetical
a.
• Inducing to vomit; producing vomiting; emetic. —
Emetine
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline bitter alkaloid extracted from ipecacuanha root, and regarded as its peculiar emetic principle.
Emforth
prep.
• According to; conformably to.
Emgalla
n.
(Zool.) The South African wart hog.
Emicant
a.
• Beaming forth; flashing.
Emication
n.
• A flying off in small particles, as heated iron or fermenting liquors; a sparkling; scintillation.
Emiction
n.
• The voiding of urine.
• What is voided by the urinary passages; urine.
Emictory
a. & n.
(Med.) Diuretic.
Emigrant
a.
• Removing from one country to another; emigrating; as, an emigrant company or nation.
• Pertaining to an emigrant; used for emigrants; as, an emigrant ship or hospital.
n.
• One who emigrates, or quits one country or region to settle in another.
Emigrate
v. i.
• To remove from one country or State to another, for the purpose of residence; to migrate from home.
a.
• Migratory; roving.
Emigration
n.
• The act of emigrating; removal from one country or state to another, for the purpose of residence, as from Europe to America, or, in America, from the Atlantic States to the Western.
• A body emigrants; emigrants collectively; as, the German emigration.
Emigrational
a.
• Relating to emigration.
Emigrationist
n.
• An advocate or promoter of emigration.
Emigrator
n.
• One who emigrates; am emigrant.
Eminence
n.
• That which is eminent or lofty; a high ground or place; a height.
• An elevated condition among men; a place or station above men in general, either in rank, office, or celebrity; social or moral loftiness; high rank; distinction; preferment.
• A title of honor, especially applied to a cardinal in the Roman Catholic Church.
Eminency
n.
• State of being eminent; eminence.
Eminent
a.
• High; lofty; towering; prominent.
• Being, metaphorically, above others, whether by birth, high station, merit, or virtue; high in public estimation; distinguished; conspicuous; as, an eminent station; an eminent historian, statements, statesman, or saint.
Eminently
adv.
• In an eminent manner; in a high degree; conspicuously; as, to be eminently learned.
Emissary
n.
• An agent employed to advance, in a covert manner, the interests of his employers; one sent out by any power that is at war with another, to create dissatisfaction among the people of the latter.
a.
• Exploring; spying.
(Anat.) Applied to the veins which pass out of the cranium through apertures in its walls.
Emissaryship
n.
• The office of an emissary.
Emission
n.
• The act of sending or throwing out; the act of sending forth or putting into circulation; issue; as, the emission of light from the sun; the emission of heat from a fire; the emission of bank notes.
• That which is sent out, issued, or put in circulation at one time; issue; as, the emission was mostly blood.
Emissitious
a.
• Looking, or narrowly examining; prying.
Emissive
a.
• Sending out; emitting; as, emissive powers.
Emissivity
n.
• Tendency to emission; comparative facility of emission, or rate at which emission takes place, as of heat from the surface of a heated body.
Emissory
a.
(Anat.) Same as Emissary, a., 2.
Emit
v. t.
• To send forth; to throw or give out; to cause to issue; to give vent to; to eject; to discharge; as, fire emits heat and smoke; boiling water emits steam; the sun emits light.
• To issue forth, as an order or decree; to print and send into circulation, as notes or bills of credit.
Emittent
a.
• Sending forth; emissive.
Emmantle
v. t.
• To cover over with, or as with, a mantle; to put about as a protection.
Emmarble
v. t.
• To turn to marble; to harden.
Emmenagogue
n.
(Med.) A medicine that promotes the menstrual discharge.
Emmet
n.
(Zool.) An ant.
Emmetropia
n.
(Med.) That refractive condition of the eye in which the rays of light are all brought accurately and without undue effort to a focus upon the retina; — opposed to hypermetropia, myopia, an astigmatism.
Emmetropic
a.
• Pertaining to, or characterized by, emmetropia.
Emmetropy
n.
(Med.) Same as Emmetropia.
Emmew
v. t.
• To mew or coop up.
Emmove
v. t.
• To move; to rouse; to excite.
Emodin
n.
(Chem.) An orange-red crystalline substance, C15H10O5, obtained from the buckthorn, rhubarb, etc., and regarded as a derivative of anthraquinone; — so called from a species of rhubarb (Rheum emodei).
Emollescence
n.
• That degree of softness in a body beginning to melt which alters its shape; the first or lowest degree of fusibility.
Emolliate
v. t.
• To soften; to render effeminate.
Emollient
a.
• Softening; making supple; acting as an emollient.
n.
(Med.) An external something or soothing application to allay irritation, soreness, etc.
Emollition
n.
• The act of softening or relaxing; relaxation.
Emolument
n.
• The profit arising from office, employment, or labor; gain; compensation; advantage; perquisites, fees, or salary.
Emolumental
a.
• Pertaining to an emolument; profitable.
Emotion
n.
• A moving of the mind or soul; excitement of the feelings, whether pleasing or painful; disturbance or agitation of mind caused by a specific exciting cause and manifested by some sensible effect on the body.
Emotional
a.
• Pertaining to, or characterized by, emotion; excitable; easily moved; sensational; as, an emotional nature.
Emotionalism
n.
• The cultivation of an emotional state of mind; tendency to regard things in an emotional manner.
Emotionalize
v. t.
• To give an emotional character to.
Emotioned
a.
• Affected with emotion.
Emotive
a.
• Attended by, or having the character of, emotion.
Emotiveness
n.
• Susceptibility to emotion.
Emotivity
n.
• Emotiveness.
Emove
v. t.
• To move.
Empair
v. t.
• To impair.
Empaistic
a.
(Fine Arts) Having to do with inlaid work; — especially used with reference to work of the ancient Greeks.
Empale
v. t.
• To make pale.
v. t.
• To fence or fortify with stakes; to surround with a line of stakes for defense; to impale.
• To inclose; to surround.
• To put to death by thrusting a sharpened stake through the body.
(Her.) Same as Impale.
Empalement
n.
• A fencing, inclosing, or fortifying with stakes.
• A putting to death by thrusting a sharpened stake through the body.
(Her.) Same as Impalement.
Empanel
n.
(Law) A list of jurors; a panel.
Empanoplied
a.
• Completely armed; panoplied.
Emparadise
v. t.
• Same as Imparadise.
Empark
v. t.
• To make a park of; to inclose, as with a fence; to impark.
Emparlance
n.
• Parley; imparlance.
Empasm
n.
• A perfumed powder sprinkled upon the body to mask the odor of sweat.
Empassion
v. t.
• To move with passion; to affect strongly.
Empassionate
a.
• Strongly affected.
Empawn
v. t.
• To put in pawn; to pledge; to impawn.
Empeach
v. t.
• To hinder.
Empearl
v. t.
• To form like pearls; to decorate with, or as with, pearls; to impearl.
Empeople
v. t.
• To form into a people or community; to inhabit; to people.
Emperice
n.
• An empress.
Emperil
v. t.
• To put in peril.
Emperished
a.
• Perished; decayed.
Emperor
n.
• The sovereign or supreme monarch of an empire; — a title of dignity superior to that of king; as, the emperor of Germany or of Austria; the emperor or Czar of Russia.
Emperorship
n.
• The rank or office of an emperor.
Empery
n.
• Empire; sovereignty; dominion.
Emphasis
n.
(Rhet.) A particular stress of utterance, or force of voice, given in reading and speaking to one or more words whose signification the speaker intends to impress specially upon his audience.
• A peculiar impressiveness of expression or weight of thought; vivid representation, enforcing assent; as, to dwell on a subject with great emphasis.
Emphasize
v. t.
• To utter or pronounce with a particular stress of voice; to make emphatic; as, to emphasize a word or a phrase.
Emphatically
adv.
• With emphasis; forcibly; in a striking manner or degree; preeminently.
• Not really, but apparently.
Emphaticalness
n.
• The quality of being emphatic; emphasis.
Emphractic
a.
(Med.) Having the quality of closing the pores of the skin.
Emphrensy
v. t.
• To madden.
Emphysema
n.
(Med.) A swelling produced by gas or air diffused in the cellular tissue.
Emphysematous
a.
(Med.) Pertaining to, or of the nature of, emphysema; swelled; bloated.
Emphyteusis
n.
(Rom. Law) A real right, susceptible of assignment and of descent, charged on productive real estate, the right being coupled with the enjoyment of the property on condition of taking care of the estate and paying taxes, and sometimes a small rent.
Emphyteutic
a.
• Of or pertaining to an emphyteusis; as, emphyteutic lands.
Emphyteuticary
n.
• One who holds lands by emphyteusis.
Empierce
v. t.
• To pierce; to impierce.
Empight
a.
• Fixed; settled; fastened.
Empire
n.
• Supreme power; sovereignty; sway; dominion.
• The dominion of an emperor; the territory or countries under the jurisdiction and dominion of an emperor (rarely of a king), usually of greater extent than a kingdom, always comprising a variety in the nationality of, or the forms of administration in, constituent and subordinate portions; as, the Austrian empire.
• Any dominion; supreme control; governing influence; rule; sway; as, the empire of mind or of reason.
Empiric
n.
• One who follows an empirical method; one who relies upon practical experience.
• One who confines himself to applying the results of mere experience or his own observation; especially, in medicine, one who deviates from the rules of science and regular practice; an ignorant and unlicensed pretender; a quack; a charlatan.
Empirically
adv.
• By experiment or experience; without science; in the manner of quacks.
Empiricism
n.
• The method or practice of an empiric; pursuit of knowledge by observation and experiment.
• Specifically, a practice of medicine founded on mere experience, without the aid of science or a knowledge of principles; ignorant and unscientific practice; charlatanry; quackery.
(Metaph.) The philosophical theory which attributes the origin of all our knowledge to experience.
Empiricist
n.
• An empiric.
Empiristic
a.
(Physics) Relating to, or resulting from, experience, or experiment; following from empirical methods or data; — opposed to nativistic.
Emplaster
v. t.
• To plaster over; to cover over so as to present a good appearance.
Emplastic
a.
• Fit to be applied as a plaster; glutinous; adhesive; as, emplastic applications.
n.
• A medicine causing constipation.
Emplastration
n.
• The act or process of grafting by inoculation; budding.
(Med.) The application of a plaster or salve.
Emplead
v. t.
• To accuse; to indict.
Emplecton
n.
• A kind of masonry in which the outer faces of the wall are ashlar, the space between being filled with broken stone and mortar. Cross layers of stone are interlaid as binders.
Employ
v. t.
• To inclose; to infold.
• To use; to have in service; to cause to be engaged in doing something; — often followed by in, about, on, or upon, and sometimes by to; as: (a) To make use of, as an instrument, a means, a material, etc., for a specific purpose; to apply; as, to employ the pen in writing, bricks in building, words and phrases in speaking; to employ the mind; to employ one's energies.
• To occupy; as, to employ time in study
• To have or keep at work; to give employment or occupation to; to intrust with some duty or behest; as, to employ a hundred workmen; to employ an envoy
n.
• That which engages or occupies a person; fixed or regular service or business; employment.
Employable
a.
• Capable of being employed; capable of being used; fit or proper for use.
Employe
n.
• One employed by another; a clerk or workman in the service of an employer.
Employee
n.
• One employed by another.
Employer
n.
• One who employs another; as, an employer of workmen.
Employment
n.
• The act of employing or using; also, the state of being employed.
• That which engages or occupies; that which consumes time or attention; office or post of business; service; as, agricultural employments; mechanical employments; public employments; in the employment of government.
Emplumed
a.
• Plumed.
Emplunge
v. t.
• To plunge; to implunge.
Empoison
v. t.
• To poison; to impoison.
n.
• Poison.
Empoisoner
n.
• Poisoner.
Empoisonment
n.
• The act of poisoning.
Emporium
n.
• A place of trade; a market place; a mart; esp., a city or town with extensive commerce; the commercial center of a country.
(Physiol.) The brain.
Empower
v. t.
• To give authority to; to delegate power to; to commission; to authorize (having commonly a legal force); as, the Supreme Court is empowered to try and decide cases, civil or criminal; the attorney is empowered to sign an acquittance, and discharge the debtor.
• To give moral or physical power, faculties, or abilities to.
Empress
n.
• The consort of an emperor.
• A female sovereign.
• A sovereign mistress.
Emprise
n.
• An enterprise; endeavor; adventure.
• The qualifies which prompt one to undertake difficult and dangerous exploits.
v. t.
• To undertake.
Emprising
a.
• Full of daring; adventurous.
Emprosthotonos
n.
(Med.) A drawing of the body forward, in consequence of the spasmodic action of some of the muscles.
Empte
v. t.
• To empty.
Emptier
n.
• One who, or that which, empties.
compar.
• of Empty.
Emptiness
n.
• The state of being empty; absence of contents; void space; vacuum; as, the emptiness of a vessel; emptiness of the stomach.
• Want of solidity or substance; unsatisfactoriness; inability to satisfy desire; vacuity; hollowness; the emptiness of earthly glory.
• Want of knowledge; lack of sense; vacuity of mind.
Emption
n.
• The act of buying.
Emptional
a.
• Capable of being purchased.
Empty
a.
• Containing nothing; not holding or having anything within; void of contents or appropriate contents; not filled; — said of an inclosure, as a box, room, house, etc.; as, an empty chest, room, purse, or pitcher; an empty stomach; empty shackles.
• Free; clear; devoid; — often with of.
• Having nothing to carry; unburdened.
• Destitute of effect, sincerity, or sense; — said of language; as, empty words, or threats.
• Unable to satisfy; unsatisfactory; hollow; vain; — said of pleasure, the world, etc.
• Producing nothing; unfruitful; — said of a plant or tree; as, an empty vine.
• Destitute of, or lacking, sense, knowledge, or courtesy; as, empty brains; an empty coxcomb.
• Destitute of reality, or real existence; unsubstantial; as, empty dreams.
n.
• An empty box, crate, cask, etc.; — used in commerce, esp. in transportation of freight; as, "special rates for empties."
v. t.
• To deprive of the contents; to exhaust; to make void or destitute; to make vacant; to pour out; to discharge; as, to empty a vessel; to empty a well or a cistern.
v. i.
• To discharge itself; as, a river empties into the ocean.
• To become empty.
Emptying
n.
• The act of making empty.
• The lees of beer, cider, etc.; yeast.
Empurple
v. t.
• To tinge or dye of a purple color; to color with purple; to impurple.
Empuse
n.
• A phantom or specter.
Empuzzle
v. t.
• To puzzle.
Empyema
n.
(Med.) A collection of blood, pus, or other fluid, in some cavity of the body, especially that of the pleura.
Empyesis
n.
(Med.) An eruption of pustules.
Empyreal
a.
• Formed of pure fire or light; refined beyond aerial substance; pertaining to the highest and purest region of heaven.
n.
• Empyrean.
Empyrean
n.
• The highest heaven, where the pure element of fire was supposed by the ancients to subsist.
a.
• Empyreal.
Empyreuma
n.
(Chem.) The peculiar smell and taste arising from products of decomposition of animal or vegetable substances when burnt in close vessels.
Empyreumatize
v. t.
• To render empyreumatic.
Empyrical
a.
• Containing the combustible principle of coal.
Empyrosis
n.
• A general fire; a conflagration.
Emu
n.
(Zool.) A large Australian bird, of two species (Dromaius Novae-Hollandiae and D. irroratus), related to the cassowary and the ostrich. The emu runs swiftly, but is unable to fly.
Emulable
a.
• Capable of being emulated.
Emulate
a.
• Striving to excel; ambitious; emulous.
v. t.
• To strive to equal or to excel in qualities or actions; to imitate, with a view to equal or to outdo, to vie with; to rival; as, to emulate the good and the great.
Emulation
n.
• The endeavor to equal or to excel another in qualities or actions; an assiduous striving to equal or excel another; rivalry.
• Jeaous rivalry; envy; envious contention.
Emulative
a.
• Inclined to emulation; aspiring to competition; rivaling; as, an emulative person or effort.
Emulatively
adv.
• In an emulative manner; with emulation.
Emulator
n.
• One who emulates, or strives to equal or surpass.
Emulatory
a.
• Pertaining to emulation; connected with rivalry.
Emulatress
n.
• A female emulator.
Emule
v. t.
• To emulate.
Emulge
v. t.
• To milk out; to drain.
Emulgent
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the kidneys; renal; as, emulgent arteries and veins.
n.
• An emulgent vessel, as a renal artery or vein.
n.
(Med.) A medicine that excites the flow of bile.
Emulous
a.
• Ambitiously desirous to equal or even to excel another; eager to emulate or vie with another; desirous of like excellence with another; — with of; as, emulous of another's example or virtues.
• Vying with; rivaling; hence, contentious, envious.
Emulously
adv.
• In an emulous manner.
Emulousness
n.
• The quality of being emulous.
Emulsic
a.
• Pertaining to, or produced from, emulsin; as, emulsic acid.
Emulsify
v. t.
• To convert into an emulsion; to form an emulsion; to reduce from an oily substance to a milky fluid in which the fat globules are in a very finely divided state, giving it the semblance of solution; as, the pancreatic juice emulsifies the oily part of food.
Emulsin
n.
(Chem.) The white milky pulp or extract of bitter almonds
• An unorganized ferment (contained in this extract and in other vegetable juices), which effects the decomposition of certain glucosides.
Emulsion
n.
• Any liquid preparation of a color and consistency resembling milk; as: (a) In pharmacy, an extract of seeds, or a mixture of oil and water united by a mucilaginous substance. (b) In photography, a liquid preparation of collodion holding salt of silver, used in the photographic process.
Emulsive
a.
• Softening; milklike.
• Yielding oil by expression; as, emulsive seeds.
• Producing or yielding a milklike substance; as, emulsive acids.
Emunctory
n.
(Physiol.) Any organ or part of the body (as the kidneys, skin, etc.,) which serves to carry off excrementitious or waste matter.
Emuscation
n.
• A freeing from moss.
Emyd
n.
(Zool.) A fresh-water tortoise of the family Emydidae.
Emydea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of chelonians which comprises many species of fresh-water tortoises and terrapins.
En
n.
(Print.) Half an em, that is, half of the unit of space in measuring printed matter.
Enable
v. t.
• To give strength or ability to; to make firm and strong.
• To make able (to do, or to be, something); to confer sufficient power upon; to furnish with means, opportunities, and the like; to render competent for; to empower; to endow.
Enablement
n.
• The act of enabling, or the state of being enabled; ability.
Enact
v. t.
• To decree; to establish by legal and authoritative act; to make into a law; especially, to perform the legislative act with reference to (a bill) which gives it the validity of law.
• To act; to perform; to do; to effect.
• To act the part of; to represent; to play.
n.
• Purpose; determination.
Enactive
a.
• Having power to enact or establish as a law.
Enactment
n.
• The passing of a bill into a law; the giving of legislative sanction and executive approval to a bill whereby it is established as a law.
• That which is enacted or passed into a law; a law; a decree; a statute; a prescribed requirement; as, a prohibitory enactment; a social enactment.
Enactor
n.
• One who enacts a law; one who decrees or establishes as a law.
Enacture
n.
• Enactment; resolution.
Enaliosaur
n.
(Paleon.) One of the Enaliosauria.
Enaliosauria
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An extinct group of marine reptiles, embracing both the Ichthyosauria and the Plesiosauria, now regarded as distinct orders.
Enaliosaurian
a.
(Paleon.) Pertaining to the Enaliosauria.
n.
• One of the Enaliosauria.
Enallage
n.
(Gram.) A substitution, as of one part of speech for another, of one gender, number, case, person, tense, mode, or voice, of the same word, for another.
Enambush
v. t.
• To ambush.
Enamel
n.
• A variety of glass, used in ornament, to cover a surface, as of metal or pottery, and admitting of after decoration in color, or used itself for inlaying or application in varied colors.
(Min.) A glassy, opaque bead obtained by the blowpipe.
• That which is enameled; also, any smooth, glossy surface, resembling enamel, especially if variegated.
(Anat.) The intensely hard calcified tissue entering into the composition of teeth. It merely covers the exposed parts of the teeth of man, but in many animals is intermixed in various ways with the dentine and cement.
v. t.
• To lay enamel upon; to decorate with enamel whether inlaid or painted.
• To variegate with colors as if with enamel.
• To form a glossy surface like enamel upon; as, to enamel card paper; to enamel leather or cloth.
• To disguise with cosmetics, as a woman's complexion.
v. i.
• To practice the art of enameling.
a.
• Relating to the art of enameling; as, enamel painting.
Enamelar
a.
• Consisting of enamel; resembling enamel; smooth; glossy.
Enameled
a.
• Coated or adorned with enamel; having a glossy or variegated surface; glazed.
Enamor
v. t.
• To inflame with love; to charm; to captivate; — with of, or with, before the person or thing; as, to be enamored with a lady; to be enamored of books or science.
Enamorment
n.
• The state of being enamored.
Enantiomorphous
a.
(Crystallog.) Similar, but not superposable, i. e., related to each other as a right-handed to a left-handed glove; — said of certain hemihedral crystals.
Enantiopathic
a.
(Med.) Serving to palliate; palliative.
Enantiopathy
n.
• An opposite passion or affection.
(Med.) Allopathy; — a term used by followers of Hahnemann, or homeopathists.
Enantiosis
n.
(Rhet.) A figure of speech by which what is to be understood affirmatively is stated negatively, and the contrary; affirmation by contraries.
Enarch
v. t.
• To arch.
Enarched
a.
(Her.) Bent into a curve; — said of a bend or other ordinary.
Enargite
n.
(Min.) An iron-black mineral of metallic luster, occurring in small orthorhombic crystals, also massive. It contains sulphur, arsenic, copper, and often silver.
Enarmed
a.
(Her.) Same as Armed, 3.
Enarration
n.
• A detailed exposition; relation.
Enarthrosis
n.
(Anat.) A ball and socket joint, or the kind of articulation represented by such a joint.
Enascent
a.
• Coming into being; nascent.
Enatation
n.
• A swimming out.
Enate
a.
• Growing out.
Enation
n.
(Bot.) Any unusual outgrowth from the surface of a thing, as of a petal; also, the capacity or act of producing such an outgrowth.
Enaunter
adv.
• Lest that.
Enavigate
v. t.
• To sail away or over.
Enbattled
a.
• Embattled.
Enbibe
v. t.
• To imbibe.
Encage
v. t.
• To confine in a cage; to coop up.
Encalendar
v. t.
• To register in a calendar; to calendar.
Encamp
v. i.
• To form and occupy a camp; to prepare and settle in temporary habitations, as tents or huts; to halt on a march, pitch tents, or form huts, and remain for the night or for a longer time, as an army or a company traveling.
v. t.
• To form into a camp; to place in a temporary habitation, or quarters.
Encampment
n.
• The act of pitching tents or forming huts, as by an army or traveling company, for temporary lodging or rest.
• The place where an army or a company is encamped; a camp; tents pitched or huts erected for temporary lodgings.
Encanker
v. t.
• To canker.
Encapsulation
n.
(Physiol.) The act of inclosing in a capsule; the growth of a membrane around (any part) so as to inclose it in a capsule.
Encarnalize
v. t.
• To carnalize; to make gross.
Encarpus
n.
(Arch.) An ornament on a frieze or capital, consisting of festoons of fruit, flowers, leaves, etc.
Encase
v. t.
• To inclose as in a case.
Encasement
n.
• The act of encasing; also, that which encases.
(Biol.) An old theory of generation similar to embotement.
Encash
v. t.
(Eng. Banking) To turn into cash; to cash.
Encashment
n.
(Eng. Banking) The payment in cash of a note, draft, etc.
Encauma
n.
(Med.) An ulcer in the eye, upon the cornea, which causes the loss of the humors.
Encaustic
a.
(Fine Arts) Prepared by means of heat; burned in.
n.
• The method of painting in heated wax, or in any way where heat is used to fix the colors.
Encave
v. t.
• To hide in, or as in, a cave or recess.
Enceinte
n.
(Fort.) The line of works which forms the main inclosure of a fortress or place; — called also body of the place.
• The area or town inclosed by a line of fortification.
a.
• Pregnant; with child.
Encenia
n. pl.
• A festival commemorative of the founding of a city or the consecration of a church; also, the ceremonies (as at Oxford and Cambridge, England) commemorative of founders or benefactors.
Encense
v. t. & i.
• To offer incense to or upon; to burn incense.
Encephalic
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the encephalon or brain.
Encephalitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the brain.
Encephalocele
n.
(Med.) Hernia of the brain.
Encephaloid
a.
• Resembling the material of the brain; cerebriform.
n.
• An encephaloid cancer.
Encephalology
n.
• The science which treats of the brain, its structure and functions.
Encephalon
n.
(Anat.) The contents of the cranium; the brain.
Encephalopathy
n.
(Med.) Any disease or symptoms of disease referable to disorders of the brain; as, lead encephalopathy, the cerebral symptoms attending chronic lead poisoning.
Encephalos
n.
(Anat.) The encephalon.
Encephalotomy
n.
(Surg.) The act or art of dissecting the brain.
Encephalous
a.
(Zool.) Having a head; — said of most Mollusca; — opposed to acephalous.
Enchafe
v. t.
• To chafe; to enrage; to heat.
Enchafing
n.
• Heating; burning.
Enchain
v. t.
• To bind with a chain; to hold in chains.
• To hold fast; to confine; as, to enchain attention.
• To link together; to connect.
Enchainment
n.
• The act of enchaining, or state of being enchained.
Enchair
v. t.
• To seat in a chair.
Enchannel
v. t.
• To make run in a channel.
Enchant
v. t.
• To charm by sorcery; to act on by enchantment; to get control of by magical words and rites.
• To delight in a high degree; to charm; to enrapture; as, music enchants the ear.
Enchanted
a.
• Under the power of enchantment; possessed or exercised by enchanters; as, an enchanted castle.
Enchanter
n.
• One who enchants; a sorcerer or magician; also, one who delights as by an enchantment.
Enchanting
a.
• Having a power of enchantment; charming; fascinating.
Enchantment
n.
• The act of enchanting; the production of certain wonderful effects by the aid of demons, or the agency of supposed spirits; the use of magic arts, spells, or charms; incantation.
• The effect produced by the act; the state of being enchanted; as, to break an enchantment.
• That which captivates the heart and senses; an influence or power which fascinates or highly delights.
Enchantress
n.
• A woman versed in magical arts; a sorceress; also, a woman who fascinates.
Encharge
v. t.
• To charge (with); to impose (a charge) upon.
n.
• A charge.
Enchase
v. t.
• To incase or inclose in a border or rim; to surround with an ornamental casing, as a gem with gold; to encircle; to inclose; to adorn.
• To chase; to ornament by embossing or engraving; as, to enchase a watch case.
• To delineate or describe, as by writing.
Enchaser
n.
• One who enchases.
Enchasten
v. t.
• To chasten.
Enchest
v. t.
• To inclose in a chest.
Enchiridion
n.
• Handbook; a manual of devotions.
Enchisel
v. t.
• To cut with a chisel.
Enchodus
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of extinct Cretaceous fishes; — so named from their spear-shaped teeth. They were allied to the pike (Esox).
Enchondroma
n.
(Med.) A cartilaginous tumor growing from the interior of a bone.
Enchylemma
n.
(Biol.) The basal substance of the cell nucleus; a hyaline or granular substance, more or less fluid during life, in which the other parts of the nucleus are imbedded.
Enchyma
n.
(Biol.) The primitive formative juice, from which the tissues, particularly the cellular tissue, are formed.
Encincture
n.
• A cincture.
Encindered
a.
• Burnt to cinders.
Encircle
v. t.
• To form a circle about; to inclose within a circle or ring; to surround; as, to encircle one in the arms; the army encircled the city.
Encirclet
n.
• A small circle; a ring.
Enclasp
v. t.
• To clasp.
Enclave
n.
• A tract of land or a territory inclosed within another territory of which it is independent.
v. t.
• To inclose within an alien territory.
Enclavement
n.
• The state of being an enclave.
Enclitic
n.
(Gram.) A word which is joined to another so closely as to lose its proper accent, as the pronoun thee in prithee (pray thee).
Enclitically
adv.
• In an enclitic manner; by throwing the accent back.
Enclitics
n.
(Gram.) The art of declining and conjugating words.
Encloister
v. t.
• To shut up in a cloister; to cloister.
Enclose
v. t.
• To inclose.
Enclosure
n.
• Inclosure.
Enclothe
v. t.
• To clothe.
Encloud
v. t.
• To envelop in clouds; to cloud.
Encoach
v. t.
• To carry in a coach.
Encoffin
v. t.
• To put in a coffin.
Encolden
v. t.
• To render cold.
Encollar
v. t.
• To furnish or surround with a collar.
Encolor
v. t.
• To color.
Encolure
n.
• The neck of horse.
Encomberment
n.
• Hindrance; molestation.
Encomiast
n.
• One who praises; a panegyrist.
Encomiastic
n.
• A panegyric.
Encomion
n.
• Encomium; panegyric.
Encomium
n.
• Warm or high praise; panegyric; strong commendation.
Encompass
v. t.
• To circumscribe or go round so as to surround closely; to encircle; to inclose; to environ; as, a ring encompasses the finger; an army encompasses a city; a voyage encompassing the world.
Encompassment
n.
• The act of surrounding, or the state of being surrounded; circumvention.
Encore
adv. or interj.
n.
• A call or demand (as, by continued applause) for a repetition; as, the encores were numerous.
v. t.
• To call for a repetition or reappearance of; as, to encore a song or a singer.
Encorporing
n.
• Incorporation.
Encoubert
n.
(Zool.) One of several species of armadillos of the genera Dasypus and Euphractus, having five toes both on the fore and hind feet.
Encounter
v. t.
• To come against face to face; to meet; to confront, either by chance, suddenly, or deliberately; especially, to meet in opposition or with hostile intent; to engage in conflict with; to oppose; to struggle with; as, to encounter a friend in traveling; two armies encounter each other; to encounter obstacles or difficulties, to encounter strong evidence of a truth.
v. i.
• To meet face to face; to have a meeting; to meet, esp. as enemies; to engage in combat; to fight; as, three armies encountered at Waterloo.
n.
• A meeting face to face; a running against; a sudden or incidental meeting; an interview.
• A meeting, with hostile purpose; hence, a combat; a battle; as, a bloody encounter.
Encounterer
n.
• One who encounters; an opponent; an antagonist.
Encourage
v. t.
• To give courage to; to inspire with courage, spirit, or hope; to raise, or to increase, the confidence of; to animate; enhearten; to incite; to help forward; — the opposite of discourage.
Encouragement
n.
• The act of encouraging; incitement to action or to practice; as, the encouragement of youth in generosity.
• That which serves to incite, support, promote, or advance, as favor, countenance, reward, etc.; incentive; increase of confidence; as, the fine arts find little encouragement among a rude people.
Encourager
n.
• One who encourages, incites, or helps forward; a favorer.
Encouraging
a.
• Furnishing ground to hope; inspiriting; favoring.
Encowl
v. t.
• To make a monk (or wearer of a cowl) of.
Encradle
v. t.
• To lay in a cradle.
Encratite
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of a sect in the 2d century who abstained from marriage, wine, and animal food; — called also Continent.
Encrimson
v. t.
• To give a crimson or red color to; to crimson.
Encrinite
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil crinoid, esp. one belonging to, or resembling, the genus Encrinus. Sometimes used in a general sense for any crinoid.
Encrinoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) That order of the Crinoidea which includes most of the living and many fossil forms, having jointed arms around the margin of the oral disk; — also called Brachiata and Articulata.
Encrinus
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of fossil encrinoidea, from the Mesozoic rocks.
Encrisped
a.
• Curled.
Encroach
v. i.
• To enter by gradual steps or by stealth into the possessions or rights of another; to trespass; to intrude; to trench; — commonly with on or upon; as, to encroach on a neighbor; to encroach on the highway.
n.
• Encroachment.
Encroacher
n.
• One who by gradual steps enters on, and takes possession of, what is not his own.
Encroachingly
adv.
• By way of encroachment.
Encroachment
n.
• The act of entering gradually or silently upon the rights or possessions of another; unlawful intrusion.
• That which is taken by encroaching on another.
(Law) An unlawful diminution of the possessions of another.
Encrust
v. t.
• To incrust.
Encrustment
n.
• That which is formed as a crust; incrustment; incrustation.
Encumber
v. t.
• To impede the motion or action of, as with a burden; to retard with something superfluous; to weigh down; to obstruct or embarrass; as, his movements were encumbered by his mantle; his mind is encumbered with useless learning.
• To load with debts, or other legal claims; as, to encumber an estate with mortgages.
Encumberment
n.
• Encumbrance.
Encumbrance
n.
• That which encumbers; a burden which impedes action, or renders it difficult and laborious; a clog; an impediment.
(Law) Same as Incumbrance.
Encumbrancer
n.
(Law) Same as Incumbrancer.
Encurtain
v. t.
• To inclose with curtains.
Encyclopediacal
a.
• Encyclopedic.
Encyclopedian
a.
• Embracing the whole circle of learning, or a wide range of subjects.
Encyclopedism
n.
• The art of writing or compiling encyclopedias; also, possession of the whole range of knowledge; encyclopedic learning.
Encyclopedist
n.
• The compiler of an encyclopedia, or one who assists in such compilation; also, one whose knowledge embraces the whole range of the sciences.
Encyst
v. t.
• To inclose in a cyst.
Encystation
n.
• Encystment.
Encysted
a.
• Inclosed in a cyst, or a sac, bladder, or vesicle; as, an encysted tumor.
Encystment
n.
(Biol.) A process which, among some of the lower forms of life, precedes reproduction by budding, fission, spore formation, etc.
(Zool.) A process by which many internal parasites, esp. in their larval states, become inclosed within a cyst in the muscles, liver, etc.
End
n.
• The extreme or last point or part of any material thing considered lengthwise (the extremity of breadth being side); hence, extremity, in general; the concluding part; termination; close; limit; as, the end of a field, line, pole, road; the end of a year, of a discourse; put an end to pain; — opposed to beginning, when used of anything having a first part.
• Point beyond which no procession can be made; conclusion; issue; result, whether successful or otherwise; conclusive event; consequence.
• Termination of being; death; destruction; extermination; also, cause of death or destruction.
• The object aimed at in any effort considered as the close and effect of exertion; ppurpose; intention; aim; as, to labor for private or public ends.
• That which is left; a remnant; a fragment; a scrap; as, odds and ends.
(Carpet Manuf.) One of the yarns of the worsted warp in a Brussels carpet.
v. t.
• To bring to an end or conclusion; to finish; to close; to terminate; as, to end a speech.
• To form or be at the end of; as, the letter k ends the word back.
• To destroy; to put to death.
v. i.
• To come to the ultimate point; to be finished; to come to a close; to cease; to terminate; as, a voyage ends; life ends; winter ends.
Endable
a.
• That may be ended; terminable.
Endall
n.
• Complete termination.
Endamage
v. t.
• To bring loss or damage to; to harm; to injure.
Endamageable
a.
• Capable of being damaged, or injured; damageable.
Endamagement
n.
• Damage; injury; harm.
Endamnify
v. t.
• To damnify; to injure.
Endanger
v. t.
• To put to hazard; to bring into danger or peril; to expose to loss or injury; as, to endanger life or peace.
• To incur the hazard of; to risk.
Endangerment
n.
• Hazard; peril.
Endark
v. t.
• To darken.
Endaspidean
a.
(Zool.) Having the anterior scutes extending around the tarsus on the inner side; — said of certain birds.
Endazzle
v. t.
• To dazzle.
Endear
v. t.
• To make dear or beloved.
• To raise the price or cost of; to make costly or expensive.
Endearedly
adv.
• With affection or endearment; dearly.
Endearedness
n.
• State of being endeared.
Endearing
a.
• Making dear or beloved; causing love.
Endearment
n.
• The act of endearing or the state of being endeared; also, that which manifests, excites, or increases, affection.
Endeavor
v. t.
• To exert physical or intellectual strength for the attainment of; to use efforts to effect; to strive to achieve or reach; to try; to attempt.
v. i.
• To exert one's self; to work for a certain end.
n.
• An exertion of physical or intellectual strength toward the attainment of an object; a systematic or continuous attempt; an effort; a trial.
Endeavorer
n.
• One who makes an effort or attempt.
Endeavorment
n.
• Act of endeavoring; endeavor.
Endecagon
n.
(Geom.) A plane figure of eleven sides and angles.
Endecagynous
a.
(Bot.) Having eleven pistils; as, an endecagynous flower.
Endecane
n.
(Chem.) One of the higher hydrocarbons of the paraffin series, C11H24, found as a constituent of petroleum.
Endecaphyllous
a.
(Bot.) Composed of eleven leaflets; — said of a leaf.
Endeictic
a.
• Serving to show or exhibit; as, an endeictic dialogue, in the Platonic philosophy, is one which exhibits a specimen of skill.
Endeixis
n.
(Med.) An indication.
Endemial
a.
• Endemic.
Endemic
n.
(Med.) An endemic disease.
Endemically
adv.
• In an endemic manner.
Endemiology
n.
• The science which treats of endemic affections.
Endenization
n.
• The act of naturalizing.
Endenize
v. t.
• To endenizen.
Endenizen
v. t.
• To admit to the privileges of a denizen; to naturalize.
Ender
n.
• One who, or that which, makes an end of something; as, the ender of my life.
Endermatic
a.
• Endermic.
Endermic
a.
(Med.) Acting through the skin, or by direct application to the skin.
Endermically
adv.
• By the endermic method; as, applied endermically.
Enderon
n.
(Anat.) The deep sensitive and vascular layer of the skin and mucous membranes.
Endiademed
a.
• Diademed.
Endiaper
v. t.
• To decorate with a diaper pattern.
Ending
n.
• Termination; concluding part; result; conclusion; destruction; death.
(Gram.) The final syllable or letter of a word; the part joined to the stem.
Endive
n.
(Bot.) A composite herb (Cichorium Endivia). Its finely divided and much curled leaves, when blanched, are used for salad.
Endless
a.
• Without end; having no end or conclusion; perpetual; interminable; — applied to length, and to duration; as, an endless line; endless time; endless bliss; endless praise; endless clamor.
• Infinite; excessive; unlimited.
• Without profitable end; fruitless; unsatisfying.
• Void of design; objectless; as, an endless pursuit.
Endlessly
adv.
• In an endless manner.
Endlessness
n.
• The quality of being endless; perpetuity.
Endlong
adv. & prep.
• Lengthwise; along.
Endmost
a.
• Farthest; remotest; at the very end.
Endoblast
n.
(Biol.) Entoblast; endoplast.
Endoblastic
a.
(Biol.) Relating to the endoblast; as, the endoblastic layer.
Endocarditis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the endocardium.
Endocardium
n.
(Anat.) The membrane lining the cavities of the heart.
Endocarp
n.
(Bot.) The inner layer of a ripened or fructified ovary.
Endochondral
a.
(Physiol.) Growing or developing within cartilage; — applied esp. to developing bone.
Endochrome
n.
(Bot.) The coloring matter within the cells of plants, whether green, red, yellow, or any other color.
Endoctrine
v. t.
• To teach; to indoctrinate.
Endocyst
n.
(Zool.) The inner layer of the cells of Bryozoa.
Endoderm
n.
(Biol.) The inner layer of the skin or integument of an animal
• The innermost layer of the blastoderm and the structures derived from it; the hypoblast; the entoblast.
Endodermis
n.
(Bot.) A layer of cells forming a kind of cuticle inside of the proper cortical layer, or surrounding an individual fibrovascular bundle.
Endogamous
a.
• Marrying within the same tribe; — opposed to exogamous.
Endogamy
n.
• Marriage only within the tribe; a custom restricting a man in his choice of a wife to the tribe to which he belongs; — opposed to exogamy.
Endogen
n.
(Bot.) A plant which increases in size by internal growth and elongation at the summit, having the wood in the form of bundles or threads, irregularly distributed throughout the whole diameter, not forming annual layers, and with no distinct pith. The leaves of the endogens have, usually, parallel veins, their flowers are mostly in three, or some multiple of three, parts, and their embryos have but a single cotyledon, with the first leaves alternate. The endogens constitute one of the great primary classes of plants, and included all palms, true lilies, grasses, rushes, orchids, the banana, pineapple, etc.
Endogenesis
n.
(Biol.) Endogeny.
Endogenetic
a.
(Biol.) Endogenous.
Endogenous
a.
(Bot.) Increasing by internal growth and elongation at the summit, instead of externally, and having no distinction of pith, wood, and bark, as the rattan, the palm, the cornstalk.
(Biol.) Originating from within; increasing by internal growth.
Endogenously
adv.
• By endogenous growth.
Endogeny
n.
(Biol.) Growth from within; multiplication of cells by endogenous division, as in the development of one or more cells in the interior of a parent cell.
Endognath
n.
(Zool.) The inner or principal branch of the oral appendages of Crustacea.
Endognathal
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the endognath.
Endolymph
n.
(Anat.) The watery fluid contained in the membranous labyrinth of the internal ear.
Endolymphangial
a.
(Anat.) Within a lymphatic vessel.
Endolymphatic
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or containing, endolymph; as, the endolymphatic duct
• Within a lymphatic vessel; endolymphangial.
Endome
v. t.
• To cover as with a dome.
Endometritis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the endometrium.
Endometrium
n.
(Anat.) The membrane lining the inner surface of the uterus, or womb.
Endomorph
n.
(Min.) A crystal of one species inclosed within one of another, as one of rutile inclosed in quartz.
Endomysium
n.
(Anat.) The delicate bands of connective tissue interspersed among muscular fibers.
Endoneurium
n.
(Anat.) The delicate bands of connective tissue among nerve fibers.
Endoparasite
n.
(Zool.) Any parasite which lives in the internal organs of an animal, as the tapeworms, Trichina, etc.; — opposed to ectoparasite.
Endophl
n.
(Bot.) The inner layer of the bark of trees.
Endophragma
n.
(Zool.) A chitinous structure above the nervous cord in the thorax of certain Crustacea.
Endophragmal
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the endophragma.
Endophyllous
a.
(Bot.) Wrapped up within a leaf or sheath.
Endoplasm
n.
(Biol.) The protoplasm in the interior of a cell.
Endoplasma
n.
(Biol.) Same as Entoplasm and Endosarc.
Endoplastica
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of Rhizopoda having a distinct nucleus, as the amba.
Endopleura
n.
(Bot.) The inner coating of a seed.
Endopleurite
n.
(Zool.) The portion of each apodeme developed from the interepimeral membrane in certain crustaceans.
Endopodite
n.
(Zool.) The internal or principal branch of the locomotive appendages of Crustacea.
Endorhiza
n.
(Bot.) Any monocotyledonous plant; — so named because many monocotyledons have an endorhizal embryo.
Endorse
v. t.
• Same as Indorse.
n.
(Her.) A subordinary, resembling the pale, but of one fourth its width (according to some writers, one eighth).
Endorsee
n.
• Same as Indorsee.
Endorsement
n.
• Same as Indorsement.
Endorser
n.
• Same as Indorser.
Endosarc
n.
(Biol.) The semifluid, granular interior of certain unicellular organisms, as the inner layer of sarcode in the amoeba; entoplasm; endoplasta.
Endoscope
n.
(Med.) An instrument for examining the interior of the rectum, the urethra, and the bladder.
Endoscopy
n.
(Med.) The art or process of examining by means of the endoscope.
Endoskeletal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or connected with, the endoskeleton; as, endoskeletal muscles.
Endoskeleton
n.
(Anat.) The bony, cartilaginous, or other internal framework of an animal, as distinguished from the exoskeleton.
Endosmometer
n.
(Physics) An instrument for measuring the force or amount of endosmotic action.
Endosmometric
a.
• Pertaining to, or designed for, the measurement of endosmotic action.
Endosmosmic
a.
• Endosmotic.
Endosmotic
a.
• Pertaining to endosmose; of the nature endosmose; osmotic.
Endosperm
n.
(Bot.) The albumen of a seed; — limited by recent writers to that formed within the embryo sac.
Endospermic
a.
(Bot.) Relating to, accompanied by, or containing, endosperm.
Endospore
n.
(Bot.) The thin inner coat of certain spores.
Endosporous
a.
(Bot.) Having the spores contained in a case; — applied to fungi.
Endoss
v. t.
• To put upon the back or outside of anything; — the older spelling of endorse.
Endosteal
a.
(Physiol.) Relating to endostosis; as, endosteal ossification.
Endosternite
n.
(Zool.) The part of each apodeme derived from the intersternal membrane in Crustacea and insects.
Endosteum
n.
(Anat.) The layer of vascular connective tissue lining the medullary cavities of bone.
Endostoma
n.
(Zool.) A plate which supports the labrum in certain Crustacea.
Endostome
n.
(Bot.) The foramen or passage through the inner integument of an ovule.
(Zool.) And endostoma.
Endostosis
n.
(Physiol.) A process of bone formation in which ossification takes place within the substance of the cartilage.
Endostyle
n.
(Zool.) A fold of the endoderm, which projects into the blood cavity of ascidians.
Endotheca
n.
(Zool.) The tissue which partially fills the interior of the interseptal chambers of most madreporarian corals. It usually consists of a series of oblique tranverse septa, one above another.
Endothecium
n.
(Bot.) The inner lining of an another cell.
Endothelial
a.
(Anat.) Of, or relating to, endothelium.
Endothelium
n.
(Anat.) The thin epithelium lining the blood vessels, lymphatics, and serous cavities.
Endotheloid
a.
(Anat.) Like endothelium.
Endothorax
n.
(Zool.) An internal process of the sternal plates in the thorax of insects.
Endow
v. t.
• To furnish with money or its equivalent, as a permanent fund for support; to make pecuniary provision for; to settle an income upon; especially, to furnish with dower; as, to endow a wife; to endow a public institution.
• To enrich or furnish with anything of the nature of a gift (as a quality or faculty); — followed by with, rarely by of; as, man is endowed by his Maker with reason; to endow with privileges or benefits.
Endower
v. t.
• To endow.
n.
• One who endows.
Endowment
n.
• The act of bestowing a dower, fund, or permanent provision for support.
• That which is bestowed or settled on a person or an institution; property, fund, or revenue permanently appropriated to any object; as, the endowment of a church, a hospital, or a college.
• That which is given or bestowed upon the person or mind; gift of nature; accomplishment; natural capacity; talents; — usually in the plural.
Endrudge
v. t.
• To make a drudge or slave of.
Endue
v. t.
• To invest.
v. t.
• An older spelling of Endow.
Enduement
n.
• Act of enduing; induement.
Endurable
a.
• Capable of being endured or borne; sufferable.
Endurably
adv.
• In an endurable manner.
Endurance
n.
• A state or quality of lasting or duration; lastingness; continuance.
• The act of bearing or suffering; a continuing under pain or distress without resistance, or without being overcome; sufferance; patience.
Endurant
a.
• Capable of enduring fatigue, pain, hunger, etc.
Endure
v. i.
• To continue in the same state without perishing; to last; to remain.
• To remain firm, as under trial or suffering; to suffer patiently or without yielding; to bear up under adversity; to hold out.
v. t.
• To remain firm under; to sustain; to undergo; to support without breaking or yielding; as, metals endure a certain degree of heat without melting; to endure wind and weather.
• To bear with patience; to suffer without opposition or without sinking under the pressure or affliction; to bear up under; to put up with; to tolerate.
• To harden; to toughen; to make hardy.
Endurement
n.
• Endurance.
Endurer
n.
• One who, or that which, endures or lasts; one who bears, suffers, or sustains.
Enduring
a.
• Lasting; durable; long-suffering; as, an enduring disposition.
Endysis
n.
(Biol.) The act of developing a new coat of hair, a new set of feathers, scales, etc.; — opposed to ecdysis.
Enecate
v. t.
• To kill off; to destroy.
Eneid
n.
• Same as Aneid.
Enema
n.
(Med.) An injection, or clyster, thrown into the rectum as a medicine, or to impart nourishment.
Enemy
n.
• One hostile to another; one who hates, and desires or attempts the injury of, another; a foe; an adversary; as, an enemy of or to a person; an enemy to truth, or to falsehood.
a.
• Hostile; inimical.
Enepidermic
a.
(Med.) Applied to the skin without friction; — said of medicines.
Energetics
n.
• That branch of science which treats of the laws governing the physical or mechanical, in distinction from the vital, forces, and which comprehends the consideration and general investigation of the whole range of the forces concerned in physical phenomena.
Energize
v. i.
• To use strength in action; to act or operate with force or vigor; to act in producing an effect.
v. t.
• To give strength or force to; to make active; to alacrify; as, to energize the will.
Energizer
n.
• One who, or that which, gives energy, or acts in producing an effect.
Energizing
a.
• Capable of imparting or exercising energy.
Energumen
n.
(Eccl. Antiq.) One possessed by an evil spirit; a demoniac.
Energy
n.
• Internal or inherent power; capacity of acting, operating, or producing an effect, whether exerted or not; as, men possessing energies may suffer them to lie inactive.
• Power efficiently and forcibly exerted; vigorous or effectual operation; as, the energy of a magistrate.
• Strength of expression; force of utterance; power to impress the mind and arouse the feelings; life; spirit; — said of speech, language, words, style; as, a style full of energy.
(Physics) Capacity for performing work.
Enerlasting
n.
• Eternal duration, past of future; eternity.
(With the definite article) The Eternal Being; God.
(Bot.) A plant whose flowers may be dried without losing their form or color, as the pearly everlasting (Anaphalis margaritacea), the immortelle of the French, the cudweeds, etc.
• A cloth fabic for shoes, etc.
Enervate
v. t.
• To deprive of nerve, force, strength, or courage; to render feeble or impotent; to make effeminate; to impair the moral powers of.
a.
• Weakened; weak; without strength of force.
Enervation
n.
• The act of weakening, or reducing strength.
• The state of being weakened; effeminacy.
Enervative
a.
• Having power, or a tendency, to enervate; weakening.
Enerve
v. t.
• To weaken; to enervate.
Enervous
a.
• Lacking nerve or force; enervated.
Enfamish
v. t.
• To famish; to starve.
Enfect
a.
• Contaminated with illegality.
Enfeeble
v. t.
• To make feeble; to deprive of strength; to reduce the strength or force of; to weaken; to debilitate.
Enfeeblement
n.
• The act of weakening; enervation; weakness.
Enfeebler
n.
• One who, or that which, weakens or makes feeble.
Enfeeblish
v. i.
• To enfeeble.
Enfeloned
a.
• Rendered fierce or frantic.
Enfeoff
v. t.
(Law) To give a feud, or right in land, to; to invest with a fief or fee; to invest (any one) with a freehold estate by the process of feoffment.
• To give in vassalage; to make subservient.
Enfeoffment
n.
(Law) The act of enfeoffing.
• The instrument or deed by which one is invested with the fee of an estate.
Enfester
v. t.
• To fester.
Enfetter
v. t.
• To bind in fetters; to enchain.
Enfever
v. t.
• To excite fever in.
Enfierce
v. t.
• To make fierce.
Enfilade
n.
• A line or straight passage, or the position of that which lies in a straight line.
(Mil.) A firing in the direction of the length of a trench, or a line of parapet or troops, etc.; a raking fire.
v. t.
(Mil.) To pierce, scour, or rake with shot in the direction of the length of, as a work, or a line of troops.
Enfiled
p. a.
(Her.) Having some object, as the head of a man or beast, impaled upon it; as, a sword which is said to be "enfiled of" the thing which it pierces.
Enfire
v. t.
• To set on fire.
Enflesh
v. t.
• To clothe with flesh.
Enflower
v. t.
• To cover or deck with flowers.
Enfoldment
n.
• The act of infolding.
Enforce
v. t.
• To put force upon; to force; to constrain; to compel; as, to enforce obedience to commands.
• To make or gain by force; to obtain by force; as, to enforce a passage.
• To put in motion or action by violence; to drive.
• To give force to; to strengthen; to invigorate; to urge with energy; as, to enforce arguments or requests.
• To put in force; to cause to take effect; to give effect to; to execute with vigor; as, to enforce the laws.
• To urge; to ply hard; to lay much stress upon.
v. i.
• To attempt by force.
• To prove; to evince.
• To strengthen; to grow strong.
n.
• Force; strength; power.
Enforceable
a.
• Capable of being enforced.
Enforced
a.
• Compelled; forced; not voluntary.
Enforcement
n.
• The act of enforcing; compulsion.
• A giving force to; a putting in execution.
• That which enforces, constraints, gives force, authority, or effect to; constraint; force applied.
Enforcer
n.
• One who enforces.
Enforcible
a.
• That may be enforced.
Enforcive
a.
• Serving to enforce or constrain; compulsive.
Enforest
v. t.
• To turn into a forest.
Enform
v. t.
• To form; to fashion.
Enfouldred
a.
• Mixed with, or emitting, lightning.
Enframe
v. t.
• To inclose, as in a frame.
Enfranchise
v. t.
• To set free; to liberate from slavery, prison, or any binding power.
• To endow with a franchise; to incorporate into a body politic and thus to invest with civil and political privileges; to admit to the privileges of a freeman.
• To receive as denizens; to naturalize; as, to enfranchise foreign words.
Enfranchisement
n.
• Releasing from slavery or custody.
• Admission to the freedom of a corporation or body politic; investiture with the privileges of free citizens.
Enfranchiser
n.
• One who enfranchises.
Enfree
v. t.
• To set free.
Enfreedom
v. t.
• To set free.
Enfreeze
v. t.
• To freeze; to congeal.
Enfroward
v. t.
• To make froward, perverse, or ungovernable.
Engage
v. t.
• To put under pledge; to pledge; to place under obligations to do or forbear doing something, as by a pledge, oath, or promise; to bind by contract or promise.
• To gain for service; to bring in as associate or aid; to enlist; as, to engage friends to aid in a cause; to engage men for service.
• To gain over; to win and attach; to attract and hold; to draw.
• To employ the attention and efforts of; to occupy; to engross; to draw on.
• To enter into contest with; to encounter; to bring to conflict.
(Mach.) To come into gear with; as, the teeth of one cogwheel engage those of another, or one part of a clutch engages the other part.
v. i.
• To promise or pledge one's self; to enter into an obligation; to become bound; to warrant.
• To embark in a business; to take a part; to employ or involve one's self; to devote attention and effort; to enlist; as, to engage in controversy.
• To enter into conflict; to join battle; as, the armies engaged in a general battle.
(Mach.) To be in gear, as two cogwheels working together.
Engaged
a.
• Occupied; employed; busy.
• Pledged; promised; especially, having the affections pledged; promised in marriage; affianced; betrothed.
• Greatly interested; of awakened zeal; earnest.
• Involved; esp., involved in a hostile encounter; as, the engaged ships continued the fight.
Engagedly
adv.
• With attachment; with interest; earnestly.
Engagedness
n.
• The state of being deeply interested; earnestness; zeal.
Engagement
n.
• The act of engaging, pledging, enlisting, occupying, or entering into contest.
• The state of being engaged, pledged or occupied; specif., a pledge to take some one as husband or wife.
• That which engages; engrossing occupation; employment of the attention; obligation by pledge, promise, or contract; an enterprise embarked in; as, his engagements prevented his acceptance of any office.
(Mil.) An action; a fight; a battle.
(Mach.) The state of being in gear; as, one part of a clutch is brought into engagement with the other part.
Engager
n.
• One who enters into an engagement or agreement; a surety.
Engaging
a.
• Tending to draw the attention or affections; attractive; as, engaging manners or address.
Engallant
v. t.
• To make a gallant of.
Engaol
v. t.
• To put in jail; to imprison.
Engarboil
v. t.
• To throw into disorder; to disturb.
Engarland
v. t.
• To encircle with a garland, or with garlands.
Engarrison
v. t.
• To garrison; to put in garrison, or to protect by a garrison.
Engastrimuth
n.
• An ventriloquist.
Engender
v. t.
• To produce by the union of the sexes; to beget.
• To cause to exist; to bring forth; to produce; to sow the seeds of; as, angry words engender strife.
v. i.
• To assume form; to come into existence; to be caused or produced.
• To come together; to meet, as in sexual embrace.
n.
• One who, or that which, engenders.
Engendrure
n.
• The act of generation.
Engild
v. t.
• To gild; to make splendent.
Engine
n.
(Pronounced, in this sense, .) Natural capacity; ability; skill.
• Anything used to effect a purpose; any device or contrivance; an agent.
• Any instrument by which any effect is produced; especially, an instrument or machine of war or torture.
(Mach.) A compound machine by which any physical power is applied to produce a given physical effect.
v. t.
• To assault with an engine.
• To equip with an engine; — said especially of steam vessels; as, vessels are often built by one firm and engined by another.
(Pronounced, in this sense, .) To rack; to torture.
Engineer
n.
• A person skilled in the principles and practice of any branch of engineering.
• One who manages as engine, particularly a steam engine; an engine driver.
• One who carries through an enterprise by skillful or artful contrivance; an efficient manager.
v. t.
• To lay out or construct, as an engineer; to perform the work of an engineer on; as, to engineer a road.
• To use contrivance and effort for; to guide the course of; to manage; as, to engineer a bill through Congress.
Engineering
n.
• Originally, the art of managing engines; in its modern and extended sense, the art and science by which the mechanical properties of matter are made useful to man in structures and machines; the occupation and work of an engineer.
Engineman
n.
• A man who manages, or waits on, an engine.
Enginer
n.
• A contriver; an inventor; a contriver of engines.
Enginery
n.
• The act or art of managing engines, or artillery.
• Engines, in general; instruments of war.
• Any device or contrivance; machinery; structure or arrangement.
Enginous
a.
• Pertaining to an engine.
• Contrived with care; ingenious.
Engird
v. t.
• To gird; to encompass.
Engirdle
v. t.
• To surround as with a girdle; to girdle.
Engirt
v. t.
• To engird.
Engiscope
n.
(Opt.) A kind of reflecting microscope.
Englaimed
a.
• Clammy.
Engle
n.
• A favorite; a paramour; an ingle.
v. t.
• To cajole or coax, as favorite.
English
a.
• Of or pertaining to England, or to its inhabitants, or to the present so-called Anglo-Saxon race.
n.
• Collectively, the people of England; English people or persons.
• The language of England or of the English nation, and of their descendants in America, India, and other countries.
• A kind of printing type, in size between Pica and Great Primer.
(Billiards) A twist or spinning motion given to a ball in striking it that influences the direction it will take after touching a cushion or another ball.
v. t.
• To translate into the English language; to Anglicize; hence, to interpret; to explain.
(Billiards) To strike (the cue ball) in such a manner as to give it in addition to its forward motion a spinning motion, that influences its direction after impact on another ball or the cushion.
Englishable
a.
• Capable of being translated into, or expressed in, English.
Englishism
n.
• A quality or characteristic peculiar to the English.
• A form of expression peculiar to the English language as spoken in England; an Anglicism.
Englishman
n.
• A native or a naturalized inhabitant of England.
Englishry
n.
• The state or privilege of being an Englishman.
• A body of English or people of English descent; — commonly applied to English people in Ireland.
Englishwoman
n.
• Fem. of Englishman.
Engloom
v. t.
• To make gloomy.
Englue
v. t.
• To join or close fast together, as with glue; as, a coffer well englued.
Englut
v. t.
• To swallow or gulp down.
• To glut.
Engore
v. t.
• To gore; to pierce; to lacerate.
• To make bloody.
Engorge
v. t.
• To gorge; to glut.
• To swallow with greediness or in large quantities; to devour.
v. i.
• To feed with eagerness or voracity; to stuff one's self with food.
Engorged
p. a.
• Swallowed with greediness, or in large draughts.
(Med.) Filled to excess with blood or other liquid; congested.
Engorgement
n.
• The act of swallowing greedily; a devouring with voracity; a glutting.
(Med.) An overfullness or obstruction of the vessels in some part of the system; congestion.
(Metal.) The clogging of a blast furnace.
Engouled
a.
(Her.) Partly swallowed; disappearing in the jaws of anything; as, an infant engouled by a serpent; said also of an ordinary, when its two ends to issue from the mouths of lions, or the like; as, a bend engouled.
Engoulee
a.
(Her.) Same as Engouled.
Engraff
v. t.
• To graft; to fix deeply.
Engrail
v. t.
• To variegate or spot, as with hail.
(Her.) To indent with small curves.
v. i.
• To form an edging or border; to run in curved or indented lines.
Engrailed
a.
(Her.) Indented with small concave curves, as the edge of a bordure, bend, or the like.
Engrailment
n.
• The ring of dots round the edge of a medal, etc.
(Her.) Indentation in curved lines, as of a line of division or the edge of an ordinary.
Engrain
v. t.
• To dye in grain, or of a fast color.
• To incorporate with the grain or texture of anything; to infuse deeply.
• To color in imitation of the grain of wood; to grain.
Engrapple
v. t. & i.
• To grapple.
Engrasp
v. t.
• To grasp; to grip.
Engrave
v. t.
• To deposit in the grave; to bury.
v. t.
• To cut in; to make by incision.
• To cut with a graving instrument in order to form an inscription or pictorial representation; to carve figures; to mark with incisions.
• To form or represent by means of incisions upon wood, stone, metal, or the like; as, to engrave an inscription.
• To impress deeply; to infix, as if with a graver.
Engraved
a.
• Made by engraving or ornamented with engraving.
(Zool.) Having the surface covered with irregular, impressed lines.
Engravement
n.
• Engraving.
• Engraved work.
Engraver
n.
• One who engraves; a person whose business it is to produce engraved work, especially on metal or wood.
Engravery
n.
• The trade or work of an engraver.
Engraving
n.
• The act or art of producing upon hard material incised or raised patterns, characters, lines, and the like; especially, the art of producing such lines, etc., in the surface of metal plates or blocks of wood. Engraving is used for the decoration of the surface itself; also, for producing an original, from which a pattern or design may be printed on paper.
• That which is engraved; an engraved plate.
• An impression from an engraved plate, block of wood, or other material; a print.
Engregge
v. t.
• To aggravate; to make worse; to lie heavy on.
Engrieve
v. t.
• To grieve.
Engross
v. t.
• To make gross, thick, or large; to thicken; to increase in bulk or quantity.
• To amass.
• To copy or write in a large hand (en gross, i. e., in large); to write a fair copy of in distinct and legible characters; as, to engross a deed or like instrument on parchment.
• To seize in the gross; to take the whole of; to occupy wholly; to absorb; as, the subject engrossed all his thoughts.
• To purchase either the whole or large quantities of, for the purpose of enhancing the price and making a profit; hence, to take or assume in undue quantity, proportion, or degree; as, to engross commodities in market; to engross power.
Engrosser
n.
• One who copies a writing in large, fair characters.
• One who takes the whole; a person who purchases such quantities of articles in a market as to raise the price; a forestaller.
Engrossment
n.
• The act of engrossing; as, the engrossment of a deed.
• That which has been engrossed, as an instrument, legislative bill, goods, etc.
Enguard
v. t.
• To surround as with a guard.
Engulf
v. t.
• To absorb or swallow up as in a gulf.
Engulfment
n.
• A swallowing up as if in a gulf.
Engyn
• Variant of Engine.
Enhalo
v. t.
• To surround with a halo.
Enhance
v. t.
• To raise or lift up; to exalt.
• To advance; to augment; to increase; to heighten; to make more costly or attractive; as, to enhance the price of commodities; to enhance beauty or kindness; hence, also, to render more heinous; to aggravate; as, to enhance crime.
v. i.
• To be raised up; to grow larger; as, a debt enhances rapidly by compound interest.
Enhancement
n.
• The act of increasing, or state of being increased; augmentation; aggravation; as, the enhancement of value, price, enjoyments, crime.
Enhancer
n.
• One who enhances; one who, or that which, raises the amount, price, etc.
Enharbor
v. t.
• To find harbor or safety in; to dwell in or inhabit.
Enharden
v. t.
• To harden; to embolden.
Enharmonically
adv.
• In the enharmonic style or system; in just intonation.
Enheahedral
a.
(Geom.) Having nine sides.
Enhearten
v. t.
• To give heart to; to fill with courage; to embolden.
Enhedge
v. t.
• To surround as with a hedge.
Enhort
v. t.
• To encourage.
Enhunger
v. t.
• To make hungry.
Enhydros
n.
(Min.) A variety of chalcedony containing water.
Enhydrous
a.
• Having water within; containing fluid drops; — said of certain crystals.
Enigma
n.
• A dark, obscure, or inexplicable saying; a riddle; a statement, the hidden meaning of which is to be discovered or guessed.
• An action, mode of action, or thing, which cannot be satisfactorily explained; a puzzle; as, his conduct is an enigma.
Enigmatically
adv.
• Darkly; obscurely.
Enigmatist
n.
• One who makes, or talks in, enigmas.
Enigmatize
v. i.
• To make, or talk in, enigmas; to deal in riddles.
Enisled
p. a.
• Placed alone or apart, as if on an island; severed, as an island.
Enjall
v. t.
• To put into jail; to imprison.
Enjoin
v. t.
• To lay upon, as an order or command; to give an injunction to; to direct with authority; to order; to charge.
(Law) To prohibit or restrain by a judicial order or decree; to put an injunction on.
v. t.
• To join or unite.
Enjoiner
n.
• One who enjoins.
Enjoinment
n.
• Direction; command; authoritative admonition.
Enjoy
v. t.
• To take pleasure or satisfaction in the possession or experience of; to feel or perceive with pleasure; to be delighted with; as, to enjoy the dainties of a feast; to enjoy conversation.
• To have, possess, and use with satisfaction; to occupy or have the benefit of, as a good or profitable thing, or as something desirable; as, to enjoy a free constitution and religious liberty.
• To have sexual intercourse with.
v. i.
• To take satisfaction; to live in happiness.
Enjoyable
a.
• Capable of being enjoyed or of giving joy; yielding enjoyment.
Enjoyer
n.
• One who enjoys.
Enjoyment
n.
• The condition of enjoying anything; pleasure or satisfaction, as in the possession or occupancy of anything; possession and use; as, the enjoyment of an estate.
• That which gives pleasure or keen satisfaction.
Enkennel
v. t.
• To put into a kennel.
Enkerchiefed
a.
• Bound with a kerchief; draped; hooded; covered.
Enkindle
v. t.
• To set on fire; to inflame; to kindle.
• To excite; to rouse into action; to incite.
Enlace
v. t.
• To bind or encircle with lace, or as with lace; to lace; to encircle; to enfold; hence, to entangle.
Enlacement
n.
• The act of enlacing, or state of being enlaced; a surrounding as with a lace.
Enlard
v. t.
• To cover or dress with lard or grease; to fatten.
Enlarge
v. t.
• To make larger; to increase in quantity or dimensions; to extend in limits; to magnify; as, the body is enlarged by nutrition; to enlarge one's house.
• To increase the capacity of; to expand; to give free scope or greater scope to; also, to dilate, as with joy, affection, and the like; as, knowledge enlarges the mind.
• To set at large or set free.
v. i.
• To grow large or larger; to be further extended; to expand; as, a plant enlarges by growth; an estate enlarges by good management; a volume of air enlarges by rarefaction.
• To speak or write at length; to be diffuse in speaking or writing; to expatiate; to dilate.
(Naut.) To get more astern or parallel with the vessel's course; to draw aft; — said of the wind.
Enlarged
a.
• Made large or larger; extended; swollen.
Enlargement
n.
• The act of increasing in size or bulk, real or apparent; the state of being increased; augmentation; further extension; expansion.
• Expansion or extension, as of the powers of the mind; ennoblement, as of the feelings and character; as, an enlargement of views, of knowledge, of affection.
• A setting at large, or being set at large; release from confinement, servitude, or distress; liberty.
• Diffusiveness of speech or writing; expatiation; a wide range of discourse or argument.
Enlarger
n.
• One that enlarges.
Enlengthen
v. t.
• To lengthen.
Enleven
n.
• Eleven.
Enlight
v. t.
• To illumine; to enlighten.
Enlighten
v. t.
• To supply with light; to illuminate; as, the sun enlightens the earth.
• To make clear to the intellect or conscience; to shed the light of truth and knowledge upon; to furnish with increase of knowledge; to instruct; as, to enlighten the mind or understanding.
Enlightener
n.
• One who enlightens or illuminates; one who, or that which, communicates light to the eye, or clear views to the mind.
Enlightenment
n.
• Act of enlightening, or the state of being enlightened or instructed.
Enlimn
v. t.
• To adorn by illuminating or ornamenting with colored and decorated letters and figures, as a book or manuscript.
Enlink
v. t.
• To chain together; to connect, as by links.
Enlist
v. t.
• To enter on a list; to enroll; to register.
• To engage for military or naval service, the name being entered on a list or register; as, to enlist men.
• To secure the support and aid of; to employ in advancing interest; as, to enlist persons in the cause of truth, or in a charitable enterprise.
v. i.
• To enroll and bind one's self for military or naval service; as, he enlisted in the regular army; the men enlisted for the war.
• To enter heartily into a cause, as if enrolled.
Enlistment
n.
• The act or enlisting, or the state of being enlisted; voluntary enrollment to serve as a soldier or a sailor.
• The writing by which an enlisted man is bound.
Enlive
v. t.
• To enliven.
Enliven
v. t.
• To give life, action, or motion to; to make vigorous or active; to excite; to quicken; as, fresh fuel enlivens a fire.
• To give spirit or vivacity to; to make sprightly, gay, or cheerful; to animate; as, mirth and good humor enliven a company; enlivening strains of music.
Enlivener
n.
• One who, or that which, enlivens, animates, or invigorates.
Enlock
v. t.
• To lock; to inclose.
Enlumine
v. t.
• To illumine.
Enlute
v. t.
• To coat with clay; to lute.
Enmanche
a.
(Her.) Resembling, or covered with, a sleeve; — said of the chief when lines are drawn from the middle point of the upper edge upper edge to the sides.
Enmarble
v. t.
• To make hard as marble; to harden.
Enmesh
v. t.
• To catch or entangle in, or as in, meshes.
Enmist
v. t.
• To infold, as in a mist.
Enmity
n.
• The quality of being an enemy; hostile or unfriendly disposition.
• A state of opposition; hostility.
Enmossed
a.
• Covered with moss; mossed.
Enmuffle
v. t.
• To muffle up.
Enmure
v. t.
• To immure.
Ennation
n.
(Zool.) The ninth segment in insects.
Ennead
n.
• The number nine or a group of nine.
Enneagon
n.
(Geom.) A polygon or plane figure with nine sides and nine angles; a nonagon.
Enneagonal
a.
(Geom.) Belonging to an enneagon; having nine angles.
Enneagynous
a.
(Bot.) Having or producing nine pistils or styles; — said of a flower or plant.
Enneandria
n.
(Bot.) A Linnaean class of plants having nine stamens.
Enneapetalous
a.
(Bot.) Having nine petals, or flower leaves.
Enneaspermous
a.
(Bot.) Having nine seeds; — said of fruits.
Ennew
v. t.
• To make new.
Enniche
v. t.
• To place in a niche.
Ennoble
v. t.
• To make noble; to elevate in degree, qualities, or excellence; to dignify.
• To raise to the rank of nobility; as, to ennoble a commoner.
Ennoblement
n.
• The act of making noble, or of exalting, dignifying, or advancing to nobility.
• That which ennobles; excellence; dignity.
Ennobler
n.
• One who ennobles.
Ennui
n.
• A feeling of weariness and disgust; dullness and languor of spirits, arising from satiety or want of interest; tedium.
Ennuye
a.
• Affected with ennui; weary in spirits; emotionally exhausted.
n.
• One who is affected with ennui.
Ennuyee
n.
• A woman affected with ennui.
Enodal
a.
(Bot.) Without a node.
Enodation
n.
• The act or operation of clearing of knots, or of untying; hence, also, the solution of a difficulty.
Enode
v. t.
• To clear of knots; to make clear.
Enoint
a.
• Anointed.
Enomotarch
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The commander of an enomoty.
Enomoty
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A band of sworn soldiers; a division of the Spartan army ranging from twenty-five to thirty-six men, bound together by oath.
Enopla
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the orders of Nemertina, characterized by the presence of a peculiar armature of spines or plates in the proboscis.
Enoptomancy
n.
• Divination by the use of a mirror.
Enorm
a.
• Enormous.
Enormity
n.
• The state or quality of exceeding a measure or rule, or of being immoderate, monstrous, or outrageous.
• That which is enormous; especially, an exceeding offense against order, right, or decency; an atrocious crime; flagitious villainy; an atrocity.
Enormous
a.
• Exceeding the usual rule, norm, or measure; out of due proportion; inordinate; abnormal.
• Exceedingly wicked; outrageous; atrocious; monstrous; as, an enormous crime.
Enormously
adv.
• In an enormous degree.
Enormousness
n.
• The state of being enormous.
Enorthotrope
n.
• An optical toy; a card on which confused or imperfect figures are drawn, but which form to the eye regular figures when the card is rapidly revolved.
Enough
a.
• Satisfying desire; giving content; adequate to meet the want; sufficient; — usually, and more elegantly, following the noun to which it belongs.
adv.
• In a degree or quantity that satisfies; to satisfaction; sufficiently.
• Fully; quite; — used to express slight augmentation of the positive degree, and sometimes equivalent to very; as, he is ready enough to embrace the offer.
• In a tolerable degree; — used to express mere acceptableness or acquiescence, and implying a degree or quantity rather less than is desired; as, the song was well enough.
n.
• A sufficiency; a quantity which satisfies desire, is adequate to the want, or is equal to the power or ability; as, he had enough to do take care of himself.
interj.
• An exclamation denoting sufficiency, being a shortened form of it is enough.
Enounce
v. t.
• To announce; to declare; to state, as a proposition or argument.
• To utter; to articulate.
Enouncement
n.
• Act of enouncing; that which is enounced.
Enow
• A form of Enough.
Enpatron
v. t.
• To act the part of a patron towards; to patronize.
Enpierce
v. t.
• To pierce.
Enquere
v. i.
• To inquire.
Enquicken
v. t.
• To quicken; to make alive.
Enquire
v. i. & t.
• See Inquire.
Enquirer
n.
• See Inquirer.
Enquiry
n.
• See Inquiry.
Enrace
v. t.
• To enroot; to implant.
Enrage
v. t.
• To fill with rage; to provoke to frenzy or madness; to make furious.
Enragement
n.
• Act of enraging or state of being enraged; excitement.
Enrange
v. t.
• To range in order; to put in rank; to arrange.
• To rove over; to range.
Enrank
v. t.
• To place in ranks or in order.
Enrapt
p. a.
• Thrown into ecstasy; transported; enraptured.
Enrapture
v. t.
• To transport with pleasure; to delight beyond measure; to enravish.
Enravish
v. t.
• To transport with delight; to enrapture; to fascinate.
Enravishingly
adv.
• So as to throw into ecstasy.
Enravishment
n.
• The state of being enravished or enraptured; ecstasy; rapture.
Enregister
v. t.
• To register; to enroll or record; to inregister.
Enrheum
v. i.
• To contract a rheum.
Enrich
v. t.
• To make rich with any kind of wealth; to render opulent; to increase the possessions of; as, to enrich the understanding with knowledge.
• To supply with ornament; to adorn; as, to enrich a ceiling by frescoes.
• To make rich with manure; to fertilize; — said of the soil; as, to enrich land by irrigation.
• To supply with knowledge; to instruct; to store; — said of the mind.
Enricher
n.
• One who enriches.
Enrichment
n.
• The act of making rich, or that which enriches; increase of value by improvements, embellishment, etc.; decoration; embellishment.
Enridge
v. t.
• To form into ridges.
Enring
v. t.
• To encircle.
Enripen
v. t.
• To ripen.
Enrive
v. t.
• To rive; to cleave.
Enrobe
v. t.
• To invest or adorn with a robe; to attire.
Enrockment
n.
• A mass of large stones thrown into water at random to form bases of piers, breakwaters, etc.
Enroll
v. t.
• To insert in a roil; to register or enter in a list or catalogue or on rolls of court; hence, to record; to insert in records; to leave in writing; as, to enroll men for service; to enroll a decree or a law; also, reflexively, to enlist.
• To envelop; to inwrap; to involve.
Enroller
n.
• One who enrolls or registers.
Enrollment
n.
• The act of enrolling; registration.
• A writing in which anything is enrolled; a register; a record.
Enroot
v. t.
• To fix by the root; to fix fast; to implant deep.
Enround
v. t.
• To surround.
Ens
n.
(Metaph.) Entity, being, or existence; an actually existing being; also, God, as the Being of Beings.
(Chem.) Something supposed to condense within itself all the virtues and qualities of a substance from which it is extracted; essence.
Ensafe
v. t.
• To make safe.
Ensample
n.
• An example; a pattern or model for imitation.
v. t.
• To exemplify, to show by example.
Ensanguine
v. t.
• To stain or cover with blood; to make bloody, or of a blood-red color; as, an ensanguined hue.
Ensate
a.
(Bot. & Zool.) Having sword-shaped leaves, or appendages; ensiform.
Enscale
v. t.
• To cover with scales.
Ensconce
v. t.
• To cover or shelter, as with a sconce or fort; to place or hide securely; to conceal.
Enseal
v. t.
• To impress with a seal; to mark as with a seal; hence, to ratify.
Enseam
v. t.
• To sew up; to inclose by a seam; hence, to include; to contain.
v. t.
• To cover with grease; to defile; to pollute.
Ensear
v. t.
• To sear; to dry up.
Ensearch
v. i.
• To make search; to try to find something.
v. t.
• To search for.
Enseel
v. t.
• To close eyes of; to seel; — said in reference to a hawk.
Enseint
a.
(Law) With child; pregnant.
Ensemble
n.
• The whole; all the parts taken together.
adv.
• All at once; together.
Enshedule
v. t.
• To insert in a schedule.
Enshelter
v. t.
• To shelter.
Enshield
v. t.
• To defend, as with a shield; to shield.
a.
• Shielded; enshielded.
Enshrine
v. t.
• To inclose in a shrine or chest; hence, to preserve or cherish as something sacred; as, to enshrine something in memory.
Enshroud
v. t.
• To cover with, or as with, a shroud; to shroud.
Ensiferous
a.
• Bearing a sword.
Ensiform
a.
• Having the form of a sword blade; sword-shaped; as, an ensiform leaf.
Ensign
n.
• A flag; a banner; a standard; esp., the national flag, or a banner indicating nationality, carried by a ship or a body of soldiers; — as distinguished from flags indicating divisions of the army, rank of naval officers, or private signals, and the like.
• A signal displayed like a standard, to give notice.
• Sign; badge of office, rank, or power; symbol.
• Formerly, a commissioned officer of the army who carried the ensign or flag of a company or regiment.
• A commissioned officer of the lowest grade in the navy, corresponding to the grade of second lieutenant in the army.
v. t.
• To designate as by an ensign.
• To distinguish by a mark or ornament; esp. (Her.), by a crown; thus, any charge which has a crown immediately above or upon it, is said to be ensigned.
Ensigncy
n.
• The rank or office of an ensign.
Ensignship
n.
• The state or rank of an ensign.
Ensilage
n.
• The process of preserving fodder (such as cornstalks, rye, oats, millet, etc.) by compressing it while green and fresh in a pit or vat called a silo, where it is kept covered from the air; as the ensilage of fodder.
• The fodder preserved in a silo.
v. t.
• To preserve in a silo; as, to ensilage cornstalks.
Ensky
v. t.
• To place in the sky or in heaven.
Enslave
v. t.
• To reduce to slavery; to make a slave of; to subject to a dominant influence.
Enslavedness
n.
• State of being enslaved.
Enslavement
n.
• The act of reducing to slavery; state of being enslaved; bondage; servitude.
Enslaver
n.
• One who enslaves.
Ensnare
v. t.
• To catch in a snare.
Ensnarl
v. t.
• To entangle.
Ensober
v. t.
• To make sober.
Ensoul
v. t.
• To indue or imbue (a body) with soul.
Ensphere
v. t.
• To place in a sphere; to envelop.
• To form into a sphere.
Enstamp
v. t.
• To stamp; to mark as ith a stamp; to impress deeply.
Enstatite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of the pyroxene group, orthorhombic in crystallization; often fibrous and massive; color grayish white or greenish. It is a silicate of magnesia with some iron. Bronzite is a ferriferous variety.
Enstatitic
a.
• Relating to enstatite.
Enstore
v. t.
• To restore.
Enstyle
v. t.
• To style; to name.
Ensuable
a.
• Ensuing; following.
Ensue
v. t.
• To follow; to pursue; to follow and overtake.
v. i.
• To follow or come afterward; to follow as a consequence or in chronological succession; to result; as, an ensuing conclusion or effect; the year ensuing was a cold one.
Ensure
v. t.
• To make sure.
• To betroth.
Enswathe
v. t.
• To swathe; to envelop, as in swaddling clothes.
Enswathement
n.
• The act of enswathing, or the state of being enswathed.
Ensweep
v. t.
• To sweep over or across; to pass over rapidly.
Entablature
n.
(Arch.) The superstructure which lies horizontally upon the columns.
Entackle
v. t.
• To supply with tackle.
Entad
adv.
(Anat.) Toward the inside or central part; away from the surface; — opposed to ectad.
Entail
n.
• That which is entailed
(Law) An estate in fee entailed, or limited in descent to a particular class of issue
• The rule by which the descent is fixed.
• Delicately carved ornamental work; intaglio.
v. t.
• To settle or fix inalienably on a person or thing, or on a person and his descendants or a certain line of descendants; — said especially of an estate; to bestow as an heritage.
• To appoint hereditary possessor.
• To cut or carve in a ornamental way.
Entailment
n.
• The act of entailing or of giving, as an estate, and directing the mode of descent.
• The condition of being entailed.
• A thing entailed.
Ental
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or situated near, central or deep parts; inner; — opposed to ectal.
Entame
v. t.
• To tame.
Entangle
v. t.
• To twist or interweave in such a manner as not to be easily separated; to make tangled, confused, and intricate; as, to entangle yarn or the hair.
• To involve in such complications as to render extrication a bewildering difficulty; hence, metaphorically, to insnare; to perplex; to bewilder; to puzzle; as, to entangle the feet in a net, or in briers.
Entanglement
n.
• State of being entangled; intricate and confused involution; that which entangles; intricacy; perplexity.
Entangler
n.
• One that entangles.
Entasia
n.
(Med.) Tonic spasm; — applied generically to denote any disease characterized by tonic spasms, as tetanus, trismus, etc.
Entasis
n.
(Arch.) A slight convex swelling of the shaft of a column.
(Med.) Same as Entasia.
Entassment
n.
• A heap; accumulation.
Entastic
a.
(Med.) Relating to any disease characterized by tonic spasms.
Entelechy
n.
(Peripatetic Philos.) An actuality; a conception completely actualized, in distinction from mere potential existence.
Entellus
n.
(Zool.) An East Indian long-tailed bearded monkey (Semnopithecus entellus) regarded as sacred by the natives. It is remarkable for the caplike arrangement of the hair on the head. Called also hoonoomaun and hungoor.
Entend
v. i.
• To attend to; to apply one's self to.
Entender
v. t.
• To make tender.
• To treat with tenderness.
Ententive
a.
• Attentive; zealous.
Enter
v. t.
• To come or go into; to pass into the interior of; to pass within the outer cover or shell of; to penetrate; to pierce; as, to enter a house, a closet, a country, a door, etc.; the river enters the sea.
• To unite in; to join; to be admitted to; to become a member of; as, to enter an association, a college, an army.
• To engage in; to become occupied with; as, to enter the legal profession, the book trade, etc.
• To pass within the limits of; to attain; to begin; to commence upon; as, to enter one's teens, a new era, a new dispensation.
• To cause to go (into), or to be received (into); to put in; to insert; to cause to be admitted; as, to enter a knife into a piece of wood, a wedge into a log; to enter a boy at college, a horse for a race, etc.
• To inscribe; to enroll; to record; as, to enter a name, or a date, in a book, or a book in a catalogue; to enter the particulars of a sale in an account, a manifest of a ship or of merchandise at the customhouse.
(Law) To go into or upon, as lands, and take actual possession of them.
• To place in regular form before the court, usually in writing; to put upon record in proper from and order; as, to enter a writ, appearance, rule, or judgment.
• To make report of (a vessel or her cargo) at the customhouse; to submit a statement of (imported goods), with the original invoices, to the proper officer of the customs for estimating the duties.
• To file or inscribe upon the records of the land office the required particulars concerning (a quantity of public land) in order to entitle a person to a right pf preemption.
• To deposit for copyright the title or description of (a book, picture, map, etc.); as, "entered according to act of Congress."
• To initiate; to introduce favorably.
v. i.
• To go or come in; — often with in used pleonastically; also, to begin; to take the first steps.
• To get admission; to introduce one's self; to penetrate; to form or constitute a part; to become a partaker or participant; to share; to engage; — usually with into; sometimes with on or upon; as, a ball enters into the body; water enters into a ship; he enters into the plan; to enter into a quarrel; a merchant enters into partnership with some one; to enter upon another's land; the boy enters on his tenth year; to enter upon a task; lead enters into the composition of pewter.
• To penetrate mentally; to consider attentively; — with into.
Enteradenography
n.
• A treatise upon, or description of, the intestinal glands.
Enteradenology
n.
• The science which treats of the glands of the alimentary canal.
Enteralgia
n.
(Med.) Pain in the intestines; colic.
Enterdeal
n.
• Mutual dealings; intercourse.
Enterer
n.
• One who makes an entrance or beginning.
Enteric
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the enteron, or alimentary canal; intestinal.
Enteritis
n.
(Med.) An inflammation of the intestines.
Entermete
v. i.
• To interfere; to intermeddle.
Entermewer
n.
(Zool.) A hawk gradually changing the color of its feathers, commonly in the second year.
Entermise
n.
• Mediation.
Enterocele
n.
(Med.) A hernial tumor whose contents are intestine.
Enterocoele
n.
(Anat.) A perivisceral cavity which arises as an outgrowth or outgrowths from the digestive tract; distinguished from a schizocoele, which arises by a splitting of the mesoblast of the embryo.
Enterography
n.
(Anat.) A treatise upon, or description of, the intestines; enterology.
Enterolith
n.
(Med.) An intestinal concretion.
Enterology
n.
• The science which treats of the viscera of the body.
Enteron
n.
(Anat.) The whole alimentary, or enteric, canal.
Enteropathy
n.
(Med.) Disease of the intestines.
Enteropneusta
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of wormlike invertebrates having, along the sides of the body, branchial openings for the branchial sacs, which are formed by diverticula of the alimentary canal. Balanoglossus is the only known genus.
Enterorrhaphy
n.
(Med.) The operation of sewing up a rent in the intestinal canal.
Enterotome
n.
(Med.) A kind of scissors used for opening the intestinal canal, as in post-mortem examinations.
Enterotomy
n.
(Med.) Incision of the intestines, especially in reducing certain cases of hernia.
Enterparlance
n.
• Mutual talk or conversation; conference.
Enterplead
v. i.
• Same as Interplead.
Enterprise
n.
• That which is undertaken; something attempted to be performed; a work projected which involves activity, courage, energy, and the like; a bold, arduous, or hazardous attempt; an undertaking; as, a manly enterprise; a warlike enterprise.
• Willingness or eagerness to engage in labor which requires boldness, promptness, energy, and like qualities; as, a man of great enterprise.
v. t.
• To undertake; to begin and attempt to perform; to venture upon.
• To treat with hospitality; to entertain.
v. i.
• To undertake an enterprise, or something hazardous or difficult.
Enterpriser
n.
• One who undertakes enterprises.
Enterprising
a.
• Having a disposition for enterprise; characterized by enterprise; resolute, active or prompt to attempt; as, an enterprising man or firm.
Entertain
v. t.
• To be at the charges of; to take or keep in one's service; to maintain; to support; to harbor; to keep.
• To give hospitable reception and maintenance to; to receive at one's board, or into one's house; to receive as a guest.
• To engage the attention of agreeably; to amuse with that which makes the time pass pleasantly; to divert; as, to entertain friends with conversation, etc.
• To give reception to; to receive, in general; to receive and take into consideration; to admit, treat, or make use of; as, to entertain a proposal.
• To meet or encounter, as an enemy.
• To keep, hold, or maintain in the mind with favor; to keep in the mind; to harbor; to cherish; as, to entertain sentiments.
• To lead on; to bring along; to introduce.
v. i.
• To receive, or provide entertainment for, guests; as, he entertains generously.
n.
• Entertainment.
Entertainer
n.
• One who entertains.
Entertaining
a.
• Affording entertainment; pleasing; amusing; diverting.
Entertainment
n.
• The act of receiving as host, or of amusing, admitting, or cherishing; hospitable reception; also, reception or treatment, in general.
• That which entertains, or with which one is entertained; as: (a) Hospitality; hospitable provision for the wants of a guest; especially, provision for the table; a hospitable repast; a feast; a formal or elegant meal. (b) That which engages the attention agreeably, amuses or diverts, whether in private, as by conversation, etc., or in public, by performances of some kind; amusement.
• Admission into service; service.
• Payment of soldiers or servants; wages.
Entertake
v. t.
• To entertain.
Entertissued
a.
• Same as Intertissued.
Entheasm
n.
• Inspiration; enthusiasm.
Entheastic
a.
• Of godlike energy; inspired.
Entheat
a.
• Divinely inspired.
Entheic
a.
(Med.) Caused by a morbifie virus implanted in the system; as, an enthetic disease like syphilis.
Enthrall
v. t.
• To hold in thrall; to enslave.
Enthrallment
n.
• The act of enthralling, or state of being enthralled.
Enthrill
v. t.
• To pierce; to thrill.
Enthrone
v. t.
• To seat on a throne; to exalt to the seat of royalty or of high authority; hence, to invest with sovereign authority or dignity.
(Eccl.) To induct, as a bishop, into the powers and privileges of a vacant see.
Enthronement
n.
• The act of enthroning, or state of being enthroned.
Enthronization
n.
• The act of enthroning; hence, the admission of a bishop to his stall or throne in his cathedral.
Enthronize
v. t.
• To place on a throne; hence, to induct into office, as a bishop.
Enthuse
v. t. & i.
• To make or become enthusiastic.
Enthusiasm
n.
• Inspiration as if by a divine or superhuman power; ecstasy; hence, a conceit of divine possession and revelation, or of being directly subject to some divine impulse.
• A state of impassioned emotion; transport; elevation of fancy; exaltation of soul; as, the poetry of enthusiasm.
• Enkindled and kindling fervor of soul; strong excitement of feeling on behalf of a cause or a subject; ardent and imaginative zeal or interest; as, he engaged in his profession with enthusiasm.
• Lively manifestation of joy or zeal.
Enthusiast
n.
• One moved or actuated by enthusiasm; as: (a) One who imagines himself divinely inspired, or possessed of some special revelation; a religious madman; a fanatic. (b) One whose mind is wholly possessed and heated by what engages it; one who is influenced by a peculiar; fervor of mind; an ardent and imaginative person.
Enthusiastic
n.
• An enthusiast; a zealot.
Enthymeme
n.
(Logic) An argument consisting of only two propositions, an antecedent and consequent deduced from it; a syllogism with one premise omitted; as, We are dependent; therefore we should be humble. Here the major proposition is suppressed. The complete syllogism would be, Dependent creatures should be humble; we are dependent creatures; therefore we should be humble.
Entice
v. t.
• To draw on, by exciting hope or desire; to allure; to attract; as, the bait enticed the fishes. Often in a bad sense: To lead astray; to induce to evil; to tempt; as, the sirens enticed them to listen.
Enticeable
a.
• Capable of being enticed.
Enticement
n.
• The act or practice of alluring or tempting; as, the enticements of evil companions.
• That which entices, or incites to evil; means of allurement; alluring object; as, an enticement to sin.
Enticer
n.
• One who entices; one who incites or allures to evil.
Enticing
a.
• That entices; alluring.
Enticingly
adv.
• In an enticing manner; charmingly.
Entire
a.
• Complete in all parts; undivided; undiminished; whole; full and perfect; not deficient; as, the entire control of a business; entire confidence, ignorance.
• Without mixture or alloy of anything; unqualified; morally whole; pure; faithful.
(Bot.) Consisting of a single piece, as a corolla.
• Having an evenly continuous edge, as a leaf which has no kind of teeth.
• Not gelded; — said of a horse.
• Internal; interior.
n.
• Entirely.
(Brewing) A name originally given to a kind of beer combining qualities of different kinds of beer.
Entirely
adv.
• In an entire manner; wholly; completely; fully; as, the trace is entirely lost.
• Without alloy or mixture; truly; sincerely.
Entireness
n.
• The state or condition of being entire; completeness; fullness; totality; as, the entireness of an arch or a bridge.
• Integrity; wholeness of heart; honesty.
• Oneness; unity; — applied to a condition of intimacy or close association.
Entirety
n.
• The state of being entire; completeness; as, entirely of interest.
• That which is entire; the whole.
Entitative
a.
• Considered as pure entity; abstracted from all circumstances.
Entitle
v. t.
• To give a title to; to affix to as a name or appellation; hence, also, to dignify by an honorary designation; to denominate; to call; as, to entitle a book "Commentaries;" to entitle a man "Honorable."
• To give a claim to; to qualify for, with a direct object of the person, and a remote object of the thing; to furnish with grounds for seeking or claiming with success; as, an officer's talents entitle him to command.
• To attribute; to ascribe.
Entitule
v. t.
• To entitle.
Entity
n.
• A real being, whether in thought (as an ideal conception) or in fact; being; essence; existence.
Entoblast
n.
(Biol.) The inner germ layer; endoderm.
Entobronchium
n.
(Anat.) One of the main bronchi in the lungs of birds.
Entogastric
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the interior of the stomach; — applied to a mode of budding from the interior of the gastric cavity, in certain hydroids.
Entoglossal
a.
(Anat.) Within the tongue; — applied to the glossohyal bone.
Entoil
v. t.
• To take with toils or bring into toils; to insnare.
Entomb
v. t.
• To deposit in a tomb, as a dead body; to bury; to inter; to inhume.
Entombment
n.
• The act of entombing or burying, or state of being entombed; burial.
Entomere
n.
(Biol.) The more granular cells, which finally become internal, in many segmenting ova, as those of mammals.
Entomoid
a.
(Zool.) Resembling an insect.
n.
• An object resembling an insect.
Entomolite
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil insect.
Entomologist
n.
• One versed in entomology.
Entomologize
v. i.
• To collect specimens in the study of entomology.
Entomology
n.
• That part of zoology which treats of insects.
• A treatise on the science of entomology.
Entomophaga
n.
(Zool.) One of a group of hymenopterous insects whose larvae feed parasitically upon living insects.
• A group of marsupials which are partly insectivorous, as the opossum.
• A group of edentates, including the ant-eaters.
Entomophagan
a.
(Zool.) Relating to the Entomophaga.
n.
• One of the Entomophaga.
Entomophagous
a.
(Zool.) Feeding on insects; insectivorous.
Entomophilous
a.
(Bot.) Fertilized by the agency of insects; — said of plants in which the pollen is carried to the stigma by insects.
Entomostraca
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the subclasses of Crustacea, including a large number of species, many of them minute. The group embraces several orders; as the Phyllopoda, Ostracoda, Copepoda, and Pectostraca.
Entomostracan
a.
(Zool.) Relating to the Entomostraca.
n.
• One of the Entomostraca.
Entomostracous
a.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Entomostracans.
Entomotomist
n.
• One who practices entomotomy.
Entomotomy
n.
• The science of the dissection of insects.
Entonic
a.
(Med.) Having great tension, or exaggerated action.
Entoperipheral
a.
(Physiol.) Being, or having its origin, within the external surface of the body; — especially applied to feelings, such as hunger, produced by internal disturbances. Opposed to epiperipheral.
Entophyte
n.
(Med.) A vegetable parasite subsisting in the interior of the body.
Entophytic
a.
• Of or pertaining to entophytes; as, an entophytic disease.
Entoplasm
n.
(Biol.) The inner granular layer of protoplasm in a developing ovum
• Endosarc.
Entoplastic
a.
(Biol.) Pertaining to, or composed of, entoplasm; as, the entoplastic products of some Protozoa, or the entoplastic modification of the cell protoplasm, by which a nucleus is produced.
Entoplastron
n.
(Anat.) The median plate of the plastron of turtles; — called also entosternum.
Entoprocta
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of Bryozoa in which the anus is within the circle of tentacles.
Entoptic
a.
(Physiol.) Relating to objects situated within the eye; esp., relating to the perception of objects in one's own eye.
Entorganism
n.
(Biol.) An internal parasitic organism.
Entortilation
n.
• A turning into a circle; round figures.
Entosthoblast
n.
(Biol.) The granule within the nucleolus or entoblast of a nucleated cell.
Entotic
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the interior of the ear.
Entozoa
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of worms, including the tapeworms, flukes, roundworms, etc., most of which live parasitically in the interior of other animals; the Helminthes.
• An artificial group, including all kinds of animals living parasitically in others.
Entozoologist
n.
• One versed in the science of the Entozoa.
Entozoon
n.
(Zool.) One of the Entozoa.
Entr'acte
n.
• The interval of time which occurs between the performance of any two acts of a drama.
• A dance, piece of music, or interlude, performed between two acts of a drama.
Entrail
v. t.
• To interweave; to intertwine.
n.
• Entanglement; fold.
Entrails
n. pl.
• The internal parts of animal bodies; the bowels; the guts; viscera; intestines.
• The internal parts; as, the entrails of the earth.
Entrain
v. t.
• To draw along as a current does; as, water entrained by steam.
v. t.
• To put aboard a railway train; as, to entrain a regiment.
v. i.
• To go aboard a railway train; as, the troops entrained at the station.
Entrammel
v. t.
• To trammel; to entangle.
Entrance
n.
• The act of entering or going into; ingress; as, the entrance of a person into a house or an apartment; hence, the act of taking possession, as of property, or of office; as, the entrance of an heir upon his inheritance, or of a magistrate into office.
• Liberty, power, or permission to enter; as, to give entrance to friends.
• The passage, door, or gate, for entering.
• The entering upon; the beginning, or that with which the beginning is made; the commencement; initiation; as, a difficult entrance into business.
• The causing to be entered upon a register, as a ship or goods, at a customhouse; an entering; as, his entrance of the arrival was made the same day.
(Naut.) The angle which the bow of a vessel makes with the water at the water line.
• The bow, or entire wedgelike forepart of a vessel, below the water line.
v. t.
• To put into a trance; to make insensible to present objects.
• To put into an ecstasy; to ravish with delight or wonder; to enrapture; to charm.
Entrancement
n.
• The act of entrancing, or the state of trance or ecstasy.
Entrant
n.
• One who enters; a beginner.
• An applicant for admission.
Entrap
v. t.
• To catch in a trap; to insnare; hence, to catch, as in a trap, by artifices; to involve in difficulties or distresses; to catch or involve in contradictions; as, to be entrapped by the devices of evil men.
Entreat
v. t.
• To treat, or conduct toward; to deal with; to use.
• To treat with, or in respect to, a thing desired; hence, to ask earnestly; to beseech; to petition or pray with urgency; to supplicate; to importune.
• To beseech or supplicate successfully; to prevail upon by prayer or solicitation; to persuade.
• To invite; to entertain.
v. i.
• To treat or discourse; hence, to enter into negotiations, as for a treaty.
• To make an earnest petition or request.
n.
• Entreaty.
Entreatable
a.
• That may be entreated.
Entreatance
n.
• Entreaty.
Entreater
n.
• One who entreats; one who asks earnestly; a beseecher.
Entreatful
a.
• Full of entreaty.
Entreatingly
adv.
• In an entreating manner.
Entreative
a.
• Used in entreaty; pleading.
Entreatment
n.
• Entreaty; invitation.
Entreaty
n.
• Treatment; reception; entertainment.
• The act of entreating or beseeching; urgent prayer; earnest petition; pressing solicitation.
Entree
n.
• A coming in, or entrance; hence, freedom of access; permission or right to enter; as, to have the entree of a house.
(Cookery) In French usage, a dish served at the beginning of dinner to give zest to the appetite; in English usage, a side dish, served with a joint, or between the courses, as a cutlet, scalloped oysters, etc.
Entremets
n. sing. & pl.
(Cookery) A side dish; a dainty or relishing dish usually eaten after the joints or principal dish; also, a sweetmeat, served with a dinner.
• Any small entertainment between two greater ones.
Entrepot
n.
• A warehouse; a magazine for depositing goods, stores, etc.; a mart or place where merchandise is deposited; as, an entrepot for shipping goods in transit.
Entrepreneur
n.
(Polit. Econ.) One who creates a product on his own account; whoever undertakes on his own account an industrial enterprise in which workmen are employed.
Entresol
n.
(Arch.) A low story between two higher ones, usually between the ground floor and the first story; mezzanine.
Entrick
v. t.
• To trick, to perplex.
Entrochal
a.
• Pertaining to, or consisting of, entrochites, or the joints of encrinites; — used of a kind of stone or marble.
Entrochite
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil joint of a crinoid stem.
Entropion
n.
(Med.) Same as Entropium.
Entropium
n.
(Med.) The inversion or turning in of the border of the eyelids.
Entropy
n.
(Thermodynamics) A certain property of a body, expressed as a measurable quantity, such that when there is no communication of heat the quantity remains constant, but when heat enters or leaves the body the quantity increases or diminishes. If a small amount, h, of heat enters the body when its temperature is t in the thermodynamic scale the entropy of the body is increased by h t. The entropy is regarded as measured from some standard temperature and pressure. Sometimes called the thermodynamic function.
Entry
n.
• The act of entering or passing into or upon; entrance; ingress; hence, beginnings or first attempts; as, the entry of a person into a house or city; the entry of a river into the sea; the entry of air into the blood; an entry upon an undertaking.
• The act of making or entering a record; a setting down in writing the particulars, as of a transaction; as, an entry of a sale; also, that which is entered; an item.
• That by which entrance is made; a passage leading into a house or other building, or to a room; a vestibule; an adit, as of a mine.
(Com.) The exhibition or depositing of a ship's papers at the customhouse, to procure license to land goods; or the giving an account of a ship's cargo to the officer of the customs, and obtaining his permission to land the goods.
(Law) The actual taking possession of lands or tenements, by entering or setting foot on them
• A putting upon record in proper form and order
• The act in addition to breaking essential to constitute the offense or burglary.
Entryng
n.
• Am entrance.
Entune
v. t.
• To tune; to intone.
Entwine
v. t.
• To twine, twist, or wreathe together or round.
v. i.
• To be twisted or twined.
Entwinement
n.
• A twining or twisting together or round; union.
Entwist
v. t.
• To twist or wreathe round; to intwine.

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