Dictionary Of The English Language "Dim"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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Dim
a.
• Not bright or distinct; wanting luminousness or clearness; obscure in luster or sound; dusky; darkish; obscure; indistinct; overcast; tarnished.
• Of obscure vision; not seeing clearly; hence, dull of apprehension; of weak perception; obtuse.
v. t.
• To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct; to take away the luster of; to darken; to dull; to obscure; to eclipse.
• To deprive of distinct vision; to hinder from seeing clearly, either by dazzling or clouding the eyes; to darken the senses or understanding of.
v. i.
• To grow dim.
Dimble
n.
• A bower; a dingle.
Dime
n.
• A silver coin of the United States, of the value of ten cents; the tenth of a dollar.
Dimension
n.
• Measure in a single line, as length, breadth, height, thickness, or circumference; extension; measurement; — usually, in the plural, measure in length and breadth, or in length, breadth, and thickness; extent; size; as, the dimensions of a room, or of a ship; the dimensions of a farm, of a kingdom.
• Extent; reach; scope; importance; as, a project of large dimensions.
(Math.) The degree of manifoldness of a quantity; as, time is quantity having one dimension; volume has three dimensions, relative to extension.
(Alg.) A literal factor, as numbered in characterizing a term. The term dimensions forms with the cardinal numbers a phrase equivalent to degree with the ordinal; thus, a2b2c is a term of five dimensions, or of the fifth degree.
(Phys.) The manifoldness with which the fundamental units of time, length, and mass are involved in determining the units of other physical quantities. Thus, since the unit of velocity varies directly as the unit of length and inversely as the unit of time, the dimensions of velocity are said to be length &divby; time; the dimensions of work are mass × (length)2 &divby; (time)2; the dimensions of density are mass &divby; (length)3.
Dimensional
a.
• Pertaining to dimension.
Dimensioned
a.
• Having dimensions.
Dimensionless
a.
• Without dimensions; having no appreciable or noteworthy extent.
Dimensity
n.
• Dimension.
Dimensive
a.
• Without dimensions; marking dimensions or the limits.
Dimera
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Coleoptera, having two joints to the tarsi.
• A division of the Hemiptera, including the aphids.
Dimeran
n.
(Zool.) One of the Dimera.
Dimerous
a.
• Composed of, or having, two parts of each kind.
Dimeter
a.
• Having two poetical measures or meters.
n.
• A verse of two meters.
Dimethyl
n.
(Chem.) Ethane; — sometimes so called because regarded as consisting of two methyl radicals.
Dimetric
a.
(Crystallog.) Same as Tetragonal.
Dimication
n.
• A fight; contest.
Dimidiate
a.
• Divided into two equal parts; reduced to half in shape or form.
(Biol.) Consisting of only one half of what the normal condition requires; having the appearance of lacking one half; as, a dimidiate leaf, which has only one side developed.
• Having the organs of one side, or half, different in function from the corresponding organs on the other side; as, dimidiate hermaphroditism.
v. t.
• To divide into two equal parts.
(Her.) To represent the half of; to halve.
Dimidiation
n.
• The act of dimidiating or halving; the state of being dimidiate.
Diminish
v. t.
• To make smaller in any manner; to reduce in bulk or amount; to lessen; — opposed to augment or increase.
• To lessen the authority or dignity of; to put down; to degrade; to abase; to weaken.
(Mus.) To make smaller by a half step; to make (an interval) less than minor; as, a diminished seventh.
• To take away; to subtract.
v. i.
• To become or appear less or smaller; to lessen; as, the apparent size of an object diminishes as we recede from it.
Diminishable
a.
• Capable of being diminished or lessened.
Diminisher
n.
• One who, or that which, diminishes anything.
Diminishingly
adv.
• In a manner to diminish.
Diminishment
n.
• Diminution.
Diminuendo
adv.
(Mus.) In a gradually diminishing manner; with abatement of tone; decrescendo; — expressed on the staff by Dim., or Dimin., or the sign.
Diminuent
a.
• Lessening.
Diminutal
a.
• Indicating or causing diminution.
Diminute
a.
• Small; diminished; diminutive.
Diminutely
adv.
• Diminutively.
Diminution
n.
• The act of diminishing, or of making or becoming less; state of being diminished; reduction in size, quantity, or degree; — opposed to augmentation or increase.
• The act of lessening dignity or consideration, or the state of being deprived of dignity; a lowering in estimation; degradation; abasement.
(Law) Omission, inaccuracy, or defect in a record.
(Mus.) In counterpoint, the imitation of, or reply to, a subject, in notes of half the length or value of those the subject itself.
Diminutival
a.
• Indicating diminution; diminutive.
n.
• A diminutive.
Diminutive
a.
• Below the average size; very small; little.
• Expressing diminution; as, a diminutive word.
• Tending to diminish.
n.
• Something of very small size or value; an insignificant thing.
(Gram.) A derivative from a noun, denoting a small or a young object of the same kind with that denoted by the primitive; as, gosling, eaglet, lambkin.
Diminutively
adv.
• In a diminutive manner.
Diminutiveness
n.
• The quality of being diminutive; smallness; littleness; minuteness.
Dimission
n.
• Leave to depart; a dismissing.
Dimissory
a.
• Sending away; dismissing to another jurisdiction; granting leave to depart.
Dimit
v. t.
• To dismiss, let go, or release.
Dimity
n.
• A cotton fabric employed for hangings and furniture coverings, and formerly used for women's under-garments. It is of many patterns, both plain and twilled, and occasionally is printed in colors.
Dimly
adv.
• In a dim or obscure manner; not brightly or clearly; with imperfect sight.
Dimness
n.
• The state or quality being dim; lack of brightness, clearness, or distinctness; dullness; obscurity.
• Dullness, or want of clearness, of vision or of intellectual perception.
Dimorph
n.
(Crystallog.) Either one of the two forms of a dimorphous substance; as, calcite and aragonite are dimorphs.
Dimorphic
a.
• Having the property of dimorphism; dimorphous.
Dimorphism
n.
(Biol.) Difference of form between members of the same species, as when a plant has two kinds of flowers, both hermaphrodite (as in the partridge berry), or when there are two forms of one or both sexes of the same species of butterfly.
(Crystallog.) Crystallization in two independent forms of the same chemical compound, as of calcium carbonate as calcite and aragonite.
Dimorphous
a.
(Biol.) Characterized by dimorphism; occurring under two distinct forms, not dependent on sex; dimorphic.
(Crystallog.) Crystallizing under two forms fundamentally different, while having the same chemical composition.
Dimple
n.
• A slight natural depression or indentation on the surface of some part of the body, esp. on the cheek or chin.
• A slight indentation on any surface.
v. i.
• To form dimples; to sink into depressions or little inequalities.
v. t.
• To mark with dimples or dimplelike depressions.
Dimplement
n.
• The state of being dimpled, or marked with gentle depressions.
Dimply
a.
• Full of dimples, or small depressions; dimpled; as, the dimply pool.
Dimyarian
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the Dimya.
n.
• One of the Dimya.
Dimyary
a. & n.
(Zool.) Same as Dimyarian.
Din
n.
• Loud, confused, harsh noise; a loud, continuous, rattling or clanging sound; clamor; roar.
v. t.
• To strike with confused or clanging sound; to stun with loud and continued noise; to harass with clamor; as, to din the ears with cries.
• To utter with a din; to repeat noisily; to ding.
v. i.
• To sound with a din; a ding.
Dinaphthyl
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, crystalline hydrocarbon, C20H14, obtained from naphthylene, and consisting of a doubled naphthylene radical.
Dinar
n.
• A petty money of accounts of Persia.
• An ancient gold coin of the East.
Dine
v. i.
• To eat the principal regular meal of the day; to take dinner.
v. t.
• To give a dinner to; to furnish with the chief meal; to feed; as, to dine a hundred men.
• To dine upon; to have to eat.
Diner
n.
• One who dines.
Dinetical
a.
• Revolving on an axis.
Ding
v. t.
• To dash; to throw violently.
• To cause to sound or ring.
v. i.
• To strike; to thump; to pound.
• To sound, as a bell; to ring; to clang.
• To talk with vehemence, importunity, or reiteration; to bluster.
n.
• A thump or stroke, especially of a bell.
Dingdong
n.
• The sound of, or as of, repeated strokes on a metallic body, as a bell; a repeated and monotonous sound.
(Horol.) An attachment to a clock by which the quarter hours are struck upon bells of different tones.
Dingily
adv.
• In a dingy manner.
Dinginess
n.
• Quality of being dingy; a dusky hue.
Dingle
n.
• A narrow dale; a small dell; a small, secluded, and embowered valley.
Dingo
n.
(Zool.) A wild dog found in Australia, but supposed to have introduced at a very early period. It has a wolflike face, bushy tail, and a reddish brown color.
Dingthrift
n.
• A spendthrift.
Dingy
a.
• Soiled; sullied; of a dark or dusky color; dark brown; dirty.
Dinichthys
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of large extinct Devonian ganoid fishes. In some parts of Ohio remains of the Dinichthys are abundant, indicating animals twenty feet in length.
Dining
n. & a.
• from Dine, a.
Dink
a.
• Trim; neat.
v. t.
• To deck; — often with out or up.
Dinmont
n.
(Zool.) A wether sheep between one and two years old.
Dinner
n.
• The principal meal of the day, eaten by most people about midday, but by many (especially in cities) at a later hour.
• An entertainment; a feast.
Dinnerless
a.
• Having no dinner.
Dinnerly
a.
• Of or pertaining to dinner.
Dinoceras
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of large extinct Eocene mammals from Wyoming; — called also Uintatherium.
Dinornis
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of extinct, ostrichlike birds of gigantic size, which formerly inhabited New Zealand.
Dinosauria
n. pl.
(Paleon.) An order of extinct mesozoic reptiles, mostly of large size (whence the name). Notwithstanding their size, they present birdlike characters in the skeleton, esp. in the pelvis and hind limbs. Some walked on their three-toed hind feet, thus producing the large "bird tracks," so-called, of mesozoic sandstones; others were five-toed and quadrupedal.
Dinoxide
n.
(Chem.) Same as Dioxide.
Dinsome
a.
• Full of din.
Dint
n.
• A blow; a stroke.
• The mark left by a blow; an indentation or impression made by violence; a dent.
• Force; power; — esp. in the phrase by dint of.
v. t.
• To make a mark or cavity on or in, by a blow or by pressure; to dent.
Dinumeration
n.
• Enumeration.
Diocesan
a.
• Of or pertaining to a diocese; as, diocesan missions.
n.
• A bishop, viewed in relation to his diocese; as, the diocesan of New York.
• The clergy or the people of a diocese.
Diocese
n.
(Eccl.) The circuit or extent of a bishop's jurisdiction; the district in which a bishop exercises his ecclesiastical authority.
Diocesener
n.
• One who belongs to a diocese.
Diodon
n.
(Zool.) A genus of spinose, plectognath fishes, having the teeth of each jaw united into a single beaklike plate. They are able to inflate the body by taking in air or water, and, hence, are called globefishes, swellfishes, etc. fishes, and sea hedgehogs.
(Zool.) A genus of whales.
Diodont
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the genus Diodon.
n.
• A fish of the genus Diodon, or an allied genus.
Dioecia
n. pl.
(Bot.) A Linnaean class of plants having the stamens and pistils on different plants.
(Zool.) A subclass of gastropod mollusks in which the sexes are separate. It includes most of the large marine species, like the conchs, cones, and cowries.
Dioeciously
adv.
(Biol.) In a dioecious manner.
Dioeciousness
n.
(Biol.) The state or quality of being dioecious.
Dioecism
n.
(Biol.) The condition of being dioecious.
Diogenes
n.
• A Greek Cynic philosopher (412?-323 B. C.) who lived much in Athens and was distinguished for contempt of the common aims and conditions of life, and for sharp, caustic sayings.
Diomedea
n.
(Zool.) A genus of large sea birds, including the albatross.
Dionaea
n.
(Bot.) An insectivorous plant.
Dionysian
a.
• Relating to Dionysius, a monk of the 6th century; as, the Dionysian, or Christian, era.
Diophantine
a.
• Originated or taught by Diophantus, the Greek writer on algebra.
Diopside
n.
(Min.) A crystallized variety of pyroxene, of a clear, grayish green color; mussite.
Dioptase
n.
(Min.) A hydrous silicate of copper, occurring in emerald-green crystals.
Dioptre
n.
(Optics) A unit employed by oculists in numbering glasses according to the metric system; a refractive power equal to that of a glass whose principal focal distance is one meter.
Dioptric
a.
(Optics) Of or pertaining to the dioptre, or to the metric system of numbering glasses.
n.
• A dioptre.
Dioptrics
n.
(Optics) The science of the refraction of light; that part of geometrical optics which treats of the laws of the refraction of light in passing from one medium into another, or through different mediums, as air, water, or glass, and esp. through different lenses; — distinguished from catoptrics, which refers to reflected light.
Dioptry
n.
(Optics) A dioptre.
Diorama
n.
• A mode of scenic representation, invented by Daguerre and Bouton, in which a painting is seen from a distance through a large opening. By a combination of transparent and opaque painting, and of transmitted and reflected light, and by contrivances such as screens and shutters, much diversity of scenic effect is produced.
• A building used for such an exhibition.
Dioramic
a.
• Pertaining to a diorama.
Diorism
n.
• Definition; logical direction.
Dioristic
a.
• Distinguishing; distinctive; defining.
Diorite
n.
(Min.) An igneous, crystalline in structure, consisting essentially of a triclinic feldspar and hornblende. It includes part of what was called greenstone.
Dioritic
a.
• Containing diorite.
Diorthotic
a.
• Relating to the correcting or straightening out of something; corrective.
Dioscorea
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants.
Diota
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A vase or drinking cup having two handles or ears.
Dioxide
n.
(Chem.) An oxide containing two atoms of oxygen in each molecule; binoxide.
• An oxide containing but one atom or equivalent of oxygen to two of a metal; a suboxide.
Dioxindol
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline, nitrogenous substance obtained by the reduction of isatin. It is a member of the indol series; — hence its name.
Dip
v. t.
• To plunge or immerse; especially, to put for a moment into a liquid; to insert into a fluid and withdraw again.
• To immerse for baptism; to baptize by immersion.
• To wet, as if by immersing; to moisten.
• To plunge or engage thoroughly in any affair.
• To take out, by dipping a dipper, ladle, or other receptacle, into a fluid and removing a part; — often with out; as, to dip water from a boiler; to dip out water.
• To engage as a pledge; to mortgage.
v. i.
• To immerse one's self; to become plunged in a liquid; to sink.
• To perform the action of plunging some receptacle, as a dipper, ladle. etc.; into a liquid or a soft substance and removing a part.
• To pierce; to penetrate; — followed by in or into.
• To enter slightly or cursorily; to engage one's self desultorily or by the way; to partake limitedly; — followed by in or into.
• To incline downward from the plane of the horizon; as, strata of rock dip.
• To dip snuff.
n.
• The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid.
• Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch.
• A liquid, as a sauce or gravy, served at table with a ladle or spoon.
• A dipped candle.
Dipaschal
a.
• Including two passovers.
Dipetalous
a.
(Bot.) Having two petals; two-petaled.
Diphenyl
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline substance, C6H5.C6H5, obtained by leading benzene through a heated iron tube. It consists of two benzene or phenyl radicals united.
Diphtheria
n.
(Med.) A very dangerous contagious disease in which the air passages, and especially the throat, become coated with a false membrane, produced by the solidification of an inflammatory exudation. Cf. Group.
Diphtheritic
a.
(Med.) Pertaining to, or connected with, diphtheria.
• Having characteristics resembling those of diphtheria; as, diphtheritic inflammation of the bladder.
Diphthong
n.
(Orthoepy) A coalition or union of two vowel sounds pronounced in one syllable; as, ou in out, oi in noise; — called a proper diphthong.
• A vowel digraph; a union of two vowels in the same syllable, only one of them being sounded; as, ai in rain, eo in people; — called an improper diphthong.
v. t.
• To form or pronounce as a diphthong; diphthongize.
Diphthongal
a.
• Relating or belonging to a diphthong; having the nature of a diphthong.
Diphthongalize
v. t.
• To make into a diphthong; to pronounce as a diphthong.
Diphthongic
a.
• Of the nature of diphthong; diphthongal.
Diphthongization
n.
• The act of changing into a diphthong.
Diphthongize
v. t. & i.
• To change into a diphthong, as by affixing another vowel to a simple vowel.
Diphycercal
a.
(Anat.) Having the tail fin divided into two equal parts by the notochord, or end of the vertebral column; protocercal.
Diphygenic
a.
(Zool.) Having two modes of embryonic development.
Diphyllous
a.
(Bot.) Having two leaves, as a calyx, etc.
Diphyodont
a.
(Anat.) Having two successive sets of teeth (deciduous and permanent), one succeeding the other; as, a diphyodont mammal; diphyodont dentition; — opposed to monophyodont.
n.
• An animal having two successive sets of teeth.
Diphyozooid
n.
(Zool.) One of the free-swimming sexual zooids of Siphonophora.
Diplanar
a.
(Math.) Of or pertaining to two planes.
Dipleidoscope
n.
(Astron.) An instrument for determining the time of apparent noon. It consists of two mirrors and a plane glass disposed in the form of a prism, so that, by the reflections of the sun's rays from their surfaces, two images are presented to the eye, moving in opposite directions, and coinciding at the instant the sun's center is on the meridian.
Diploblastic
a.
(Biol.) Characterizing the ovum when it has two primary germinal layers.
Diplocardiac
a.
(Anat.) Having the heart completely divided or double, one side systemic, the other pulmonary.
Diplococcus
n.
(Biol.) A form of micrococcus in which cocci are united in a binary manner.
Diploe
n.
(Anat.) The soft, spongy, or cancellated substance between the plates of the skull.
Diploetic
a.
(Anat.) Diploic.
Diplogenic
a.
• Partaking of the nature of two bodies; producing two substances.
Diploic
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the diploe.
Diploid
n.
(Crystallog.) A solid bounded by twenty-four similar quadrilateral faces. It is a hemihedral form of the hexoctahedron.
Diploma
n.
• A letter or writing, usually under seal, conferring some privilege, honor, or power; a document bearing record of a degree conferred by a literary society or educational institution.
Diplomacy
n.
• The art and practice of conducting negotiations between nations (particularly in securing treaties), including the methods and forms usually employed.
• Dexterity or skill in securing advantages; tact.
• The body of ministers or envoys resident at a court; the diplomatic body.
Diplomate
v. t.
• To invest with a title o privilege by diploma.
Diplomatial
a.
• Diplomatic.
Diplomatic
n.
• A minister, official agent, or envoy to a foreign court; a diplomatist.
Diplomatic
n.
• The science of diplomas, or the art of deciphering ancient writings, and determining their age, authenticity, etc.; paleography.
Diplomatically
adv.
• According to the rules of diplomacy; in the manner of a diplomatist; artfully.
Diplomatism
n.
• Diplomacy.
Diplomatist
n.
• A person employed in, or skilled in, diplomacy; a diplomat.
Diplopod
n.
(Zool.) One of the Diplopoda.
Diplopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of myriapods having two pairs of legs on each segment; the Chilognatha.
Diplostemonous
a.
(Bot.) Having twice as many stamens as petals, as the geranium.
Diplostemony
n.
(Bot.) The condition of being diplostemonous.
Dipneumona
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of spiders having only two lunglike organs.
Dipnoi
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of ganoid fishes, including the living genera Ceratodus and Lepidosiren, which present the closest approximation to the Amphibia. The air bladder acts as a lung, and the nostrils open inside the mouth.
Dipody
n.
(Pros.) Two metrical feet taken together, or included in one measure.
Dipolar
a.
• Having two poles, as a magnetic bar.
Dipper
n.
• One who, or that which, dips; especially, a vessel used to dip water or other liquid; a ladle.
(Zool.) A small grebe; the dabchick
• The buffel duck
• The water ouzel (Cinolus aquaticus) of Europe
• The American dipper or ouzel (Cinclus Mexicanus).
Dipping
n.
• The act or process of immersing.
• The act of inclining downward.
• The act of lifting or moving a liquid with a dipper, ladle, or the like.
• The process of cleaning or brightening sheet metal or metalware, esp. brass, by dipping it in acids, etc.
• The practice of taking snuff by rubbing the teeth or gums with a stick or brush dipped in snuff.
Diprismatic
a.
• Doubly prismatic.
Dipropargyl
n.
(Chem.) A pungent, mobile, volatile liquid, C6H6, produced artificially from certain allyl derivatives. Though isomeric with benzine, it is very different in its chemical relations. Called also dipropinyl.
Dipropyl
n.
(Chem.) One of the hexane paraffins, found in petroleum, consisting of two propyl radicals.
Diprotodon
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct Quaternary marsupial from Australia, about as large as the hippopotamus; — so named because of its two large front teeth.
Dipsas
n.
• A serpent whose bite was fabled to produce intense thirst.
(Zool.) A genus of harmless colubrine snakes.
Dipsetic
a.
• Tending to produce thirst.
Dipsomania
n.
(Med.) A morbid an uncontrollable craving (often periodic) for drink, esp. for alcoholic liquors; also improperly used to denote acute and chronic alcoholism.
Dipsomaniac
n.
• One who has an irrepressible desire for alcoholic drinks.
Dipsomaniacal
a.
• Of or pertaining to dipsomania.
Dipsosis
n.
(Med.) Excessive thirst produced by disease.
Diptera
n. pl.
(Zool.) An extensive order of insects having only two functional wings and two balancers, as the house fly, mosquito, etc. They have a suctorial proboscis, often including two pairs of sharp organs (mandibles and maxillae) with which they pierce the skin of animals. They undergo a complete metamorphosis, their larvae (called maggots) being usually without feet.
Dipteral
a.
(Zool.) Having two wings only; belonging to the order Diptera.
(Anc. Arch.) Having a double row of columns on each on the flanks, as well as in front and rear; — said of a temple.
Dipteran
n.
(Zool.) An insect of the order Diptera.
Dipterocarpus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of trees found in the East Indies, some species of which produce a fragrant resin, other species wood oil. The fruit has two long wings.
Dipterous
a.
(Zool.) Having two wings, as certain insects; belonging to the order Diptera.
(Bot.) Having two wings; two-winged.
Dipterygian
a.
(Zool.) Having two dorsal fins; — said of certain fishes.
Diptote
n.
(Gram.) A noun which has only two cases.
Diptych
n.
• Anything consisting of two leaves
(Roman Antiq.) A writing tablet consisting of two leaves of rigid material connected by hinges and shutting together so as to protect the writing within
• A picture or series of pictures painted on two tablets connected by hinges.
• A double catalogue, containing in one part the names of living, and in the other of deceased, ecclesiastics and benefactors of the church; a catalogue of saints.
Dipyre
n.
(Min.) A mineral of the scapolite group; — so called from the double effect of fire upon it, in fusing it, and rendering it phosphorescent.
Dipyrenous
a.
(Bot.) Containing two stones or nutlets.
Dipyridil
n.
(Chem.) A crystalline nitrogenous base, C10H8N2, obtained by the reduction of pyridine.
Dipyridine
n.
(Geom.) A polymeric form of pyridine, C10H10N2, obtained as a colorless oil by the action of sodium on pyridine.
Diradiation
n.
• The emission and diffusion of rays of light.
Dire
a.
• Ill-boding; portentous; as, dire omens.
• Evil in great degree; dreadful; dismal; horrible; terrible; lamentable.
Direct
a.
• Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means.
• Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken.
• Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.
• In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line.
(Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; — said of the motion of a celestial body.
v. t.
• To arrange in a direct or straight line, as against a mark, or towards a goal; to point; to aim; as, to direct an arrow or a piece of ordnance.
• To point out or show to (any one), as the direct or right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way; as, he directed me to the left-hand road.
• To determine the direction or course of; to cause to go on in a particular manner; to order in the way to a certain end; to regulate; to govern; as, to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army.
• To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order; as, he directed them to go.
• To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent; to superscribe; as, to direct a letter.
v. i.
• To give direction; to point out a course; to act as guide.
n.
(Mus.) A character, thus [], placed at the end of a staff on the line or space of the first note of the next staff, to apprise the performer of its situation.
Directer
n.
• One who directs; a director.
Direction
n.
• The act of directing, of aiming, regulating, guiding, or ordering; guidance; management; superintendence; administration; as, the direction o public affairs or of a bank.
• That which is imposed by directing; a guiding or authoritative instruction; prescription; order; command; as, he grave directions to the servants.
• The name and residence of a person to whom any thing is sent, written upon the thing sent; superscription; address; as, the direction of a letter.
• The line or course upon which anything is moving or aimed to move, or in which anything is lying or pointing; aim; line or point of tendency; direct line or course; as, the ship sailed in a southeasterly direction.
• The body of managers of a corporation or enterprise; board of directors.
(Gun.) The pointing of a piece with reference to an imaginary vertical axis; — distinguished from elevation. The direction is given when the plane of sight passes through the object.
Directive
a.
• Having power to direct; tending to direct, guide, or govern; showing the way.
• Able to be directed; manageable.
Directly
adv.
• In a direct manner; in a straight line or course.
• In a straightforward way; without anything intervening; not by secondary, but by direct, means.
• Without circumlocution or ambiguity; absolutely; in express terms.
• Exactly; just.
• Straightforwardly; honestly.
• Manifestly; openly.
• Straightway; next in order; without delay; immediately.
• Immediately after; as soon as.
Directness
n.
• The quality of being direct; straightness; straightforwardness; immediateness.
Director
n.
• One who, or that which, directs; one who regulates, guides, or orders; a manager or superintendent.
• One of a body of persons appointed to manage the affairs of a company or corporation; as, the directors of a bank, insurance company, or railroad company.
(Mech.) A part of a machine or instrument which directs its motion or action.
(Surg.) A slender grooved instrument upon which a knife is made to slide when it is wished to limit the extent of motion of the latter, or prevent its injuring the parts beneath.
Directorate
n.
• The office of director; also, a body of directors taken jointly.
Directorial
a.
• Having the quality of a director, or authoritative guide; directive.
• Pertaining to: director or directory; specifically, relating to the Directory of France under the first republic.
Directorship
n.
• The condition or office of a director; directorate.
Directory
a.
• Containing directions; enjoining; instructing; directorial.
n.
• A collection or body of directions, rules, or ordinances; esp., a book of directions for the conduct of worship; as, the Directory used by the nonconformists instead of the Prayer Book.
• A book containing the names and residences of the inhabitants of any place, or of classes of them; an address book; as, a business directory.
• A body of directors; board of management; especially, a committee which held executive power in France under the first republic.
• Direction; guide.
Directress
n.
• A woman who directs.
Directrix
n.
• A directress.
(Geom.) A line along which a point in another line moves, or which in any way governs the motion of the point and determines the position of the curve generated by it; the line along which the generatrix moves in generating a surface.
• A straight line so situated with respect to a conic section that the distance of any point of the curve from it has a constant ratio to the distance of the same point from the focus.
Direful
a.
• Dire; dreadful; terrible; calamitous; woeful; as, a direful fiend; a direful day.
Direly
adv.
• In a dire manner.
Dirempt
a.
• Divided; separated.
v. t.
• To separate by force; to tear apart.
Diremption
n.
• A tearing apart; violent separation.
Direness
n.
• Terribleness; horror; woefulness.
Direption
n.
• The act of plundering, despoiling, or snatching away.
Direptitious
a.
• Characterized by direption.
Direptitiously
adv.
• With plundering violence; by violent injustice.
Dirge
n.
• A piece of music of a mournful character, to accompany funeral rites; a funeral hymn.
Dirgeful
a.
• Funereal; moaning.
Dirige
n.
• A service for the dead, in the Roman Catholic Church, being the first antiphon of Matins for the dead, of which Dirige is the first word; a dirge.
Dirigent
a.
• Directing.
n.
(Geom.) The line of motion along which a describent line or surface is carried in the genesis of any plane or solid figure; a directrix.
Dirigible
a.
• Capable of being directed; steerable; as, a dirigible balloon.
Diriment
a.
(Law) Absolute.
Dirk
n.
• A kind of dagger or poniard; — formerly much used by the Scottish Highlander.
v. t.
• To stab with a dirk.
a.
• Dark.
v. t.
• To darken.
Dirkness
n.
• Darkness.
Dirl
v. i. & t.
• To thrill; to vibrate; to penetrate.
Dirt
n.
• Any foul of filthy substance, as excrement, mud, dust, etc.; whatever, adhering to anything, renders it foul or unclean; earth; as, a wagonload of dirt.
• Meanness; sordidness.
• In placer mining, earth, gravel, etc., before washing.
v. t.
• To make foul of filthy; to dirty.
Dirtily
adv.
• In a dirty manner; foully; nastily; filthily; meanly; sordidly.
Dirtiness
n.
• The state of being dirty; filthiness; foulness; nastiness; baseness; sordidness.
Dirty
a.
• Defiled with dirt; foul; nasty; filthy; not clean or pure; serving to defile; as, dirty hands; dirty water; a dirty white.
• Sullied; clouded; — applied to color.
• Sordid; base; groveling; as, a dirty fellow.
• Sleety; gusty; stormy; as, dirty weather.
v. t.
• To foul; to make filthy; to soil; as, to dirty the clothes or hands.
• To tarnish; to sully; to scandalize; — said of reputation, character, etc.
Diruption
n.
• Disruption.
Dis
n.
• The god Pluto.
Disability
n.
• State of being disabled; deprivation or want of ability; absence of competent physical, intellectual, or moral power, means, fitness, and the like.
• Want of legal qualification to do a thing; legal incapacity or incompetency.
Disable
a.
• Lacking ability; unable.
v. t.
• To render unable or incapable; to destroy the force, vigor, or power of action of; to deprive of competent physical or intellectual power; to incapacitate; to disqualify; to make incompetent or unfit for service; to impair.
(Law) To deprive of legal right or qualification; to render legally incapable.
• To deprive of that which gives value or estimation; to declare lacking in competency; to disparage; to undervalue.
Disablement
n.
• Deprivation of ability; incapacity.
Disabuse
v. t.
• To set free from mistakes; to undeceive; to disengage from fallacy or deception; to set right.
Disaccommodate
v. t.
• To put to inconvenience; to incommode.
Disaccommodation
n.
• A state of being unaccommodated or unsuited.
Disaccord
v. i.
• To refuse to assent.
n.
• Disagreement.
Disaccordant
a.
• Not accordant.
Disaccustom
v. t.
• To destroy the force of habit in; to wean from a custom.
Disacidify
v. t.
• To free from acid.
Disacknowledge
v. t.
• To refuse to acknowledge; to deny; to disown.
Disacquaint
v. t.
• To render unacquainted; to make unfamiliar.
Disacquaintance
n.
• Neglect of disuse of familiarity, or familiar acquaintance.
Disacryl
n.
(Chem.) A white amorphous substance obtained as a polymeric modification of acrolein.
Disadorn
v. t.
• To deprive of ornaments.
Disadvance
v. t. & i.
• To draw back, or cause to draw back.
Disadvantage
n.
• Deprivation of advantage; unfavorable or prejudicial quality, condition, circumstance, or the like; that which hinders success, or causes loss or injury.
• Loss; detriment; hindrance; prejudice to interest, fame, credit, profit, or other good.
v. t.
• To injure the interest of; to be detrimental to.
Disadvantageable
a.
• Injurious; disadvantageous.
Disadvantageous
a.
• Attended with disadvantage; unfavorable to success or prosperity; inconvenient; prejudicial; — opposed to advantageous; as, the situation of an army is disadvantageous for attack or defense.
Disadventure
n.
• Misfortune; mishap.
Disadventurous
a.
• Unprosperous; unfortunate.
Disadvise
v. t.
• To advise against; to dissuade from.
Disaffect
v. t.
• To alienate or diminish the affection of; to make unfriendly or less friendly; to fill with discontent and unfriendliness.
• To disturb the functions of; to disorder.
• To lack affection for; to be alienated from, or indisposed toward; to dislike.
Disaffected
a.
• Alienated in feeling; not wholly loyal. J. H. Newman. —
Disaffection
n.
• State of being disaffected; alienation or want of affection or good will, esp. toward those in authority; unfriendliness; dislike.
• Disorder; bad constitution.
Disaffectionate
a.
• Not disposed to affection; unfriendly; disaffected.
Disaffirm
v. t.
• To assert the contrary of; to contradict; to deny; — said of that which has been asserted.
(Law) To refuse to confirm; to annul, as a judicial decision, by a contrary judgment of a superior tribunal.
Disaffirmance
n.
• The act of disaffirming; denial; negation.
(Law) Overthrow or annulment by the decision of a superior tribunal; as, disaffirmance of judgment.
Disaffirmation
n.
• The act of disaffirming; negation; refutation.
Disafforest
v. t.
(Eng. Law) To reduce from the privileges of a forest to the state of common ground; to exempt from forest laws.
Disaggregate
v. t.
• To destroy the aggregation of; to separate into component parts, as an aggregate mass.
Disaggregation
n.
• The separation of an aggregate body into its component parts.
Disagree
v. i.
• To fail to accord; not to agree; to lack harmony; to differ; to be unlike; to be at variance.
• To differ in opinion; to hold discordant views; to be at controversy; to quarrel.
• To be unsuited; to have unfitness; as, medicine sometimes disagrees with the patient; food often disagrees with the stomach or the taste.
Disagreeable
a.
• Not agreeable, conformable, or congruous; ontrary; unsuitable.
• Exciting repugnance; offensive to the feelings or enses; displeasing; unpleasant.
Disagreeableness
n.
• The state or quality of being; disagreeable; unpleasantness.
Disagreeably
adv.
• In a disagreeable manner; unsuitably; offensively.
Disagreeance
n.
• Disagreement.
Disagreement
n.
• The state of disagreeing; a being at variance; dissimilitude; diversity.
• Unsuitableness; unadaptedness.
• Difference of opinion or sentiment.
• A falling out, or controversy; difference.
Disagreer
n.
• One who disagrees.
Disalliege
v. t.
• To alienate from allegiance.
Disallow
v. t.
• To refuse to allow; to deny the force or validity of; to disown and reject; as, the judge disallowed the executor's charge.
Disallowable
a.
• Not allowable; not to be suffered.
Disallowance
n.
• The act of disallowing; refusal to admit or permit; rejection.
Disally
v. t.
• To part, as an alliance; to sunder.
Disanchor
v. t. & i.
• To raise the anchor of, as a ship; to weigh anchor.
Disangelical
a.
• Not angelical.
Disanimate
v. t.
• To deprive of life.
• To deprive of spirit; to dishearten.
Disanimation
n.
• Privation of life.
• The state of being disanimated or discouraged; depression of spirits.
Disannex
v. t.
• To disunite; to undo or repeal the annexation of.
Disannul
v. t.
• To annul completely; to render void or of no effect.
Disannuller
n.
• One who disannuls.
Disannulment
n.
• Complete annulment.
Disanoint
v. t.
• To invalidate the consecration of; as, to disanoint a king.
Disapparel
v. t.
• To disrobe; to strip of apparel; to make naked.
Disappear
v. i.
• To cease to appear or to be perceived; to pass from view, gradually or suddenly; to vanish; to be no longer seen; as, darkness disappears at the approach of light; a ship disappears as she sails from port.
• To cease to be or exist; as, the epidemic has disappeared.
Disappearance
n.
• The act of disappearing; cessation of appearance; removal from sight; vanishing.
Disappendency
n.
• A detachment or separation from a former connection.
Disappendent
a.
• Freed from a former connection or dependence; disconnected.
Disappoint
v. t.
• To defeat of expectation or hope; to hinder from the attainment of that which was excepted, hoped, or desired; to balk; as, a man is disappointed of his hopes or expectations, or his hopes, desires, intentions, expectations, or plans are disappointed; a bad season disappoints the farmer of his crops; a defeat disappoints an enemy of his spoil.
• To frustrate; to fail; to hinder of result.
Disappointed
a.
• Defeated of expectation or hope; balked; as, a disappointed person or hope.
• Unprepared; unequipped.
Disappointment
n.
• The act of disappointing, or the state of being disappointed; defeat or failure of expectation or hope; miscarriage of design or plan; frustration.
• That which disappoints.
Disappreciate
v. t.
• To undervalue; not to esteem.
Disapprobation
n.
Disapprobatory
a.
• Containing disapprobation; serving to disapprove.
Disappropriate
a.
(Law) Severed from the appropriation or possession of a spiritual corporation.
v. t.
• To release from individual ownership or possession.
(Law) To sever from appropriation or possession a spiritual corporation.
Disappropriation
n.
• The act of disappropriating.
Disapproval
n.
• Disapprobation; dislike; censure; adverse judgment.
Disapprove
v. t.
• To pass unfavorable judgment upon; to condemn by an act of the judgment; to regard as wrong, unsuitable, or inexpedient; to censure; as, to disapprove the conduct of others.
• To refuse official approbation to; to disallow; to decline to sanction; as, the sentence of the court-martial was disapproved by the commander in chief.
Disapprover
n.
• One who disapproves.
Disapprovingly
adv.
• In a disapproving manner.
Disarm
v. t.
• To deprive of arms; to take away the weapons of; to deprive of the means of attack or defense; to render defenseless.
• To deprive of the means or the disposition to harm; to render harmless or innocuous; as, to disarm a man's wrath.
Disarmament
n.
• The act of disarming.
Disarmature
n.
• The act of divesting of armature.
Disarmed
a.
• Deprived of arms.
(Her.) Deprived of claws, and teeth or beaks.
Disarmer
n.
• One who disarms.
Disarrange
v. t.
• To unsettle or disturb the order or due arrangement of; to throw out of order.
Disarrangement
n.
• The act of disarranging, or the state of being disarranged; confusion; disorder.
Disarray
v. t.
• To throw into disorder; to break the array of.
• To take off the dress of; to unrobe.
n.
• Want of array or regular order; disorder; confusion.
• Confused attire; undress.
Disarrayment
n.
• Disorder.
Disarticulate
v. t.
• To sunder; to separate, as joints.
Disarticulator
n.
• One who disarticulates and prepares skeletons.
Disassent
v. i.
• To dissent.
n.
• Dissent.
Disassenter
n.
• One who disassents; a dissenter.
Disassiduity
n.
• Want of as siduity or care.
Disassimilate
v. t.
(Physiol.) To subject to disassimilation.
Disassimilation
n.
(Physics) The decomposition of complex substances, within the organism, into simpler ones suitable only for excretion, with evolution of energy, — a normal nutritional process the reverse of assimilation; downward metabolism.
Disassimilative
a.
(Physiol.) Having power to disassimilate; of the nature of disassimilation.
Disassociate
v. t.
• To disconnect from things associated; to disunite; to dissociate.
Disaster
n.
• An unpropitious or baleful aspect of a planet or star; malevolent influence of a heavenly body; hence, an ill portent.
• An adverse or unfortunate event, esp. a sudden and extraordinary misfortune; a calamity; a serious mishap.
v. t.
• To blast by the influence of a baleful star.
• To bring harm upon; to injure.
Disasterly
adv.
• Disastrously.
Disastrous
a.
• Full of unpropitious stellar influences; unpropitious; ill-boding.
• Attended with suffering or disaster; very unfortunate; calamitous; ill-fated; as, a disastrous day; a disastrous termination of an undertaking.
Disattire
v. t.
• To unrobe; to undress.
Disaugment
v. t.
• To diminish.
Disauthorize
v. t.
• To deprive of credit or authority; to discredit.
Disavaunce
v. t.
• To retard; to repel; to do damage to.
Disaventure
n.
• Misfortune.
Disaventurous
a.
• Misadventurous; unfortunate.
Disavouch
v. t.
• To disavow.
Disavow
v. t.
• To refuse strongly and solemnly to own or acknowledge; to deny responsibility for, approbation of, an the like; to disclaim; to disown; as, he was charged with embezzlement, but he disavows the crime.
• To deny; to show the contrary of; to disprove.
Disavowal
n.
• The act of disavowing, disclaiming, or disowning; rejection and denial.
Disavowance
n.
• Disavowal.
Disavower
n.
• One who disavows.
Disavowment
n.
• Disavowal.
Disband
v. t.
• To loose the bands of; to set free; to disunite; to scatter; to disperse; to break up the organization of; especially, to dismiss from military service; as, to disband an army.
• To divorce.
v. i.
• To become separated, broken up, dissolved, or scattered; especially, to quit military service by breaking up organization.
Disbandment
n.
• The act of disbanding.
Disbar
v. t.
(Law) To expel from the bar, or the legal profession; to deprive (an attorney, barrister, or counselor) of his status and privileges as such.
Disbark
v. t.
• To disembark.
v. t.
• To strip of bark; to bark.
Disbarment
n.
• Act of disbarring.
Disbase
v. t.
• To debase or degrade.
Disbecome
v. t.
• To misbecome.
Disbelief
n.
• The act of disbelieving;; a state of the mind in which one is fully persuaded that an opinion, assertion, or doctrine is not true; refusal of assent, credit, or credence; denial of belief.
Disbelieve
v. t.
• Not to believe; to refuse belief or credence to; to hold not to be true or actual.
Disbeliever
n.
• One who disbelieves, or refuses belief; an unbeliever. Specifically, one who does not believe the Christian religion.
Disbench
v. t.
• To drive from a bench or seat.
(Eng. Law) To deprive (a bencher) of his privileges.
Disbend
v. t.
• To unbend.
Disbind
v. t.
• To unbind; to loosen.
Disblame
v. t.
• To clear from blame.
Disbodied
a.
• Disembodied.
Disboscation
n.
• Converting forest land into cleared or arable land; removal of a forest.
Disbowel
v. t.
• To disembowel.
Disbranch
v. t.
• To divest of a branch or branches; to tear off.
Disbud
v. t.
(Hort.) To deprive of buds or shoots, as for training, or economizing the vital strength of a tree.
Disburden
v. t.
• To rid of a burden; to free from a load borne or from something oppressive; to unload; to disencumber; to relieve.
v. i.
• To relieve one's self of a burden; to ease the mind.
Disburgeon
v. t.
• To strip of burgeons or buds; to disbud.
Disburse
v. t.
• To pay out; to expend; — usually from a public fund or treasury.
Disbursement
n.
• The act of disbursing or paying out.
• That which is disbursed or paid out; as, the annual disbursements exceed the income.
Disburser
n.
• One who disburses money.
Disburthen
v. t.
• To disburden; to relieve of a load.
Disc
n.
• A flat round plate
(Biol.) a circular structure either in plants or animals; as, a blood disc, a germinal disc, etc. Same as Disk.
Discage
v. t.
• To uncage.
Discal
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, a disk; as, discal cells.
Discalceate
v. t.
• To pull off shoes or sandals from.
Discalceated
a.
• Deprived off shoes or sandals; unshod; discalced.
Discalceation
n.
• The act of pulling off the shoes or sandals.
Discalced
a.
• Unshod; barefooted; — in distinction from calced.
Discamp
v. t.
• To drive from a camp.
Discandy
v. i.
• To melt; to dissolve; to thaw.
Discapacitate
v. t.
• To deprive of capacity; to incapacitate.
Discard
v. t.
(Card Playing) To throw out of one's hand, as superfluous cards; to lay aside (a card or cards).
• To cast off as useless or as no longer of service; to dismiss from employment, confidence, or favor; to discharge; to turn away.
• To put or thrust away; to reject.
v. i.
(Card Playing) To make a discard.
n.
(Card Playing) The act of discarding; also, the card or cards discarded.
Discardure
n.
• Rejection; dismissal.
Discarnate
a.
• Stripped of flesh.
Discase
v. t.
• To strip; to undress.
Discede
v. i.
• To yield or give up; to depart.
Discept
v. i.
• To debate; to discuss.
Disceptation
n.
• Controversy; disputation; discussion.
Disceptator
n.
• One who arbitrates or decides.
Discern
v. t.
• To see and identify by noting a difference or differences; to note the distinctive character of; to discriminate; to distinguish.
• To see by the eye or by the understanding; to perceive and recognize; as, to discern a difference.
v. i.
• To see or understand the difference; to make distinction; as, to discern between good and evil, truth and falsehood.
• To make cognizance.
Discernance
n.
• Discernment.
Discerner
n.
• One who, or that which, discerns, distinguishes, perceives, or judges; as, a discerner of truth, of right and wrong.
Discernible
a.
• Capable of being discerned by the eye or the understanding; as, a star is discernible by the eye; the identity of difference of ideas is discernible by the understanding.
Discernibleness
n.
• The quality of being discernible.
Discernibly
adv.
• In a manner to be discerned; perceptibly; visibly.
Discerning
a.
• Acute; shrewd; sagacious; sharp-sighted.
Discerningly
adv.
• In a discerning manner; with judgment; judiciously; acutely.
Discernment
n.
• The act of discerning.
• The power or faculty of the mind by which it distinguishes one thing from another; power of viewing differences in objects, and their relations and tendencies; penetrative and discriminate mental vision; acuteness; sagacity; insight; as, the errors of youth often proceed from the want of discernment.
Discerp
v. t.
• To tear in pieces; to rend.
• To separate; to disunite.
Discerption
n.
• The act of pulling to pieces, or of separating the parts.
Discerptive
a.
• Tending to separate or disunite parts.
Discession
n.
• Departure.
Discharge
v. t.
• To relieve of a charge, load, or burden; to empty of a load or cargo; to unburden; to unload; as, to discharge a vessel.
• To free of the missile with which anything is charged or loaded; to let go the charge of; as, to discharge a bow, catapult, etc.; especially, said of firearms, — to fire off; to shoot off; also, to relieve from a state of tension, as a Leyden jar.
• To of something weighing upon or impeding over one, as a debt, claim, obligation, responsibility, accusation, etc.; to absolve; to acquit; to clear.
• To relieve of an office or employment; to send away from service; to dismiss.
• To release legally from confinement; to set at liberty; as, to discharge a prisoner.
• To put forth, or remove, as a charge or burden; to take out, as that with which anything is loaded or filled; as, to discharge a cargo.
• To let fly, as a missile; to shoot.
• To set aside; to annul; to dismiss.
• To throw off the obligation of, as a duty or debt; to relieve one's self of, by fulfilling conditions, performing duty, trust, and the like; hence, to perform or exte, as an office, or part.
• To send away (a creditor) satisfied by payment; to pay one's debt or obligation to.
• To give forth; to emit or send out; as, a pipe discharges water; to let fly; to give expression to; to utter; as, to discharge a horrible oath.
• To prohibit; to forbid.
v. i.
• To throw off or deliver a load, charge, or burden; to unload; to emit or give vent to fluid or other contents; as, the water pipe discharges freely.
n.
• The act of discharging; the act of relieving of a charge or load; removal of a load or burden; unloading; as, the discharge of a ship; discharge of a cargo.
• Firing off; explosive removal of a charge; explosion; letting off; as, a discharge of arrows, of artillery.
• Act of relieving of something which oppresses or weighs upon one, as an obligation, liability, debt, accusation, etc.; acquittance; as, the discharge of a debtor.
• Act of removing, or getting rid of, an obligation, liability, etc.; fulfillment, as by the payment of a debt, or the performance of a trust or duty.
• Release or dismissal from an office, employment, etc.; dismission; as, the discharge of a workman by his employer.
• Legal release from confinement; liberation; as, the discharge of a prisoner.
• The state of being discharged or relieved of a debt, obligation, office, and the like; acquittal.
• That which discharges or releases from an obligation, liability, penalty, etc., as a price of ransom, a legal document.
• A flowing or issuing out; emission; vent; evacuation; also, that which is discharged or emitted; as, a rapid discharge of water from the pipe.
Discharger
n.
• One who, or that which, discharges. Specifically, in electricity, an instrument for discharging a Leyden jar, or electrical battery, by making a connection between the two surfaces; a discharging rod.
Dischevele
a.
• Disheveled.
Dischurch
v. t.
• To deprive of status as a church, or of membership in a church.
Discide
v. t.
• To divide; to cleave in two.
Disciferous
a.
• Bearing disks.
Disciform
a.
• Discoid.
Discina
n.
(Zool.) A genus of Branchiopoda, having a disklike shell, attached by one valve, which is perforated by the peduncle.
Discinct
a.
• Ungirded; loosely dressed.
Discind
v. t.
• To part; to divide.
Disciple
n.
• One who receives instruction from another; a scholar; a learner; especially, a follower who has learned to believe in the truth of the doctrine of his teacher; an adherent in doctrine; as, the disciples of Plato; the disciples of our Savior.
v. t.
• To teach; to train.
• To punish; to discipline.
• To make disciples of; to convert to doctrines or principles.
Discipleship
n.
• The state of being a disciple or follower in doctrines and precepts.
Discipless
n.
• A female disciple.
Disciplinable
a.
• Capable of being disciplined or improved by instruction and training.
• Liable or deserving to be disciplined; subject to disciplinary punishment; as, a disciplinable offense.
Disciplinableness
n.
• The quality of being improvable by discipline.
Disciplinal
a.
• Relating to discipline.
Disciplinant
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A flagellant.
Disciplinarian
a.
• Pertaining to discipline.
n.
• One who disciplines; one who excels in training, especially with training, especially with regard to order and obedience; one who enforces rigid discipline; a stickler for the observance of rules and methods of training; as, he is a better disciplinarian than scholar.
• A Puritan or Presbyterian; — because of rigid adherence to religious or church discipline.
Disciplinary
a.
• Pertaining to discipline; intended for discipline; corrective; belonging to a course of training.
Discipline
n.
• The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.
• Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.
• Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.
• Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc.
• Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.
• The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge.
(Eccl.) The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member.
(R. C. Ch.) Self- inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge.
(Eccl.) A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline.
v. t.
• To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.
• To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill.
• To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct.
• To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon.
Discipliner
n.
• One who disciplines.
Disclaim
v. t.
• To renounce all claim to deny; ownership of, or responsibility for; to disown; to disavow; to reject.
• To deny, as a claim; to refuse.
(Law) To relinquish or deny having a claim; to disavow another's claim; to decline accepting, as an estate, interest, or office.
v. t.
• To disavow or renounce all part, claim, or share.
Disclaimer
n.
• One who disclaims, disowns, or renounces.
(Law) A denial, disavowal, or renunciation, as of a title, claim, interest, estate, or trust; relinquishment or waiver of an interest or estate.
• A public disavowal, as of pretensions, claims, opinions, and the like.
Disclamation
n.
• A disavowing or disowning.
Disclame
v. t.
• To disclaim; to expel.
Disclaunder
v. t.
• To injure one's good name; to slander.
Discloak
v. t.
• To take off a cloak from; to uncloak.
Disclose
v. t.
• To unclose; to open; — applied esp. to eggs in the sense of to hatch.
• To remove a cover or envelope from;; to set free from inclosure; to uncover.
• To lay open or expose to view; to cause to appear; to bring to light; to reveal.
• To make known, as that which has been kept secret or hidden; to reveal; to expose; as, events have disclosed his designs.
n.
• Disclosure.
Disclosed
p. a.
(Her.) Represented with wings expanded; — applied to doves and other birds not of prey.
Discloser
n.
• One who discloses.
Disclosure
n.
• The act of disclosing, uncovering, or revealing; bringing to light; exposure.
• That which is disclosed or revealed.
Discloud
v. t.
• To clear from clouds.
Disclout
v. t.
• To divest of a clout.
Disclusion
n.
• A shutting off; exclusion.
Discoast
v. i.
• To depart; to quit the coast (that is, the side or border) of anything; to be separated.
Discoblastic
a.
(Biol.) Applied to a form of egg cleavage seen in osseous fishes, which occurs only in a small disk that separates from the rest of the egg.
Discobolus
n.
(Fine Arts) A thrower of the discus
• A statue of an athlete holding the discus, or about to throw it
Discodactyl
n.
(Zool.) One of the tree frogs.
Discodactylia
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of amphibians having suctorial disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.
Discodactylous
a.
(Zool.) Having sucking disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.
Discoherent
a.
• Incoherent.
Discoid
a.
• Having the form of a disk, as those univalve shells which have the whorls in one plane, so as to form a disk, as the pearly nautilus.
n.
• Anything having the form of a discus or disk; particularly, a discoid shell.
Discoidal
a.
• Disk-shaped; discoid.
Discolith
n.
(Biol.) One of a species of coccoliths, having an oval discoidal body, with a thick strongly refracting rim, and a thinner central portion. One of them measures about
Discolor
v. t.
• To alter the natural hue or color of; to change to a different color; to stain; to tinge; as, a drop of wine will discolor water; silver is discolored by sea water.
• To alter the true complexion or appearance of; to put a false hue upon.
Discolorate
v. t.
• To discolor.
Discoloration
n.
• The act of discoloring, or the state of being discolored; alteration of hue or appearance.
• A discolored spot; a stain.
Discolored
a.
• Altered in color; tained.
• Variegated; of divers colors.
Discomfit
v. t.
• To scatter in fight; to put to rout; to defeat.
• To break up and frustrate the plans of; to balk to throw into perplexity and dejection; to disconcert.
a.
• Discomfited; overthrown.
n.
• Rout; overthrow; discomfiture.
Discomfiture
n.
• The act of discomfiting, or the state of being discomfited; rout; overthrow; defeat; frustration; confusion and dejection.
Discomfort
v. t.
• To discourage; to deject.
• To destroy or disturb the comfort of; to deprive o quiet enjoyment; to make uneasy; to pain; as, a smoky chimney discomforts a family.
n.
• Discouragement.
• Want of comfort; uneasiness, mental or physical; disturbance of peace; inquietude; pain; distress; sorrow.
Discomfortable
a.
• Causing discomfort; occasioning uneasiness; making sad.
• Destitute of comfort; uncomfortable.
Discommend
v. t.
• To mention with disapprobation; to blame; to disapprove.
• To expose to censure or ill favor; to put out of the good graces of any one.
Discommendable
a.
• Deserving, disapprobation or blame.
Discommendation
n.
• Blame; censure; reproach.
Discommender
n.
• One who discommends; a dispraiser.
Discommission
v. t.
• To deprive of a commission or trust.
Discommodate
v. t.
• To discommode.
Discommode
v. t.
• To put inconvenience; to incommode; to trouble.
Discommodious
a.
• Inconvenient; troublesome; incommodious.
Discommodity
n.
• Disadvantage; inconvenience.
Discommon
v. t.
• To deprive of the right of common.
• To deprive of privileges.
(Law) To deprive of commonable quality, as lands, by inclosing or appropriating.
Discommunity
n.
• A lack of common possessions, properties, or relationship.
Discompany
v. t.
• To free from company; to dissociate.
Discomplexion
v. t.
• To change the complexion or hue of.
Discompliance
n.
• Failure or refusal to comply; noncompliance.
Discompose
v. t.
• To disarrange; to interfere with; to disturb; to disorder; to unsettle; to break up.
• To throw into disorder; to ruffle; to destroy the composure or equanimity; to agitate.
• To put out of place or service; to discharge; to displace.
Discomposed
a.
• Disordered; disturbed; disquieted.
Discomposition
n.
• Inconsistency; discordance.
Discomposure
n.
• The state of being discomposed; disturbance; disorder; agitation; perturbation.
• Discordance; disagreement of parts.
Discompt
v. t.
• To discount.
Disconcert
v. t.
• To break up the harmonious progress of; to throw into disorder or confusion; as, the emperor disconcerted the plans of his enemy.
• To confuse the faculties of; to disturb the composure of; to discompose; to abash.
n.
• Want of concert; disagreement.
Disconcertion
n.
• The act of disconcerting, or state of being disconcerted; discomposure; perturbation.
Disconducive
a.
• Not conductive; impeding; disadvantageous.
Disconformable
a.
• Not conformable.
Disconformity
n.
• Want of conformity or correspondence; inconsistency; disagreement.
Discongruity
n.
• Incongruity; disagreement; unsuitableness.
Disconnect
v. t.
• To dissolve the union or connection of; to disunite; to sever; to separate; to disperse.
Disconnection
n.
• The act of disconnecting, or state of being disconnected; separation; want of union.
Disconsecrate
v. t.
• To deprive of consecration or sacredness.
Disconsolacy
n.
• The state of being disconsolate.
Disconsolate
n.
• Disconsolateness.
a.
• Destitute of consolation; deeply dejected and dispirited; hopelessly sad; comfortless; filled with grief; as, a bereaved and disconsolate parent.
• Inspiring dejection; saddening; cheerless; as, the disconsolate darkness of the winter nights.
Disconsolated
a.
• Disconsolate.
Disconsolation
n.
• Dejection; grief.
Discontent
a.
• Not content; discontented; dissatisfied.
v. t.
• To deprive if content; to make uneasy; to dissatisfy.
n.
• Want of content; uneasiness and inquietude of mind; dissatisfaction; disquiet.
• A discontented person; a malcontent.
Discontentation
n.
• Discontent.
Discontented
p. p. & a.
• Dissatisfied; uneasy in mind; malcontent.
Discontentful
a.
• Full of discontent.
Discontenting
a.
• Discontented.
• Causing discontent; dissatisfying.
Discontentive
a.
• Relating or tending to discontent.
Discontentment
n.
• The state of being discontented; uneasiness; inquietude.
Discontinuable
a.
• Admitting of being discontinued.
Discontinuance
n.
• The act of discontinuing, or the state of being discontinued; want of continued connection or continuity; breaking off; cessation; interruption; as, a discontinuance of conversation or intercourse; discontinuance of a highway or of travel.
(Law) A breaking off or interruption of an estate, which happened when an alienation was made by a tenant in tail, or other tenant, seized in right of another, of a larger estate than the tenant was entitled to, whereby the party ousted or injured was driven to his real action, and could not enter. This effect of such alienation is now obviated by statute in both England and the United States.
• The termination of an action in practice by the voluntary act of the plaintiff; an entry on the record that the plaintiff discontinues his action.
• That technical interruption of the proceedings in pleading in an action, which follows where a defendant does not answer the whole of the plaintiff's declaration, and the plaintiff omits to take judgment for the part unanswered.
Discontinuation
n.
• Breach or interruption of continuity; separation of parts in a connected series; discontinuance.
Discontinue
v. t.
• To interrupt the continuance of; to intermit, as a practice or habit; to put an end to; to cause to cease; to cease using, to stop; to leave off.
v. i.
• To lose continuity or cohesion of parts; to be disrupted or broken off.
• To be separated or severed; to part.
Discontinuee
n.
(Law) One whose possession of an estate is broken off, or discontinued; one whose estate is subject to discontinuance.
Discontinuer
n.
• One who discontinues, or breaks off or away from; an absentee.
Discontinuity
n.
• Want of continuity or cohesion; disunion of parts.
Discontinuor
n.
(Law) One who deprives another of the possession of an estate by discontinuance.
Discontinuous
a.
• Not continuous; interrupted; broken off.
• Exhibiting a dissolution of continuity; gaping.
Disconvenience
n.
• Unsuitableness; incongruity.
Disconvenient
a.
• Not convenient or congruous; unsuitable; ill-adapted.
Discophora
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of acalephs or jellyfishes, including most of the large disklike species.
Discord
n.
• Want of concord or agreement; absence of unity or harmony in sentiment or action; variance leading to contention and strife; disagreement; — applied to persons or to things, and to thoughts, feelings, or purposes.
(Mus.) Union of musical sounds which strikes the ear harshly or disagreeably, owing to the incommensurability of the vibrations which they produce; want of musical concord or harmony; a chord demanding resolution into a concord.
v. i.
• To disagree; to be discordant; to jar; to clash; not to suit.
Discordable
a.
• That may produce discord; disagreeing; discordant.
Discordant
a.
• Disagreeing; incongruous; being at variance; clashing; opposing; not harmonious.
(Mus.) Dissonant; not in harmony or musical concord; harsh; jarring; as, discordant notes or sounds.
(Geol.) Said of strata which lack conformity in direction of bedding, either as in unconformability, or as caused by a fault.
Discordful
a.
• Full of discord; contentious.
Discordous
a.
• Full of discord.
Discorporate
a.
• Deprived of the privileges or form of a body corporate.
Discorrespondent
a.
• Incongruous.
Discosent
v. i.
• To differ; to disagree; to dissent.
Discost
v. i.
• Same as Discoast.
Discounsel
v. t.
• To dissuade.
Discount
v. t.
• To deduct from an account, debt, charge, and the like; to make an abatement of; as, merchants sometimes discount five or six per cent for prompt payment of bills.
• To lend money upon, deducting the discount or allowance for interest; as, the banks discount notes and bills of exchange.
• To take into consideration beforehand; to anticipate and form conclusions concerning (an event).
• To leave out of account; to take no notice of.
v. i.
• To lend, or make a practice of lending, money, abating the discount; as, the discount for sixty or ninety days.
n.
• A counting off or deduction made from a gross sum on any account whatever; an allowance upon an account, debt, demand, price asked, and the like; something taken or deducted.
• A deduction made for interest, in advancing money upon, or purchasing, a bill or note not due; payment in advance of interest upon money.
• The rate of interest charged in discounting.
Discountable
a.
• Capable of being, or suitable to be, discounted; as, certain forms are necessary to render notes discountable at a bank.
Discountenance
v. t.
• To ruffle or discompose the countenance of; to put of countenance; to put to shame; to abash.
• To refuse to countenance, or give the support of one's approval to; to give one's influence against; to restrain by cold treatment; to discourage.
n.
• Unfavorable aspect; unfriendly regard; cold treatment; disapprobation; whatever tends to check or discourage.
Discountenancer
n.
• One who discountenances; one who disfavors.
Discounter
n.
• One who discounts; a discount broker.
Discourage
v. t.
• To extinguish the courage of; to dishearten; to depress the spirits of; to deprive of confidence; to deject; — the opposite of encourage; as, he was discouraged in his undertaking; he need not be discouraged from a like attempt.
• To dishearten one with respect to; to discountenance; to seek to check by disfavoring; to deter one from; as, they discouraged his efforts.
n.
• Lack of courage; cowardliness.
Discourageable
a.
• Capable of being discouraged; easily disheartened.
Discouragement
n.
• The act of discouraging, or the state of being discouraged; depression or weakening of confidence; dejection.
• That which discourages; that which deters, or tends to deter, from an undertaking, or from the prosecution of anything; a determent; as, the revolution was commenced under every possible discouragement.
Discourager
n.
• One who discourages.
Discouraging
a.
• Causing or indicating discouragement.
Discoure
v. t.
• To discover.
Discourse
n.
• The power of the mind to reason or infer by running, as it were, from one fact or reason to another, and deriving a conclusion; an exercise or act of this power; reasoning; range of reasoning faculty.
• Conversation; talk.
• The art and manner of speaking and conversing.
• Consecutive speech, either written or unwritten, on a given line of thought; speech; treatise; dissertation; sermon, etc.; as, the preacher gave us a long discourse on duty.
• Dealing; transaction.
v. i.
• To exercise reason; to employ the mind in judging and inferring; to reason.
• To express one's self in oral discourse; to expose one's views; to talk in a continuous or formal manner; to hold forth; to speak; to converse.
• To relate something; to tell.
• To treat of something in writing and formally.
v. t.
• To treat of; to expose or set forth in language.
• To utter or give forth; to speak.
• To talk to; to confer with.
Discourser
n.
• One who discourse; a narrator; a speaker; an haranguer.
• The writer of a treatise or dissertation.
Discoursive
a.
• Reasoning; characterized by reasoning; passing from premises to consequences; discursive.
• Containing dialogue or conversation; interlocutory.
• Inclined to converse; conversable; communicative; as, a discoursive man.
n.
• The state or quality of being discoursive or able to reason.
Discourteous
a.
• Uncivil; rude; wanting in courtesy or good manners; uncourteous.
Discourtesy
n.
• Rudeness of behavior or language; ill manners; manifestation of disrespect; incivility.
Discourtship
n.
• Want of courtesy.
Discous
a.
• Disklike; discoid.
Discovenant
v. t.
• To dissolve covenant with.
Discover
v. t.
• To uncover.
• To disclose; to lay open to view; to make visible; to reveal; to make known; to show (what has been secret, unseen, or unknown).
• To obtain for the first time sight or knowledge of, as of a thing existing already, but not perceived or known; to find; to ascertain; to espy; to detect.
• To manifest without design; to show.
• To explore; to examine.
v. i.
• To discover or show one's self.
Discoverability
n.
• The quality of being discoverable.
Discoverable
a.
• Capable of being discovered, found out, or perceived; as, many minute animals are discoverable only by the help of the microscope; truths discoverable by human industry.
Discoverer
n.
• One who discovers; one who first comes to the knowledge of something; one who discovers an unknown country, or a new principle, truth, or fact.
• A scout; an explorer.
Discoverment
n.
• Discovery.
Discovert
a.
(Law) Not covert; not within the bonds of matrimony; unmarried; — applied either to a woman who has never married or to a widow.
n.
• An uncovered place or part.
Discoverture
n.
• Discovery.
(Law) A state of being released from coverture; freedom of a woman from the coverture of a husband.
Discovery
n.
• The action of discovering; exposure to view; laying open; showing; as, the discovery of a plot.
• A making known; revelation; disclosure; as, a bankrupt is bound to make a full discovery of his assets.
• Finding out or ascertaining something previously unknown or unrecognized; as, Harvey's discovery of the circulation of the blood.
• That which is discovered; a thing found out, or for the first time ascertained or recognized; as, the properties of the magnet were an important discovery.
• Exploration; examination.
Discradle
v. t.
• To take from a cradle.
Discredit
n.
• The act of discrediting or disbelieving, or the state of being discredited or disbelieved; as, later accounts have brought the story into discredit.
• Hence, some degree of dishonor or disesteem; ill repute; reproach; — applied to persons or things.
v. t.
• To refuse credence to; not to accept as true; to disbelieve; as, the report is discredited.
• To deprive of credibility; to destroy confidence or trust in; to cause disbelief in the accuracy or authority of.
• To deprive of credit or good repute; to bring reproach upon; to make less reputable; to disgrace.
Discreditable
a.
• Not creditable; injurious to reputation; disgraceful; disreputable.
Discreditor
n.
• One who discredits.
Discreet
a.
• Possessed of discernment, especially in avoiding error or evil, and in the adaptation of means to ends; prudent; sagacious; judicious; not rash or heedless; cautious.
• Differing; distinct.
Discrepant
a.
• Discordant; at variance; disagreeing; contrary; different.
n.
• A dissident.
Discrete
a.
• Separate; distinct; disjunct.
• Disjunctive; containing a disjunctive or discretive clause; as, "I resign my life, but not my honor," is a discrete proposition.
(Bot.) Separate; not coalescent; — said of things usually coalescent.
v. t.
• To separate.
Discretely
adv.
• Separately; disjunctively.
Discretion
n.
• Disjunction; separation.
• The quality of being discreet; wise conduct and management; cautious discernment, especially as to matters of propriety and self-control; prudence; circumspection; wariness.
• Discrimination.
• Freedom to act according to one's own judgment; unrestrained exercise of choice or will.
Discretive
a.
• Marking distinction or separation; disjunctive.
Discretively
adv.
• In a discretive manner.
Discriminable
a.
• Capable of being discriminated.
Discriminal
a.
• In palmistry, applied to the line which marks the separation between the hand and the arm.
Discriminant
n.
(Math.) The eliminant of the n partial differentials of any homogenous function of n variables.
Discriminate
a.
• Having the difference marked; distinguished by certain tokens.
v. t.
• To set apart as being different; to mark as different; to separate from another by discerning differences; to distinguish.
v. i.
• To make a difference or distinction; to distinguish accurately; as, in judging of evidence, we should be careful to discriminate between probability and slight presumption.
• To treat unequally
(Railroads) To impose unequal tariffs for substantially the same service.
Discriminately
adv.
• In a discriminating manner; distinctly.
Discriminateness
n.
• The state of being discriminated; distinctness.
Discriminating
a.
• Marking a difference; distinguishing.
Discrimination
n.
• The act of discriminating, distinguishing, or noting and marking differences.
• The state of being discriminated, distinguished, or set apart.
(Railroads) The arbitrary imposition of unequal tariffs for substantially the same service.
• The quality of being discriminating; faculty of nicely distinguishing; acute discernment; as, to show great discrimination in the choice of means.
• That which discriminates; mark of distinction.
Discriminative
a.
• Marking a difference; distinguishing; distinctive; characteristic.
• Observing distinctions; making differences; discriminating.
Discriminatively
adv.
• With discrimination or distinction.
Discriminator
n.
• One who discriminates.
Discriminatory
a.
• Discriminative.
Discriminous
a.
• Hazardous; dangerous.
Discrive
v. t.
• To describe.
Discrown
v. t.
• To deprive of a crown.
Discruciate
v. t.
• To torture; to excruciate.
Discubitory
a.
• Leaning; fitted for a reclining posture.
Disculpate
v. t.
• To free from blame or the imputation of a fault; to exculpate.
Disculpation
n.
• Exculpation.
Disculpatory
a.
• Tending to exculpate; exculpatory.
Discumbency
n.
• The act of reclining at table according to the manner of the ancients at their meals.
Discumber
v. t.
• To free from that which cumbers or impedes; to disencumber.
Discure
v. t.
• To discover; to reveal; to discoure.
Discurrent
a.
• Not current or free to circulate; not in use.
Discursion
n.
• The act of discoursing or reasoning; range, as from thought to thought.
Discursist
n.
• A discourser.
Discursive
a.
• Passing from one thing to another; ranging over a wide field; roving; digressive; desultory.
• Reasoning; proceeding from one ground to another, as in reasoning; argumentative.
Discursory
a.
• Argumentative; discursive; reasoning.
Discursus
n.
(Logic) Argumentation; ratiocination; discursive reasoning.
Discus
n.
• A quoit; a circular plate of some heavy material intended to be pitched or hurled as a trial of strength and skill
• The exercise with the discus.
• A disk.
Discuss
v. t.
• To break to pieces; to shatter.
• To break up; to disperse; to scatter; to dissipate; to drive away; — said especially of tumors.
• To shake; to put away; to finish.
• To examine in detail or by disputation; to reason upon by presenting favorable and adverse considerations; to debate; to sift; to investigate; to ventilate.
• To deal with, in eating or drinking.
(Law) To examine or search thoroughly; to exhaust a remedy against, as against a principal debtor before proceeding against the surety.
Discusser
n.
• One who discusses; one who sifts or examines.
Discussion
n.
• The act or process of discussing by breaking up, or dispersing, as a tumor, or the like.
• The act of discussing or exchanging reasons; examination by argument; debate; disputation; agitation.
Discussional
a.
• Pertaining to discussion.
Discussive
a.
(Med.) Able or tending to discuss or disperse tumors or coagulated matter.
• Doubt-dispelling; decisive.
n.
(Med.) A medicine that discusses or disperses morbid humors; a discutient.
Discutient
a.
(Med.) Serving to disperse morbid matter; discussive; as, a discutient application.
n.
• An agent (as a medicinal application) which serves to disperse morbid matter.
Disdain
n.
• A feeling of contempt and aversion; the regarding anything as unworthy of or beneath one; scorn.
• That which is worthy to be disdained or regarded with contempt and aversion.
• The state of being despised; shame.
v. t.
• To think unworthy; to deem unsuitable or unbecoming; as, to disdain to do a mean act.
• To reject as unworthy of one's self, or as not deserving one's notice; to look with scorn upon; to scorn, as base acts, character, etc.
v. i.
• To be filled with scorn; to feel contemptuous anger; to be haughty.
Disdained
a.
• Disdainful.
Disdainful
a.
• Full of disdain; expressing disdain; scornful; contemptuous; haughty.
Disdainishly
adv.
• Disdainfully.
Disdainous
a.
• Disdainful.
Disdainously
adv.
• Disdainfully.
Disdeify
v. t.
• To divest or deprive of deity or of a deific rank or condition.
Disdeign
v. t.
• To disdain.
Disdiaclast
n.
(Physiol.) One of the dark particles forming the doubly refracting disks of muscle fibers.
Disdiapason
n.
(Anc. Mus.) An interval of two octaves, or a fifteenth; — called also bisdiapason.
Disease
v. t.
• To deprive of ease; to disquiet; to trouble; to distress.
• To derange the vital functions of; to afflict with disease or sickness; to disorder; — used almost exclusively in the participle diseased.
n.
• Lack of ease; uneasiness; trouble; vexation; disquiet.
• An alteration in the state of the body or of some of its organs, interrupting or disturbing the performance of the vital functions, and causing or threatening pain and weakness; malady; affection; illness; sickness; disorder; — applied figuratively to the mind, to the moral character and habits, to institutions, the state, etc.
Diseased
a.
• Afflicted with disease.
Diseasedness
n.
• The state of being diseased; a morbid state; sickness.
Diseaseful
a.
• Causing uneasiness.
• Abounding with disease; producing diseases; as, a diseaseful climate.
Diseasefulness
n.
• The quality of being diseaseful; trouble; trial.
Diseasement
n.
• Uneasiness; inconvenience.
Disedge
v. t.
• To deprive of an edge; to blunt; to dull.
Disedify
v. t.
• To fail of edifying; to injure.
Diselder
v. t.
• To deprive of an elder or elders, or of the office of an elder.
Diselenide
n.
(Chem.) A selenide containing two atoms of selenium in each molecule.
Disembark
v. t.
• To remove from on board a vessel; to put on shore; to land; to debark; as, the general disembarked the troops.
v. i.
• To go ashore out of a ship or boat; to leave a ship; to debark.
Disembarkation
n.
• The act of disembarking.
Disembarkment
n.
• Disembarkation.
Disembarrass
v. t.
• To free from embarrassment, or perplexity; to clear; to extricate.
Disembarrassment
n.
• Freedom or relief from impediment or perplexity.
Disembay
v. t.
• To clear from a bay.
Disembellish
v. t.
• To deprive of embellishment; to disadorn.
Disembitter
v. t.
• To free from
Disembodied
a.
• Divested of a body; ceased to be corporal; incorporeal.
Disembodiment
n.
• The act of disembodying, or the state of being disembodied.
Disembody
v. t.
• To divest of the or corporeal existence.
(Mil.) To disarm and disband, as a body of soldiers,-
Disembogue
v. t.
• To pour out or discharge at the mouth, as a stream; to vent; to discharge into an ocean, a lake, etc.
• To eject; to cast forth.
v. i.
• To become discharged; to flow put; to find vent; to pour out contents.
Disemboguement
n.
• The act of disemboguing; discharge.
Disembossom
v. t.
• To separate from the bosom.
Disembowel
v. t.
• To take or let out the bowels or interior parts of; to eviscerate.
• To take or draw from the body, as the web of a spider.
Disembowelment
n.
• The act of disemboweling, or state of being disemboweled; evisceration.
Disembowered
a.
• Deprived of, or removed from, a bower.
Disembrangle
v. t.
• To free from wrangling or litigation.
Disembroil
v. t.
• To disentangle; to free from perplexity; to extricate from confusion.
Disemploy
v. t.
• To throw out of employment.
Disemployment
n.
• The state of being disemployed, or deprived of employment.
Disempower
v. t.
• To deprive of power; to divest of strength.
Disenable
v. t.
• To disable; to disqualify.
Disenamor
v. t.
• To free from the captivity of love.
Disenchained
a.
• Freed from restraint; unrestrained.
Disenchant
v. t.
• To free from enchantment; to deliver from the power of charms or spells; to free from fascination or delusion.
Disenchanter
n.
• One who, or that which, disenchants.
Disenchantment
n.
• The act of disenchanting, or state of being disenchanted.
Disencharm
v. t.
• To free from the influence of a charm or spell; to disenchant.
Disencouragement
n.
• Discouragement.
Disencrese
v. i.
• To decrease.
n.
• Decrease.
Disencumber
v. t.
• To free from encumbrance, or from anything which clogs, impedes, or obstructs; to disburden.
Disencumbrance
n.
• Freedom or deliverance from encumbrance, or anything burdensome or troublesome.
Disendow
v. t.
• To deprive of an endowment, as a church.
Disendowment
n.
• The act of depriving of an endowment or endowments.
Disenfranchise
v. t.
• To disfranchise; to deprive of the rights of a citizen.
Disengage
v. t.
• To release from that with which anything is engaged, engrossed, involved, or entangled; to extricate; to detach; to set free; to liberate; to clear; as, to disengage one from a party, from broils and controversies, from an oath, promise, or occupation; to disengage the affections a favorite pursuit, the mind from study.
v. i.
• To release one's self; to become detached; to free one's self.
Disengaged
a.
• Not engaged; free from engagement; at leisure; free from occupation or care; vacant.
Disengagement
n.
• The act of disengaging or setting free, or the state of being disengaged.
• Freedom from engrossing occupation; leisure.
Disengaging
a.
• Loosing; setting free; detaching.
Disennoble
v. t.
• To deprive of that which ennobles; to degrade.
Disenroll
v. i.
• To erase from a roll or list.
Disensanity
n.
• Insanity; folly.
Disenshrouded
a.
• Freed from a shroudlike covering; unveiled.
Disenslave
v. t.
• To free from bondage or slavery; to disenthrall.
Disentail
v. t.
(Law) To free from entailment.
Disentangle
v. t.
• To free from entanglement; to release from a condition of being intricately and confusedly involved or interlaced; to reduce to orderly arrangement; to straighten out; as, to disentangle a skein of yarn.
• To extricate from complication and perplexity; disengage from embarrassing connection or intermixture; to disembroil; to set free; to separate.
Disentanglement
n.
• The act of disentangling or clearing from difficulties.
Disenthrall
v. t.
• To release from thralldom or slavery; to give freedom to; to disinthrall.
Disenthrallment
n.
• Liberation from bondage; emancipation; disinthrallment.
Disenthrone
v. t.
• To dethrone; to depose from sovereign authority.
Disentitle
v. t.
• To deprive of title or claim.
Disentomb
v. t.
• To take out from a tomb; a disinter.
Disentrail
v. t.
• To disembowel; to let out or draw forth, as the entrails.
Disentrance
v. t.
• To awaken from a trance or an enchantment.
Disentwine
v. t.
• To free from being entwined or twisted.
Disepalous
a.
(Bot.) Having two sepals; two-sepaled.
Disert
a.
• Eloquent.
Disertitude
n.
• Eloquence.
Diserty
adv.
• Expressly; clearly; eloquently.
Disespouse
v. t.
• To release from espousal or plighted faith.
Disestablish
v. t.
• To unsettle; to break up (anything established); to deprive, as a church, of its connection with the state.
Disestablishment
n.
• The act or process of unsettling or breaking up that which has been established; specifically, the withdrawal of the support of the state from an established church; as, the disestablishment and disendowment of the Irish Church by Act of Parliament.
• The condition of being disestablished.
Disesteem
n.
• Want of esteem; low estimation, inclining to dislike; disfavor; disrepute.
v. t.
• To feel an absence of esteem for; to regard with disfavor or slight contempt; to slight.
• To deprive of esteem; to bring into disrepute; to cause to be regarded with disfavor.
Disesteemer
n.
• One who disesteems.
Disestimation
n.
• Disesteem.
Disexercise
v. t.
• To deprive of exercise; to leave untrained.
Disfame
n.
• Disrepute.
Disfancy
v. t.
• To dislike.
Disfashion
v. t.
• To disfigure.
Disfavor
n.
• Want of favor of favorable regard; disesteem; disregard.
• The state of not being in favor; a being under the displeasure of some one; state of unacceptableness; as, to be in disfavor at court.
• An unkindness; a disobliging act.
v. t.
• To withhold or withdraw favor from; to regard with disesteem; to show disapprobation of; to discountenance.
• To injure the form or looks of.
Disfavorable
a.
• Unfavorable.
Disfavorably
adv.
• Unpropitiously.
Disfavorer
n.
• One who disfavors.
Disfeature
v. t.
• To deprive of features; to mar the features of.
Disfellowship
v. t.
• To exclude from fellowship; to refuse intercourse with, as an associate.
Disfiguration
n.
• The act of disfiguring, or the state of being disfigured; defacement; deformity; disfigurement.
Disfigure
v. t.
• To mar the figure of; to render less complete, perfect, or beautiful in appearance; to deface; to deform.
n.
• Disfigurement; deformity.
Disfigurement
n.
• Act of disfiguring, or state of being disfigured; deformity.
• That which disfigures; a defacement; a blot.
Disfigurer
n.
• One who disfigures.
Disflesh
v. t.
• To reduce the flesh or obesity of.
Disforest
v. t.
• To disafforest.
• To clear or deprive of forests or trees.
Disforestation
n.
• The act of clearing land of forests.
Disformity
n.
• Discordance or diversity of form; unlikeness in form.
Disfranchise
v. t.
• To deprive of a franchise or chartered right; to dispossess of the rights of a citizen, or of a particular privilege, as of voting, holding office, etc.
Disfranchisement
n.
• The act of disfranchising, or the state disfranchised; deprivation of privileges of citizenship or of chartered immunities.
Disfriar
v. t.
• To depose or withdraw from the condition of a friar.
Disfrock
v. t.
• To unfrock.
Disfurnish
v. t.
• To deprive of that with which anything is furnished (furniture, equipments, etc.); to strip; to render destitute; to divest.
Disfurnishment
n.
• The act of disfurnishing, or the state of being disfurnished.
Disfurniture
n.
• The act of disfurnishing, or the state of being disfurnished.
v. t.
• To disfurnish.
Disgage
v. t.
• To free from a gage or pledge; to disengage.
Disgallant
v. t.
• To deprive of gallantry.
Disgarland
v. t.
• To strip of a garland.
Disgarnish
v. t.
• To divest of garniture; to disfurnish; to dismantle.
Disgarrison
v. t.
• To deprive of a garrison.
Disgavel
v. t.
(Eng. Law) To deprive of that principal quality of gavelkind tenure by which lands descend equally among all the sons of the tenant; — said of lands.
Disgest
v. t.
• To digest.
Disgestion
n.
• Digestion.
Disglorify
v. t.
• To deprive of glory; to treat with indignity.
Disglory
n.
• Dishonor.
Disgorge
v. t.
• To eject or discharge by the throat and mouth; to vomit; to pour forth or throw out with violence, as if from the mouth; to discharge violently or in great quantities from a confined place.
• To give up unwillingly as what one has wrongfully seized and appropriated; to make restitution of; to surrender; as, he was compelled to disgorge his ill-gotten gains.
v. i.
• To vomit forth what anything contains; to discharge; to make restitution.
Disgorgement
n.
• The act of disgorging; a vomiting; that which is disgorged.
Disgospel
v. i.
• To be inconsistent with, or act contrary to, the precepts of the gospel; to pervert the gospel.
Disgrace
n.
• The condition of being out of favor; loss of favor, regard, or respect.
• The state of being dishonored, or covered with shame; dishonor; shame; ignominy.
• That which brings dishonor; cause of shame or reproach; great discredit; as, vice is a disgrace to a rational being.
• An act of unkindness; a disfavor.
v. t.
• To put out favor; to dismiss with dishonor.
• To do disfavor to; to bring reproach or shame upon; to dishonor; to treat or cover with ignominy; to lower in estimation.
• To treat discourteously; to upbraid; to revile.
Disgraceful
a.
• Bringing disgrace; causing shame; shameful; dishonorable; unbecoming; as, profaneness is disgraceful to a man.
Disgracer
n.
• One who disgraces.
Disgracious
a.
• Wanting grace; unpleasing; disagreeable.
Disgracive
a.
• Disgracing.
Disgradation
n.
(Scots Law) Degradation; a stripping of titles and honors.
Disgrade
v. t.
• To degrade.
Disgraduate
v. t.
• To degrade; to reduce in rank.
Disgregate
v. t.
• To disperse; to scatter; — opposite of congregate.
Disgregation
n.
(Physiol.) The process of separation, or the condition of being separate, as of the molecules of a body.
Disgruntle
v. t.
• To dissatisfy; to disaffect; to anger.
Disguise
v. t.
• To change the guise or appearance of; especially, to conceal by an unusual dress, or one intended to mislead or deceive.
• To hide by a counterfeit appearance; to cloak by a false show; to mask; as, to disguise anger; to disguise one's sentiments, character, or intentions.
• To affect or change by liquor; to intoxicate.
n.
• A dress or exterior put on for purposes of concealment or of deception; as, persons doing unlawful acts in disguise are subject to heavy penalties.
• Artificial language or manner assumed for deception; false appearance; counterfeit semblance or show.
• Change of manner by drink; intoxication.
• A masque or masquerade.
Disguisedfy
adv.
• In disguise.
Disguisedness
n.
• The state of being disguised.
Disguisement
n.
• Disguise.
Disguiser
n.
• One who, or that which, disguises.
• One who wears a disguise; an actor in a masquerade; a masker.
Disguising
n.
• A masque or masquerade.
Disgust
v. t.
• To provoke disgust or strong distaste in; to cause (any one) loathing, as of the stomach; to excite aversion in; to offend the moral taste of; — often with at, with, or by.
n.
• Repugnance to what is offensive; aversion or displeasure produced by something loathsome; loathing; strong distaste; — said primarily of the sickening opposition felt for anything which offends the physical organs of taste; now rather of the analogous repugnance excited by anything extremely unpleasant to the moral taste or higher sensibilities of our nature; as, an act of cruelty may excite disgust.
Disgustful
a.
• Provoking disgust; offensive to the taste; exciting aversion; disgusting.
Disgustfulness
n.
• The state of being disgustful.
Disgusting
a.
• That causes disgust; sickening; offensive; revolting.
Dish
n.
• A vessel, as a platter, a plate, a bowl, used for serving up food at the table.
• The food served in a dish; hence, any particular kind of food; as, a cold dish; a warm dish; a delicious dish. "A dish fit for the gods."
• The state of being concave, or like a dish, or the degree of such concavity; as, the dish of a wheel.
• A hollow place, as in a field.
(Mining) A trough about 28 inches long, 4 deep, and 6 wide, in which ore is measured.
• That portion of the produce of a mine which is paid to the land owner or proprietor.
v. t.
• To put in a dish, ready for the table.
• To make concave, or depress in the middle, like a dish; as, to dish a wheel by inclining the spokes.
• To frustrate; to beat; to ruin.
Dishabilitate
v. t.
• To disqualify.
Dishabille
n.
• An undress; a loose, negligent dress; deshabille.
Dishabit
v. t.
• To dislodge.
Dishabited
p. a.
• Rendered uninhabited.
Dishabituate
v. t.
• To render unaccustomed.
Dishable
v. t.
• To disable.
• To disparage.
Dishallow
v. t.
• To make unholy; to profane.
Disharmonious
a.
• Unharmonious; discordant.
Disharmony
n.
• Want of harmony; discord; incongruity.
Dishaunt
v. t.
• To leave; to quit; to cease to haunt.
Dishcloth
n.
• A cloth used for washing dishes.
Dishclout
n.
• A dishcloth.
Disheart
v. t.
• To dishearten.
Dishearten
v. t.
• To discourage; to deprive of courage and hope; to depress the spirits of; to deject.
Disheartenment
n.
• Discouragement; dejection; depression of spirits.
Disheir
v. t.
• To disinherit.
Dishelm
v. t.
• To deprive of the helmet.
Disherison
n.
• The act of disheriting, or debarring from inheritance; disinhersion.
Disherit
v. t.
• To disinherit; to cut off, or detain, from the possession or enjoyment of an inheritance.
Disheritance
n.
• The act of disinheriting or state of being disinherited; disinheritance.
Disheritor
n.
(Law) One who puts another out of his inheritance.
Dishevel
v. t.
• To suffer (the hair) to hang loosely or disorderly; to spread or throw (the hair) in disorder; — used chiefly in the passive participle.
• To spread loosely or disorderly.
v. i.
• To be spread in disorder or hang negligently, as the hair.
Dishevele
p. p. & a.
• Disheveled.
Disheveled
a.
• Having in loose disorder; disarranged; as, disheveled hair.
• Having the hair in loose disorder.
Dishful
n.
• As much as a dish holds when full.
Dishing
a.
• Dish-shaped; concave.
Dishonest
a.
• Dishonorable; shameful; indecent; unchaste; lewd.
• Dishonored; disgraced; disfigured.
• Wanting in honesty; void of integrity; faithless; disposed to cheat or defraud; not trustworthy; as, a dishonest man.
• Characterized by fraud; indicating a want of probity; knavish; fraudulent; unjust.
v. t.
• To disgrace; to dishonor; as, to dishonest a maid.
Dishonestly
adv.
• In a dishonest manner.
Dishonesty
n.
• Dishonor; dishonorableness; shame.
• Want of honesty, probity, or integrity in principle; want of fairness and straightforwardness; a disposition to defraud, deceive, or betray; faithlessness.
• Violation of trust or of justice; fraud; any deviation from probity; a dishonest act.
• Lewdness; unchastity.
Dishonor
n.
• Lack of honor; disgrace; ignominy; shame; reproach.
(Law) The nonpayment or nonacceptance of commercial paper by the party on whom it is drawn.
v. t.
• To deprive of honor; to disgrace; to bring reproach or shame on; to treat with indignity, or as unworthy in the sight of others; to stain the character of; to lessen the reputation of; as, the duelist dishonors himself to maintain his honor.
• To violate the chastity of; to debauch.
• To refuse or decline to accept or pay; — said of a bill, check, note, or draft which is due or presented; as, to dishonor a bill exchange.
Dishonorable
a.
• Wanting in honor; not honorable; bringing or deserving dishonor; staining the character, and lessening the reputation; shameful; disgraceful; base.
• Wanting in honor or esteem; disesteemed.
Dishonorary
a.
• Bringing dishonor on; tending to disgrace; lessening reputation.
Dishonorer
n.
• One who dishonors or disgraces; one who treats another indignity.
Dishorn
v. t.
• To deprive of horns; as, to dishorn cattle.
Dishorse
v. t.
• To dismount.
Dishouse
v. t.
• To deprive of house or home.
Dishumor
n.
• Ill humor.
v. t.
• To deprive of humor or desire; to put out of humor.
Dishwasher
n.
• One who, or that which, washes dishes.
(Zool.) A European bird; the wagtail.
Dishwater
n.
• Water in which dishes have been washed.
Disillusion
n.
• The act or process of freeing from an illusion, or the state of being freed therefrom.
v. t.
• To free from an illusion; to disillusionize.
Disillusionize
v. t.
• To disenchant; to free from illusion.
Disillusionment
n.
• The act of freeing from an illusion, or the state of being freed therefrom.
Disimbitter
v. t.
• To free from bitterness.
Disimpark
v. t.
• To free from the barriers or restrictions of a park.
Disimpassioned
a.
• Free from warmth of passion or feeling.
Disimprove
v. t.
• To make worse; — the opposite of improve.
v. i.
• To grow worse; to deteriorate.
Disimprovement
n.
• Reduction from a better to a worse state; as, disimprovement of the earth.
Disincarcerate
v. t.
• To liberate from prison.
Disinclination
n.
• The state of being disinclined; want of propensity, desire, or affection; slight aversion or dislike; indisposition.
Disincline
v. t.
• To incline away the affections of; to excite a slight aversion in; to indispose; to make unwilling; to alienate.
Disinclose
v. t.
• To free from being inclosed.
Disincorporate
v. t.
• To deprive of corporate powers, rights, or privileges; to divest of the condition of a corporate body.
• To detach or separate from a corporation.
a.
• Separated from, or not included in, a corporation; disincorporated.
Disincorporation
n.
• Deprivation of the rights and privileges of a corporation.
Disinfect
v. t.
• To free from infectious or contagious matter; to destroy putrefaction; to purify; to make innocuous.
Disinfectant
n.
• That which disinfects; an agent for removing the causes of infection, as chlorine.
Disinfection
n.
• The act of disinfecting; purification from infecting matter.
Disinfector
n.
• One who, or that which, disinfects; an apparatus for applying disinfectants.
Disinflame
v. t.
• To divest of flame or ardor.
Disingenuity
n.
• Disingenuousness.
Disingenuous
a.
• Not noble; unbecoming true honor or dignity; mean; unworthy; as, disingenuous conduct or schemes.
• Not ingenuous; wanting in noble candor or frankness; not frank or open; uncandid; unworthily or meanly artful.
Disinhabited
a.
• Uninhabited.
Disinherison
n.
• Same as Disherison.
Disinherit
v. t.
• To cut off from an inheritance or from hereditary succession; to prevent, as an heir, from coming into possession of any property or right, which, by law or custom, would devolve on him in the course of descent.
• To deprive of heritage; to dispossess.
Disinheritance
n.
• The act of disinheriting, or the condition of being; disinherited; disherison.
Disinhume
v. t.
• To disinter.
Disinsure
v. t.
• To render insecure; to put in danger.
Disintegrable
a.
• Capable of being disintegrated, or reduced to fragments or powder.
Disintegrate
v. t.
• To separate into integrant parts; to reduce to fragments or to powder; to break up, or cause to fall to pieces, as a rock, by blows of a hammer, frost, rain, and other mechanical or atmospheric influences.
v. i.
• To decompose into integrant parts; as, chalk rapidly disintegrates.
Disintegration
n.
• The process by which anything is disintegrated; the condition of anything which is disintegrated
(Geol.) The wearing away or falling to pieces of rocks or strata, produced by atmospheric action, frost, ice, etc.
Disintegrator
n.
(Mech.) A machine for grinding or pulverizing by percussion.
Disinter
v. t.
• To take out of the grave or tomb; to unbury; to exhume; to dig up.
• To bring out, as from a grave or hiding place; to bring from obscurity into view.
Disinteress
v. t.
• To deprive or rid of interest in, or regard for; to disengage.
Disinteressment
n.
• Disinterestedness; impartiality; fairness.
Disinterest
p. a.
• Disinterested.
n.
• What is contrary to interest or advantage; disadvantage.
• Indifference to profit; want of regard to private advantage; disinterestedness.
v. t.
• To divest of interest or interested motives.
Disinterested
a.
• Not influenced by regard to personal interest or advantage; free from selfish motive; having no relation of interest or feeling; not biased or prejudiced; as, a disinterested decision or judge.
Disinterestedly
adv.
• In a disinterested manner; without bias or prejudice.
Disinterestedness
n.
• The state or quality of being disinterested; impartiality.
Disinteresting
a.
• Uninteresting.
Disinterment
n.
• The act of disinterring, or taking out of the earth; exhumation.
Disinthrall
v. t.
• To free from thralldom; to disenthrall.
Disinthrallment
n.
• A releasing from thralldom or slavery; disenthrallment.
Disintricate
v. t.
• To disentangle.
Disinure
v. t.
• To render unaccustomed or unfamiliar.
Disinvestiture
n.
• The act of depriving of investiture.
Disinvigorate
v. t.
• To enervate; to weaken.
Disinvolve
v. t.
• To uncover; to unfold or unroll; to disentangle.
Disjection
n.
• Destruction; dispersion.
Disjoin
v. t.
• To part; to disunite; to separate; to sunder.
v. i.
• To become separated; to part.
Disjoint
a.
• Disjointed; unconnected; — opposed to conjoint.
n.
• Difficult situation; dilemma; strait.
v. t.
• To separate the joints of; to separate, as parts united by joints; to put out of joint; to force out of its socket; to dislocate; as, to disjoint limbs; to disjoint bones; to disjoint a fowl in carving.
• To separate at junctures or joints; to break where parts are united; to break in pieces; as, disjointed columns; to disjoint and edifice.
• To break the natural order and relations of; to make incoherent; as, a disjointed speech.
v. i.
• To fall in pieces.
Disjointed
a.
• Separated at the joints; disconnected; incoherent.
Disjointly
adv.
• In a disjointed state.
Disjudication
n.
• Judgment; discrimination.
Disjunct
a.
• Disjoined; separated.
(Zool.) Having the head, thorax, and abdomen separated by a deep constriction.
Disjunctive
a.
• Tending to disjoin; separating; disjoining.
(Mus.) Pertaining to disjunct tetrachords.
n.
(Gram.) A disjunctive conjunction
(Logic) A disjunctive proposition.
Disjunctively
adv.
• In a disjunctive manner; separately.
Disjuncttion
n.
• The act of disjoining; disunion; separation; a parting; as, the disjunction of soul and body.
• A disjunctive proposition.
Disjuncture
n.
• The act of disjoining, or state of being disjoined; separation.
Disk
n.
• A discus; a quoit.
• A flat, circular plate; as, a disk of metal or paper.
(Astron.) The circular figure of a celestial body, as seen projected of the heavens.
(Biol.) A circular structure either in plants or animals; as, a blood disk; germinal disk, etc.
(Bot.) The whole surface of a leaf
• The central part of a radiate compound flower, as in sunflower
• A part of the receptacle enlarged or expanded under, or around, or even on top of, the pistil.
(Zool.) The anterior surface or oral area of coelenterate animals, as of sea anemones
• The lower side of the body of some invertebrates, especially when used for locomotion, when it is often called a creeping disk
• In owls, the space around the eyes.
Diskindness
n.
• Unkindness; disservice.
Diskless
a.
• Having no disk; appearing as a point and not expanded into a disk, as the image of a faint star in a telescope.
Dislade
v. t.
• To unlade.
Disleal
a.
• Disloyal; perfidious.
Disleave
v. t.
• To deprive of leaves.
Dislike
v. t.
• To regard with dislike or aversion; to disapprove; to disrelish.
• To awaken dislike in; to displease.
n.
• A feeling of positive and usually permanent aversion to something unpleasant, uncongenial, or offensive; disapprobation; repugnance; displeasure; disfavor; — the opposite of liking or fondness.
• Discord; dissension.
Dislikeful
a.
• Full of dislike; disaffected; malign; disagreeable.
Dislikelihood
n.
• The want of likelihood; improbability.
Disliken
v. t.
• To make unlike; to disguise.
Dislikeness
n.
• Unlikeness.
Disliker
n.
• One who dislikes or disrelishes.
Dislimb
v. t.
• To tear limb from limb; to dismember.
Dislimn
v. t.
• To efface, as a picture.
Dislink
v. t.
• To unlink; to disunite; to separate.
Dislive
v. t.
• To deprive of life.
Dislocate
v. t.
• To displace; to put out of its proper place. Especially, of a bone: To remove from its normal connections with a neighboring bone; to put out of joint; to move from its socket; to disjoint; as, to dislocate your bones.
a.
• Dislocated.
Dislocation
n.
• The act of displacing, or the state of being displaced.
(Geol.) The displacement of parts of rocks or portions of strata from the situation which they originally occupied. Slips, faults, and the like, are dislocations.
(Surg.) The act of dislocating, or putting out of joint; also, the condition of being thus displaced.
Dislodge
v. t.
• To drive from a lodge or place of rest; to remove from a place of quiet or repose; as, shells resting in the sea at a considerate depth are not dislodged by storms.
• To drive out from a place of hiding or defense; as, to dislodge a deer, or an enemy.
v. i.
• To go from a place of rest.
n.
• Dwelling apart; separation.
Dislodgment
n.
• The act or process of dislodging, or the state of being dislodged.
Disloign
v. t.
• To put at a distance; to remove.
Disloyal
a.
• Not loyal; not true to a sovereign or lawful superior, or to the government under which one lives; false where allegiance is due; faithless; as, a subject disloyal to the king; a husband disloyal to his wife.
Disloyally
adv.
• In a disloyal manner.
Disloyalty
n.
• Want of loyalty; lack of fidelity; violation of allegiance.
Dismail
v. t.
• To divest of coat of mail.
Dismal
a.
• Fatal; ill-omened; unlucky.
• Gloomy to the eye or ear; sorrowful and depressing to the feelings; foreboding; cheerless; dull; dreary; as, a dismal outlook; dismal stories; a dismal place.
Dismally
adv.
• In a dismal manner; gloomily; sorrowfully; uncomfortably.
Dismalness
n.
• The quality of being dismal; gloominess.
Disman
v. t.
• To unman.
Dismantle
v. t.
• To strip or deprive of dress; to divest.
• To strip of furniture and equipments, guns, etc.; to unrig; to strip of walls or outworks; to break down; as, to dismantle a fort, a town, or a ship.
• To disable; to render useless.
Dismarch
v. i.
• To march away.
Dismarry
v. t.
• To free from the bonds of marriage; to divorce.
Dismarshal
v. t.
• To disarrange; to derange; to put in disorder.
Dismask
v. t.
• To divest of a mask.
Dismast
v. t.
• To deprive of a mast of masts; to break and carry away the masts from; as, a storm dismasted the ship.
Dismastment
n.
• The act of dismasting; the state of being dismasted.
Dismaw
v. t.
• To eject from the maw; to disgorge.
Dismay
v. t.
• To disable with alarm or apprehensions; to depress the spirits or courage of; to deprive or firmness and energy through fear; to daunt; to appall; to terrify.
• To render lifeless; to subdue; to disquiet.
v. i.
• To take dismay or fright; to be filled with dismay.
n.
• Loss of courage and firmness through fear; overwhelming and disabling terror; a sinking of the spirits; consternation.
• Condition fitted to dismay; ruin.
Dismayedness
n.
• A state of being dismayed; dejection of courage; dispiritedness.
Dismayful
a.
• Terrifying.
Disme
n.
• A tenth; a tenth part; a tithe.
Dismember
v. t.
• To tear limb from limb; to dilacerate; to disjoin member from member; to tear or cut in pieces; to break up.
• To deprive of membership.
Dismemberment
n.
• The act of dismembering, or the state of being dismembered; cutting in piece; mtilation; division; separation.
Dismettled
a.
• Destitute of mettle, that is, or fire or spirit.
Dismiss
v. t.
• To send away; to give leave of departure; to cause or permit to go; to put away.
• To discard; to remove or discharge from office, service, or employment; as, the king dismisses his ministers; the matter dismisses his servant.
• To lay aside or reject as unworthy of attentions or regard, as a petition or motion in court.
n.
• Dismission.
Dismissal
n.
• Dismission; discharge.
Dismission
n.
• The act dismissing or sending away; permission to leave; leave to depart; dismissal; as, the dismission of the grand jury.
• Removal from office or employment; discharge, either with honor or with disgrace.
• Rejection; a setting aside as trivial, invalid, or unworthy of consideration.
Dismissive
a.
• Giving dismission.
Dismortgage
v. t.
• To redeem from mortgage.
Dismount
v. i.
• To come down; to descend.
• To alight from a horse; to descend or get off, as a rider from his beast; as, the troops dismounted.
v. t.
• To throw or bring down from an elevation, place of honor and authority, or the like.
• To throw or remove from a horse; to unhorse; as, the soldier dismounted his adversary.
(Mech.) To take down, or apart, as a machine.
• To throw or remove from the carriage, or from that on which a thing is mounted; to break the carriage or wheels of, and render useless; to deprive of equipments or mountings; — said esp. of artillery.
Disnaturalize
v. t.
• To make alien; to deprive of the privileges of birth.
Disnatured
a.
• Deprived or destitute of natural feelings; unnatural.
Disobedience
n.
• Neglect or refusal to obey; violation of a command or prohibition.
Disobediency
n.
• Disobedience.
Disobedient
a.
• Neglecting or refusing to obey; omitting to do what is commanded, or doing what is prohibited; refractory; not observant of duty or rules prescribed by authority; — applied to persons and acts.
• Not yielding.
Disobediently
adv.
• In a disobedient manner.
Disobeisance
n.
• Disobedience.
Disobeisant
a.
• Disobedient.
Disobey
v. t.
• Not to obey; to neglect or refuse to obey (a superior or his commands, the laws, etc.); to transgress the commands of (one in authority); to violate, as an order; as, refractory children disobey their parents; men disobey their Maker and the laws.
v. i.
• To refuse or neglect to obey; to violate commands; to be disobedient.
Disobeyer
n.
• One who disobeys.
Disobligation
n.
• The act of disobliging.
• A disobliging act; an offense.
• Release from obligation.
Disobligatory
a.
• Releasing from obligation.
Disoblige
v. t.
• To do an act which contravenes the will or desires of; to offend by an act of unkindness or incivility; to displease; to refrain from obliging; to be unaccommodating to.
• To release from obligation.
Disobligement
n.
• Release from obligation.
Disobliger
n.
• One who disobliges.
Disobliging
a.
• Not obliging; not disposed to do a favor; unaccommodating; as, a disobliging person or act.
• Displeasing; offensive.
Disoccident
v. t.
• To turn away from the west; to throw out of reckoning as to longitude.
Disoccupation
n.
• The state of being unemployed; want of occupation.
Disopinion
n.
• Want or difference of belief; disbelief.
Disoppilate
v. t.
• To open.
Disorb
v. t.
• To throw out of the proper orbit; to unsphere.
Disord
n.
• Disorder.
Disordeined
a.
• Inordinate; irregular; vicious.
Disorder
n.
• Want of order or regular disposition; lack of arrangement; confusion; disarray; as, the troops were thrown into disorder; the papers are in disorder.
• Neglect of order or system; irregularity.
• Breach of public order; disturbance of the peace of society; tumult.
• Disturbance of the functions of the animal economy of the soul; sickness; derangement.
v. t.
• To disturb the order of; to derange or disarrange; to throw into confusion; to confuse.
• To disturb or interrupt the regular and natural functions of (either body or mind); to produce sickness or indisposition in; to discompose; to derange; as, to disorder the head or stomach.
• To depose from holy orders.
Disordered
a.
• Thrown into disorder; deranged; as, a disordered house, judgment.
• Disorderly.
Disorderliness
n.
• The state of being disorderly.
Disorderly
a.
• Not in order; marked by disorder; disarranged; immethodical; as, the books and papers are in a disorderly state.
• Not acting in an orderly way, as the functions of the body or mind.
• Not complying with the restraints of order and law; tumultuous; unruly; lawless; turbulent; as, disorderly people; disorderly assemblies.
(Law) Offensive to good morals and public decency; notoriously offensive; as, a disorderly house.
adv.
• In a disorderly manner; without law or order; irregularly; confusedly.
Disordinance
n.
• Disarrangement; disturbance.
Disordinate
a.
• Inordinate; disorderly.
Disordinately
adv.
• Inordinately.
Disordination
n.
• The state of being in disorder; derangement; confusion.
Disorganization
n.
• The act of disorganizing; destruction of system.
• The state of being disorganized; as, the disorganization of the body, or of government.
Disorganize
v. t.
• To destroy the organic structure or regular system of (a government, a society, a party, etc.); to break up (what is organized); to throw into utter disorder; to disarrange.
Disorganizer
n.
• One who disorganizes or causes disorder and confusion.
Disorient
v. t.
• To turn away from the cast; to confuse as to which way is east; to cause to lose one's bearings.
Disorientate
v. t.
• To turn away from the east, or (figuratively) from the right or the truth.
Disown
v. t.
• To refuse to own or acknowledge as belonging to one's self; to disavow or deny, as connected with one's self personally; as, a parent can hardly disown his child; an author will sometimes disown his writings.
• To refuse to acknowledge or allow; to deny.
Disownment
n.
• Act of disowning.
Disoxidate
v. t.
(Chem.) To deoxidate; to deoxidize.
Disoxidation
n.
(Chem.) Deoxidation.
Disoxygenate
v. t.
(Chem.) To deprive of oxygen; to deoxidize.
Disoxygenation
n.
(Chem.) Deoxidation.
Dispace
v. i.
• To roam.
Dispair
v. t.
• To separate (a pair).
Dispand
v. t.
• To spread out; to expand.
Dispansion
n.
• Act of dispanding, or state of being dispanded.
Disparadised
a.
• Removed from paradise.
Disparage
v. t.
• To match unequally; to degrade or dishonor by an unequal marriage.
• To dishonor by a comparison with what is inferior; to lower in rank or estimation by actions or words; to speak slightingly of; to depreciate; to undervalue.
n.
• Inequality in marriage; marriage with an inferior.
Disparagement
n.
• Matching any one in marriage under his or her degree; injurious union with something of inferior excellence; a lowering in rank or estimation.
• Injurious comparison with an inferior; a depreciating or dishonoring opinion or insinuation; diminution of value; dishonor; indignity; reproach; disgrace; detraction; — commonly with to.
Disparager
n.
• One who disparages or dishonors; one who vilifies or disgraces.
Disparagingly
adv.
• In a manner to disparage or dishonor; slightingly.
Disparate
a.
• Unequal; dissimilar; separate.
(Logic) Pertaining to two coordinate species or divisions.
Disparates
n. pl.
• Things so unequal or unlike that they can not be compared with each other.
Disparition
n.
• Act of disappearing; disappearance.
Disparity
n.
• Inequality; difference in age, rank, condition, or excellence; dissimilitude; — followed by between, in, of, as to, etc.; as, disparity in, or of, years; a disparity as to color.
Dispark
v. t.
• To throw (a park or inclosure); to treat (a private park) as a common.
• To set at large; to release from inclosure.
Disparkle
v. t.
• To scatter abroad.
Dispart
v. t.
• To part asunder; to divide; to separate; to sever; to rend; to rive or split; as, disparted air; disparted towers.
v. i.
• To separate, to open; to cleave.
n.
(Gun.) The difference between the thickness of the metal at the mouth and at the breech of a piece of ordnance.
(Gun.) A piece of metal placed on the muzzle, or near the trunnions, on the top of a piece of ordnance, to make the line of sight parallel to the axis of the bore; — called also dispart sight, and muzzle sight.
v. t.
(Gun.) To make allowance for the dispart in (a gun), when taking aim.
(Gun.) To furnish with a dispart sight.
Dispassion
n.
• Freedom from passion; an undisturbed state; apathy.
Dispassionate
a.
• Free from passion; not warped, prejudiced, swerved, or carried away by passion or feeling; judicial; calm; composed.
• Not dictated by passion; not proceeding from temper or bias; impartial; as, dispassionate proceedings; a dispassionate view.
Dispassioned
a.
• Free from passion; dispassionate.
Dispatch
v. t.
• To dispose of speedily, as business; to execute quickly; to make a speedy end of; to finish; to perform.
• To rid; to free.
• To get rid of by sending off; to send away hastily.
• To send off or away; — particularly applied to sending off messengers, messages, letters, etc., on special business, and implying haste.
• To send out of the world; to put to death.
v. i.
• To make haste; to conclude an affair; to finish a matter of business.
n.
• The act of sending a message or messenger in haste or on important business.
• Any sending away; dismissal; riddance.
• The finishing up of a business; speedy performance, as of business; prompt execution; diligence; haste.
• A message dispatched or sent with speed; especially, an important official letter sent from one public officer to another; — often used in the plural; as, a messenger has arrived with dispatches for the American minister; naval or military dispatches.
• A message transmitted by telegraph.
Dispatcher
n.
• One who dispatches.
Dispatchful
a.
• Bent on haste; intent on speedy execution of business or any task; indicating haste; quick; as, dispatchful looks.
Dispatchment
n.
• The act of dispatching.
Dispathy
n.
• Lack of sympathy; want of passion; apathy.
Dispauper
v. t.
• To deprive of the claim of a pauper to public support; to deprive of the privilege of suing in forma pauperis.
Dispauperize
v. t.
• To free a state of pauperism, or from paupers.
Dispeed
v. t.
• To send off with speed; to dispatch.
Dispel
v. t.
• To drive away by scattering, or so to cause to vanish; to clear away; to banish; to dissipate; as, to dispel a cloud, vapors, cares, doubts, illusions.
Dispend
v. t.
• To spend; to lay out; to expend.
Dispender
n.
• One who dispends or expends; a steward.
Dispensable
a.
• Capable of being dispensed or administered.
• Capable of being dispensed with.
Dispensableness
n.
• Quality of being dispensable.
Dispensary
n.
• A place where medicines are prepared and dispensed; esp., a place where the poor can obtain medical advice and medicines gratuitously or at a nominal price.
• A dispensatory.
Dispensation
n.
• The act of dispensing or dealing out; distribution; often used of the distribution of good and evil by God to man, or more generically, of the acts and modes of his administration.
• That which is dispensed, dealt out, or appointed; that which is enjoined or bestowed
(Theol.) a system of principles, promises, and rules ordained and administered; scheme; economy; as, the Patriarchal, Mosaic, and Christian dispensations.
• The relaxation of a law in a particular case; permission to do something forbidden, or to omit doing something enjoined; specifically, in the Roman Catholic Church, exemption from some ecclesiastical law or obligation to God which a man has incurred of his own free will (oaths, vows, etc.).
Dispensative
a.
• Granting dispensation.
Dispensatively
adv.
• By dispensation.
Dispensator
n.
• A distributer; a dispenser.
Dispensatorily
adv.
• In the way of dispensation; dispensatively.
Dispensatory
a.
• Granting, or authorized to grant, dispensations.
n.
• A book or medicinal formulary containing a systematic description of drugs, and of preparations made from them. It is usually, but not always, distinguished from a pharmacop&oe;ia in that it issued by private parties, and not by an official body or by government.
Dispense
v. t.
• To deal out in portions; to distribute; to give; as, the steward dispenses provisions according directions; Nature dispenses her bounties; to dispense medicines.
• To apply, as laws to particular cases; to administer; to execute; to manage; to direct.
• To pay for; to atone for.
• To exempt; to excuse; to absolve; — with from.
v. i.
• To compensate; to make up; to make amends.
• To give dispensation.
n.
• Dispensation; exemption.
n.
• Expense; profusion; outlay.
Dispenser
n.
• One who, or that which, dispenses; a distributer; as, a dispenser of favors.
Dispeople
v. t.
• To deprive of inhabitants; to depopulate.
Dispeopler
n.
• One who, or that which, dispeoples; a depopulator.
Disperge
v. t.
• To sprinkle.
Disperple
v. t.
• To scatter; to sprinkle.
Dispersal
n.
• The act or result of dispersing or scattering; dispersion.
Disperse
v. t.
• To scatter abroad; to drive to different parts; to distribute; to diffuse; to spread; as, the Jews are dispersed among all nations.
• To scatter, so as to cause to vanish; to dissipate; as, to disperse vapors.
v. i.
• To separate; to go or move into different parts; to vanish; as, the company dispersed at ten o'clock; the clouds disperse.
• To distribute wealth; to share one's abundance with others.
Dispersed
a.
• Scattered.
Disperseness
n.
• Dispersedness.
Disperser
n.
• One that disperses.
Dispersion
n.
• The act or process of scattering or dispersing, or the state of being scattered or separated; as, the Jews in their dispersion retained their rites and ceremonies; a great dispersion of the human family took place at the building of Babel.
(Opt.) The separation of light into its different colored rays, arising from their different refrangibilities.
Dispersive
a.
• Tending to disperse.
Disperson'ate
v. t.
• To deprive of personality or individuality.
Dispirit
v. t.
• To deprive of cheerful spirits; to depress the spirits of; to dishearten; to discourage.
• To distill or infuse the spirit of.
Dispirited
a.
• Depressed in spirits; disheartened; daunted.
Dispiritment
n.
• Depression of spirits; discouragement.
Dispiteous
a.
• Full of despite; cruel; spiteful; pitiless.
Displace
v. t.
• To change the place of; to remove from the usual or proper place; to put out of place; to place in another situation; as, the books in the library are all displaced.
• To crowd out; to take the place of.
• To remove from a state, office, dignity, or employment; to discharge; to depose; as, to displace an officer of the revenue.
• To dislodge; to drive away; to banish.
Displaceable
a.
• Capable of being displaced.
Displacement
n.
• The act of displacing, or the state of being displaced; a putting out of place.
• The quantity of anything, as water, displaced by a floating body, as by a ship, the weight of the displaced liquid being equal to that of the displacing body.
(Chem.) The process of extracting soluble substances from organic material and the like, whereby a quantity of saturated solvent is displaced, or removed, for another quantity of the solvent.
Displacency
n.
• Want of complacency or gratification; envious displeasure; dislike.
Displacer
n.
• One that displaces.
(Chem.) The funnel part of the apparatus for solution by displacement.
Displant
v. t.
• To remove (what is planted or fixed); to unsettle and take away; to displace; to root out; as, to displant inhabitants.
• To strip of what is planted or settled; as, to displant a country of inhabitants.
Displantation
n.
• The act of displanting; removal; displacement.
Displat
v. t.
• To untwist; to uncurl; to unplat.
Display
v. t.
• To unfold; to spread wide; to expand; to stretch out; to spread.
(Mil.) To extend the front of (a column), bringing it into line.
• To spread before the view; to show; to exhibit to the sight, or to the mind; to make manifest.
• To make an exhibition of; to set in view conspicuously or ostentatiously; to exhibit for the sake of publicity; to parade.
(Print.) To make conspicuous by large or prominent type.
• To discover; to descry.
v. i.
• To make a display; to act as one making a show or demonstration.
n.
• An opening or unfolding; exhibition; manifestation.
• Ostentatious show; exhibition for effect; parade.
Displayed
a.
• Unfolded; expanded; exhibited conspicuously or ostentatiously.
(Her.) With wings expanded; — said of a bird of pray, esp. an eagle.
(Print.) Set with lines of prominent type interspersed, to catch the eye.
Displayer
n.
• One who, or that which, displays.
Disple
v. t.
• To discipline; to correct.
Displeasance
n.
• Displeasure; discontent; annoyance.
Displeasant
a.
• Unpleasing; offensive; unpleasant.
Displease
v. t.
• To make not pleased; to excite a feeling of disapprobation or dislike in; to be disagreeable to; to offend; to vex; — often followed by with or at. It usually expresses less than to anger, vex, irritate, or provoke.
• To fail to satisfy; to miss of.
v. i.
• To give displeasure or offense.
Displeasedly
adv.
• With displeasure.
Displeasedness
n.
• Displeasure.
Displeaser
n.
• One who displeases.
Displeasing
a.
• Causing displeasure or dissatisfaction; offensive; disagreeable.
Displeasure
n.
• The feeling of one who is displeased; irritation or uneasiness of the mind, occasioned by anything that counteracts desire or command, or which opposes justice or a sense of propriety; disapprobation; dislike; dissatisfaction; disfavor; indignation.
• That which displeases; cause of irritation or annoyance; offense; injury.
• State of disgrace or disfavor; disfavor.
v. t.
• To displease.
Displenish
v. t.
• To deprive or strip, as a house of furniture, or a barn of stock.
Displode
v. t.
• To discharge; to explode.
v. i.
• To burst with a loud report; to explode.
Displosion
n.
• Explosion.
Displosive
a.
• Explosive.
Displume
v. t.
• To strip of, or as of, a plume, or plumes; to deprive of decoration; to dishonor; to degrade.
Dispoline
n.
(Chem.) One of several isomeric organic bases of the quinoline series of alkaloids.
Dispondee
n.
(Gr. Lat. Pros.) A double spondee; a foot consisting of four long syllables.
Dispone
v. t.
(Her.) To dispose.
• To dispose of.
(Scots Law) To make over, or convey, legally.
Disponee
n.
(Scots Law) The person to whom any property is legally conveyed.
Disponer
n.
(Scots Law) One who legally transfers property from himself to another.
Disponge
v. t.
• To sprinkle, as with water from a sponge.
Dispope
v. t.
• To refuse to consider as pope; to depose from the popedom.
Disporous
a.
(Biol.) Having two spores.
Disport
n.
• Play; sport; pastime; diversion; playfulness.
v. i.
• To play; to wanton; to move in gayety; to move lightly and without restraint; to amuse one's self.
v. t.
• To divert or amuse; to make merry.
• To remove from a port; to carry away.
Disportment
n.
• Act of disporting; diversion; play.
Disposable
a.
• Subject to disposal; free to be used or employed as occasion may require; not assigned to any service or use.
Disposal
n.
• The act of disposing, or disposing of, anything; arrangement; orderly distribution; a putting in order; as, the disposal of the troops in two lines.
• Ordering; regulation; adjustment; management; government; direction.
• Regulation of the fate, condition, application, etc., of anything; the transference of anything into new hands, a new place, condition, etc.; alienation, or parting; as, a disposal of property.
• Power or authority to dispose of, determine the condition of, control, etc., especially in the phrase at, or in, the disposal of.
Dispose
v. t.
• To distribute and put in place; to arrange; to set in order; as, to dispose the ships in the form of a crescent.
• To regulate; to adjust; to settle; to determine.
• To deal out; to assign to a use; to bestow for an object or purpose; to apply; to employ; to dispose of.
• To give a tendency or inclination to; to adapt; to cause to turn; especially, to incline the mind of; to give a bent or propension to; to incline; to make inclined; — usually followed by to, sometimes by for before the indirect object.
v. i.
• To bargain; to make terms.
n.
• Disposal; ordering; management; power or right of control.
• Cast of mind; disposition; inclination; behavior; demeanor.
Disposed
p. a.
• Inclined; minded.
• Inclined to mirth; jolly.
Disposedness
n.
• The state of being disposed or inclined; inclination; propensity.
Disposement
n.
• Disposal.
Disposer
n.
• One who, or that which, disposes; a regulator; a director; a bestower.
Disposingly
adv.
• In a manner to dispose.
Disposited
a.
• Disposed.
Disposition
n.
• The act of disposing, arranging, ordering, regulating, or transferring; application; disposal; as, the disposition of a man's property by will.
• The state or the manner of being disposed or arranged; distribution; arrangement; order; as, the disposition of the trees in an orchard; the disposition of the several parts of an edifice.
• Tendency to any action or state resulting from natural constitution; nature; quality; as, a disposition in plants to grow in a direction upward; a disposition in bodies to putrefaction.
• Conscious inclination; propension or propensity.
• Natural or prevailing spirit, or temperament of mind, especially as shown in intercourse with one's fellow-men; temper of mind.
• Mood; humor.
Dispositional
a.
• Pertaining to disposition.
Dispositioned
a.
• Having (such) a disposition; — used in compounds; as, well-dispositioned.
Dispositive
a.
• Disposing; tending to regulate; decretive.
• Belonging to disposition or natural, tendency.
Dispositively
adv.
• In a dispositive manner; by natural or moral disposition.
Dispositor
n.
• A disposer.
(Astrol.) The planet which is lord of the sign where another planet is.
Dispossess
v. t.
• To put out of possession; to deprive of the actual occupancy of, particularly of land or real estate; to disseize; to eject; — usually followed by of before the thing taken away; as, to dispossess a king of his crown.
Dispossession
n.
• The act of putting out of possession; the state of being dispossessed.
(Law) The putting out of possession, wrongfully or otherwise, of one who is in possession of a freehold, no matter in what title; — called also ouster.
Dispossessor
n.
• One who dispossesses.
Dispost
v. t.
• To eject from a post; to displace.
Disposure
n.
• The act of disposing; power to dispose of; disposal; direction.
• Disposition; arrangement; position; posture.
Dispraisable
a.
• Blamable.
Dispraise
v. t.
• To withdraw praise from; to notice with disapprobation or some degree of censure; to disparage; to blame.
n.
• The act of dispraising; detraction; blame censure; reproach; disparagement.
Dispraiser
n.
• One who blames or dispraises.
Dispraisingly
adv.
• By way of dispraise.
Dispread
v. t.
• To spread abroad, or different ways; to spread apart; to open; as, the sun dispreads his beams.
v. i.
• To extend or expand itself.
Dispreader
n.
• One who spreads abroad.
Disprejudice
v. t.
• To free from prejudice.
Disprepare
v. t.
• To render unprepared.
Disprince
v. t.
• To make unlike a prince.
Disprison
v. t.
• To let loose from prison, to set all liberty.
Disprivilege
v. t.
• To deprive of a privilege or privileges.
Disprize
v. t.
• To do preciate.
Disprofess
v. t.
• To renounce the profession or pursuit of.
Disprofit
n.
• Loss; damage.
v. i. & i.
• To be, or to cause to be, without profit or benefit.
Disprofitable
a.
• Unprofitable.
Disproof
n.
• A proving to be false or erroneous; confutation; refutation; as, to offer evidence in disproof of a statement.
Disproperty
v. t.
• To cause to be no longer property; to dispossess of.
Disproportion
n.
• Want of proportion in form or quantity; lack of symmetry; as, the arm may be in disproportion to the body; the disproportion of the length of a building to its height.
• Want of suitableness, adequacy, or due proportion to an end or use; unsuitableness; disparity; as, the disproportion of strength or means to an object.
v. t.
• To make unsuitable in quantity, form, or fitness to an end; to violate symmetry in; to mismatch; to join unfitly.
Disproportionable
a.
• Disproportional; unsuitable in form, size, quantity, or adaptation; disproportionate; inadequate.
Disproportional
a.
• Not having due proportion to something else; not having proportion or symmetry of parts; unsuitable in form, quantity or value; inadequate; unequal; as, a disproportional limb constitutes deformity in the body; the studies of youth should not be disproportional to their understanding.
Disproportionality
n.
• The state of being disproportional.
Disproportionally
adv.
• In a disproportional manner; unsuitably in form, quantity, or value; unequally.
Disproportionate
a.
• Not proportioned; unsymmetrical; unsuitable to something else in bulk, form, value, or extent; out of proportion; inadequate; as, in a perfect body none of the limbs are disproportionate; it is wisdom not to undertake a work disproportionate means.
Dispropriate
v. t.
• To cancel the appropriation of; to disappropriate.
Disprovable
a.
• Capable of being disproved or refuted.
Disproval
n.
• Act of disproving; disproof.
Disprove
v. t.
• To prove to be false or erroneous; to confute; to refute.
• To disallow; to disapprove of.
Disprover
n.
• One who disproves or confutes.
Disprovide
v. t.
• Not to provide; to fail to provide.
Dispunct
a.
• Wanting in punctilious respect; discourteous.
v. t.
• To expunge.
Dispunge
v. t.
• To expunge; to erase.
Dispunishable
a.
• Without penal restraint; not punishable.
Dispurpose
v. t.
• To dissuade; to frustrate; as, to dispurpose plots.
Dispurse
v. t.
• To disburse.
Dispurvey
v. t.
• To disfurnish; to strip.
Dispurveyance
n.
• Want of provisions; ack of food.
Disputable
a.
• Capable of being disputed; liable to be called in question, controverted, or contested; or doubtful certainty or propriety; controvertible; as, disputable opinions, propositions, points, or questions.
• Disputatious; contentious.
Disputableness
n.
• State of being disputable.
Disputacity
n.
• Proneness to dispute.
Disputant
a.
• Disputing; engaged in controversy.
n.
• One who disputes; one who argues opposition to another; one appointed to dispute; a controvertist; a reasoner in opposition.
Disputation
n.
• The act of disputing; a reasoning or argumentation in opposition to something, or on opposite sides; controversy in words; verbal contest respecting the truth of some fact, opinion, proposition, or argument.
• A rhetorical exercise in which parties reason in opposition to each other on some question proposed.
Disputatious
a.
• Inclined to dispute; apt to civil or controvert; characterized by dispute; as, a disputatious person or temper.
Disputative
a.
• Disposed to dispute; inclined to cavil or to reason in opposition; as, a disputative temper.
Dispute
v. i.
• To contend in argument; to argue against something maintained, upheld, or claimed, by another; to discuss; to reason; to debate; to altercate; to wrangle.
v. t.
• To make a subject of disputation; to argue pro and con; to discuss.
• To oppose by argument or assertion; to attempt to overthrow; to controvert; to express dissent or opposition to; to call in question; to deny the truth or validity of; as, to dispute assertions or arguments.
• To strive or contend about; to contest.
• To struggle against; to resist.
n.
• Verbal controversy; contest by opposing argument or expression of opposing views or claims; controversial discussion; altercation; debate.
• Contest; struggle; quarrel.
Disputeless
a.
• Admitting no dispute; incontrovertible.
Disputer
n.
• One who disputes, or who is given to disputes; a controvertist.
Disputison
n.
• Dispute; discussion.
Disqualification
n.
• The act of disqualifying, or state of being disqualified; want of qualification; incompetency; disability; as, the disqualification of men for holding certain offices.
• That which disqualifies; that which incapacitates or makes unfit; as, conviction of crime is a disqualification of a person for office; sickness is a disqualification for labor.
Disqualify
v. t.
• To deprive of the qualities or properties necessary for any purpose; to render unfit; to incapacitate; — with for or from before the purpose, state, or act.
• To deprive of some power, right, or privilege, by positive restriction; to disable; to debar legally; as, a conviction of perjury disqualifies a man to be a witness.
Disquantity
v. t.
• To diminish the quantity of; to lessen.
Disquiet
a.
• Deprived of quiet; impatient; restless; uneasy.
n.
• Want of quiet; want of tranquility in body or mind; uneasiness; restlessness; disturbance; anxiety.
v. t.
• To render unquiet; to deprive of peace, rest, or tranquility; to make uneasy or restless; to disturb.
Disquietal
n.
• The act of disquieting; a state of disquiet.
Disquieter
n.
• One who, or that which, disquiets, or makes uneasy; a disturber.
Disquietful
a.
• Producing inquietude or uneasiness.
Disquietive
a.
• Tending to disquiet.
Disquietly
adv.
• In a disquiet manner; uneasily; as, he rested disquietly that night.
Disquietment
n.
• State of being disquieted; uneasiness; harassment.
Disquietness
n.
• Disturbance of quiet in body or mind; restlessness; uneasiness.
Disquietous
a.
• Causing uneasiness.
Disquiettude
n.
• Want of peace or tranquility; uneasiness; disturbance; agitation; anxiety.
Disquisition
n.
• A formal or systematic inquiry into, or discussion of, any subject; a full examination or investigation of a matter, with the arguments and facts bearing upon it; elaborate essay; dissertation.
Disquisitional
a.
• Pertaining to disquisition; of the nature of disquisition.
Disquisitionary
a.
• Pertaining to disquisition; disquisitional.
Disquisitive
a.
• Relating to disquisition; fond discussion or investigation; examining; inquisitive.
Disquisitorial
a.
• Disquisitory.
Disquisitory
a.
• Of or pertaining to disquisition; disquisitive.
Disrange
v. t.
• To disarrange.
Disrank
v. t.
• To degrade from rank.
• To throw out of rank or into confusion.
Disrate
v. t.
• To reduce to a lower rating or rank; to degrade.
Disray
variant
• of Disarray.
Disrealize
v. t.
• To divest of reality; to make uncertain.
Disregard
v. t.
• Not to regard; to pay no heed to; to omit to take notice of; to neglect to observe; to slight as unworthy of regard or notice; as, to disregard the admonitions of conscience.
n.
• The act of disregarding, or the state of being disregarded; intentional neglect; omission of notice; want of attention; slight.
Disregarder
n.
• One who disregards.
Disregardful
a.
• Neglect; negligent; heedless; regardless.
Disregardfully
adv.
• Negligently; heedlessly.
Disrelish
n.
• Want of relish; dislike (of the palate or of the mind); distaste; a slight degree of disgust; as, a disrelish for some kinds of food.
• Absence of relishing or palatable quality; bad taste; nauseousness.
v. t.
• Not to relish; to regard as unpalatable or offensive; to feel a degree of disgust at.
• To deprive of relish; to make nauseous or disgusting in a slight degree.
Disremember
v. t.
• To fail to remember; to forget.
Disrepair
n.
• A state of being in bad condition, and wanting repair.
Disreputability
n.
• The state of being disreputable.
Disreputable
a.
• Not reputable; of bad repute; not in esteem; dishonorable; disgracing the reputation; tending to bring into disesteem; as, it is disreputable to associate familiarly with the mean, the lewd, and the profane.
Disreputably
adv.
• In a disreputable manner.
Disreputation
n.
• Loss or want of reputation or good name; dishonor; disrepute; disesteem.
Disrepute
n.
• Loss or want of reputation; ill character; disesteem; discredit.
v. t.
• To bring into disreputation; to hold in dishonor.
Disrespect
n.
• Want of respect or reverence; disesteem; incivility; discourtesy.
v. t.
• To show disrespect to.
Disrespectability
n.
• Want of respectability.
Disrespectable
a.
• Not respectable; disreputable.
Disrespecter
n.
• One who disrespects.
Disrespectful
a.
• Wanting in respect; manifesting disesteem or lack of respect; uncivil; as, disrespectful behavior.
Disrespective
a.
• Showing want of respect; disrespectful.
Disreverence
v. t.
• To treat irreverently or with disrespect.
Disrobe
v. t. & i.
• To divest of a robe; to undress; figuratively, to strip of covering; to divest of that which clothes or decorates; as, autumn disrobes the fields of verdure.
Disrober
n.
• One who, or that which, disrobes.
Disroof
v. t.
• To unroof.
Disroot
v. t.
• To tear up the roots of, or by the roots; hence, to tear from a foundation; to uproot.
Disrout
v. i.
• To put to rout.
Disrudder
v. t.
• To deprive of the rudder, as a ship.
Disrulily
adv.
• In a disorderly manner.
Disruly
a.
• Unruly; disorderly.
Disrupt
a.
• Rent off; torn asunder; severed; disrupted.
v. t.
• To break asunder; to rend.
Disruption
n.
• The act or rending asunder, or the state of being rent asunder or broken in pieces; breach; rent; dilaceration; rupture; as, the disruption of rocks in an earthquake; disruption of a state.
Disruptive
a.
• Causing, or tending to cause, disruption; caused by disruption; breaking through; bursting; as, the disruptive discharge of an electrical battery.
Disrupture
n.
• Disruption.
Dissatisfaction
n.
• The state of being dissatisfied, unsatisfied, or discontented; uneasiness proceeding from the want of gratification, or from disappointed wishes and expectations.
Dissatisfactory
a.
• Causing dissatisfaction; unable to give content; unsatisfactory; displeasing.
Dissatisfy
v. t.
• To render unsatisfied or discontented; to excite uneasiness in by frustrating wishes or expectations; to displease by the want of something requisite; as, to be dissatisfied with one's fortune.
Disseat
v. t.
• To unseat.
Dissect
v. t.
(Anat.) To divide into separate parts; to cut in pieces; to separate and expose the parts of, as an animal or a plant, for examination and to show their structure and relations; to anatomize.
• To analyze, for the purposes of science or criticism; to divide and examine minutely.
Dissected
a.
• Cut into several parts; divided into sections; as, a dissected map.
(Bot.) Cut deeply into many lobes or divisions; as, a dissected leaf.
Dissectible
a.
• Capable of being dissected, or separated by dissection.
Dissecting
a.
• Dividing or separating the parts of an animal or vegetable body; as, a dissecting aneurism, one which makes its way between or within the coats of an artery.
• Of or pertaining to, or received during, a dissection; as, a dissecting wound.
• Used for or in dissecting; as, a dissecting knife; a dissecting microscope.
Dissection
n.
• The act of dissecting an animal or plant; as, dissection of the human body was held sacrilege till the time of Francis I.
• Fig.: The act of separating or dividing for the purpose of critical examination.
• Anything dissected; especially, some part, or the whole, of an animal or plant dissected so as to exhibit the structure; an anatomical so prepared.
Dissector
n.
• One who dissects; an anatomist.
Disseize
v. t.(Law)
Disseizee
n.
(Law) A person disseized, or put out of possession of an estate unlawfully; — correlative to disseizor.
Disseizin
n.
(Law) The act of disseizing; an unlawful dispossessing and ouster of a person actually seized of the freehold.
Disseizor
n.
(Law) One who wrongfully disseizes, or puts another out of possession of a freehold.
Disseizoress
n.
(Law) A woman disseizes.
Disseizure
n.
• Disseizin.
Dissemblance
n.
• Want of resemblance; dissimilitude.
n.
• The act or art of dissembling; dissimulation.
Dissemble
v. t.
• To hide under a false semblance or seeming; to feign (something) not to be what it really is; to put an untrue appearance upon; to disguise; to mask.
• To put on the semblance of; to make pretense of; to simulate; to feign.
v. i.
• To conceal the real fact, motives, tention, or sentiments, under some pretense; to assume a false appearance; to act the hypocrite.
Dissembler
n.
• One who dissembles; one who conceals his opinions or dispositions under a false appearance; a hypocrite.
Dissembling
a.
• That dissembles; hypocritical; false.
Disseminate
v. t. & i.
• To sow broadcast or as seed; to scatter for growth and propagation, like seed; to spread abroad; to diffuse; as, principles, ideas, opinions, and errors are disseminated when they are spread abroad for propagation.
• To spread or extend by dispersion.
Disseminated
p. a.
(Min.) Occurring in small portions scattered through some other substance.
Dissemination
n.
• The act of disseminating, or the state of being disseminated; diffusion for propagation and permanence; a scattering or spreading abroad, as of ideas, beliefs, etc.
Disseminative
a.
• Tending to disseminate, or to become disseminated.
Disseminator
n.
• One who, or that which, disseminates, spreads, or propagates; as, disseminators of disease.
Dissension
n.
• Disagreement in opinion, usually of a violent character, producing warm debates or angry words; contention in words; partisan and contentious divisions; breach of friendship and union; strife; discord; quarrel.
Dissensious
a.
• Disposed to discord; contentious; dissentious.
Dissent
v. i.
• To differ in opinion; to be of unlike or contrary sentiment; to disagree; — followed by from.
(Eccl.) To differ from an established church in regard to doctrines, rites, or government.
• To differ; to be of a contrary nature.
n.
• The act of dissenting; difference of opinion; refusal to adopt something proposed; nonagreement, nonconcurrence, or disagreement.
(Eccl.) Separation from an established church, especially that of England; nonconformity.
• Contrariety of nature; diversity in quality.
Dissentaneous
a.
• Disagreeing; contrary; differing; — opposed to consentaneous.
Dissentany
a.
• Dissentaneous; inconsistent.
Dissentation
n.
• Dissension.
Dissenter
n.
• One who dissents; one who differs in opinion, or declares his disagreement.
(Eccl.) One who separates from the service and worship of an established church; especially, one who disputes the authority or tenets of the Church of England; a nonconformist.
Dissenterism
n.
• The spirit or principles of dissenters.
Dissentiate
v. t.
• To throw into a state of dissent.
Dissentient
a.
• Disagreeing; declaring dissent; dissenting.
n.
• One who dissents.
Dissentious
a.
• Marked by dissensions; apt to breed discord; quarrelsome; contentious; factious.
Dissentive
a.
• Disagreeing; inconsistent.
Dissepiment
n.
• A separating tissue; a partition; a septum.
(Bot.) One of the partitions which divide a compound ovary into cells.
(Zool.) One of the transverse, calcareous partitions between the radiating septa of a coral.
Dissert
v. i.
• To discourse or dispute; to discuss.
Dissertate
v. i.
• To deal in dissertation; to write dissertations; to discourse.
Dissertation
n.
• A formal or elaborate argumentative discourse, oral or written; a disquisition; an essay; a discussion; as, Dissertations on the Prophecies.
Dissertational
a.
• Relating to dissertations; resembling a dissertation.
Dissertationist
n.
• A writer of dissertations.
Dissertator
n.
• One who writers a dissertation; one who discourses.
Disserve
v. t.
• To fail to serve; to do injury or mischief to; to damage; to hurt; to harm.
Disservice
n.
• Injury; mischief.
Disserviceable
a.
• Calculated to do disservice or harm; not serviceable; injurious; harmful; unserviceable.
Dissettle
v. t.
• To unsettle.
Dissettlement
n.
• The act of unsettling, or the state of being unsettled.
Dissever
v. t.
• To part in two; to sever thoroughly; to sunder; to disunite; to separate; to disperse.
v. i.
• To part; to separate.
Disseverance
n.
• The act of disserving; separation.
Disseveration
n.
• The act of disserving; disseverance.
Disseverment
n.
• Disseverance.
Disshadow
v. t.
• To free from shadow or shade.
Dissheathe
v. i.
• To become unsheathed.
Disship
v. t.
• To dismiss from service on board ship.
Disshiver
v. t. & i.
• To shiver or break in pieces.
Dissidence
n.
• Disagreement; dissent; separation from the established religion.
Dissident
a.
• No agreeing; dissenting; discordant; different.
n.
(Eccl.) One who disagrees or dissents; one who separates from the established religion.
Dissidently
adv.
• In a dissident manner.
Dissilient
a.
• Starting asunder; bursting and opening with an elastic force; dehiscing explosively; as, a dissilient pericarp.
Dissilition
n.
• The act of bursting or springing apart.
Dissimilar
a.
• Not similar; unlike; heterogeneous; as, the tempers of men are as dissimilar as their features.
Dissimilarity
n.
• Want of resemblance; unlikeness; dissimilitude; variety; as, the dissimilarity of human faces and forms.
Dissimilarly
adv.
• In a dissimilar manner; in a varied style.
Dissimilate
v. t.
• To render dissimilar.
Dissimilation
n.
• The act of making dissimilar.
Dissimile
n.
(Rhet.) Comparison or illustration by contraries.
Dissimilitude
n.
• Want of resemblance; unlikeness; dissimilarity.
(Rhet.) A comparison by contrast; a dissimile.
Dissimulate
a.
• Feigning; simulating; pretending.
v. i.
• To dissemble; to feign; to pretend.
Dissimulation
n.
• The act of dissembling; a hiding under a false appearance; concealment by feigning; false pretension; hypocrisy.
Dissimulator
n.
• One who dissimulates; a dissembler.
Dissimule
v. t. & i.
• To dissemble.
Dissimuler
n.
• A dissembler.
Dissimulour
n.
• A dissembler.
Dissipable
a.
• Capable of being scattered or dissipated.
Dissipate
v. t.
• To scatter completely; to disperse and cause to disappear; — used esp. of the dispersion of things that can never again be collected or restored.
• To destroy by wasteful extravagance or lavish use; to squander.
v. i.
• To separate into parts and disappear; to waste away; to scatter; to disperse; to vanish; as, a fog or cloud gradually dissipates before the rays or heat of the sun; the heat of a body dissipates.
• To be extravagant, wasteful, or dissolute in the pursuit of pleasure; to engage in dissipation.
Dissipated
a.
• Squandered; scattered.
• Wasteful of health, money, etc., in the pursuit of pleasure; dissolute; intemperate.
Dissipation
n.
• The act of dissipating or dispersing; a state of dispersion or separation; dispersion; waste.
• A dissolute course of life, in which health, money, etc., are squandered in pursuit of pleasure; profuseness in vicious indulgence, as late hours, riotous living, etc.; dissoluteness.
• A trifle which wastes time or distracts attention.
Dissipative
a.
• Tending to dissipate.
Dissipativity
n.
• The rate at which palpable energy is dissipated away into other forms of energy.
Dissite
a.
• Lying apart.
Disslander
v. t.
• To slander.
n.
• Slander.
Disslanderous
a.
• Slanderous.
Dissociability
n.
• Want of sociability; unsociableness.
Dissociable
a.
• Not ell associated or assorted; incongruous.
• Having a tendency to dissolve social connections; unsuitable to society; unsociable.
Dissocial
a.
• Unfriendly to society; contracted; selfish; as, dissocial feelings.
Dissocialize
v. t.
• To render unsocial.
Dissociate
v. t.
• To separate from fellowship or union; to disunite; to disjoin; as, to dissociate the particles of a concrete substance.
Dissociation
n.
• The act of dissociating or disuniting; a state of separation; disunion.
(Chem.) The process by which a compound body breaks up into simpler constituents; — said particularly of the action of heat on gaseous or volatile substances; as, the dissociation of the sulphur molecules; the dissociation of ammonium chloride into hydrochloric acid and ammonia.
Dissociative
a.
• Tending or leading to dissociation.
Dissolubility
n.
• The quality of being dissoluble; capacity of being dissoluble; capacity of being dissolved by heat or moisture, and converted into a fluid.
Dissoluble
a.
• Capable of being dissolved; having its parts separable by heat or moisture; convertible into a fluid.
• Capable of being disunited.
Dissolubleness
n.
• The quality of being dissoluble; dissolubility.
Dissolute
a.
• With nerves unstrung; weak.
• Loosed from restraint; esp., loose in morals and conduct; recklessly abandoned to sensual pleasures; profligate; wanton; lewd; debauched.
Dissolutely
adv.
• In a dissolute manner.
Dissoluteness
n.
• State or quality of being dissolute; looseness of morals and manners; addictedness to sinful pleasures; debauchery; dissipation.
Dissolution
n.
• The act of dissolving, sundering, or separating into component parts; separation.
• Change from a solid to a fluid state; solution by heat or moisture; liquefaction; melting.
• Change of form by chemical agency; decomposition; resolution.
• The dispersion of an assembly by terminating its sessions; the breaking up of a partnership.
• The extinction of life in the human body; separation of the soul from the body; death.
• The state of being dissolved, or of undergoing liquefaction.
• The new product formed by dissolving a body; a solution.
• Destruction of anything by the separation of its parts; ruin.
• Corruption of morals; dissipation; dissoluteness.
Dissolvability
n.
• Capacity of being dissolved; solubility.
Dissolvable
a.
• Capable of being dissolved, or separated into component parts; capable of being liquefied; soluble.
Dissolvative
n.
• Having the power to dissolve anything; solvent.
Dissolve
v. t.
• To separate into competent parts; to disorganize; to break up; hence, to bring to an end by separating the parts, sundering a relation, etc.; to terminate; to destroy; to deprive of force; as, to dissolve a partnership; to dissolve Parliament.
• To break the continuity of; to disconnect; to disunite; to sunder; to loosen; to undo; to separate.
• To convert into a liquid by means of heat, moisture, etc.,; to melt; to liquefy; to soften.
• To solve; to clear up; to resolve.
• To relax by pleasure; to make powerless.
(Law) To annul; to rescind; to discharge or release; as, to dissolve an injunction.
v. i.
• To waste away; to be dissipated; to be decomposed or broken up.
• To become fluid; to be melted; to be liquefied.
• To fade away; to fall to nothing; to lose power.
Dissolvent
a.
• Having power to dissolve power to dissolve a solid body; as, the dissolvent juices of the stomach.
n.
• That which has the power of dissolving or melting other substances, esp. by mixture with them; a menstruum; a solvent.
(Med.) A remedy supposed capable of dissolving concretions in the body, such as calculi, tubercles, etc.
Dissolver
n.
• One who, or that which, has power to dissolve or dissipate.
Dissolving
a.
• Melting; breaking up; vanishing.
Dissonance
n.
• A mingling of discordant sounds; an inharmonious combination of sounds; discord.
• Want of agreement; incongruity.
Dissonancy
n.
• Discord; dissonance.
Dissonant
a.
• Sounding harshly; discordant; unharmonious.
• Disagreeing; incongruous; discrep, — with from or to.
Disspermous
a.
(Bot.) Containing only two seeds; two-seeded.
Dissuade
v. t.
• To advise or exhort against; to try to persuade (one from a course).
• To divert by persuasion; to turn from a purpose by reasons or motives; — with from; as, I could not dissuade him from his purpose.
Dissuader
n.
• One who dissuades; a dehorter.
Dissuasion
n.
• The act of dissuading; exhortation against a thing; dehortation.
• A motive or consideration tending to dissuade; a dissuasive.
Dissuasive
a.
• Tending to dissuade or divert from a measure or purpose; dehortatory; as, dissuasive advice.
n.
• A dissuasive argument or counsel; dissuasion; dehortation.
Dissuasory
n.
• A dissuasive.
Dissunder
v. t.
• To separate; to sunder; to destroy.
Dissweeten
v. t.
• To deprive of sweetness.
Dissyllabic
a.
• Consisting of two syllab only; as, a dissyllabic foot in poetry.
Dissyllabification
n.
• A formi into two syllables.
Dissyllabify
v. t.
• To form into two syllables.
Dissyllabize
v. t.
• To form into two syllables; to dyssyllabify.
Dissyllable
n.
• A word of two syllables; as, pa-per.
Dissymmetrical
a.
• Not having symmetry; asymmetrical; unsymmetrical.
Dissymmetry
n.
• Absence or defect of symmetry; asymmetry.
Dissympathy
n.
• Lack of sympathy; want of interest; indifference.
Distad
adv.
(Anat.) Toward a distal part; on the distal side of; distally.
Distaff
n.
• The staff for holding a bunch of flax, tow, or wool, from which the thread is drawn in spinning by hand.
• Used as a symbol of the holder of a distaff; hence, a woman; women, collectively.
Distain
v. t.
• To tinge with a different color from the natural or proper one; to stain; to discolor; to sully; to tarnish; to defile; — used chiefly in poetry.
Distal
a.
(Physiol.) Remote from the point of attachment or origin; as, the distal end of a bone or muscle
• Pertaining to that which is distal; as, the distal tuberosities of a bone.
Distally
adv.
(Anat.) Toward a distal part.
Distance
n.
• The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.
• Remoteness of place; a remote place.
(Racing) A space marked out in the last part of a race course.
(Mil.) Relative space, between troops in ranks, measured from front to rear; — contrasted with interval, which is measured from right to left.
• Space between two antagonists in fencing.
(Painting) The part of a picture which contains the representation of those objects which are the farthest away, esp. in a landscape.
• Ideal disjunction; discrepancy; contrariety.
• Length or interval of time; period, past or future, between two eras or events.
• The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.
• A withholding of intimacy; alienation; coldness; disagreement; variance; restraint; reserve.
• Remoteness in succession or relation; as, the distance between a descendant and his ancestor.
(Mus.) The interval between two notes; as, the distance of a fourth or seventh.
v. t.
• To place at a distance or remotely.
• To cause to appear as if at a distance; to make seem remote.
• To outstrip by as much as a distance (see Distance, n., 3); to leave far behind; to surpass greatly.
Distancy
n.
• Distance.
Distant
a.
• Separated; having an intervening space; at a distance; away.
• Far separated; far off; not near; remote; — in place, time, consanguinity, or connection; as, distant times; distant relatives.
• Reserved or repelling in manners; cold; not cordial; somewhat haughty; as, a distant manner.
• Indistinct; faint; obscure, as from distance.
• Not conformable; discrepant; repugnant; as, a practice so widely distant from Christianity.
Distantial
a.
• Distant.
Distantly
adv.
• At a distance; remotely; with reserve.
Distaste
n.
• Aversion of the taste; dislike, as of food or drink; disrelish.
• Discomfort; uneasiness.
• Alienation of affection; displeasure; anger.
v. t.
• Not to have relish or taste for; to disrelish; to loathe; to dislike.
• To offend; to disgust; to displease.
• To deprive of taste or relish; to make unsavory or distasteful.
v. i.
• To be distasteful; to taste ill or disagreeable.
Distasteful
a.
• Unpleasant or disgusting to the taste; nauseous; loathsome.
• Offensive; displeasing to the feelings; disagreeable; as, a distasteful truth.
• Manifesting distaste or dislike; repulsive.
Distasteive
a.
• Tending to excite distaste.
n.
• That which excites distaste or aversion.
Distasture
n.
• Something which excites distaste or disgust.
Distemper
v. t.
• To temper or mix unduly; to make disproportionate; to change the due proportions of.
• To derange the functions of, whether bodily, mental, or spiritual; to disorder; to disease.
• To deprive of temper or moderation; to disturb; to ruffle; to make disaffected, ill-humored, or malignant.
• To intoxicate.
(Paint.) To mix (colors) in the way of distemper; as, to distemper colors with size.
n.
• An undue or unnatural temper, or disproportionate mixture of parts.
• Severity of climate; extreme weather, whether hot or cold.
• A morbid state of the animal system; indisposition; malady; disorder; — at present chiefly applied to diseases of brutes; as, a distemper in dogs; the horse distemper; the horn distemper in cattle.
• Morbid temper of the mind; undue predominance of a passion or appetite; mental derangement; bad temper; ill humor.
• Political disorder; tumult.
(Paint.) A preparation of opaque or body colors, in which the pigments are tempered or diluted with weak glue or size (cf. Tempera) instead of oil, usually for scene painting, or for walls and ceilings of rooms.
• A painting done with this preparation.
Distemperance
n.
• Distemperature.
Distemperate
a.
• Immoderate.
• Diseased; disordered.
Distemperately
adv.
• Unduly.
Distemperature
n.
• Bad temperature; intemperateness; excess of heat or cold, or of other qualities; as, the distemperature of the air.
• Disorder; confusion.
• Disorder of body; slight illness; distemper.
• Perturbation of mind; mental uneasiness.
Distemperment
n.
• Distempered state; distemperature.
Distend
v. t.
• To extend in some one direction; to lengthen out; to stretch.
• To stretch out or extend in all directions; to dilate; to enlarge, as by elasticity of parts; to inflate so as to produce tension; to cause to swell; as, to distend a bladder, the stomach, etc.
v. i.
• To become expanded or inflated; to swell.
Distensibility
n.
• The quality or capacity of being distensible.
Distensible
a.
• Capable of being distended or dilated.
Distension
n.
• Same as Distention.
Distensive
a.
• Distending, or capable of being distended.
Distent
a.
• Distended.
n.
• Breadth.
Distention
n.
• The act of distending; the act of stretching in breadth or in all directions; the state of being Distended; as, the distention of the lungs.
• Breadth; extent or space occupied by the thing distended.
Dister
v. t.
• To banish or drive from a country.
Disterminate
a.
• Separated by bounds.
Distermination
n.
• Separation by bounds.
Disthene
n.
(Min.) Cyanite or kyanite; — so called in allusion to its unequal hardness in two different directions.
Disthrone
v. t.
• To dethrone.
Disthronize
v. t.
• To dethrone.
Distich
n.
(Pros.) A couple of verses or poetic lines making complete sense; an epigram of two verses.
Distichously
adv.
• In a distichous manner.
Distill
v. i.
• To drop; to fall in drops; to trickle.
• To flow gently, or in a small stream.
• To practice the art of distillation.
v. t.
• To let fall or send down in drops.
• To obtain by distillation; to extract by distillation, as spirits, essential oil, etc.; to rectify; as, to distill brandy from wine; to distill alcoholic spirits from grain; to distill essential oils from flowers, etc.; to distill fresh water from sea water.
• To subject to distillation; as, to distill molasses in making rum; to distill barley, rye, corn, etc.
• To dissolve or melt.
Distillable
a.
(Chem.) Capable of being distilled; especially, capable of being distilled without chemical change or decomposition; as, alcohol is distillable; olive oil is not distillable.
Distillate
n.
(Chem.) The product of distillation; as, the distillate from molasses.
Distillation
n.
• The act of falling in drops, or the act of pouring out in drops.
• That which falls in drops.
(Chem.) The separation of the volatile parts of a substance from the more fixed; specifically, the operation of driving off gas or vapor from volatile liquids or solids, by heat in a retort or still, and the condensation of the products as far as possible by a cool receiver, alembic, or condenser; rectification; vaporization; condensation; as, the distillation of illuminating gas and coal, of alcohol from sour mash, or of boric acid in steam.
• The substance extracted by distilling.
Distillatory
a.
• Belonging to, or used in, distilling; as, distillatory vessels.
n.
• A distillatory apparatus; a still.
Distiller
n.
• One who distills; esp., one who extracts alcoholic liquors by distillation.
• The condenser of a distilling apparatus.
Distillery
n.
• The building and works where distilling, esp. of alcoholic liquors, is carried on.
• The act of distilling spirits.
Distillment
n.
• Distillation; the substance obtained by distillation.
Distinct
a.
• Distinguished; having the difference marked; separated by a visible sign; marked out; specified.
• Marked; variegated.
• Separate in place; not conjunct; not united by growth or otherwise; — with from.
• Not identical; different; individual.
• So separated as not to be confounded with any other thing; not liable to be misunderstood; not confused; well-defined; clear; as, we have a distinct or indistinct view of a prospect.
v. t.
• To distinguish.
Distinction
n.
• A marking off by visible signs; separation into parts; division.
• The act of distinguishing or denoting the differences between objects, or the qualities by which one is known from others; exercise of discernment; discrimination.
• That which distinguishes one thing from another; distinguishing quality; sharply defined difference; as, the distinction between real and apparent good.
• Estimation of difference; regard to differences or distinguishing circumstance.
• Conspicuous station; eminence; superiority; honorable estimation; as, a man of distinction.
Distinctive
a.
• Marking or expressing distinction or difference; distinguishing; characteristic; peculiar.
• Having the power to distinguish and discern; discriminating.
Distinctively
adv.
• With distinction; plainly.
Distinctiveness
n.
• State of being distinctive.
Distinctly
adv.
• With distinctness; not confusedly; without the blending of one part or thing another; clearly; plainly; as, to see distinctly.
• With meaning; significantly.
Distinctness
n.
• The quality or state of being distinct; a separation or difference that prevents confusion of parts or things.
• Nice discrimination; hence, clearness; precision; as, he stated his arguments with great distinctness.
Distincture
n.
• Distinctness.
Distinguish
v. t.
• Not set apart from others by visible marks; to make distinctive or discernible by exhibiting differences; to mark off by some characteristic.
• To separate by definition of terms or logical division of a subject with regard to difference; as, to distinguish sounds into high and low.
• To recognize or discern by marks, signs, or characteristic quality or qualities; to know and discriminate (anything) from other things with which it might be confounded; as, to distinguish the sound of a drum.
• To constitute a difference; to make to differ.
• To separate from others by a mark of honor; to make eminent or known; to confer distinction upon; — with by or for.
v. i.
• To make distinctions; to perceive the difference; to exercise discrimination; — with between; as, a judge distinguishes between cases apparently similar, but differing in principle.
• To become distinguished or distinctive; to make one's self or itself discernible.
Distinguishable
a.
• Capable of being distinguished; separable; divisible; discernible; capable of recognition; as, a tree at a distance is distinguishable from a shrub.
• Worthy of note or special regard.
Distinguishableness
n.
• The quality of being distinguishable.
Distinguishably
adv.
• So as to be distinguished.
Distinguished
a.
• Marked; special.
• Separated from others by distinct difference; having, or indicating, superiority; eminent or known; illustrious; — applied to persons and deeds.
Distinguishedly
adv.
• In a distinguished manner.
Distinguisher
n.
• One who, or that which, distinguishes or separates one thing from another by marks of diversity.
• One who discerns accurately the difference of things; a nice or judicious observer.
Distinguishing
a.
• Constituting difference, or distinction from everything else; distinctive; peculiar; characteristic.
Distinguishingly
adv.
• With distinction; with some mark of preference.
Distinguishment
n.
• Observation of difference; distinction.
Distitle
v. t.
• To deprive of title or right.
Distoma
n.
(Zool.) A genus of parasitic, trematode worms, having two suckers for attaching themselves to the part they infest.
Distort
a.
• Distorted; misshapen.
v. t.
• To twist of natural or regular shape; to twist aside physically; as, to distort the limbs, or the body.
• To force or put out of the true posture or direction; to twist aside mentally or morally.
• To wrest from the true meaning; to pervert; as, to distort passages of Scripture, or their meaning.
Distorter
n.
• One who, or that which, distorts.
Distortion
n.
• The act of distorting, or twisting out of natural or regular shape; a twisting or writhing motion; as, the distortions of the face or body.
• A wresting from the true meaning.
• The state of being distorted, or twisted out of shape or out of true position; crookedness; perversion.
(Med.) An unnatural deviation of shape or position of any part of the body producing visible deformity.
Distortive
a.
• Causing distortion.
Distract
a.
• Separated; drawn asunder.
• Insane; mad.
v. t.
• To draw apart or away; to divide; to disjoin.
• To draw (the sight, mind, or attention) in different directions; to perplex; to confuse; as, to distract the eye; to distract the attention.
• To agitate by conflicting passions, or by a variety of motives or of cares; to confound; to harass.
• To unsettle the reason of; to render insane; to craze; to madden; — most frequently used in the participle, distracted.
Distracted
a.
• Mentally disordered; unsettled; mad.
Distractedly
adv.
• Disjointedly; madly.
Distractedness
n.
• A state of being distracted; distraction.
Distracter
n.
• One who, or that which, distracts away.
Distractful
a.
• Distracting.
Distractible
a.
• Capable of being drawn aside or distracted.
Distractile
a.
(Bot.) Tending or serving to draw apart.
Distracting
a.
• Tending or serving to distract.
Distraction
n.
• The act of distracting; a drawing apart; separation.
• That which diverts attention; a diversion.
• A diversity of direction; detachment.
• State in which the attention is called in different ways; confusion; perplexity.
• Confusion of affairs; tumult; disorder; as, political distractions.
• Agitation from violent emotions; perturbation of mind; despair.
• Derangement of the mind; madness.
Distractious
a.
• Distractive.
Distractive
a.
• Causing perplexity; distracting.
Distrain
v. t.
• To press heavily upon; to bear down upon with violence; hence, to constrain or compel; to bind; to distress, torment, or afflict.
• To rend; to tear.
(Law) To seize, as a pledge or indemnification; to take possession of as security for nonpayment of rent, the reparation of an injury done, etc.; to take by distress; as, to distrain goods for rent, or of an amercement
• To subject to distress; to coerce; as, to distrain a person by his goods and chattels.
v. i.
• To levy a distress.
Distrainable
a.
• Capable of being, or liable to be, distrained.
Distrainer
n.
• Same as Distrainor.
Distrainor
n.
(Law) One who distrains; the party distraining goods or chattels.
Distraint
n.
(Law) The act or proceeding of seizing personal property by distress.
Distrait
a.
• Absent-minded; lost in thought; abstracted.
Distraught
p. p. & a.
• Torn asunder; separated.
• Distracted; perplexed.
Distraughted
a.
• Distracted.
Distream
v. i.
• To flow.
Distress
n.
• Extreme pain or suffering; anguish of body or mind; as, to suffer distress from the gout, or from the loss of friends.
• That which occasions suffering; painful situation; misfortune; affliction; misery.
• A state of danger or necessity; as, a ship in distress, from leaking, loss of spars, want of provisions or water, etc.
(Law) The act of distraining; the taking of a personal chattel out of the possession of a wrongdoer, by way of pledge for redress of an injury, or for the performance of a duty, as for nonpayment of rent or taxes, or for injury done by cattle, etc.
• The thing taken by distraining; that which is seized to procure satisfaction.
v. t.
• To cause pain or anguish to; to pain; to oppress with calamity; to afflict; to harass; to make miserable.
• To compel by pain or suffering.
(Law) To seize for debt; to distrain.
Distressedness
n.
• A state of being distressed or greatly pained.
Distressful
a.
• Full of distress; causing, indicating, or attended with, distress; as, a distressful situation.
Distressing
a.
• Causing distress; painful; unpleasant.
adv.
• In a distressing manner.
Distributable
a.
• Capable of being distributed.
Distributary
a.
• Tending to distribute or be distributed; that distributes; distributive.
Distribute
v. t.
• To divide among several or many; to deal out; to apportion; to allot.
• To dispense; to administer; as, to distribute justice.
• To divide or separate, as into classes, orders, kinds, or species; to classify; to assort, as specimens, letters, etc.
(Printing) To separate (type which has been used) and return it to the proper boxes in the cases.
• To spread (ink) evenly, as upon a roller or a table.
(Logic) To employ (a term) in its whole extent; to take as universal in one premise.
v. i.
• To make distribution.
Distributer
n.
• One who, or that which, distributes or deals out anything; a dispenser.
Distributing
a.
• That distributes; dealing out.
Distribution
n.
• The act of distributing or dispensing; the act of dividing or apportioning among several or many; apportionment; as, the distribution of an estate among heirs or children.
• Separation into parts or classes; arrangement of anything into parts; disposition; classification.
• That which is distributed.
(Logic) A resolving a whole into its parts.
(Print.) The sorting of types and placing them in their proper boxes in the cases.
(Steam Engine) The steps or operations by which steam is supplied to and withdrawn from the cylinder at each stroke of the piston; viz., admission, suppression or cutting off, release or exhaust, and compression of exhaust steam prior to the next admission.
Distributional
a.
• Of or pertaining to distribution.
Distributionist
n.
• A distributer.
Distributive
a.
• Tending to distribute; serving to divide and assign in portions; dealing to each his proper share.
(Logic) Assigning the species of a general term.
(Gram.) Expressing separation; denoting a taking singly, not collectively; as, a distributive adjective or pronoun, such as each, either, every; a distributive numeral, as (Latin) bini (two by two).
n.
(Gram.) A distributive adjective or pronoun; also, a distributive numeral.
Distributively
adv.
• By distribution; singly; not collectively; in a distributive manner.
Distributiveness
n.
• Quality of being distributive.
District
a.
• Rigorous; stringent; harsh.
n.
(Feudal Law) The territory within which the lord has the power of coercing and punishing.
• A division of territory; a defined portion of a state, town, or city, etc., made for administrative, electoral, or other purposes; as, a congressional district, judicial district, land district, school district, etc.
• Any portion of territory of undefined extent; a region; a country; a tract.
v. t.
• To divide into districts or limited portions of territory; as, legislatures district States for the choice of representatives.
Distriction
n.
• Sudden display; flash; glitter.
Districtly
adv.
• Strictly.
Distringas
n.
(Law) A writ commanding the sheriff to distrain a person by his goods or chattels, to compel a compliance with something required of him.
Distrouble
v. t.
• To trouble.
Distrust
v. t.
• To feel absence of trust in; not to confide in or rely upon; to deem of questionable sufficiency or reality; to doubt; to be suspicious of; to mistrust.
n.
• Doubt of sufficiency, reality, or sincerity; want of confidence, faith, or reliance; as, distrust of one's power, authority, will, purposes, schemes, etc.
• Suspicion of evil designs.
• State of being suspected; loss of trust.
Distruster
n.
• One who distrusts.
Distrustful
a.
• Not confident; diffident; wanting confidence or thrust; modest; as, distrustful of ourselves, of one's powers.
• Apt to distrust; suspicious; mistrustful.
Distrusting
a.
• That distrusts; suspicious; lacking confidence in.
Distrustless
a.
• Free from distrust.
Distune
v. t.
• To put out of tune.
Disturb
v. t.
• To throw into disorder or confusion; to derange; to interrupt the settled state of; to excite from a state of rest.
• To agitate the mind of; to deprive of tranquillity; to disquiet; to render uneasy; as, a person is disturbed by receiving an insult, or his mind is disturbed by envy.
• To turn from a regular or designed course.
n.
• Disturbance.
Disturbance
n.
• An interruption of a state of peace or quiet; derangement of the regular course of things; disquiet; disorder; as, a disturbance of religious exercises; a disturbance of the galvanic current.
• Confusion of the mind; agitation of the feelings; perplexity; uneasiness.
• Violent agitation in the body politic; public commotion; tumult.
(Law) The hindering or disquieting of a person in the lawful and peaceable enjoyment of his right; the interruption of a right; as, the disturbance of a franchise, of common, of ways, and the like.
Disturbation
n.
• Act of disturbing; disturbance.
Disturber
n.
• One who, or that which, disturbs of disquiets; a violator of peace; a troubler.
(Law) One who interrupts or incommodes another in the peaceable enjoyment of his right.
Disturn
v. t.
• To turn aside.
Distyle
a.
(Arch.) Having two columns in front; — said of a temple, portico, or the like.
Disulphate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of disulphuric or pyrosulphuric acid; a pyrosulphate.
• An acid salt of sulphuric acid, having only one equivalent of base to two of the acid.
Disulphide
n.
(Chem.) A binary compound of sulphur containing two atoms of sulphur in each molecule; — formerly called disulphuret. Cf. Bisulphide.
Disulphuric
a.
(Chem.) Applied to an acid having in each molecule two atoms of sulphur in the higher state of oxidation.
Disuniform
a.
• Not uniform.
Disunion
n.
• The termination of union; separation; disjunction; as, the disunion of the body and the soul.
• A breach of concord and its effect; alienation.
• The termination or disruption of the union of the States forming the United States.
Disunionist
n.
• An advocate of disunion, specifically, of disunion of the United States.
Disunite
v. t.
• To destroy the union of; to divide; to part; to sever; to disjoin; to sunder; to separate; as, to disunite particles of matter.
• To alienate in spirit; to break the concord of.
v. i.
• To part; to fall asunder; to become separated.
Disuniter
n.
• One who, or that which, disjoins or causes disunion.
Disunity
n.
• A state of separation or disunion; want of unity.
Disusage
n.
• Gradual cessation of use or custom; neglect of use; disuse.
Disuse
v. t.
• To cease to use; to discontinue the practice of.
• To disaccustom; — with to or from; as, disused to toil.
n.
• Cessation of use, practice, or exercise; inusitation; desuetude; as, the limbs lose their strength by disuse.
Disutilize
v. t.
• To deprive of utility; to render useless.
Disvaluation
n.
• Disesteem; depreciation; disrepute.
Disvalue
v. t.
• To undervalue; to depreciate.
n.
• Disesteem; disregard.
Disvantageous
a.
• Disadvantageous.
Disvelop
v. t.
• To develop.
Disventure
n.
• A disadventure.
Disvouch
v. t.
• To discredit; to contradict.
Diswarn
v. t.
• To dissuade from by previous warning.
Diswitted
a.
• Deprived of wits or understanding; distracted.
Diswont
v. t.
• To deprive of wonted usage; to disaccustom.
Disworkmanship
n.
• Bad workmanship.
Disworship
v. t.
• To refuse to worship; to treat as unworthy.
n.
• A deprivation of honor; a cause of disgrace; a discredit.
Disworth
v. t.
• To deprive of worth; to degrade.
Disyoke
v. t.
• To unyoke; to free from a yoke; to disjoin.
Dit
n.
• A word; a decree.
• A ditty; a song.
v. t.
• To close up.
Ditation
n.
• The act of making rich; enrichment.
Ditch
n.
• A trench made in the earth by digging, particularly a trench for draining wet land, for guarding or fencing inclosures, or for preventing an approach to a town or fortress. In the latter sense, it is called also a moat or a fosse.
• Any long, narrow receptacle for water on the surface of the earth.
v. t.
• To dig a ditch or ditches in; to drain by a ditch or ditches; as, to ditch moist land.
• To surround with a ditch.
• To throw into a ditch; as, the engine was ditched and turned on its side.
v. i.
• To dig a ditch or ditches.
Ditcher
n.
• One who digs ditches.
Dite
v. t.
• To prepare for action or use; to make ready; to dight.
Ditheism
n.
• The doctrine of those who maintain the existence of two gods or of two original principles (as in Manicheism), one good and one evil; dualism.
Ditheist
n.
• One who holds the doctrine of ditheism; a dualist.
Dithionic
a.
(Chem.) Containing two equivalents of sulphur; as, dithionic acid.
Dithyramb
n.
• A kind of lyric poetry in honor of Bacchus, usually sung by a band of revelers to a flute accompaniment; hence, in general, a poem written in a wild irregular strain.
Dithyrambic
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, a dithyramb; wild and boisterous.
n.
• A dithyrambic poem; a dithyramb.
Dition
n.
• Dominion; rule.
Ditionary
a.
• Under rule; subject; tributary.
n.
• A subject; a tributary.
Ditokous
a.
(Zool.) Having two kinds of young, as certain annelids.
• Producing only two eggs for a clutch, as certain birds do.
Ditolyl
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline, aromatic hydrocarbon, C14H14, consisting of two radicals or residues of toluene.
Ditone
n.
(Mus.) The Greek major third, which comprehend two major tones (the modern major third contains one major and one minor whole tone).
Ditrichotomous
a.
• Divided into twos or threes.
(Bot.) Dividing into double or treble ramifications; — said of a leaf or stem.
Ditrochean
a.
(Pros.) Containing two trochees.
Ditrochee
n.
(Pros.) A double trochee; a foot made up of two trochees.
Ditroite
n.
(Min.) An igneous rock composed of orthoclase, elaeolite, and sodalite.
Dittander
n.
(Bot.) A kind of peppergrass (Lepidium latifolium).
Dittany
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the Mint family (Origanum Dictamnus), a native of Crete
• The Dictamnus Fraxinella
• In America, the Cunila Mariana, a fragrant herb of the Mint family.
Dittied
a.
• Set, sung, or composed as a ditty; — usually in composition.
Ditto
n.
• The aforesaid thing; the same (as before). Often contracted to do., or to two "turned commas" ("), or small marks. Used in bills, books of account, tables of names, etc., to save repetition.
adv.
• As before, or aforesaid; in the same manner; also.
Dittology
n.
• A double reading, or twofold interpretation, as of a Scripture text.
Ditty
n.
• A saying or utterance; especially, one that is short and frequently repeated; a theme.
• A song; a lay; a little poem intended to be sung.
v. i.
• To sing; to warble a little tune.
Diureide
n.
(Chem.) One of a series of complex nitrogenous substances regarded as containing two molecules of urea or their radicals, as uric acid or allantoin. Cf. Ureide.
Diuresis
n.
(Med.) Free excretion of urine.
Diuretic
a.
(Med.) Tending to increase the secretion and discharge of urine.
n.
• A medicine with diuretic properties.
Diuretical
a.
• Diuretic.
Diureticalness
n.
• The quality of being diuretical; diuretic property.
Diurna
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Lepidoptera, including the butterflies; — so called because they fly only in the daytime.
Diurnal
a.
• Relating to the daytime; belonging to the period of daylight, distinguished from the night; — opposed to nocturnal; as, diurnal heat; diurnal hours.
• Daily; recurring every day; performed in a day; going through its changes in a day; constituting the measure of a day; as, a diurnal fever; a diurnal task; diurnal aberration, or diurnal parallax; the diurnal revolution of the earth.
(Bot.) Opening during the day, and closing at night; — said of flowers or leaves.
(Zool.) Active by day; — applied especially to the eagles and hawks among raptorial birds, and to butterflies (Diurna) among insects.
n.
• A daybook; a journal.
(R. C. Ch.) A small volume containing the daily service for the "little hours," viz., prime, tierce, sext, nones, vespers, and compline.
(Zool.) A diurnal bird or insect.
Diurnalist
n.
• A journalist.
Diurnally
adv.
• Daily; every day.
Diurnalness
n.
• The quality of being diurnal.
Diurnation
n.
• Continuance during the day.
(Zool.) The condition of sleeping or becoming dormant by day, as is the case of the bats.
Diuturnal
a.
• Of long continuance; lasting.
Diuturnity
n.
• Long duration; lastingness.
Divagation
n.
• A wandering about or going astray; digression.
Divalent
a.
(Chem.) Having two units of combining power; bivalent. Cf. Valence.
Divan
n.
• A book; esp., a collection of poems written by one author; as, the divan of Hafiz.
• In Turkey and other Oriental countries: A council of state; a royal court. Also used by the poets for a grand deliberative council or assembly.
• A chief officer of state.
• A saloon or hall where a council is held, in Oriental countries, the state reception room in places, and in the houses of the richer citizens. Cushions on the floor or on benches are ranged round the room.
• A cushioned seat, or a large, low sofa or couch; especially, one fixed to its place, and not movable.
• A coffee and smoking saloon.
Divaricate
v. i.
• To part into two branches; to become bifid; to fork.
• To diverge; to be divaricate.
v. t.
• To divide into two branches; to cause to branch apart.
a.
• Diverging; spreading asunder; widely diverging.
(Biol.) Forking and diverging; widely diverging; as the branches of a tree, or as lines of sculpture, or color markings on animals, etc.
Divaricately
adv.
• With divarication.
Divarication
n.
• A separation into two parts or branches; a forking; a divergence.
• An ambiguity of meaning; a disagreement of difference in opinion.
(Biol.) A divergence of lines of color sculpture, or of fibers at different angles.
Divaricator
n.
(Zool.) One of the muscles which open the shell of brachiopods; a cardinal muscle.
Divast
a.
• Devastated; laid waste.
Dive
v. i.
• To plunge into water head foremost; to thrust the body under, or deeply into, water or other fluid.
• Fig.: To plunge or to go deeply into any subject, question, business, etc.; to penetrate; to explore.
v. t.
• To plunge (a person or thing) into water; to dip; to duck.
• To explore by diving; to plunge into.
n.
• A plunge headforemost into water, the act of one who dives, literally or figuratively.
• A place of low resort.
Divedapper
n.
(Zool.) A water fowl; the didapper.
Divel
v. t.
• To rend apart.
Divellent
a.
• Drawing asunder.
Divellicate
v. t.
• To pull in pieces.
Diver
n.
• One who, or that which, dives.
• Fig.: One who goes deeply into a subject, study, or business.
(Zool.) Any bird of certain genera, as Urinator (formerly Colymbus), or the allied genus Colymbus, or Podiceps, remarkable for their agility in diving.
Diverb
n.
• A saying in which two members of the sentence are contrasted; an antithetical proverb.
Diverberate
v. t.
• To strike or sound through.
Diverberation
n.
• A sounding through.
Diverge
v. i.
• To extend from a common point in different directions; to tend from one point and recede from each other; to tend to spread apart; to turn aside or deviate (as from a given direction); — opposed to converge; as, rays of light diverge as they proceed from the sun.
• To differ from a typical form; to vary from a normal condition; to dissent from a creed or position generally held or taken.
Divergement
n.
• Divergence.
Divergent
a.
• Receding farther and farther from each other, as lines radiating from one point; deviating gradually from a given direction; — opposed to convergent.
(Optics) Causing divergence of rays; as, a divergent lens.
• Fig.: Disagreeing from something given; differing; as, a divergent statement.
Diverging
a.
• Tending in different directions from a common center; spreading apart; divergent.
Divergingly
adv.
• In a diverging manner.
Divers
a.
• Different in kind or species; diverse.
• Several; sundry; various; more than one, but not a great number; as, divers philosophers. Also used substantively or pronominally.
Diverse
a.
• Different; unlike; dissimilar; distinct; separate.
• Capable of various forms; multiform.
adv.
• In different directions; diversely.
v. i.
• To turn aside.
Diversely
adv.
• In different ways; differently; variously.
• In different directions; to different points.
Diverseness
n.
• The quality of being diverse.
Diversifiability
n.
• The quality or capacity of being diversifiable.
Diversifiable
a.
• Capable of being diversified or varied.
Diversification
n.
• The act of making various, or of changing form or quality.
• State of diversity or variation; variegation; modification; change; alternation.
Diversified
a.
• Distinguished by various forms, or by a variety of aspects or objects; variegated; as, diversified scenery or landscape.
Diversifier
n.
• One who, or that which, diversifies.
Diversiform
a.
• Of a different form; of varied forms.
Diversify
v. t.
• To make diverse or various in form or quality; to give variety to; to variegate; to distinguish by numerous differences or aspects.
Diversiloquent
a.
• Speaking in different ways.
Diversion
n.
• The act of turning aside from any course, occupation, or object; as, the diversion of a stream from its channel; diversion of the mind from business.
• That which diverts; that which turns or draws the mind from care or study, and thus relaxes and amuses; sport; play; pastime; as, the diversions of youth.
(Mil.) The act of drawing the attention and force of an enemy from the point where the principal attack is to be made; the attack, alarm, or feint which diverts.
Diversity
n.
• A state of difference; dissimilitude; unlikeness.
• Multiplicity of difference; multiformity; variety.
• Variegation.
Diversivolent
a.
• Desiring different things.
Diversory
a.
• Serving or tending to divert; also, distinguishing.
n.
• A wayside inn.
Divert
v. t.
• To turn aside; to turn off from any course or intended application; to deflect; as, to divert a river from its channel; to divert commerce from its usual course.
• To turn away from any occupation, business, or study; to cause to have lively and agreeable sensations; to amuse; to entertain; as, children are diverted with sports; men are diverted with works of wit and humor.
v. i.
• To turn aside; to digress.
Diverter
n.
• One who, or that which, diverts, turns off, or pleases.
Divertible
a.
• Capable of being diverted.
Diverticle
n.
• A turning; a byway; a bypath.
(Anat.) A diverticulum.
Diverticular
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to a diverticulum.
Diverticulum
n.
(Anat.) A blind tube branching out of a longer one.
Divertimento
n.(Mus.
• ) A light and pleasing composition.
Diverting
a.
• Amusing; entertaining.
Divertise
v. t.
• To divert; to entertain.
Divertisement
n.
• Diversion; amusement; recreation.
Divertissement
n.
• A short ballet, or other entertainment, between the acts of a play.
Divertive
a.
• Tending to divert; diverting; amusing; interesting.
Dives
n.
• The name popularly given to the rich man in our Lord's parable of the "Rich Man and Lazarus" (Luke xvi. 19-31). Hence, a name for a rich worldling.
Divest
v. t.
• To unclothe; to strip, as of clothes, arms, or equipage; — opposed to invest.
• Fig.: To strip; to deprive; to dispossess; as, to divest one of his rights or privileges; to divest one's self of prejudices, passions, etc.
Divestible
a.
• Capable of being divested.
Divestiture
n.
• The act of stripping, or depriving; the state of being divested; the deprivation, or surrender, of possession of property, rights, etc.
Divestment
n.
• The act of divesting.
Divesture
n.
• Divestiture.
Dividable
a.
• Capable of being divided; divisible.
• Divided; separated; parted.
Dividant
a.
• Different; distinct.
Divide
v. t.
• To part asunder (a whole); to sever into two or more parts or pieces; to sunder; to separate into parts.
• To cause to be separate; to keep apart by a partition, or by an imaginary line or limit; as, a wall divides two houses; a stream divides the towns.
• To make partition of among a number; to apportion, as profits of stock among proprietors; to give in shares; to distribute; to mete out; to share.
• To disunite in opinion or interest; to make discordant or hostile; to set at variance.
• To separate into two parts, in order to ascertain the votes for and against a measure; as, to divide a legislative house upon a question.
(Math.) To subject to arithmetical division.
(Logic) To separate into species; — said of a genus or generic term.
(Mech.) To mark divisions on; to graduate; as, to divide a sextant.
(Music) To play or sing in a florid style, or with variations.
v. i.
• To be separated; to part; to open; to go asunder.
• To cause separation; to disunite.
• To break friendship; to fall out.
• To have a share; to partake.
• To vote, as in the British Parliament, by the members separating themselves into two parties (as on opposite sides of the hall or in opposite lobbies), that is, the ayes dividing from the noes.
n.
• A dividing ridge of land between the tributaries of two streams; a watershed.
Divided
a.
• Parted; disunited; distributed.
(Bot.) Cut into distinct parts, by incisions which reach the midrib; — said of a leaf.
Dividedly
adv.
• Separately; in a divided manner.
Dividend
n.
• A sum of money to be divided and distributed; the share of a sum divided that falls to each individual; a distribute sum, share, or percentage; — applied to the profits as appropriated among shareholders, and to assets as apportioned among creditors; as, the dividend of a bank, a railway corporation, or a bankrupt estate.
(Math.) A number or quantity which is to be divided.
Divident
n.
• Dividend; share.
Divider
n.
• One who, or that which, divides; that which separates anything into parts.
• One who deals out to each his share.
• One who, or that which, causes division.
• An instrument for dividing lines, describing circles, etc., compasses.
Dividing
a.
• That divides; separating; marking divisions; graduating.
Dividingly
adv.
• By division.
Dividual
a.
• Divided, shared, or participated in, in common with others.
Dividually
adv.
• By dividing.
Dividuous
a.
• Divided; dividual.
Divination
n.
• The act of divining; a foreseeing or foretelling of future events; the pretended art discovering secret or future by preternatural means.
• An indication of what is future or secret; augury omen; conjectural presage; prediction.
Divinator
n.
• One who practices or pretends to divination; a diviner.
Divinatory
a.
• Professing, or relating to, divination.
Divine
a.
• Of or belonging to God; as, divine perfections; the divine will.
• Proceeding from God; as, divine judgments.
• Appropriated to God, or celebrating his praise; religious; pious; holy; as, divine service; divine songs; divine worship.
• Pertaining to, or proceeding from, a deity; partaking of the nature of a god or the gods.
• Godlike; heavenly; excellent in the highest degree; supremely admirable; apparently above what is human. In this application, the word admits of comparison; as, the divinest mind. Sir J. Davies.
• Presageful; foreboding; prescient.
• Relating to divinity or theology.
n.
• One skilled in divinity; a theologian.
• A minister of the gospel; a priest; a clergyman.
v. t.
• To foresee or foreknow; to detect; to anticipate; to conjecture.
• To foretell; to predict; to presage.
• To render divine; to deify.
v. i.
• To use or practice divination; to foretell by divination; to utter prognostications.
• To have or feel a presage or foreboding.
• To conjecture or guess; as, to divine rightly.
Divinely
adv.
• In a divine or godlike manner; holily; admirably or excellently in a supreme degree.
• By the agency or influence of God.
Divinement
n.
• Divination.
Divineness
n.
• The quality of being divine; superhuman or supreme excellence.
Diviner
n.
• One who professes divination; one who pretends to predict events, or to reveal occult things, by supernatural means.
• A conjecture; a guesser; one who makes out occult things.
Divineress
n.
• A woman who divines.
Diving
a.
• That dives or is used or diving.
Divinify
v. t.
• To render divine; to deify.
Divining
a.
• That divines; for divining.
Diviningly
adv.
• In a divining manner.
Divinistre
n.
• A diviner.
Divinity
n.
• The state of being divine; the nature or essence of God; deity; godhead.
• The Deity; the Supreme Being; God.
• A pretended deity of pagans; a false god
• A celestial being, inferior to the supreme God, but superior to man.
• Something divine or superhuman; supernatural power or virtue; something which inspires awe.
• The science of divine things; the science which treats of God, his laws and moral government, and the way of salvation; theology.
Divinization
n.
• A making divine.
Divinize
v. t.
• To invest with a divine character; to deify.
Divisibility
n.
• The quality of being divisible; the property of bodies by which their parts are capable of separation.
Divisible
a.
• Capable of being divided or separated.
n.
• A divisible substance.
Division
n.
• The act or process of diving anything into parts, or the state of being so divided; separation.
• That which divides or keeps apart; a partition.
• The portion separated by the divining of a mass or body; a distinct segment or section.
• Disunion; difference in opinion or feeling; discord; variance; alienation.
• Difference of condition; state of distinction; distinction; contrast.
• Separation of the members of a deliberative body, esp. of the Houses of Parliament, to ascertain the vote.
(Math.) The process of finding how many times one number or quantity is contained in another; the reverse of multiplication; also, the rule by which the operation is performed.
(Logic) The separation of a genus into its constituent species.
(Mil.) Two or more brigades under the command of a general officer.
• Two companies of infantry maneuvering as one subdivision of a battalion.
• One of the larger districts into which a country is divided for administering military affairs.
(Naut.) One of the groups into which a fleet is divided.
(Mus.) A course of notes so running into each other as to form one series or chain, to be sung in one breath to one syllable.
(Rhet.) The distribution of a discourse into parts; a part so distinguished.
(Biol.) A grade or rank in classification; a portion of a tribe or of a class; or, in some recent authorities, equivalent to a subkingdom.
Divisional
a.
• That divides; prtaining to, making, or noting, a division; as, a divisional line; a divisional general; a divisional surgeon of police.
Divisionally
adv.
• So as to be divisional.
Divisionary
a.
• Divisional.
Divisionor
n.
• One who divides or makes division.
Divisive
a.
• Indicating division or distribution.
• Creating, or tending to create, division, separation, or difference.
Divisor
n.
(Math.) The number by which the dividend is divided.
Divorce
n.
(Law) A legal dissolution of the marriage contract by a court or other body having competent authority. This is properly a divorce, and called, technically, divorce a vinculo matrimonii.
• The separation of a married woman from the bed and board of her husband — divorce a mensa et toro (or thoro), "from bed board."
• The decree or writing by which marriage is dissolved.
• Separation; disunion of things closely united.
• That which separates.
v. t.
• To dissolve the marriage contract of, either wholly or partially; to separate by divorce.
• To separate or disunite; to sunder.
• To make away; to put away.
Divorceable
a.
• Capable of being divorced.
Divorcee
n.
• A person divorced.
Divorceless
a.
• Incapable of being divorced or separated; free from divorce.
Divorcement
n.
• Dissolution of the marriage tie; divorce; separation.
Divorcer
n.
• The person or cause that produces or effects a divorce.
Divorcible
a.
• Divorceable.
Divorcive
a.
• Having power to divorce; tending to divorce.
Divot
n.
• A thin, oblong turf used for covering cottages, and also for fuel.
Divulgate
a.
• Published.
v. t.
• To divulge.
Divulgater
n.
• A divulger.
Divulgation
n.
• The act of divulging or publishing.
Divulge
v. t.
• To make public; to several or communicate to the public; to tell (a secret) so that it may become generally known; to disclose; — said of that which had been confided as a secret, or had been before unknown; as, to divulge a secret.
• To indicate publicly; to proclaim.
• To impart; to communicate.
v. i.
• To become publicly known.
Divulsive
a.
• Tending to pull asunder, tear, or rend; distracting.
Dixie
n.
• A colloquial name for the Southern portion of the United States, esp. during the Civil War.
Dizen
v. t.
• To dress; to attire.
• To dress gaudily; to overdress; to bedizen; to deck out.
Dizz
v. t.
• To make dizzy; to astonish; to puzzle.
Dizzard
n.
• A blockhead. [Written also dizard, and disard.]
Dizzily
adv.
• In a dizzy manner or state.
Dizziness
n.
• Giddiness; a whirling sensation in the head; vertigo.
Dizzy
a.
• Having in the head a sensation of whirling, with a tendency to fall; vertiginous; giddy; hence, confused; indistinct.
• Causing, or tending to cause, giddiness or vertigo.
• Without distinct thought; unreflecting; thoughtless; heedless.
v. t.
• To make dizzy or giddy; to give the vertigo to; to confuse.
Do
n.
(Mus.) A syllable attached to the first tone of the major diatonic scale for the purpose of solmization, or solfeggio. It is the first of the seven syllables used by the Italians as manes of musical tones, and replaced, for the sake of euphony, the syllable Ut, applied to the note C. In England and America the same syllables are used by mane as a scale pattern, while the tones in respect to absolute pitch are named from the first seven letters of the alphabet.
v. t. or auxiliary
• To place; to put.
• To cause; to make; — with an infinitive.
• To bring about; to produce, as an effect or result; to effect; to achieve.
• To perform, as an action; to execute; to transact to carry out in action; as, to do a good or a bad act; do our duty; to do what I can.
• To bring to an end by action; to perform completely; to finish; to accomplish; — a sense conveyed by the construction, which is that of the past participle done.
• To make ready for an object, purpose, or use, as food by cooking; to cook completely or sufficiently; as, the meat is done on one side only.
• To put or bring into a form, state, or condition, especially in the phrases, to do death, to put to death; to slay; to do away (often do away with), to put away; to remove; to do on, to put on; to don; to do off, to take off, as dress; to doff; to do into, to put into the form of; to translate or transform into, as a text.
• To cheat; to gull; to overreach.
• To see or inspect; to explore; as, to do all the points of interest.
(Stock Exchange) To cash or to advance money for, as a bill or note.
v. i.
• To act or behave in any manner; to conduct one's self.
• To fare; to be, as regards health; as, they asked him how he did; how do you do to-day?
• To succeed; to avail; to answer the purpose; to serve; as, if no better plan can be found, he will make this do.
n.
• Ado; bustle; stir; to do.
• A cheat; a swindle.
Doab
• A tongue or tract of land included between two rivers; as, the doab between the Ganges and the Jumna.
Doable
a.
• Capable of being done.
Doand
p. pr.
• Doing.
Dobber
n.
• A float to a fishing line.
Dobbin
n.
• An old jaded horse.
• Sea gravel mixed with sand.
Dobson
n.
(Zool.) The aquatic larva of a large neuropterous insect (Corydalus cornutus), used as bait in angling.
Dobule
n.
(Zool.) The European dace.
Docent
a.
• Serving to instruct; teaching.
Docetae
n. pl.
(Eccl. Hist.) Ancient heretics who held that Christ's body was merely a phantom or appearance.
Docetic
a.
• Pertaining to, held by, or like, the Docetae.
Docetism
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) The doctrine of the Docetae.
Dochmiac
a.
(Pros.) Pertaining to, or containing, the dochmius.
Dochmius
n.
(Pros.) A foot of five syllables (usually — - -).
Docible
a.
• Easily taught or managed; teachable.
Docile
a.
• Teachable; easy to teach; docible.
• Disposed to be taught; tractable; easily managed; as, a docile child.
Docility
n.
• teachableness; aptness for being taught; docibleness.
• Willingness to be taught; tractableness.
Docimacy
n.
• The art or practice of applying tests to ascertain the nature, quality, etc., of objects, as of metals or ores, of medicines, or of facts pertaining to physiology.
Docimastic
a.
• Proving by experiments or tests.
Docimology
n.
• A treatise on the art of testing, as in assaying metals, etc.
Docity
n.
• Teachableness.
Dock
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants (Rumex), some species of which are well-known weeds which have a long taproot and are difficult of extermination.
n.
• The solid part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair; the stump of a tail; the part of a tail left after clipping or cutting.
• A case of leather to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
v. t.
• to cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.
• To cut off a part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to subject to a deduction; as, to dock one's wages.
• To cut off, bar, or destroy; as, to dock an entail.
n.
• An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, — used for the reception of vessels, and provided with gates for keeping in or shutting out the tide.
• The slip or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of ships; — sometimes including the piers themselves; as, to be down on the dock.
• The place in court where a criminal or accused person stands.
v. t.
• To draw, law, or place (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the bottom, etc.
Dockage
n.
• A charge for the use of a dock.
Docket
n.
• A small piece of paper or parchment, containing the heads of a writing; a summary or digest.
• A bill tied to goods, containing some direction, as the name of the owner, or the place to which they are to be sent; a label.
(Law) An abridged entry of a judgment or proceeding in an action, or register or such entries; a book of original, kept by clerks of courts, containing a formal list of the names of parties, and minutes of the proceedings, in each case in court
• A list or calendar of causes ready for hearing or trial, prepared for the use of courts by the clerks.
• A list or calendar of business matters to be acted on in any assembly.
v. t.
• To make a brief abstract of (a writing) and indorse it on the back of the paper, or to indorse the title or contents on the back of; to summarize; as, to docket letters and papers.
(Law) To make a brief abstract of and inscribe in a book; as, judgments regularly docketed.
• To enter or inscribe in a docket, or list of causes for trial.
• To mark with a ticket; as, to docket goods.
Dockyard
n.
• A yard or storage place for all sorts of naval stores and timber for shipbuilding.
Docoglossa
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of gastropods, including the true limpets, and having the teeth on the odontophore or lingual ribbon.
Doctor
n.
• A teacher; one skilled in a profession, or branch of knowledge learned man.
• An academical title, originally meaning a men so well versed in his department as to be qualified to teach it. Hence: One who has taken the highest degree conferred by a university or college, or has received a diploma of the highest degree; as, a doctor of divinity, of law, of medicine, of music, or of philosophy. Such diplomas may confer an honorary title only.
• One duly licensed to practice medicine; a member of the medical profession; a physician.
• Any mechanical contrivance intended to remedy a difficulty or serve some purpose in an exigency; as, the doctor of a calico-printing machine, which is a knife to remove superfluous coloring matter; the doctor, or auxiliary engine, called also donkey engine.
(Zool.) The friar skate.
v. t.
• To treat as a physician does; to apply remedies to; to repair; as, to doctor a sick man or a broken cart.
• To confer a doctorate upon; to make a doctor.
• To tamper with and arrange for one's own purposes; to falsify; to adulterate; as, to doctor election returns; to doctor whisky.
v. i.
• To practice physic.
Doctoral
a.
• Of or relating to a doctor, or to the degree of doctor.
Doctorally
adv.
• In the manner of a doctor.
Doctorate
n.
• The degree, title, or rank, of a doctor.
v. t.
• To make (one) a doctor.
Doctoress
n.
• A female doctor.
Doctorly
a.
• Like a doctor or learned man.
Doctorship
n.
• Doctorate.
Doctress
n.
• A female doctor.
Doctrinable
a.
• Of the nature of, or constituting, doctrine.
Doctrinaire
n.
• One who would apply to political or other practical concerns the abstract doctrines or the theories of his own philosophical system; a propounder of a new set of opinions; a dogmatic theorist. Used also adjectively; as, doctrinaire notions.
Doctrinal
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, doctrine or something taught and to be believed; as, a doctrinal observation.
• Pertaining to, or having to do with, teaching.
n.
• A matter of doctrine; also, a system of doctrines.
Doctrinally
adv.
• In a doctrinal manner or for; by way of teaching or positive direction.
Doctrinarian
n.
• A doctrinaire.
Doctrinarianism
n.
• The principles or practices of the Doctrinaires.
Doctrine
n.
• Teaching; instruction.
• That which is taught; what is held, put forth as true, and supported by a teacher, a school, or a sect; a principle or position, or the body of principles, in any branch of knowledge; any tenet or dogma; a principle of faith; as, the doctrine of atoms; the doctrine of chances.
Document
n.
• That which is taught or authoritatively set forth; precept; instruction; dogma.
• An example for instruction or warning.
• An original or official paper relied upon as the basis, proof, or support of anything else; — in its most extended sense, including any writing, book, or other instrument conveying information in the case; any material substance on which the thoughts of men are represented by any species of conventional mark or symbol.
v. t.
• To teach; to school.
• To furnish with documents or papers necessary to establish facts or give information; as, a a ship should be documented according to the directions of law.
Documental
a.
• Of or pertaining to instruction.
• Of or pertaining to written evidence; documentary; as, documental testimony.
Documentary
a.
• Pertaining to written evidence; contained or certified in writing.
Doddart
n.
• A game much like hockey, played in an open field; also, the, bent stick for playing the game.
Dodded
a.
• Without horns; as, dodded cattle; without beards; as, dodded corn.
Dodder
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Cuscuta. It is a leafless parasitical vine with yellowish threadlike stems. It attaches itself to some other plant, as to flax, goldenrod, etc., and decaying at the root. is nourished by the plant that supports it.
v. t. & i.
• To shake, tremble, or totter.
Doddered
a.
• Shattered; infirm.
Dodecagon
n.
(Geom.) A figure or polygon bounded by twelve sides and containing twelve angles.
Dodecagynia
n. pl.
(Bot.) A Linnaean order of plants having twelve styles.
Dodecahedral
a.
• Pertaining to, or like, a dodecahedion; consisting of twelve equal sides.
Dodecahedron
n.
(Geom. & Crystallog.) A solid having twelve faces.
Dodecandria
n. pl.
(Bot.) A Linnaean class of plants including all that have any number of stamens between twelve and nineteen.
Dodecane
n.
(Chem.) Any one of a group of thick oily hydrocarbons, C12H26, of the paraffin series.
Dodecastyle
a.
(Arch.) Having twelve columns in front.
n.
• A dodecastyle portico, or building.
Dodecasyllabic
a.
• Having twelve syllables.
Dodecasyllable
n.
• A word consisting of twelve syllables.
Dodecatemory
n.
(Astron.) A tern applied to the twelve houses, or parts, of the zodiac of the primum mobile, to distinguish them from the twelve signs; also, any one of the twelve signs of the zodiac.
Dodge
v. i.
• To start suddenly aside, as to avoid a blow or a missile; to shift place by a sudden start.
• To evade a duty by low craft; to practice mean shifts; to use tricky devices; to play fast and loose; to quibble.
v. t.
• To evade by a sudden shift of place; to escape by starting aside; as, to dodge a blow aimed or a ball thrown.
• Fig.: To evade by craft; as, to dodge a question; to dodge responsibility.
• To follow by dodging, or suddenly shifting from place to place.
n.
• The act of evading by some skillful movement; a sudden starting aside; hence, an artful device to evade, deceive, or cheat; a cunning trick; an artifice.
Dodger
n.
• One who dodges or evades; one who plays fast and loose, or uses tricky devices.
• A small handbill.
Dodgery
n.
• trickery; artifice.
Dodkin
n.
• A doit; a small coin.
Dodman
n.
• A snail; also, a snail shell; a hodmandod.
(Zool.) Any shellfish which casts its shell, as a lobster.
Dodo
n.
(Zool.) A large, extinct bird (Didus ineptus), formerly inhabiting the Island of Mauritius. It had short, half-fledged wings, like those of the ostrich, and a short neck and legs; — called also dronte. It was related to the pigeons.
Doe
n.
(Zool.) A female deer or antelope; specifically, the female of the fallow deer, of which the male is called a buck. Also applied to the female of other animals, as the rabbit.
n.
• A feat.
Doeglic
a.
• Pertaining to, or obtained from, the doegling; as, doeglic acid (Chem.), an oily substance resembling oleic acid.
Doegling
n.
(Zool.) The beaked whale (Balaenoptera rostrata), from which doegling oil is obtained.
Doer
m.
• One who does; one performs or executes; one who is wont and ready to act; an actor; an agent.
(Scots Law) An agent or attorney; a factor.
Does
• The 3d pers. sing. pres. of Do.
Doeskin
n.
• The skin of the doe.
• A firm woolen cloth with a smooth, soft surface like a doe's skin; — made for men's wear.
Doff
v. t.
• To put off, as dress; to divest one's self of; hence, figuratively, to put or thrust away; to rid one's self of.
• To strip; to divest; to undress.
v. i.
• To put off dress; to take off the hat.
Doffer
n.
(Mach.) A revolving cylinder, or a vibrating bar with teeth, in a carding machine, which doffs, or strips off, the cotton from the cards.
Dog
n.
(Zool.) A quadruped of the genus Canis, esp. the domestic dog (C. familiaris).
• A mean, worthless fellow; a wretch.
• A fellow; — used humorously or contemptuously; as, a sly dog; a lazy dog.
(Astron.) One of the two constellations, Canis Major and Canis Minor, or the Greater Dog and the Lesser Dog. Canis Major contains the Dog Star (Sirius).
• An iron for holding wood in a fireplace; a firedog; an andiron.
(Mech.) A grappling iron, with a claw or claws, for fastening into wood or other heavy articles, for the purpose of raising or moving them
• An iron with fangs fastening a log in a saw pit, or on the carriage of a sawmill
• A piece in machinery acting as a catch or clutch; especially, the carrier of a lathe, also, an adjustable stop to change motion, as in a machine tool.
v. t.
• To hunt or track like a hound; to follow insidiously or indefatigably; to chase with a dog or dogs; to worry, as if by dogs; to hound with importunity.
Dogal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a doge.
Dogate
n.
• The office or dignity of a doge.
Dogbane
n.
(Bot.) A small genus of perennial herbaceous plants, with poisonous milky juice, bearing slender pods pods in pairs.
Dogberry
n.
(Bot.) The berry of the dogwood; — called also dogcherry.
Dogbolt
n.
(Gun.) The bolt of the cap-square over the trunnion of a cannon.
Dogcart
n.
• A light one-horse carriage, commonly two-wheeled, patterned after a cart. The original dogcarts used in England by sportsmen had a box at the back for carrying dogs.
Dogdraw
n.
(Eng. Forest Law) The act of drawing after, or pursuing, deer with a dog.
Doge
n.
• The chief magistrate in the republics of Venice and Genoa.
Dogeate
n.
• Dogate.
Dogeless
a.
• Without a doge.
Dogfish
n.
(Zool.) A small shark, of many species, of the genera Mustelus, Scyllium, Spinax, etc.
• The bowfin (Amia calva).
• The burbot of Lake Erie.
Dogged
a.
• Sullen; morose.
• Sullenly obstinate; obstinately determined or persistent; as, dogged resolution; dogged work.
Doggedly
adv.
• In a dogged manner; sullenly; with obstinate resolution.
Doggedness
n.
• Sullenness; moroseness.
• Sullen or obstinate determination; grim resolution or persistence.
Dogger
n.
(Naut.) A two-masted fishing vessel, used by the Dutch.
n.
• A sort of stone, found in the mines with the true alum rock, chiefly of silica and iron.
Doggerel
a.
• Low in style, and irregular in measure; as, doggerel rhymes.
n.
• A sort of loose or irregular verse; mean or undignified poetry.
Doggerman
n.
• A sailor belonging to a dogger.
Dogget
n.
• Docket.
Doggish
a.
• Like a dog; having the bad qualities of a dog; churlish; growling; brutal.
Doggrel
a. & n.
• Same as Doggerel.
Doghole
n.
• A place fit only for dogs; a vile, mean habitation or apartment.
Dogma
n.
• That which is held as an opinion; a tenet; a doctrine.
• A formally stated and authoritatively settled doctrine; a definite, established, and authoritative tenet.
• A doctrinal notion asserted without regard to evidence or truth; an arbitrary dictum.
Dogmatic
n.
• One of an ancient sect of physicians who went by general principles; — opposed to the Empiric.
Dogmatically
adv.
• In a dogmatic manner; positively; magisterially.
Dogmaticalness
n.
• The quality of being dogmatical; positiveness.
Dogmatician
n.
• A dogmatist.
Dogmatics
n.
• The science which treats of Christian doctrinal theology.
Dogmatism
n.
• The manner or character of a dogmatist; arrogance or positiveness in stating opinion.
Dogmatist
n.
• One who dogmatizes; one who speaks dogmatically; a bold and arrogant advancer of principles.
Dogmatize
v. i.
• To assert positively; to teach magisterially or with bold and undue confidence; to advance with arrogance.
v. t.
• To deliver as a dogma.
Dogmatizer
n.
• One who dogmatizes; a bold asserter; a magisterial teacher.
Dogship
n.
• The character, or individuality, of a dog.
Dogshore
n.
(Naut.) One of several shores used to hold a ship firmly and prevent her moving while the blocks are knocked away before launching.
Dogsick
a.
• Sick as a dog sometimes is very sick.
Dogskin
n.
• The skin of a dog, or leather made of the skin. Also used adjectively.
Dogsleep
n.
• Pretended sleep.
(Naut.) The fitful naps taken when all hands are kept up by stress.
Dogtie
n.
(Arch.) A cramp.
Dogtooth
n.
(Arch.) An ornament common in Gothic architecture, consisting of pointed projections resembling teeth; — also called tooth ornament.
Dogtrick
n.
• A gentle trot, like that of a dog.
Dogvane
n.
(Naut.) A small vane of bunting, feathers, or any other light material, carried at the masthead to indicate the direction of the wind.
Dogwatch
n.
(Naut.) A half watch; a watch of two hours, of which there are two, the first dogwatch from 4 to 6 o'clock, p.m., and the second dogwatch from 6 to 8 o'clock, P. M.
Dogwood
n.
(Bot.) The Cornus, a genus of large shrubs or small trees, the wood of which is exceedingly hard, and serviceable for many purposes.
Dohtren
n. pl.
• Daughters.
Doily
n.
• A kind of woolen stuff.
• A small napkin, used at table with the fruit, etc.; — commonly colored and fringed.
Doing
n.
• Anything done; a deed; an action good or bad; hence, in the plural, conduct; behavior.
Doit
n.
• A small Dutch coin, worth about half a farthing; also, a similar small coin once used in Scotland; hence, any small piece of money.
• A thing of small value; as, I care not a doit.
Doitkin
n.
• A very small coin; a doit.
Dokimastic
a.
• Docimastic.
Dolabra
n.
• A rude ancient ax or hatchet, seen in museums.
Dolabriform
a.
• Shaped like the head of an ax or hatchet, as some leaves, and also certain organs of some shellfish.
Doldrums
n. pl.
• A part of the ocean near the equator, abounding in calms, squalls, and light, baffling winds, which sometimes prevent all progress for weeks; — so called by sailors.
Dole
n.
• grief; sorrow; lamentation.
n.
• Distribution; dealing; apportionment.
• That which is dealt out; a part, share, or portion also, a scanty share or allowance.
• Alms; charitable gratuity or portion.
• A boundary; a landmark.
• A void space left in tillage.
v. t.
• To deal out in small portions; to distribute, as a dole; to deal out scantily or grudgingly.
Doleful
a.
• Full of dole or grief; expressing or exciting sorrow; sorrowful; sad; dismal.
Dolent
a.
• Sorrowful.
Dolente
a. & adv.
(Mus.) Plaintively.
Dolerite
n.
(Geol. & Min.) A dark-colored, basic, igneous rock, composed essentially of pyroxene and a triclinic feldspar with magnetic iron. By many authors it is considered equivalent to a coarse-grained basalt.
Doleritic
a.
• Of the nature of dolerite; as, much lava is doleritic lava.
Dolesome
a.
• Doleful; dismal; gloomy; sorrowful.
Dolf
imp.
• of Delve.
Dolioform
a.
(Biol.) Barrel-shaped, or like a cask in form.
Doliolum
n.
(Zool.) A genus of freeswimming oceanic tunicates, allied to Salpa, and having alternate generations.
Dolium
n.
(Zool.) A genus of large univalve mollusks, including the partridge shell and tun shells.
Doll
n.
• A child's puppet; a toy baby for a little girl.
Dollar
n.
• A silver coin of the United States containing 371.25 grains of silver and 41.25 grains of alloy, that is, having a total weight of 412.5 grains.
• A gold coin of the United States containing 23.22 grains of gold and 2.58 grains of alloy, that is, having a total weight of 25.8 grains, nine-tenths fine. It is no longer coined.
• A coin of the same general weight and value, though differing slightly in different countries, current in Mexico, Canada, parts of South America, also in Spain, and several other European countries.
• The value of a dollar; the unit commonly employed in the United States in reckoning money values.
Dollardee
n.
(Zool.) A species of sunfish (Lepomis pallidus), common in the United States; — called also blue sunfish, and copper-nosed bream.
Dolly
n.
(Mining) A contrivance, turning on a vertical axis by a handle or winch, and giving a circular motion to the ore to be washed; a stirrer.
(Mach.) A tool with an indented head for shaping the head of a rivet.
• In pile driving, a block interposed between the head of the pile and the ram of the driver.
• A small truck with a single wide roller used for moving heavy beams, columns, etc., in bridge building.
• A compact, narrow-gauge locomotive used for moving construction trains, switching, etc.
n.
• A child's mane for a doll.
Dolman
n.
• A long robe or outer garment, with long sleeves, worn by the Turks.
• A cloak of a peculiar fashion worn by women.
Dolmen
n.
• A cromlech.
Dolomite
n.
(Geol. & Min.) A mineral consisting of the carbonate of lime and magnesia in varying proportions. It occurs in distinct crystals, and in extensive beds as a compact limestone, often crystalline granular, either white or clouded. It includes much of the common white marble. Also called bitter spar.
Dolomitic
a.
• Pertaining to dolomite.
Dolomize
v. t.
• To convert into dolomite.
Dolor
n.
• Pain; grief; distress; anguish.
Doloriferous
a.
• Producing pain.
Doloroso
a. & adv.
(Mus.) Plaintive; pathetic; — used adverbially as a musical direction.
Dolorous
a.
• Full of grief; sad; sorrowful; doleful; dismal; as, a dolorous object; dolorous discourses.
• Occasioning pain or grief; painful.
Dolphin
n.
(Zool.) A cetacean of the genus Delphinus and allied genera (esp. D. delphis); the true dolphin
• The Coryphaena hippuris, a fish of about five feet in length, celebrated for its surprising changes of color when dying. It is the fish commonly known as the dolphin.
(Gr. Antiq.) A mass of iron or lead hung from the yardarm, in readiness to be dropped on the deck of an enemy's vessel.
(Naut.) A kind of wreath or strap of plaited cordage.
• A spar or buoy held by an anchor and furnished with a ring to which ships may fasten their cables.
• A mooring post on a wharf or beach.
• A permanent fender around a heavy boat just below the gunwale.
(Gun.) In old ordnance, one of the handles above the trunnions by which the gun was lifted.
(Astron.) A small constellation between Aquila and Pegasus.
Dolphinet
n.
• A female dolphin.
Dolt
n.
• A heavy, stupid fellow; a blockhead; a numskull; an ignoramus; a dunce; a dullard.
v. i.
• To behave foolishly.
Doltish
a.
• Doltlike; dull in intellect; stupid; blockish; as, a doltish clown.
Dolus
n.
(Law) Evil intent, embracing both malice and fraud.
Dolven
p. p.
• of Delve.
Dom
n.
• A title anciently given to the pope, and later to other church dignitaries and some monastic orders.
• In Portugal and Brazil, the title given to a member of the higher classes.
Domable
a.
• Capable of being tamed; tamable.
Domableness
n.
• Tamableness.
Domage
n.
• Damage; hurt.
• Subjugation.
Domain
n.
• Dominion; empire; authority.
• The territory over which dominion or authority is exerted; the possessions of a sovereign or commonwealth, or the like. Also used figuratively.
• Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne.
(Law) Ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign ownership.
Domal
a.
(Astrol.) Pertaining to a house.
Domanial
a.
• Of or relating to a domain or to domains.
Dome
n.
• A building; a house; an edifice; — used chiefly in poetry.
(Arch.) A cupola formed on a large scale.
• Any erection resembling the dome or cupola of a building; as the upper part of a furnace, the vertical steam chamber on the top of a boiler, etc.
(Crystallog.) A prism formed by planes parallel to a lateral axis which meet above in a horizontal edge, like the roof of a house; also, one of the planes of such a form.
n.
• Decision; judgment; opinion; a court decision.
Domebook
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A book said to have been compiled under the direction of King Alfred. It is supposed to have contained the principal maxims of the common law, the penalties for misdemeanors, and the forms of judicial proceedings. Domebook was probably a general name for book of judgments.
Domed
a.
• Furnished with a dome; shaped like a dome.
Domesday
n.
• A day of judgment.
Domesman
n.
• A judge; an umpire.
Domestic
a.
• Of or pertaining to one's house or home, or one's household or family; relating to home life; as, domestic concerns, life, duties, cares, happiness, worship, servants.
• Of or pertaining to a nation considered as a family or home, or to one's own country; intestine; not foreign; as, foreign wars and domestic dissensions.
• Remaining much at home; devoted to home duties or pleasures; as, a domestic man or woman.
• Living in or near the habitations of man; domesticated; tame as distinguished from wild; as, domestic animals.
• Made in one's own house, nation, or country; as, domestic manufactures, wines, etc.
n.
• One who lives in the family of an other, as hired household assistant; a house servant.
(Com.) Articles of home manufacture, especially cotton goods.
Domestical
a.
• Domestic.
n.
• A family; a household.
Domestically
adv.
• In a domestic manner; privately; with reference to domestic affairs.
Domesticant
a.
• Forming part of the same family.
Domesticate
v. t.
• To make domestic; to habituate to home life; as, to domesticate one's self.
• To cause to be, as it were, of one's family or country; as, to domesticate a foreign custom or word.
• To tame or reclaim from a wild state; as, to domesticate wild animals; to domesticate a plant.
Domestication
n.
• The act of domesticating, or accustoming to home; the action of taming wild animals.
Domesticator
n.
• One who domesticates.
Domesticity
n.
• The state of being domestic; domestic character; household life.
Domett
n.
• A kind of baize of which the ward is cotton and the weft woolen.
Domeykite
n.
(Min.) A massive mineral of tin-white or steel-gray color, an arsenide of copper.
Domical
a.
• Relating to, or shaped like, a dome.
Domicile
n.
• An abode or mansion; a place of permanent residence, either of an individual or a family.
(Law) A residence at a particular place accompanied with an intention to remain there for an unlimited time; a residence accepted as a final abode.
v. t.
• To establish in a fixed residence, or a residence that constitutes habitancy; to domiciliate.
Domiciliar
n.
• A member of a household; a domestic.
Domiciliate
v. t.
• To establish in a permanent residence; to domicile.
• To domesticate.
Domiciliation
n.
• The act of domiciliating; permanent residence; inhabitancy.
Domicillary
a.
• Of or pertaining to a domicile, or the residence of a person or family.
Domiculture
n.
• The art of house-keeping, cookery, etc.
Domify
v. t.
(Astrol.) To divide, as the heavens, into twelve houses.
• To tame; to domesticate.
Domina
n.
(O. Eng. Law) Lady; a lady; — a title formerly given to noble ladies who held a barony in their own right.
Dominant
a.
• Ruling; governing; prevailing; controlling; predominant; as, the dominant party, church, spirit, power.
n.
(Mus.) The fifth tone of the scale; thus G is the dominant of C, A of D, and so on.
Dominate
v. t.
• To predominate over; to rule; to govern.
v. i.
• To be dominant.
Domination
n.
• The act of dominating; exercise of power in ruling; dominion; supremacy; authority; often, arbitrary or insolent sway.
• A ruling party; a party in power.
• A high order of angels in the celestial hierarchy; — a meaning given by the schoolmen.
Dominative
a.
• Governing; ruling; imperious.
Dominator
n.
• A ruler or ruling power.
Domine
n.
• A name given to a pastor of the Reformed Church. The word is also applied locally in the United States, in colloquial speech, to any clergyman.
(Zool.) A West Indian fish (Epinula magistralis), of the family Trichiuridae. It is a long-bodied, voracious fish.
Domineer
v. i. & t.
• To rule with insolence or arbitrary sway; to play the master; to be overbearing; to tyrannize; to bluster; to swell with conscious superiority or haughtiness; — often with over; as, to domineer over dependents.
Domineering
a.
• Ruling arrogantly; overbearing.
Dominical
a.
• Indicating, or pertaining to, the Lord's day, or Sunday.
• Relating to, or given by, our Lord; as, the dominical (or Lord's) prayer.
n.
• The Lord's day or Sunday; also, the Lord's prayer.
Dominican
a.
• Of or pertaining to St. Dominic (Dominic de Guzman), or to the religions communities named from him.
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) One of an order of mendicant monks founded by Dominic de Guzman, in 1215. A province of the order was established in England in 1221. The first foundation in the United States was made in 1807. The Master of the Sacred Palace at Rome is always a Dominican friar. The Dominicans are called also preaching friars, friars preachers, black friars (from their black cloak), brothers of St. Mary, and in France, Jacobins.
Dominicide
n.
• The act of killing a master.
• One who kills his master.
Dominie
n.
• A schoolmaster; a pedagogue.
• A clergyman.
Dominion
n.
• Sovereign or supreme authority; the power of governing and controlling; independent right of possession, use, and control; sovereignty; supremacy.
• Superior prominence; predominance; ascendency.
• That which is governed; territory over which authority is exercised; the tract, district, or county, considered as subject; as, the dominions of a king. Also used figuratively; as, the dominion of the passions.
• A supposed high order of angels; dominations.
Domino
n.
• A kind of hood worn by the canons of a cathedral church; a sort of amice.
• A mourning veil formerly worn by women.
• A kind of mask; particularly, a half mask worn at masquerades, to conceal the upper part of the face. Dominos were formerly worn by ladies in traveling.
• A costume worn as a disguise at masquerades, consisting of a robe with a hood adjustable at pleasure.
• A person wearing a domino.
• A game played by two or more persons, with twenty-eight pieces of wood, bone, or ivory, of a flat, oblong shape, plain at the back, but on the face divided by a line in the middle, and either left blank or variously dotted after the manner of dice. The game is played by matching the spots or the blank of an unmatched half of a domino already played
• One of the pieces with which the game of dominoes is played.
Dominus
n.
• Master; sir; — a title of respect formerly applied to a knight or a clergyman, and sometimes to the lord of a manor.
Domitable
a.
• That can be tamed.
Domite
n.
(Min.) A grayish variety of trachyte; — so called from the Puy-de-Dome in Auvergne, France, where it is found.
Don
n.
• Sir; Mr; Signior; — a title in Spain, formerly given to noblemen and gentlemen only, but now common to all classes.
• A grand personage, or one making pretension to consequence; especially, the head of a college, or one of the fellows at the English universities.
v. t.
• To put on; to dress in; to invest one's self with.
Dona
n.
• Lady; mistress; madam; — a title of respect used in Spain, prefixed to the Christian name of a lady.
Donable
a.
• Capable of being donated or given.
Donary
n.
• A thing given to a sacred use.
Donat
n.
• A grammar.
Donate
v. t.
• To give; to bestow; to present; as, to donate fifty thousand dollars to a college.
Donation
n.
• The act of giving or bestowing; a grant.
(Law) The act or contract by which a person voluntarily transfers the title to a thing of which be is the owner, from himself to another, without any consideration, as a free gift.
Donatism
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) The tenets of the Donatists.
Donatist
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A follower of Donatus, the leader of a body of North African schismatics and purists, who greatly disturbed the church in the 4th century. They claimed to be the true church.
Donatistic
a.
• Pertaining to Donatism.
Donative
n.
• A gift; a largess; a gratuity; a present.
(Eccl. Law) A benefice conferred on a person by the founder or patron, without either presentation or institution by the ordinary, or induction by his orders.
a.
• Vested or vesting by donation; as, a donative advowson.
Donator
n.
(Law) One who makes a gift; a donor; a giver.
Donatory
n.
(Scots Law) A donee of the crown; one the whom, upon certain condition, escheated property is made over.
Donax
n.
(Bot.) A canelike grass of southern Europe (Arundo Donax), used for fishing rods, etc.
Doncella
n.
(Zool.) A handsome fish of Florida and the West Indies (Platyglossus radiatus). The name is applied also to the ladyfish (Harpe rufa) of the same region.
Done
• p. p. from Do, and formerly the infinitive.
• Performed; executed; finished.
• It is done or agreed; let it be a match or bargain; — used elliptically.
a.
• Given; executed; issued; made public; — used chiefly in the clause giving the date of a proclamation or public act.
Donee
n.
• The person to whom a gift or donation is made.
(Law) Anciently, one to whom lands were given; in later use, one to whom lands and tenements are given in tail; in modern use, one on whom a power is conferred for execution; — sometimes called the appointor.
Donet
n.
• Same as Donat. Piers Plowman.
Doni
n.
(Naut.) A clumsy craft, having one mast with a long sail, used for trading purposes on the coasts of Coromandel and Ceylon.
Doniferous
a.
• Bearing gifts.
Donjon
n.
• The chief tower, also called the keep; a massive tower in ancient castles, forming the strongest part of the fortifications.
Donkey
n.
• An ass; or (less frequently) a mule.
• A stupid or obstinate fellow; an ass.
Donna
n.
• A lady; madam; mistress; — the title given a lady in Italy.
Donnism
n.
• Self-importance; loftiness of carriage.
Donor
n.
• One who gives or bestows; one who confers anything gratuitously; a benefactor.
(Law) One who grants an estate; in later use, one who confers a power; — the opposite of donee.
Donship
n.
• The quality or rank of a don, gentleman, or knight.
Donzel
n.
• A young squire, or knight's attendant; a page.
Doo
n.
(Zool.) A dove.
Doodle
n.
• A trifler; a simple fellow.
Doodlesack
n.
• The Scotch bagpipe.
Doole
n.
• Sorrow; dole.
Dooly
n.
• A kind of litter suspended from men's shoulders, for carrying persons or things; a palanquin.
Doom
n.
• Judgment; judicial sentence; penal decree; condemnation.
• That to which one is doomed or sentenced; destiny or fate, esp. unhappy destiny; penalty.
• Ruin; death.
• Discriminating opinion or judgment; discrimination; discernment; decision.
v. t.
• To judge; to estimate or determine as a judge.
• To pronounce sentence or judgment on; to condemn; to consign by a decree or sentence; to sentence; as, a criminal doomed to chains or death.
• To ordain as penalty; hence, to mulct or fine.
• To assess a tax upon, by estimate or at discretion.
• To destine; to fix irrevocably the destiny or fate of; to appoint, as by decree or by fate.
Doomage
n.
• A penalty or fine for neglect.
Doomful
a.
• Full of condemnation or destructive power.
Doomsday
n.
• A day of sentence or condemnation; day of death.
• The day of the final judgment.
Doomsman
n.
• A judge; an umpire.
Doomster
n.
• Same as Dempster.
Door
n.
• An opening in the wall of a house or of an apartment, by which to go in and out; an entrance way.
• The frame or barrier of boards, or other material, usually turning on hinges, by which an entrance way into a house or apartment is closed and opened.
• Passage; means of approach or access.
• An entrance way, but taken in the sense of the house or apartment to which it leads.
Doorcase
n.
• The surrounding frame into which a door shuts.
Doorcheek
n.
• The jamb or sidepiece of a door.
Doorga
n.
(Myth.) A Hindoo divinity, the consort of Siva, represented with ten arms.
Dooring
n.
• The frame of a door.
Doorkeeper
n.
• One who guards the entrance of a house or apartment; a porter; a janitor.
Doorless
a.
• Without a door.
Doornail
n.
• The nail or knob on which in ancient doors the knocker struck; — hence the old saying, "As dead as a doornail."
Doorplane
n.
• A plane on a door, giving the name, and sometimes the employment, of the occupant.
Doorpost
n.
• The jamb or sidepiece of a doorway.
Doorsill
n.
• The sill or threshold of a door.
Doorstead
n.
• Entrance or place of a door.
Doorstep
n.
• The stone or plank forming a step before an outer door.
Doorstone
n.
• The stone forming a threshold.
Doorstop
n.
(Carp.) The block or strip of wood or similar material which stops, at the right place, the shutting of a door.
Doorway
n.
• The passage of a door; entrance way into a house or a room.
Dooryard
n.
• A yard in front of a house or around the door of a house.
Dop
v. i.
• To dip.
n.
• A dip; a low courtesy.
Dopper
n.
• An Anabaptist or Baptist.
Dopplerite
n.
(Min.) A brownish black native hydrocarbon occurring in elastic or jellylike masses.
Doquet
n.
• A warrant.
Dor
n.
(Zool.) A large European scaraboid beetle (Geotrupes stercorarius), which makes a droning noise while flying. The name is also applied to allied American species, as the June bug. Called also dorr, dorbeetle, or dorrbeetle, dorbug, dorrfly, and buzzard clock.
n.
• A trick, joke, or deception.
v. t.
• To make a fool of; to deceive.
Dorado
n.
(Astron.) A southern constellation, within which is the south pole of the ecliptic; — called also sometimes Xiphias, or the Swordfish.
(Zool.) A large, oceanic fish of the genus Coryphaena.
Doree
n.
(Zool.) A European marine fish (Zeus faber), of a yellow color.
Doretree
n.
• A doorpost.
Dorhawk
n.
(Zool.) The European goatsucker; — so called because it eats the dor beetle.
Dorian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the ancient Greeks of Doris; Doric; as, a Dorian fashion.
(Mus.) Same as Doric, 3.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Doris in Greece.
Doric
a.
• Pertaining to Doris, in ancient Greece, or to the Dorians; as, the Doric dialect.
(Arch.) Belonging to, or resembling, the oldest and simplest of the three orders of architecture used by the Greeks, but ranked as second of the five orders adopted by the Romans.
(Mus.) Of or relating to one of the ancient Greek musical modes or keys. Its character was adapted both to religions occasions and to war.
n.
• The Doric dialect.
Doricism
n.
• A Doric phrase or idiom.
Doris
n.
(Zool.) A genus of nudibranchiate mollusks having a wreath of branchiae on the back.
Dorism
n.
• A Doric phrase or idiom.
Dormancy
n.
• The state of being dormant; quiescence; abeyance.
Dormant
a.
• Sleeping; as, a dormant animal; hence, not in action or exercise; quiescent; at rest; in abeyance; not disclosed, asserted, or insisted on; as, dormant passions; dormant claims or titles.
(Her.) In a sleeping posture; as, a lion dormant; — distinguished from couchant.
n.
(Arch.) A large beam in the roof of a house upon which portions of the other timbers rest or " sleep."
Dormitive
a.
• Causing sleep; as, the dormitive properties of opium.
n.
(Med.) A medicine to promote sleep; a soporific; an opiate.
Dormitory
n.
• A sleeping room, or a building containing a series of sleeping rooms; a sleeping apartment capable of containing many beds; esp., one connected with a college or boarding school.
• A burial place.
Dormouse
n.
(Zool.) A small European rodent of the genus Myoxus, of several species. They live in trees and feed on nuts, acorns, etc.; — so called because they are usually torpid in winter.
Dorn
n.
(Zool.) A British ray; the thornback.
Dorp
n.
• A hamlet.
Dorr
n.
• The dorbeetle; also, a drone or an idler.
v. t.
• To deceive.
• To deafen with noise.
Dorsad
adv.
(Anat.) Toward the dorsum or back; on the dorsal side; dorsally.
Dorsal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or situated near, the back, or dorsum, of an animal or of one of its parts; notal; tergal; neural; as, the dorsal fin of a fish; the dorsal artery of the tongue; — opposed to ventral.
(Bot.) Pertaining to the surface naturally inferior, as of a leaf.
• Pertaining to the surface naturally superior, as of a creeping hepatic moss.
n.
(Fine Arts) A hanging, usually of rich stuff, at the back of a throne, or of an altar, or in any similar position.
Dorsale
n.
• Same as Dorsal, n.
Dorsally
adv.
(Anat.) On, or toward, the dorsum, or back; on the dorsal side of; dorsad.
Dorse
n.
• Same as dorsal, n.
• The back of a book.
n.
(Zool.) The Baltic or variable cod (Gadus callarias), by some believed to be the young of the common codfish.
Dorsel
n.
• A pannier.
• Same as Dorsal, n.
Dorsibranchiate
a.
(Zool.) Having branchiae along the back; belonging to the Dorsibranchiata.
n.
• One of the Dorsibranchiata.
Dorsiferous
(Biol.) Bearing, or producing, on the back; — applied to ferns which produce seeds on the back of the leaf, and to certain Batrachia, the ova of which become attached to the skin of the back of the parent, where they develop; dorsiparous.
Dorsiparous
a.
(Biol.) Same as Dorsiferous.
Dorsiventral
a.
(Biol.) Having distinct upper and lower surfaces, as most common leaves. The leaves of the iris are not dorsiventral.
Dorsoventral
a.
(Anat.) From the dorsal to the ventral side of an animal; as, the dorsoventral axis.
Dorsum
n.
• The ridge of a hill.
(Anat.) The back or dorsal region of an animal; the upper side of an appendage or part; as, the dorsum of the tongue.
Dory
n.
(Zool.) A European fish.
(Zool.) The American wall-eyed perch; — called also dore.
n.
• A small, strong, flat-bottomed rowboat, with sharp prow and flaring sides.
Doryphora
n.
(Zool.) A genus of plant-eating beetles, including the potato beetle.
Doryphoros
n.
(Fine Arts) A spear bearer; a statue of a man holding a spear or in the attitude of a spear bearer. Several important sculptures of this subject existed in antiquity, copies of which remain to us.
Dose
n.
• The quantity of medicine given, or prescribed to be taken, at one time.
• A sufficient quantity; a portion; as much as one can take, or as falls to one to receive.
• Anything nauseous that one is obliged to take; a disagreeable portion thrust upon one.
v. t.
• To proportion properly (a medicine), with reference to the patient or the disease; to form into suitable doses.
• To give doses to; to medicine or physic to; to give potions to, constantly and without need.
• To give anything nauseous to.
Dosel
n.
• Same as Dorsal, n.
Dosology
n.
• Posology.
Dossel
n.
• Same as Dorsal, n.
Dosser
n.
• A pannier, or basket.
• A hanging tapestry; a dorsal.
Dossil
n.
(Surg.) A small ovoid or cylindrical roil or pledget of lint, for keeping a sore, wound, etc., open; a tent.
(Printing) A roll of cloth for wiping off the face of a copperplate, leaving the ink in the engraved lines.
Dost
2d pers. sing. pres.
• of Do.
Dot
n.
(Law) A marriage portion; dowry.
n.
• A small point or spot, made with a pen or other pointed instrument; a speck, or small mark.
• Anything small and like a speck comparatively; a small portion or specimen; as, a dot of a child.
v. t.
• To mark with dots or small spots; as, to dot a line.
• To mark or diversify with small detached objects; as, a landscape dotted with cottages.
v. i.
• To make dots or specks.
Dotage
n.
• Feebleness or imbecility of understanding or mind, particularly in old age; the childishness of old age; senility; as, a venerable man, now in his dotage.
• Foolish utterance; drivel.
• Excessive fondness; weak and foolish affection.
Dotal
a.
• Pertaining to dower, or a woman's marriage portion; constituting dower, or comprised in it.
Dotant
n.
• A dotard.
Dotard
n.
• One whose mind is impaired by age; one in second childhood.
Dotardly
a.
• Foolish; weak.
Dotary
n.
• A dotard's weakness; dotage.
Dotation
n.
• The act of endowing, or bestowing a marriage portion on a woman.
• Endowment; establishment of funds for support, as of a hospital or eleemosynary corporation.
Dote
n.
• A marriage portion.
• Natural endowments.
v. i.
• To act foolishly.
• To be weak-minded, silly, or idiotic; to have the intellect impaired, especially by age, so that the mind wanders or wavers; to drivel.
• To be excessively or foolishly fond; to love to excess; to be weakly affectionate; — with on or upon; as, the mother dotes on her child.
n.
• An imbecile; a dotard.
Doted
a.
• Stupid; foolish.
• Half-rotten; as, doted wood.
Dotehead
n.
• A dotard.
Doter
n.
• One who dotes; a man whose understanding is enfeebled by age; a dotard.
• One excessively fond, or weak in love.
Dotery
n.
• The acts or speech of a dotard; drivel.
Doth
3d pers. sing. pres.
• of Do.
Doting
a.
• That dotes; silly; excessively fond.
Dotish
a.
• Foolish; weak; imbecile.
Dottard
n.
• An old, decayed tree.
Dotted
a.
• Marked with, or made of, dots or small spots; diversified with small, detached objects.
Dotterel
a.
• Decayed.
n.
(Zool.) A European bird of the Plover family (Eudromias, or Charadrius, morinellus). It is tame and easily taken, and is popularly believed to imitate the movements of the fowler.
• A silly fellow; a dupe; a gull.
Doty
a.
• Half-rotten; as, doty timber.
Douane
n.
• A customhouse.
Douanier
n.
• An officer of the French customs.
Douar
n.
• A village composed of Arab tents arranged in streets.
Double
a.
• Twofold; multiplied by two; increased by its equivalent; made twice as large or as much, etc.
• Being in pairs; presenting two of a kind, or two in a set together; coupled.
• Divided into two; acting two parts, one openly and the other secretly; equivocal; deceitful; insincere.
(Bot.) Having the petals in a flower considerably increased beyond the natural number, usually as the result of cultivation and the expense of the stamens, or stamens and pistils. The white water lily and some other plants have their blossoms naturally double.
adv.
• Twice; doubly.
v. t.
• To increase by adding an equal number, quantity, length, value, or the like; multiply by two; to double a sum of money; to double a number, or length.
• To make of two thicknesses or folds by turning or bending together in the middle; to fold one part upon another part of; as, to double the leaf of a book, and the like; to clinch, as the fist; — often followed by up; as, to double up a sheet of paper or cloth.
• To be the double of; to exceed by twofold; to contain or be worth twice as much as.
• To pass around or by; to march or sail round, so as to reverse the direction of motion.
(Mil.) To unite, as ranks or files, so as to form one from each two.
v. i.
• To be increased to twice the sum, number, quantity, length, or value; to increase or grow to twice as much.
• To return upon one's track; to turn and go back over the same ground, or in an opposite direction.
• To play tricks; to use sleights; to play false.
(Print.) To set up a word or words a second time by mistake; to make a doublet.
n.
• Twice as much; twice the number, sum, quantity, length, value, and the like.
• Among compositors, a doublet (see Doublet, 2.); among pressmen, a sheet that is twice pulled, and blurred.
• That which is doubled over or together; a doubling; a plait; a fold.
• A turn or circuit in running to escape pursues; hence, a trick; a shift; an artifice.
• Something precisely equal or counterpart to another; a counterpart. Hence, a wraith.
• A player or singer who prepares to take the part of another player in his absence; a substitute.
• Double beer; strong beer.
(Eccl.) A feast in which the antiphon is doubled, hat is, said twice, before and after the Psalms, instead of only half being said, as in simple feasts.
(Lawn Tennis) A game between two pairs of players; as, a first prize for doubles.
(Mus.) An old term for a variation, as in Bach's Suites.
Doublehearted
a.
• Having a false heart; deceitful; treacherous.
Doubleminded
a.
• Having different minds at different times; unsettled; undetermined.
Doubleness
n.
• The state of being double or doubled.
• Duplicity; insincerity.
Doubler
n.
• One who, or that which, doubles.
(Elec.) An instrument for augmenting a very small quantity of electricity, so as to render it manifest by sparks or the electroscope.
Doublet
n.
• Two of the same kind; a pair; a couple.
(Print.) A word or words unintentionally doubled or set up a second time.
• A close-fitting garment for men, covering the body from the neck to the waist or a little below. It was worn in Western Europe from the 15th to the 17th century.
(Lapidary Work) A counterfeit gem, composed of two pieces of crystal, with a color them, and thus giving the appearance of a naturally colored gem. Also, a piece of paste or glass covered by a veneer of real stone.
(Opt.) An arrangement of two lenses for a microscope, designed to correct spherical aberration and chromatic dispersion, thus rendering the image of an object more clear and distinct.
• Two dice, each of which, when thrown, has the same number of spots on the face lying uppermost; as, to throw doublets.
• A game somewhat like backgammon.
• One of two or more words in the same language derived by different courses from the same original from; as, crypt and grot are doublets; also, guard and ward; yard and garden; abridge and abbreviate, etc.
Doublethreaded
a.
• Consisting of two threads twisted together; using two threads.
(Mech.) Having two screw threads instead of one; — said of a screw in which the pitch is equal to twice the distance between the centers of adjacent threads.
Doubletree
n.
• The bar, or crosspiece, of a carriage, to which the singletrees are attached.
Doubling
n.
• The act of one that doubles; a making double; reduplication; also, that which is doubled.
• A turning and winding; as, the doubling of a hunted hare; shift; trick; artifice.
(Her.) The lining of the mantle borne about the shield or escutcheon.
• The process of redistilling spirits, to improve the strength and flavor.
Doubloon
n.
• A Spanish gold coin, no longer issued, varying in value at different times from over fifteen dollars to about five.
Doubly
adv.
• In twice the quantity; to twice the degree; as, doubly wise or good; to be doubly sensible of an obligation.
• Deceitfully.
Doubt
v. i.
• To waver in opinion or judgment; to be in uncertainty as to belief respecting anything; to hesitate in belief; to be undecided as to the truth of the negative or the affirmative proposition; to b e undetermined.
• To suspect; to fear; to be apprehensive.
v. t.
• To question or hold questionable; to withhold assent to; to hesitate to believe, or to be inclined not to believe; to withhold confidence from; to distrust; as, I have heard the story, but I doubt the truth of it.
• To suspect; to fear; to be apprehensive of.
• To fill with fear; to affright.
n.
• A fluctuation of mind arising from defect of knowledge or evidence; uncertainty of judgment or mind; unsettled state of opinion concerning the reality of an event, or the truth of an assertion, etc.; hesitation.
• Uncertainty of condition.
• Suspicion; fear; apprehension; dread.
• Difficulty expressed or urged for solution; point unsettled; objection.
Doubtable
a.
• Capable of being doubted; questionable.
• Worthy of being feared; redoubtable.
Doubtance
n.
• State of being in doubt; uncertainty; doubt.
Doubter
n.
• One who doubts; one whose opinion is unsettled; one who scruples.
Doubtful
a.
• Not settled in opinion; undetermined; wavering; hesitating in belief; also used, metaphorically, of the body when its action is affected by such a state of mind; as, we are doubtful of a fact, or of the propriety of a measure.
• Admitting of doubt; not obvious, clear, or certain; questionable; not decided; not easy to be defined, classed, or named; as, a doubtful case, hue, claim, title, species, and the like.
• Characterized by ambiguity; dubious; as, a doubtful expression; a doubtful phrase.
• Of uncertain issue or event.
• Fearful; apprehensive; suspicious.
Doubtfully
adv.
• In a doubtful manner.
Doubtfulness
n.
• State of being doubtful.
• Uncertainty of meaning; ambiguity; indefiniteness.
• Uncertainty of event or issue.
Doubting
a.
• That is uncertain; that distrusts or hesitates; having doubts.
Doubtless
a.
• Free from fear or suspicion.
adv.
• Undoubtedly; without doubt.
Doubtlessly
adv.
• Unquestionably.
Doubtous
a.
• Doubtful.
Douc
n.
(Zool.) A monkey (Semnopithecus nemaeus), remarkable for its varied and brilliant colors. It is a native of Cochin China.
Douce
a.
• Sweet; pleasant.
• Sober; prudent; sedate; modest.
Doucepere
n.
• One of the twelve peers of France, companions of Charlemagne in war.
Douceur
n.
• Gentleness and sweetness of manner; agreeableness.
• A gift for service done or to be done; an honorarium; a present; sometimes, a bribe.
Douche
n.
• A jet or current of water or vapor directed upon some part of the body to benefit it medicinally; a douche bath.
(Med.) A syringe.
Doucine
n.
(Arch.) Same as Cymarecta, under Cyma.
Doucker
n.
(Zool.) A grebe or diver; — applied also to the golden-eye, pochard, scoter, and other ducks.
Dough
n.
• Paste of bread; a soft mass of moistened flour or meal, kneaded or unkneaded, but not yet baked; as, to knead dough.
• Anything of the consistency of such paste.
Doughbird
n.
(Zool.) The Eskimo curlew (Numenius borealis).
Doughface
n.
• A contemptuous nickname for a timid, yielding politician, or one who is easily molded.
Doughfaceism
n.
• The character of a doughface; truckling pliability.
Doughiness
n.
• The quality or state of being doughy.
Doughnut
n.
• A small cake (usually sweetened) fried in a kettle of boiling lard.
Doughtily
adv.
• In a doughty manner.
Doughtiness
n.
• The quality of being doughty; valor; bravery.
Doughtren
n. pl.
• Daughters.
Doughty
a.
• Able; strong; valiant; redoubtable; as, a doughty hero.
Doughy
a.
• Like dough; soft and heavy; pasty; crude; flabby and pale; as, a doughy complexion.
Doulocracy
n.
• A government by slaves.
Doupe
n.
(Zool.) The carrion crow.
Dour
a.
• Hard; inflexible; obstinate; sour in aspect; hardy; bold.
Doura
n.
• A kind of millet.
Douse
v. t.
• To plunge suddenly into water; to duck; to immerse; to dowse.
(Naut.) To strike or lower in haste; to slacken suddenly; as, douse the topsail.
v. i.
• To fall suddenly into water.
v. t.
• To put out; to extinguish.
Dout
v. t.
• To put out.
Douter
n.
• An extinguisher for candles.
Dove
n.
(Zool.) A pigeon of the genus Columba and various related genera. The species are numerous.
• A word of endearment for one regarded as pure and gentle.
Dovekie
n.
(Zool.) A guillemot (Uria grylle), of the arctic regions. Also applied to the little auk or sea dove.
Dovelet
n.
• A young or small dove.
Dovelike
a.
• Mild as a dove; gentle; pure and lovable.
Doveship
n.
• The possession of dovelike qualities, harmlessness and innocence.
Dovetail
n.
(Carp.) A flaring tenon, or tongue (shaped like a bird's tail spread), and a mortise, or socket, into which it fits tightly, making an interlocking joint between two pieces which resists pulling a part in all directions except one.
v. t.
(Carp.) To cut to a dovetail
• To join by means of dovetails.
• To fit in or connect strongly, skillfully, or nicely; to fit ingeniously or complexly.
Dovish
a.
• Like a dove; harmless; innocent.
Dow
n.
• A kind of vessel.
v. t.
• To furnish with a dower; to endow.
Dowable
a.
• Capable of being endowed; entitled to dower.
Dowager
n.
(Eng. Law) A widow endowed, or having a jointure; a widow who either enjoys a dower from her deceased husband, or has property of her own brought by her to her husband on marriage, and settled on her after his decease.
• A title given in England to a widow, to distinguish her from the wife of her husband's heir bearing the same name; — chiefly applied to widows of personages of rank.
Dowagerism
n.
• The rank or condition of a dowager; formality, as that of a dowager. Also used figuratively.
Dowcet
n.
• One of the testicles of a hart or stag.
Dowdy
a.
• Showing a vulgar taste in dress; awkward and slovenly in dress; vulgar-looking.
n.
• An awkward, vulgarly dressed, inelegant woman.
Dowdyish
a.
• Like a dowdy.
Dowel
n.
(Mech.) A pin, or block, of wood or metal, fitting into holes in the abutting portions of two pieces, and being partly in one piece and partly in the other, to keep them in their proper relative position.
• A piece of wood driven into a wall, so that other pieces may be nailed to it.
v. t.
• To fasten together by dowels; to furnish with dowels; as, a cooper dowels pieces for the head of a cask.
Dower
n.
• That with which one is gifted or endowed; endowment; gift.
• The property with which a woman is endowed
• That which a woman brings to a husband in marriage; dowry.
(Law) That portion of the real estate of a man which his widow enjoys during her life, or to which a woman is entitled after the death of her husband
Dowered
p. a.
• Furnished with, or as with, dower or a marriage portion.
Dowerless
a.
• Destitute of dower; having no marriage portion.
Dowitcher
n.
(Zool.) The red-breasted or gray snipe (Macrorhamphus griseus); — called also brownback, and grayback.
Dowl
n.
• Same as Dowle.
Dowlas
n.
• A coarse linen cloth made in the north of England and in Scotland, now nearly replaced by calico.
Dowle
n.
• Feathery or wool-like down; filament of a feather.
Down
n.
• Fine, soft, hairy outgrowth from the skin or surface of animals or plants, not matted and fleecy like wool
(Zool.) The soft under feathers of birds. They have short stems with soft rachis and bards and long threadlike barbules, without hooklets
(Bot.) The pubescence of plants; the hairy crown or envelope of the seeds of certain plants, as of the thistle
• The soft hair of the face when beginning to appear.
• That which is made of down, as a bed or pillow; that which affords ease and repose, like a bed of down
v. t.
• To cover, ornament, line, or stuff with down.
n.
• A bank or rounded hillock of sand thrown up by the wind along or near the shore; a flattish-topped hill; — usually in the plural.
• A tract of poor, sandy, undulating or hilly land near the sea, covered with fine turf which serves chiefly for the grazing of sheep; — usually in the plural.
• A road for shipping in the English Channel or Straits of Dover, near Deal, employed as a naval rendezvous in time of war.
• A state of depression; low state; abasement.
adv.
• In the direction of gravity or toward the center of the earth; toward or in a lower place or position; below; — the opposite of up.
• From a higher to a lower position, literally or figuratively; in a descending direction; from the top of an ascent; from an upright position; to the ground or floor; to or into a lower or an inferior condition; as, into a state of humility, disgrace, misery, and the like; into a state of rest; — used with verbs indicating motion.
• In a low or the lowest position, literally or figuratively; at the bottom of a decent; below the horizon; of the ground; in a condition of humility, dejection, misery, and the like; in a state of quiet
• From a remoter or higher antiquity.
• From a greater to a less bulk, or from a thinner to a thicker consistence; as, to boil down in cookery, or in making decoctions.
prep.
• In a descending direction along; from a higher to a lower place upon or within; at a lower place in or on; as, down a hill; down a well.
• Hence: Towards the mouth of a river; towards the sea; as, to sail or swim down a stream; to sail down the sound.
v. t.
• To cause to go down; to make descend; to put down; to overthrow, as in wrestling; hence, to subdue; to bring down.
v. i.
• To go down; to descend.
a.
• Downcast; as, a down look.
• Downright; absolute; positive; as, a down denial.
• Downward; going down; sloping; as, a down stroke; a down grade; a down train on a railway.
Downbear
v. t.
• To bear down; to depress.
Downcast
a.
• Cast downward; directed to the ground, from bashfulness, modesty, dejection, or guilt.
n.
• Downcast or melancholy look.
(mining) A ventilating shaft down which the air passes in circulating through a mine.
Downcome
n.
• Sudden fall; downfall; overthrow.
(Iron Manuf.) A pipe for leading combustible gases downward from the top of the blast furnace to the hot-blast stoves, boilers, etc., where they are burned.
Downfall
n.
• A sudden fall; a body of things falling.
• A sudden descent from rank or state, reputation or happiness; destruction; ruin.
Downfallen
a.
• Fallen; ruined.
Downfalling
a.
• Falling down.
Downgyved
a.
• Hanging down like gyves or fetters.
Downhaul
n.
(Naut.) A rope to haul down, or to assist in hauling down, a sail; as, a staysail downhaul; a trysail downhaul.
Downhearted
a.
• Dejected; low-spirited.
Downhill
adv.
• Towards the bottom of a hill; as, water runs downhill.
a.
• Declivous; descending; sloping.
n.
• Declivity; descent; slope.
Downiness
n.
• The quality or state of being downy.
Downlooked
a.
• Having a downcast countenance; dejected; gloomy; sullen.
Downlying
n.
• The time of retiring to rest; time of repose.
Downpour
n.
• A pouring or streaming downwards; esp., a heavy or continuous shower.
Downright
adv.
• Straight down; perpendicularly.
• In plain terms; without ceremony.
• Without delay; at once; completely.
a.
• Plain; direct; unceremonious; blunt; positive; as, he spoke in his downright way.
• Open; artless; undisguised; absolute; unmixed; as, downright atheism.
Downsitting
n.
• The act of sitting down; repose; a resting.
Downstairs
adv.
• Down the stairs; to a lower floor.
a.
• Below stairs; as, a downstairs room.
Downsteepy
a.
• Very steep.
Downstream
adv.
• Down the stream; as, floating downstream.
Downstroke
n.
(Penmanship) A stroke made with a downward motion of the pen or pencil.
Downthrow
n.
(Geol.) The sudden drop or depression of the strata of rocks on one side of a fault.
Downward
a.
• Moving or extending from a higher to a lower place; tending toward the earth or its center, or toward a lower level; declivous.
• Descending from a head, origin, or source; as, a downward line of descent.
• Tending to a lower condition or state; depressed; dejected; as, downward thoughts.
Downweed
n.
(Bot.) Cudweed, a species of Gnaphalium.
Downweigh
v. t.
• To weigh or press down.
Downy
a.
• Covered with down, or with pubescence or soft hairs.
• Made of, or resembling, down. Hence, figuratively: Soft; placid; soothing; quiet.
• Cunning; wary.
Dowral
a.
• Of or relating to a dower.
Dowress
n.
• A woman entitled to dower.
Dowry
n.
• A gift; endowment.
• The money, goods, or estate, which a woman brings to her husband in marriage; a bride's portion on her marriage.
• A gift or presents for the bride, on espousal.
Dowse
v. t.
• To plunge, or duck into water; to immerse; to douse.
• To beat or thrash.
v. i.
• To use the dipping or divining rod, as in search of water, ore, etc.
n.
• A blow on the face.
Dowser
n.
• A divining rod used in searching for water, ore, etc., a dowsing rod.
• One who uses the dowser or divining rod.
Dowst
n.
• A dowse.
Dowve
n.
• A dove.
Doxological
a.
• Pertaining to doxology; giving praise to God.
Doxologize
v. i.
• To give glory to God, as in a doxology; to praise God with doxologies.
Doxology
n.
• In Christian worship: A hymn expressing praise and honor to God; a form of praise to God designed to be sung or chanted by the choir or the congregation.
Doxy
n.
• A loose wench; a disreputable sweetheart.
Doze
v. i.
• To slumber; to sleep lightly; to be in a dull or stupefied condition, as if half asleep; to be drowsy.
v. t.
• To pass or spend in drowsiness; as, to doze away one's time.
• To make dull; to stupefy.
n.
• A light sleep; a drowse.
Dozen
n.
• A collection of twelve objects; a tale or set of twelve; with or without of before the substantive which follows.
• An indefinite small number.
Dozenth
a.
• Twelfth.
Dozer
n.
• One who dozes or drowses.
Doziness
n.
• The state of being dozy; drowsiness; inclination to sleep.
Dozy
a.
• Drowsy; inclined to doze; sleepy; sluggish; as, a dozy head.
Dozzled
a.
• Stupid; heavy.
Drab
n.
• A low, sluttish woman.
• A lewd wench; a strumpet.
• A wooden box, used in salt works for holding the salt when taken out of the boiling pans.
v. i.
• To associate with strumpets; to wench.
n.
• A kind of thick woolen cloth of a dun, or dull brownish yellow, or dull gray, color; — called also drabcloth.
• A dull brownish yellow or dull gray color.
a.
• Of a color between gray and brown.
n.
• A drab color.
Drabber
n.
• One who associates with drabs; a wencher.
Drabbet
n.
• A coarse linen fabric, or duck.
Drabbish
a.
• Somewhat drab in color.
a.
• Having the character of a drab or low wench.
Drabble
v. t.
• To draggle; to wet and befoul by draggling; as, to drabble a gown or cloak.
v. i.
• To fish with a long line and rod; as, to drabble for barbels.
Drabbler
n.
(Naut.) A piece of canvas fastened by lacing to the bonnet of a sail, to give it a greater depth, or more drop.
Dracaena
n.
(Bot.) A genus of liliaceous plants with woody stems and funnel-shaped flowers.
Dracanth
n.
• A kind of gum; — called also gum tragacanth, or tragacanth.
Drachm
n.
• A drachma.
• Same as Dram.
Drachma
n.
• A silver coin among the ancient Greeks, having a different value in different States and at different periods. The average value of the Attic drachma is computed to have been about 19 cents.
• A gold and silver coin of modern Greece worth 19.3 cents.
• Among the ancient Greeks, a weight of about 66.5 grains; among the modern Greeks, a weight equal to a gram.
Draco
n.
(Astron.) The Dragon, a northern constellation within which is the north pole of the ecliptic.
• A luminous exhalation from marshy grounds.
(Zool.) A genus of lizards.
Draconian
a.
• Pertaining to Draco, a famous lawgiver of Athens, 621 b. c.
Draconic
a.
• Relating to Draco, the Athenian lawgiver; or to the constellation Draco; or to dragon's blood.
Draconin
n.
(Chem.) A red resin forming the essential basis of dragon's blood; — called also dracin.
Dracontic
a.
(Astron.) Belonging to that space of time in which the moon performs one revolution, from ascending node to ascending node.
Dracontine
a.
• Belonging to a dragon.
Dracunculus
n.
(Zool.) A fish; the dragonet
• The Guinea worm (Filaria medinensis).
Drad
p. p. & a.
• Dreaded.
Dradde
imp.
• of Dread.
Dradge
n.
(Min.) Inferior ore, separated from the better by cobbing.
Draff
n.
• Refuse; lees; dregs; the wash given to swine or cows; hogwash; waste matter.
Draff
n.
• The act of drawing; also, the thing drawn. Same as Draught.
(Mil.) A selecting or detaching of soldiers from an army, or from any part of it, or from a military post; also from any district, or any company or collection of persons, or from the people at large; also, the body of men thus drafted.
• An order from one person or party to another, directing the payment of money; a bill of exchange.
• An allowance or deduction made from the gross veight of goods.
• A drawing of lines for a plan; a plan delineated, or drawn in outline; a delineation.
• The form of any writing as first drawn up; the first rough sketch of written composition, to be filled in, or completed.
(Masonry) A narrow border left on a finished stone, worked differently from the rest of its face.
• A narrow border worked to a plane surface along the edge of a stone, or across its face, as a guide to the stone-cutter.
(Milling) The slant given to the furrows in the dress of a millstone.
(Naut.) Depth of water necessary to float a ship.
• A current of air. Same as Draught.
Draffish
a.
• Worthless; draffy.
Draffy
a.
• Dreggy; waste; worthless.
Draft
a.
• Pertaining to, or used for, drawing or pulling (as vehicles, loads, etc.). Same as Draught.
• Relating to, or characterized by, a draft, or current of air. Same as Draught.
v. t.
• To draw the outline of; to delineate.
• To compose and write; as, to draft a memorial.
• To draw from a military band or post, or from any district, company, or society; to detach; to select.
• To transfer by draft.
Drag
n.
• A confection; a comfit; a drug.
v. t.
• To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; — applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing.
• To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag.
• To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.
v. i.
• To be drawn along, as a rope or dress, on the ground; to trail; to be moved onward along the ground, or along the bottom of the sea, as an anchor that does not hold.
• To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.
• To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.
• To fish with a dragnet.
n.
• The act of dragging; anything which is dragged.
• A net, or an apparatus, to be drawn along the bottom under water, as in fishing, searching for drowned persons, etc.
• A kind of sledge for conveying heavy bodies; also, a kind of low car or handcart; as, a stone drag.
• A heavy coach with seats on top; also, a heavy carriage.
• A heavy harrow, for breaking up ground.
• Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; esp., a canvas bag with a hooped mouth, so used.
• Also, a skid or shoe, for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel
• Hence, anything that retards; a clog; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.
• Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.
(Founding) The bottom part of a flask or mold, the upper part being the cope.
(Masonry) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.
(Marine Engin.) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.
Dragantine
n.
• A mucilage obtained from, or containing, gun tragacanth.
Dragbar
n.
• Same as Drawbar (b)
Dragbolt
n.
• A coupling pin.
Dragees
n. pl.
(Pharmacy) Sugar-coated medicines.
Draggle
v. t.
• To wet and soil by dragging on the ground, mud, or wet grass; to drabble; to trail.
v. i.
• To be dragged on the ground; to become wet or dirty by being dragged or trailed in the mud or wet grass.
Draglink
n.
(Mach.) A link connecting the cranks of two shafts.
• A drawbar.
Dragman
n.
• A fisherman who uses a dragnet.
Dragnet
n.
• A net to be drawn along the bottom of a body of water, as in fishing.
Dragoman
n.
• An interpreter; — so called in the Levant and other parts of the East.
Dragon
n.
(Myth.) A fabulous animal, generally represented as a monstrous winged serpent or lizard, with a crested head and enormous claws, and regarded as very powerful and ferocious.
• A fierce, violent person, esp. a woman.
(Astron.) A constellation of the northern hemisphere figured as a dragon; Draco.
• A luminous exhalation from marshy grounds, seeming to move through the air as a winged serpent.
(Mil. Antiq.) A short musket hooked to a swivel attached to a soldier's belt; — so called from a representation of a dragon's head at the muzzle.
(Zool.) A small arboreal lizard of the genus Draco, of several species, found in the East Indies and Southern Asia. Five or six of the hind ribs, on each side, are prolonged and covered with weblike skin, forming a sort of wing. These prolongations aid them in making long leaps from tree to tree. Called also flying lizard.
(Zool.) A variety of carrier pigeon.
(Her.) A fabulous winged creature, sometimes borne as a charge in a coat of arms.
Dragonet
n.
• A little dragon.
(Zool.) A small British marine fish (Callionymuslyra); — called also yellow sculpin, fox, and gowdie.
Dragonish
a.
• resembling a dragon.
Dragonlike
a.
• Like a dragon.
Dragonnade
n.
• The severe persecution of French Protestants under Louis XIV., by an armed force, usually of dragoons; hence, a rapid and devastating incursion; dragoonade.
Dragoon
n.
((Mil.) Formerly, a soldier who was taught and armed to serve either on horseback or on foot; now, a mounted soldier; a cavalry man.
• A variety of pigeon.
v. t.
• To harass or reduce to subjection by dragoons; to persecute by abandoning a place to the rage of soldiers.
• To compel submission by violent measures; to harass; to persecute.
Dragooner
n.
• A dragoon.
Drail
v. t. & i.
• To trail; to draggle.
Drain
v. t.
• To draw off by degrees; to cause to flow gradually out or off; hence, to cause the exhaustion of.
• To exhaust of liquid contents by drawing them off; to make gradually dry or empty; to remove surface water, as from streets, by gutters, etc.; to deprive of moisture; hence, to exhaust; to empty of wealth, resources, or the like; as, to drain a country of its specie.
• To filter.
v. i.
• To flow gradually; as, the water of low ground drains off.
• To become emptied of liquor by flowing or dropping; as, let the vessel stand and drain.
n.
• The act of draining, or of drawing off; gradual and continuous outflow or withdrawal; as, the drain of specie from a country.
• That means of which anything is drained; a channel; a trench; a water course; a sewer; a sink.
• The grain from the mashing tub; as, brewers' drains.
Drainable
a.
• Capable of being drained.
Drainage
n.
• A draining; a gradual flowing off of any liquid; also, that which flows out of a drain.
• The mode in which the waters of a country pass off by its streams and rivers.
(Engin.) The system of drains and their operation, by which superfluous water is removed from towns, railway beds, mines, and other works.
• Area or district drained; as, the drainage of the Po, the Thames, etc.
(Surg.) The act, process, or means of drawing off the pus or fluids from a wound, abscess, etc.
Draine
n.
(Zool.) The missel thrush.
Drainer
n.
• One who, or that which, drains.
Draining
vb. n.
(Agric.) The art of carrying off surplus water, as from land.
Drainpipe
n.
• A pipe used for carrying off surplus water.
Draintile
n.
• A hollow tile used in making drains; — called also draining tile.
Drake
n.
• The male of the duck kind.
• The drake fly.
n.
• A dragon.
• A small piece of artillery.
n.
• Wild oats, brome grass, or darnel grass; — called also drawk, dravick, and drank.
Drakestone
n.
• A flat stone so thrown along the surface of water as to skip from point to point before it sinks; also, the sport of so throwing stones; — sometimes called ducks and drakes.
Dram
n.
• A weight; in Apothecaries' weight, one eighth part of an ounce, or sixty grains; in Avoirdupois weight, one sixteenth part of an ounce, or 27.34375 grains.
• A minute quantity; a mite.
• As much spirituous liquor as is usually drunk at once; as, a dram of brandy; hence, a potation or potion; as, a dram of poison.
(Numis.) A Persian daric.
v. i. & t.
• To drink drams; to ply with drams.
Drama
n.
• A composition, in prose or poetry, accommodated to action, and intended to exhibit a picture of human life, or to depict a series of grave or humorous actions of more than ordinary interest, tending toward some striking result. It is commonly designed to be spoken and represented by actors on the stage.
• A series of real events invested with a dramatic unity and interest.
• Dramatic composition and the literature pertaining to or illustrating it; dramatic literature.
Dramatically
adv.
• In a dramatic manner; theatrically; vividly.
Dramatist
n.
• The author of a dramatic composition; a writer of plays.
Dramatizable
a.
• Capable of being dramatized.
Dramatization
n.
• Act of dramatizing.
Dramatize
v. t.
• To compose in the form of the drama; to represent in a drama; to adapt to dramatic representation; as, to dramatize a novel, or an historical episode.
Dramaturgic
a.
• Relating to dramaturgy.
Dramaturgist
n.
• One versed in dramaturgy.
Dramaturgy
n.
• The art of dramatic composition and representation.
Dramming
n.
• The practice of drinking drams.
Dramseller
n.
• One who sells distilled liquors by the dram or glass.
Dramshop
n.
• A shop or barroom where spirits are sold by the dram.
Drank
imp.
• of Drink.
n.
• Wild oats, or darnel grass.
Drape
v. t.
• To cover or adorn with drapery or folds of cloth, or as with drapery; as, to drape a bust, a building, etc.
• To rail at; to banter.
v. i.
• To make cloth.
• To design drapery, arrange its folds, etc., as for hangings, costumes, statues, etc.
Draper
n.
• One who sells cloths; a dealer in cloths; as, a draper and tailor.
Draperied
a.
• Covered or supplied with drapery.
Drapery
n.
• The occupation of a draper; cloth-making, or dealing in cloth.
• Cloth, or woolen stuffs in general.
• A textile fabric used for decorative purposes, especially when hung loosely and in folds carefully disturbed; as: (a) Garments or vestments of this character worn upon the body, or shown in the representations of the human figure in art. (b) Hangings of a room or hall, or about a bed.
Drapet
n.
• Cloth.
Drastic
a.
(Med.) Acting rapidly and violently; efficacious; powerful; — opposed to bland; as, drastic purgatives.
n.
(Med.) A violent purgative.
Drasty
a.
• Filthy; worthless.
Draught
n.
• The act of drawing or pulling
• The act of moving loads by drawing, as by beasts of burden, and the like.
• The drawing of a bowstring
• Act of drawing a net; a sweeping the water for fish
• The act of drawing liquor into the mouth and throat; the act of drinking
• A sudden attack or drawing upon an enemy
(Mil.) The act of selecting or detaching soldiers; a draft (see Draft, n., 2)
• The act of drawing up, marking out, or delineating; representation.
• That which is drawn
• That which is taken by sweeping with a net.
(Mil.) The force drawn; a detachment; — in this sense usually written draft
• The quantity drawn in at once in drinking; a potion or potation
• A sketch, outline, or representation, whether written, designed, or drawn; a delineation
(Com.) An order for the payment of money; — in this sense almost always written draft
• A current of air moving through an inclosed place, as through a room or up a chimney
• That which draws
• A team of oxen or horses
• A sink or drain; a privy
(Med.) A mild vesicatory; a sinapism; as, to apply draughts to the feet
• Capacity of being drawn; force necessary to draw; traction.
(Naut.) The depth of water necessary to float a ship, or the depth a ship sinks in water, especially when laden; as, a ship of twelve feet draught.
(Com.) An allowance on weighable goods.
• A move, as at chess or checkers.
• The bevel given to the pattern for a casting, in order that it may be drawn from the sand without injury to the mold.
a.
• Used for drawing vehicles, loads, etc.; as, a draught beast; draught hooks.
• Relating to, or characterized by, a draft, or current of air.
• Used in making drawings; as, draught compasses.
• Drawn directly from the barrel, or other receptacle, in distinction from bottled; on draught; — said of ale, cider, and the like.
v. t.
• To draw out; to call forth.
• To diminish or exhaust by drawing.
• To draw in outline; to make a draught, sketch, or plan of, as in architectural and mechanical drawing.
Draughtboard
n.
• A checkered board on which draughts are played.
Draughthouse
n.
• A house for the reception of waste matter; a privy.
Draughts
n. pl.
• A mild vesicatory.
n. pl.
• A game, now more commonly called checkers.
Draughtsman
n.
• One who draws pleadings or other writings.
• One who draws plans and sketches of machinery, structures, and places; also, more generally, one who makes drawings of any kind.
• A "man" or piece used in the game of draughts.
• One who drinks drams; a tippler.
Draughtsmanship
n.
• The office, art, or work of a draughtsman.
Draughty
a.
• Pertaining to a draught, or current of air; as, a draughtly, comfortless room.
Drave
• , old imp. of Drive.
Dravida
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A race Hindostan, believed to be the original people who occupied the land before the Hindoo or Aryan invasion.
Dravidian
a.
(Ethnol.) Of or pertaining to the Dravida.
Draw
v. t.
• To cause to move continuously by force applied in advance of the thing moved; to pull along; to haul; to drag; to cause to follow.
• To influence to move or tend toward one's self; to exercise an attracting force upon; to call towards itself; to attract; hence, to entice; to allure; to induce.
• To cause to come out for one's use or benefit; to extract; to educe; to bring forth; as: (a) To bring or take out, or to let out, from some receptacle, as a stick or post from a hole, water from a cask or well, etc.
• To pull from a sheath, as a sword
• To extract; to force out; to elicit; to derive
• To obtain from some cause or origin; to infer from evidence or reasons; to deduce from premises; to derive
• To take or procure from a place of deposit; to call for and receive from a fund, or the like; as, to draw money from a bank
• To take from a box or wheel, as a lottery ticket; to receive from a lottery by the drawing out of the numbers for prizes or blanks; hence, to obtain by good fortune; to win; to gain; as, he drew a prize
• To select by the drawing of lots
• To remove the contents of
• To drain by emptying; to suck dry.
• To extract the bowels of; to eviscerate; as, to draw a fowl; to hang, draw, and quarter a criminal
• To take into the lungs; to inhale; to inspire; hence, also, to utter or produce by an inhalation; to heave.
• To extend in length; to lengthen; to protract; to stretch; to extend, as a mass of metal into wire.
• To run, extend, or produce, as a line on any surface; hence, also, to form by marking; to make by an instrument of delineation; to produce, as a sketch, figure, or picture.
• To represent by lines drawn; to form a sketch or a picture of; to represent by a picture; to delineate; hence, to represent by words; to depict; to describe.
• To write in due form; to prepare a draught of; as, to draw a memorial, a deed, or bill of exchange.
• To require (so great a depth, as of water) for floating; — said of a vessel; to sink so deep in (water); as, a ship draws ten feet of water.
• To withdraw.
• To trace by scent; to track; — a hunting term.
v. i.
• To pull; to exert strength in drawing anything; to have force to move anything by pulling; as, a horse draws well; the sails of a ship draw well.
• To draw a liquid from some receptacle, as water from a well.
• To exert an attractive force; to act as an inducement or enticement.
(Med.) To have efficiency as an epispastic; to act as a sinapism; — said of a blister, poultice, etc.
• To have draught, as a chimney, flue, or the like; to furnish transmission to smoke, gases, etc.
• To unsheathe a weapon, especially a sword.
• To perform the act, or practice the art, of delineation; to sketch; to form figures or pictures.
• To become contracted; to shrink.
• To move; to come or go; literally, to draw one's self; — with prepositions and adverbs; as, to draw away, to move off, esp. in racing, to get in front; to obtain the lead or increase it; to draw back, to retreat; to draw level, to move up even (with another); to come up to or overtake another; to draw off, to retire or retreat; to draw on, to advance; to draw up, to form in array; to draw near, nigh, or towards, to approach; to draw together, to come together, to collect.
• To make a draft or written demand for payment of money deposited or due; — usually with on or upon.
• To admit the action of pulling or dragging; to undergo draught; as, a carriage draws easily.
• To sink in water; to require a depth for floating.
n.
• The act of drawing; draught.
• A lot or chance to be drawn.
• A drawn game or battle, etc.
• That part of a bridge which may be raised, swung round, or drawn aside; the movable part of a drawbridge.
Drawable
a.
• Capable of being drawn.
Drawback
n.
• A lose of advantage, or deduction from profit, value, success, etc.; a discouragement or hindrance; objectionable feature.
(Com.) Money paid back or remitted; especially, a certain amount of duties or customs, sometimes the whole, and sometimes only a part, remitted or paid back by the government, on the exportation of the commodities on which they were levied.
Drawbar
n.
(Railroad) An openmouthed bar at the end of a car, which receives a coupling link and pin by which the car is drawn. It is usually provided with a spring to give elasticity to the connection between the cars of a train.
• A bar of iron with an eye at each end, or a heavy link, for coupling a locomotive to a tender or car.
Drawbench
n.
(Med.) A machine in which strips of metal are drawn through a drawplate; especially, one in which wire is thus made; — also called drawing bench.
Drawbolt
n.
(Engin.) A coupling pin.
Drawbore
n.
(Joinery) A hole bored through a tenon nearer to the shoulder than the holes through the cheeks are to the edge or abutment against which the shoulder is to rest, so that a pin or bolt, when driven into it, will draw these parts together.
v. t.
• To make a drawbore in; as, to drawbore a tenon.
• To enlarge the bore of a gun barrel by drawing, instead of thrusting, a revolving tool through it.
Drawboy
n.
(Weaving) A boy who operates the harness cords of a hand loom; also, a part of power loom that performs the same office.
Drawbridge
n.
• A bridge of which either the whole or a part is made to be raised up, let down, or drawn or turned aside, to admit or hinder communication at pleasure, as before the gate of a town or castle, or over a navigable river or canal.
Drawcansir
n.
• A blustering, bullying fellow; a pot-valiant braggart; a bully.
Drawee
n.
(Law) The person on whom an order or bill of exchange is drawn; — the correlative of drawer.
Drawer
n.
• One who, or that which, draws
• One who draws liquor for guests; a waiter in a taproom
• One who delineates or depicts; a draughtsman; as, a good drawer
(Law) One who draws a bill of exchange or order for payment; — the correlative of drawee.
• That which is drawn
• A sliding box or receptacle in a case, which is opened by pulling or drawing out, and closed by pushing in
• An under-garment worn on the lower limbs.
Drawfiling
n.
• The process of smooth filing by working the file sidewise instead of lengthwise.
Drawgear
n.
• A harness for draught horses.
(Railroad) The means or parts by which cars are connected to be drawn.
Drawgloves
n. pl.
• An old game, played by holding up the fingers.
Drawhead
n.
(Railroad) The flanged outer end of a drawbar; also, a name applied to the drawgear.
Drawing
n.
• The act of pulling, or attracting.
• The act or the art of representing any object by means of lines and shades; especially, such a representation when in one color, or in tints used not to represent the colors of natural objects, but for effect only, and produced with hard material such as pencil, chalk, etc.; delineation; also, the figure or representation drawn.
• The process of stretching or spreading metals as by hammering, or, as in forming wire from rods or tubes and cups from sheet metal, by pulling them through dies.
(Textile Manuf.) The process of pulling out and elongating the sliver from the carding machine, by revolving rollers, to prepare it for spinning.
• The distribution of prizes and blanks in a lottery.
Drawl
v. t.
• To utter in a slow, lengthened tone.
v. i.
• To speak with slow and lingering utterance, from laziness, lack of spirit, affectation, etc.
n.
• A lengthened, slow monotonous utterance.
Drawlatch
n.
• A housebreaker or thief.
Drawling
n.
• The act of speaking with a drawl; a drawl.
Drawlink
n.
• Same as Drawbar (b).
Drawloom
n.
• A kind of loom used in weaving figured patterns; — called also drawboy.
• A species of damask made on the drawloom.
Drawn
p. p. & a.
• p. p. of Draw.
Drawnet
n.
• A net for catching the larger sorts of birds; also, a dragnet.
Drawplate
n.
• A hardened steel plate having a hole, or a gradation of conical holes, through which wires are drawn to be reduced and elongated.
Drawrod
n.
(Railroad) A rod which unites the drawgear at opposite ends of the car, and bears the pull required to draw the train.
Drawspring
n.
(Railroad) The spring to which a drawbar is attached.
Dray
n.
• A squirrel's nest.
n.
• A strong low cart or carriage used for heavy burdens.
• A kind of sledge or sled.
Drayage
n.
• Use of a dray.
• The charge, or sum paid, for the use of a dray.
Drayman
n.
• A man who attends a dray.
Drazel
n.
• A slut; a vagabond wench. Same as Drossel.
Dread
v. t.
• To fear in a great degree; to regard, or look forward to, with terrific apprehension.
v. i.
• To be in dread, or great fear.
n.
• Great fear in view of impending evil; fearful apprehension of danger; anticipatory terror.
• Reverential or respectful fear; awe.
• An object of terrified apprehension.
• A person highly revered.
• Fury; dreadfulness.
• Doubt; as, out of dread.
a.
• Exciting great fear or apprehension; causing terror; frightful; dreadful.
• Inspiring with reverential fear; awful' venerable; as, dread sovereign; dread majesty; dread tribunal.
Dreadable
a.
• Worthy of being dreaded.
Dreader
n.
• One who fears, or lives in fear.
Dreadful
a.
• Full of dread or terror; fearful.
• Inspiring dread; impressing great fear; fearful; terrible; as, a dreadful storm.
• Inspiring awe or reverence; awful.
Dreadfully
adv.
• In a dreadful manner; terribly.
Dreadfulness
n.
• The quality of being dreadful.
Dreadingly
adv.
• With dread.
Dreadless
a.
• Free from dread; fearless; intrepid; dauntless; as, dreadless heart.
• Exempt from danger which causes dread; secure.
adv.
• Without doubt.
Dreadlessness
n.
• Freedom from dread.
Dreadly
a.
• Dreadful.
adv.
• With dread.
Dreadnaught
n.
• A fearless person.
• Hence: A garment made of very thick cloth, that can defend against storm and cold; also, the cloth itself; fearnaught.
Dream
n.
• The thoughts, or series of thoughts, or imaginary transactions, which occupy the mind during sleep; a sleeping vision.
• A visionary scheme; a wild conceit; an idle fancy; a vagary; a revery; — in this sense, applied to an imaginary or anticipated state of happiness; as, a dream of bliss; the dream of his youth.
v. i.
• To have ideas or images in the mind while in the state of sleep; to experience sleeping visions; — often with of; as, to dream of a battle, or of an absent friend.
• To let the mind run on in idle revery or vagary; to anticipate vaguely as a coming and happy reality; to have a visionary notion or idea; to imagine.
v. t.
• To have a dream of; to see, or have a vision of, in sleep, or in idle fancy; — often followed by an objective clause.
Dreamer
n.
• One who dreams.
• A visionary; one lost in wild imaginations or vain schemes of some anticipated good; as, a political dreamer.
Dreamful
a.
• Full of dreams.
Dreamily
adv.
• As if in a dream; softly; slowly; languidly.
Dreaminess
n.
• The state of being dreamy.
Dreamingly
adv.
• In a dreamy manner.
Dreamland
n.
• An unreal, delightful country such as in sometimes pictured in dreams; region of fancies; fairyland.
Dreamless
a.
• Free from, or without, dreams.
Dreamy
a.
• Abounding in dreams or given to dreaming; appropriate to, or like, dreams; visionary.
Drear
a.
• Dismal; gloomy with solitude.
n.
• Sadness; dismalness.
Drearily
adv.
• Gloomily; dismally.
Dreariment
n.
• Dreariness.
Dreariness
n.
• Sorrow; wretchedness.
• Dismalness; gloomy solitude.
Drearing
n.
• Sorrow.
Drearisome
a.
• Very dreary.
Dreary
a.
• Sorrowful; distressful.
• Exciting cheerless sensations, feelings, or associations; comfortless; dismal; gloomy.
Drecche
v. t.
• To vex; to torment; to trouble.
v. i.
• To delay.
Dredge
n.
• Any instrument used to gather or take by dragging; as: (a) A dragnet for taking up oysters, etc., from their beds. (b) A dredging machine. (c) An iron frame, with a fine net attached, used in collecting animals living at the bottom of the sea.
(Mining) Very fine mineral matter held in suspension in water.
v. t.
• To catch or gather with a dredge; to deepen with a dredging machine.
n.
• A mixture of oats and barley.
v. t.
• To sift or sprinkle flour, etc., on, as on roasting meat.
Dredger
n.
• One who fishes with a dredge.
• A dredging machine.
n.
(Cookery) A box with holes in its lid; — used for sprinkling flour, as on meat or a breadboard; — called also dredging box, drudger, and drudging box.
Dree
v. t.
• To endure; to suffer.
v. i.
• To be able to do or endure.
a.
• Wearisome; tedious.
Dreg
n.
• Corrupt or defiling matter contained in a liquid, or precipitated from it; refuse; feculence; lees; grounds; sediment; hence, the vilest and most worthless part of anything; as, the dregs of society.
Dregginess
n.
• Fullness of dregs or lees; foulness; feculence.
Dreggish
a.
• Foul with lees; feculent.
Dreggy
a.
• Containing dregs or lees; muddy; foul; feculent.
Drein
v. i.
• To drain.
Dreissena
n.
(Zool.) A genus of bivalve shells of which one species (D. polymorpha) is often so abundant as to be very troublesome in the fresh waters of Europe.
Drench
v. t.
• To cause to drink; especially, to dose by force; to put a potion down the throat of, as of a horse; hence. to purge violently by physic.
• To steep in moisture; to wet thoroughly; to soak; to saturate with water or other liquid; to immerse.
n.
• A drink; a draught; specifically, a potion of medicine poured or forced down the throat; also, a potion that causes purging.
n.
(O. Eng. Law) A military vassal mentioned in Domesday Book.
Drenche
v. t. & i.
• To drown.
Drencher
n.
• One who, or that which, west or steeps.
• One who administers a drench.
Drengage
n.
(O. Eng. Law) The tenure by which a drench held land.
Drent
p. p.
• Drenched; drowned.
Dress
v. t.
• To direct; to put right or straight; to regulate; to order.
(Mil.) To arrange in exact continuity of line, as soldiers; commonly to adjust to a straight line and at proper distance; to align; as, to dress the ranks.
(Med.) To treat methodically with remedies, bandages, or curative appliances, as a sore, an ulcer, a wound, or a wounded or diseased part.
• To adjust; to put in good order; to arrange; specifically: (a) To prepare for use; to fit for any use; to render suitable for an intended purpose; to get ready; as, to dress a slain animal; to dress meat; to dress leather or cloth; to dress or trim a lamp; to dress a garden; to dress a horse, by currying and rubbing; to dress grain, by cleansing it; in mining and metallurgy, to dress ores, by sorting and separating them.
• To cut to proper dimensions, or give proper shape to, as to a tool by hammering; also, to smooth or finish
• To put in proper condition by appareling, as the body; to put clothes upon; to apparel; to invest with garments or rich decorations; to clothe; to deck
• To break and train for use, as a horse or other animal
v. i.
(Mil.) To arrange one's self in due position in a line of soldiers; — the word of command to form alignment in ranks; as, Right, dress!
• To clothe or apparel one's self; to put on one's garments; to pay particular regard to dress; as, to dress quickly.
n.
• That which is used as the covering or ornament of the body; clothes; garments; habit; apparel.
• A lady's gown; as, silk or a velvet dress.
• Attention to apparel, or skill in adjusting it.
(Milling) The system of furrows on the face of a millstone.
Dresser
n.
• One who dresses; one who put in order or makes ready for use; one who on clothes or ornaments.
(Mining) A kind of pick for shaping large coal.
• An assistant in a hospital, whose office it is to dress wounds, sores, etc.
• A table or bench on which meat and other things are dressed, or prepared for use.
• A cupboard or set of shelves to receive dishes and cooking utensils.
Dressiness
n.
• The state of being dressy.
Dressing
n.
• Dress; raiment; especially, ornamental habiliment or attire.
(Surg.) An application (a remedy, bandage, etc.) to a sore or wound.
• Manure or compost over land. When it remains on the surface, it is called a top-dressing.
(Cookery) A preparation to fit food for use; a condiment; as, a dressing for salad.
• The stuffing of fowls, pigs, etc.; forcemeat.
• Gum, starch, and the like, used in stiffening or finishing silk, linen, and other fabrics.
• An ornamental finish, as a molding around doors, windows, or on a ceiling, etc.
• Castigation; scolding; — often with down.
Dressmaker
n.
• A maker of gowns, or similar garments; a mantuamaker.
Dressmaking
n.
• The art, process, or occupation, of making dresses.
Dressy
a.
• Showy in dress; attentive to dress.
Drest
p. p.
• of Dress.
Dreul
v. i.
• To drool.
Drevil
n.
• A fool; a drudge.
Drew
imp.
• of Draw.
Drey
n.
• A squirrel's nest.
Dreye
a.
• Dry.
Drib
v. t.
• To do by little and little
• To cut off by a little at a time; to crop
• To appropriate unlawfully; to filch; to defalcate.
• To lead along step by step; to entice
v. t. & i.
(Archery) To shoot (a shaft) so as to pierce on the descent.
n.
• A drop.
Dribber
n.
• One who dribs; one who shoots weakly or badly.
Dribble
v. i.
• To fall in drops or small drops, or in a quick succession of drops; as, water dribbles from the eaves.
• To slaver, as a child or an idiot; to drivel.
• To fall weakly and slowly.
v. t.
• To let fall in drops.
n.
• A drizzling shower; a falling or leaking in drops.
Dribbler
n.
• One who dribbles.
Drie
v. t.
• To endure.
Dried
imp. & p. p.
• of Day. Also adj.; as, dried apples.
Drier
n.
• One who, or that which, dries; that which may expel or absorb moisture; a desiccative; as, the sun and a northwesterly wind are great driers of the earth.
(Paint.) Drying oil; a substance mingled with the oil used in oil painting to make it dry quickly.
Drift
n.
• A driving; a violent movement.
• The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.
• Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.
• The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.
• That which is driven, forced, or urged along
• Anything driven at random.
• A mass of matter which has been driven or forced onward together in a body, or thrown together in a heap, etc., esp. by wind or water; as, a drift of snow, of ice, of sand, and the like.
• A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds
(Arch.) The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.
(Geol.) A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the agency of ice.
• In South Africa, a ford in a river.
(Mech.) A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.
(Mil.) A tool used in driving down compactly the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework
• A deviation from the line of fire, peculiar to oblong projectiles.
(Mining) A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.
(Naut.) The distance through which a current flows in a given time.
• The angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the meridian, in drifting.
• The distance to which a vessel is carried off from her desired course by the wind, currents, or other causes.
• The place in a deep-waisted vessel where the sheer is raised and the rail is cut off, and usually terminated with a scroll, or driftpiece.
• The distance between the two blocks of a tackle.
• The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.
v. i.
• To float or be driven along by, or as by, a current of water or air; as, the ship drifted astern; a raft drifted ashore; the balloon drifts slowly east.
• To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps; as, snow or sand drifts.
(mining) to make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.
v. t.
• To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.
• To drive into heaps; as, a current of wind drifts snow or sand.
(Mach.) To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.
a.
• That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud.
Driftage
n.
• Deviation from a ship's course due to leeway.
• Anything that drifts.
Driftbolt
n.
• A bolt for driving out other bolts.
Driftless
a.
• Having no drift or direction; without aim; purposeless.
Driftpiece
n.
(Shipbuilding) An upright or curved piece of timber connecting the plank sheer with the gunwale; also, a scroll terminating a rail.
Driftpin
n.
(Mech.) A smooth drift.
Driftway
n.
• A common way, road, or path, for driving cattle.
(Mining) Same as Drift, 11.
Driftweed
n.
• Seaweed drifted to the shore by the wind.
Driftwind
n.
• A driving wind; a wind that drives snow, sand, etc., into heaps.
Driftwood
n.
• Wood drifted or floated by water.
• Fig.: Whatever is drifting or floating as on water.
Drifty
a.
• Full of drifts; tending to form drifts, as snow, and the like.
Drill
v. t.
• To pierce or bore with a drill, or a with a drill; to perforate; as, to drill a hole into a rock; to drill a piece of metal.
• To train in the military art; to exercise diligently, as soldiers, in military evolutions and exercises; hence, to instruct thoroughly in the rudiments of any art or branch of knowledge; to discipline.
v. i.
• To practice an exercise or exercises; to train one's self.
n.
• An instrument with an edged or pointed end used for making holes in hard substances; strictly, a tool that cuts with its end, by revolving, as in drilling metals, or by a succession of blows, as in drilling stone; also, a drill press.
(Mil.) The act or exercise of training soldiers in the military art, as in the manual of arms, in the execution of evolutions, and the like; hence, diligent and strict instruction and exercise in the rudiments and methods of any business; a kind or method of military exercises; as, infantry drill; battalion drill; artillery drill.
• Any exercise, physical or mental, enforced with regularity and by constant repetition; as, a severe drill in Latin grammar.
(Zool.) A marine gastropod, of several species, which kills oysters and other bivalves by drilling holes through the shell. The most destructive kind is Urosalpinx cinerea.
v. t.
• To cause to flow in drills or rills or by trickling; to drain by trickling; as, waters drilled through a sandy stratum.
• To sow, as seeds, by dribbling them along a furrow or in a row, like a trickling rill of water.
• To entice; to allure from step; to decoy; — with on.
• To cause to slip or waste away by degrees.
v. i.
• To trickle.
• To sow in drills.
n.
• A small trickling stream; a rill.
(Agr.) An implement for making holes for sowing seed, and sometimes so formed as to contain seeds and drop them into the hole made
• A light furrow or channel made to put seed into sowing
• A row of seed sown in a furrow.
n.
(Zool.) A large African baboon (Cynocephalus leucophaeus).
n.
(Manuf.) Same as Drilling.
Driller
n.
• One who, or that which, drills.
Drilling
n.
• The act of piercing with a drill.
• A training by repeated exercises.
n.
• The act of using a drill in sowing seeds.
n.
(Manuf.) A heavy, twilled fabric of linen or cotton.
Drillmaster
n.
• One who teaches drill, especially in the way of gymnastics.
Drillstock
n.
(Mech.) A contrivance for holding and turning a drill.
Drimays
n.
(Bot.) A genus of magnoliaceous trees. Drimys aromatica furnishes Winter's bark.
Drink
v. i.
• To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst; as, to drink from a spring.
• To quaff exhilarating or intoxicating liquors, in merriment or feasting; to carouse; to revel; hence, to lake alcoholic liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the se of intoxicating or spirituous liquors; to tipple.
v. t.
• To swallow (a liquid); to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; to imbibe; as, to drink milk or water.
• To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe.
• To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see.
• To smoke, as tobacco.
n.
• Liquid to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach for quenching thirst or for other purposes, as water, coffee, or decoctions.
• Specifically, intoxicating liquor; as, when drink is on, wit is out.
Drinkable
a.
• Capable of being drunk; suitable for drink; potable. Macaulay. Also used substantively, esp. in the plural.
Drinkableness
n.
• State of being drinkable.
Drinker
n.
• One who drinks; as, the effects of tea on the drinker; also, one who drinks spirituous liquors to excess; a drunkard.
Drinking
n.
• The act of one who drinks; the act of imbibing.
• The practice of partaking to excess of intoxicating liquors.
• An entertainment with liquors; a carousal.
Drinkless
a.
• Destitute of drink.
Drip
v. i.
• To fall in drops; as, water drips from the eaves.
• To let fall drops of moisture or liquid; as, a wet garment drips.
v. t.
• To let fall in drops.
n.
• A falling or letting fall in drops; a dripping; that which drips, or falls in drops.
(Arch.) That part of a cornice, sill course, or other horizontal member, which projects beyond the rest, and is of such section as to throw off the rain water.
Dripping
n.
• A falling in drops, or the sound so made.
• That which falls in drops, as fat from meat in roasting.
Dripple
a.
• Weak or rare.
Dripstone
n.
(Arch.) A drip, when made of stone.
Drive
v. t.
• To impel or urge onward by force in a direction away from one, or along before one; to push forward; to compel to move on; to communicate motion to; as, to drive cattle; to drive a nail; smoke drives persons from a room.
• To urge on and direct the motions of, as the beasts which draw a vehicle, or the vehicle borne by them; hence, also, to take in a carriage; to convey in a vehicle drawn by beasts; as, to drive a pair of horses or a stage; to drive a person to his own door.
• To urge, impel, or hurry forward; to force; to constrain; to urge, press, or bring to a point or state; as, to drive person by necessity, by persuasion, by force of circumstances, by argument, and the like.
• To carry or; to keep in motion; to conduct; to prosecute. [Now used only colloquially.]
• To clear, by forcing away what is contained.
(Mining) To dig Horizontally; to cut a horizontal gallery or tunnel.
• To pass away; — said of time.
v. i.
• To rush and press with violence; to move furiously.
• To be forced along; to be impelled; to be moved by any physical force or agent; to be driven.
• To go by carriage; to pass in a carriage; to proceed by directing or urging on a vehicle or the animals that draw it; as, the coachman drove to my door.
• To press forward; to aim, or tend, to a point; to make an effort; to strive; — usually with at.
• To distrain for rent.
p. p.
• Driven.
n.
• The act of driving; a trip or an excursion in a carriage, as for exercise or pleasure; — distinguished from a ride taken on horseback.
• A place suitable or agreeable for driving; a road prepared for driving.
• Violent or rapid motion; a rushing onward or away; esp., a forced or hurried dispatch of business.
• In type founding and forging, an impression or matrix, formed by a punch drift.
• A collection of objects that are driven; a mass of logs to be floated down a river.
Drivebolt
n.
• A drift; a tool for setting bolts home.
Drivel
v. i.
• To slaver; to let spittle drop or flow from the mouth, like a child, idiot, or dotard.
• To be weak or foolish; to dote; as, a driveling hero; driveling love.
n.
• Slaver; saliva flowing from the mouth.
• Inarticulate or unmeaning utterance; foolish talk; babble.
• A driveler; a fool; an idiot.
• A servant; a drudge.
Driveler
n.
• A slaverer; a slabberer; an idiot; a fool.
Driven
p. p.
• of Drive. Also adj.
Drivepipe
n.
• A pipe for forcing into the earth.
Driver
n.
• One who, or that which, drives; the person or thing that urges or compels anything else to move onward.
• The person who drives beasts or a carriage; a coachman; a charioteer, etc.; hence, also, one who controls the movements of a locomotive.
• An overseer of a gang of slaves or gang of convicts at their work.
(Mach.) A part that transmits motion to another part by contact with it, or through an intermediate relatively movable part, as a gear which drives another, or a lever which moves another through a link, etc. Specifically:
• The driving wheel of a locomotive
• An attachment to a lathe, spindle, or face plate to turn a carrier
• A crossbar on a grinding mill spindle to drive the upper stone
(Naut.) The after sail in a ship or bark, being a fore-and-aft sail attached to a gaff; a spanker.
Driveway
n.
• A passage or way along or through which a carriage may be driven.
Driving
a.
• Having great force of impulse; as, a driving wind or storm.
• Communicating force; impelling; as, a driving shaft.
n.
• The act of forcing or urging something along; the act of pressing or moving on furiously.
• Tendency; drift.
Drizzle
v. i.
• To rain slightly in very small drops; to fall, as water from the clouds, slowly and in fine particles; as, it drizzles; drizzling drops or rain.
v. t.
• To shed slowly in minute drops or particles.
n.
• Fine rain or mist.
Drizzly
a.
• Characterized by small rain, or snow; moist and disagreeable.
Drock
n.
• A water course.
Drogher
n.
• A small craft used in the West India Islands to take off sugars, rum, etc., to the merchantmen; also, a vessel for transporting lumber, cotton, etc., coastwise; as, a lumber drogher.
Droh
imp.
• of Draw.
Droil
v. i.
• To work sluggishly or slowly; to plod.
n.
• A drudge
• Mean labor; toil.
Droit
n.
• A right; law in its aspect of the foundation of rights; also, in old law, the writ of right.
Droitural
a.
(O. Eng. Law) relating to the mere right of property, as distinguished from the right of possession; as, droitural actions.
Droll
a.
• Queer, and fitted to provoke laughter; ludicrous from oddity; amusing and strange.
n.
• One whose practice it is to raise mirth by odd tricks; a jester; a buffoon; a merry-andrew.
• Something exhibited to raise mirth or sport, as a puppet, a farce, and the like.
v. i.
• To jest; to play the buffoon.
v. t.
• To lead or influence by jest or trick; to banter or jest; to cajole.
• To make a jest of; to set in a comical light.
Droller
n.
• A jester; a droll.
Drollery
n.
• The quality of being droll; sportive tricks; buffoonery; droll stories; comical gestures or manners.
• Something which serves to raise mirth
• A puppet show; also, a puppet
• A lively or comic picture.
Drollingly
adv.
• In a jesting manner.
Drollish
a.
• Somewhat droll.
Drollist
n.
• A droll.
Dromaeognathous
a.
(Zool.) Having the structure of the palate like that of the ostrich and emu.
Dromatherium
n.
(Paleon.) A small extinct triassic mammal from North Carolina, the earliest yet found in America.
Drome
n.
(Zool.) The crab plover (Dromas ardeola), a peculiar North African bird, allied to the oyster catcher.
Dromedary
n.
(Zool.) The Arabian camel (Camelus dromedarius), having one hump or protuberance on the back, in distinction from the Bactrian camel, which has two humps.
Drone
n.
(Zool.) The male of bees, esp. of the honeybee. It gathers no honey.
• One who lives on the labors of others; a lazy, idle fellow; a sluggard.
• That which gives out a grave or monotonous tone or dull sound; as: (a) A drum. Halliwell. (b) The part of the bagpipe containing the two lowest tubes, which always sound the key note and the fifth.
• A humming or deep murmuring sound.
(Mus.) A monotonous bass, as in a pastoral composition.
v. i.
• To utter or make a low, dull, monotonous, humming or murmuring sound.
• To love in idleness; to do nothing.
Dronepipe
n.
• One of the low-toned tubes of a bagpipe.
Drongo
n.
(Zool.) A passerine bird of the family Dicruridae. They are usually black with a deeply forked tail. They are natives of Asia, Africa, and Australia; — called also drongo shrikes.
Dronish
a.
• Like a drone; indolent; slow.
Dronkelewe
a.
• Given to drink; drunken.
Dronte
n.
(Zool.) The dodo.
Drony
a.
• Like a drone; sluggish; lazy.
Drool
v. i.
• To drivel, or drop saliva; as, the child drools.
Droop
v. i.
• To hang bending downward; to sink or hang down, as an animal, plant, etc., from physical inability or exhaustion, want of nourishment, or the like.
• To grow weak or faint with disappointment, grief, or like causes; to be dispirited or depressed; to languish; as, her spirits drooped.
• To proceed downward, or toward a close; to decline.
v. t.
• To let droop or sink.
n.
• A drooping; as, a droop of the eye.
Drooper
n.
• One who, or that which, droops.
Droopingly
adv.
• In a drooping manner.
Drop
n.
• The quantity of fluid which falls in one small spherical mass; a liquid globule; a minim; hence, also, the smallest easily measured portion of a fluid; a small quantity; as, a drop of water.
• That which resembles, or that which hangs like, a liquid drop; as a hanging diamond ornament, an earring, a glass pendant on a chandelier, a sugarplum (sometimes medicated), or a kind of shot or slug.
(Arch.) Same as Gutta.
• Any small pendent ornament.
• Whatever is arranged to drop, hang, or fall from an elevated position; also, a contrivance for lowering something
• A door or platform opening downward; a trap door; that part of the gallows on which a culprit stands when he is to be hanged; hence, the gallows itself
• A machine for lowering heavy weights, as packages, coal wagons, etc., to a ship's deck
• A contrivance for temporarily lowering a gas jet
• A curtain which drops or falls in front of the stage of a theater, etc.
• A drop press or drop hammer
(Mach.) The distance of the axis of a shaft below the base of a hanger.
• Any medicine the dose of which is measured by drops; as, lavender drops.
(Naut.) The depth of a square sail; — generally applied to the courses only.
• Act of dropping; sudden fall or descent.
v. t.
• To pour or let fall in drops; to pour in small globules; to distill.
• To cause to fall in one portion, or by one motion, like a drop; to let fall; as, to drop a line in fishing; to drop a courtesy.
• To let go; to dismiss; to set aside; to have done with; to discontinue; to forsake; to give up; to omit.
• To bestow or communicate by a suggestion; to let fall in an indirect, cautious, or gentle manner; as, to drop hint, a word of counsel, etc.
• To lower, as a curtain, or the muzzle of a gun, etc.
• To send, as a letter; as, please drop me a line, a letter, word.
• To give birth to; as, to drop a lamb.
• To cover with drops; to variegate; to bedrop.
v. i.
• To fall in drops.
• To fall, in general, literally or figuratively; as, ripe fruit drops from a tree; wise words drop from the lips.
• To let drops fall; to discharge itself in drops.
• To fall dead, or to fall in death.
• To come to an end; to cease; to pass out of mind; as, the affair dropped.
• To come unexpectedly; — with in or into; as, my old friend dropped in a moment.
• To fall or be depressed; to lower; as, the point of the spear dropped a little.
• To fall short of a mark.
• To be deep in extent; to descend perpendicularly; as, her main topsail drops seventeen yards.
Droplet
n.
• A little drop; a tear.
Droplight
n.
• An apparatus for bringing artificial light down from a chandelier nearer to a table or desk; a pendant.
Dropper
n.
• One who, or that which, drops. Specif.: (Fishing) A fly that drops from the leaden above the bob or end fly.
• A dropping tube.
(Mining) A branch vein which drops off from, or leaves, the main lode.
(Zool.) A dog which suddenly drops upon the ground when it sights game, — formerly a common, and still an occasional, habit of the setter.
Dropping
n.
• The action of causing to drop or of letting drop; falling.
• That which falls in drops; the excrement or dung of animals.
Droppinly
adv.
• In drops.
Dropsical
a.
• Diseased with dropsy; hydropical; tending to dropsy; as, a dropsical patient.
• Of or pertaining to dropsy.
Dropsicalness
n.
• State of being dropsical.
Dropsied
a.
• Diseased with drops.
Dropsy
n.
(Med.) An unnatural collection of serous fluid in any serous cavity of the body, or in the subcutaneous cellular tissue.
Dropt
• imp. & p. p. of Drop, v.
Dropwise
adv.
• After the manner of a drop; in the form of drops.
Dropworm
n.
(Zool.) The larva of any geometrid moth, which drops from trees by means of a thread of silk, as the cankerworm.
Dropwort
n.
(Bot.) An Old World species of Spiraea (S. filipendula), with finely cut leaves.
Drosera
n.
(Bot.) A genus of low perennial or biennial plants, the leaves of which are beset with gland-tipped bristles.
Drosky
n.
• A low, four-wheeled, open carriage, used in Russia, consisting of a kind of long, narrow bench, on which the passengers ride as on a saddle, with their feet reaching nearly to the ground. Other kinds of vehicles are now so called, esp. a kind of victoria drawn by one or two horses, and used as a public carriage in German cities.
Drosometer
n.
(Meteorol.) An instrument for measuring the quantity of dew on the surface of a body in the open air. It consists of a balance, having a plate at one end to receive the dew, and at the other a weight protected from the deposit of dew.
Dross
n.
• The scum or refuse matter which is thrown off, or falls from, metals in smelting the ore, or in the process of melting; recrement.
• Rust of metals.
• Waste matter; any worthless matter separated from the better part; leavings; dregs; refuse.
Drossel
n.
• A slut; a hussy; a drazel.
Drossless
a.
• Free from dross.
Drossy
a.
• Of, pertaining to, resembling, dross; full of dross; impure; worthless.
Drough
imp.
• imp. of Draw.
Drought
n.
• Dryness; want of rain or of water; especially, such dryness of the weather as affects the earth, and prevents the growth of plants; aridity.
• Thirst; want of drink.
• Scarcity; lack.
Droughtiness
n.
• A state of dryness of the weather; want of rain.
Droughty
a.
• Characterized by drought; wanting rain; arid; adust.
• Dry; thirsty; wanting drink.
Droumy
a.
• Troubled; muddy.
Drouth
n.
• Same as Drought.
Drouthy
a.
• Droughty.
Drove
imp.
• of Drive.
n.
• A collection of cattle driven, or cattle collected for driving; a number of animals, as oxen, sheep, or swine, driven in a body.
• Any collection of irrational animals, moving or driving forward; as, a finny drove.
• A crowd of people in motion.
• A road for driving cattle; a driftway.
(Agric.) A narrow drain or channel used in the irrigation of land.
(Masonry) A broad chisel used to bring stone to a nearly smooth surface; — called also drove chisel.
• The grooved surface of stone finished by the drove chisel; — called also drove work.
Droven
p. p.
• of Drive.
Drover
n.
• One who drives cattle or sheep to market; one who makes it his business to purchase cattle, and drive them to market.
• A boat driven by the tide.
Drovy
a.
• Turbid; muddy; filthy.
Drow
imp.
• of Draw.
Drown
v. i.
• To be suffocated in water or other fluid; to perish in water.
v. t.
• To overwhelm in water; to submerge; to inundate.
• To deprive of life by immersion in water or other liquid.
• To overpower; to overcome; to extinguish; — said especially of sound.
Drownage
n.
• The act of drowning.
Drowner
n.
• One who, or that which, drowns.
Drowse
v. i.
• To sleep imperfectly or unsoundly; to slumber; to be heavy with sleepiness; to doze.
v. t.
• To make heavy with sleepiness or imperfect sleep; to make dull or stupid.
n.
• A slight or imperfect sleep; a doze.
Drowsihead
n.
• Drowsiness.
Drowsihed
n.
• Drowsihead.
Drowsily
adv.
• In a drowsy manner.
Drowsiness
n.
• State of being drowsy.
Drowsy
a.
• Inclined to drowse; heavy with sleepiness; lethargic; dozy.
• Disposing to sleep; lulling; soporific.
• Dull; stupid.
Drub
v. t.
• To beat with a stick; to thrash; to cudgel.
n.
• A blow with a cudgel; a thump.
Drubber
n.
• One who drubs.
Drudge
v. i.
• To perform menial work; to labor in mean or unpleasant offices with toil and fatigue.
v. t.
• To consume laboriously; — with away.
n.
• One who drudges; one who works hard in servile employment; a mental servant.
Drudger
n.
• One who drudges; a drudge.
• A dredging box.
Drudgery
n.
• The act of drudging; disagreeable and wearisome labor; ignoble or slavish toil.
Drudgingly
adv.
• In a drudging manner; laboriously.
Druery
n.
• Courtship; gallantry; love; an object of love.
Drug
v. i.
• To drudge; to toil laboriously.
n.
• A drudge (?).
n.
• Any animal, vegetable, or mineral substance used in the composition of medicines; any stuff used in dyeing or in chemical operations.
v. i.
• To prescribe or administer drugs or medicines.
v. t.
• To affect or season with drugs or ingredients; esp., to stupefy by a narcotic drug. Also Fig.
• To tincture with something offensive or injurious.
• To dose to excess with, or as with, drugs.
Drugger
n.
• A druggist.
Drugget
n.
• A coarse woolen cloth dyed of one color or printed on one side; generally used as a covering for carpets.
• By extension, any material used for the same purpose.
Druggist
n.
• One who deals in drugs; especially, one who buys and sells drugs without compounding them; also, a pharmaceutist or apothecary.
Drugster
n.
• A druggist.
Druid
n.
• One of an order of priests which in ancient times existed among certain branches of the Celtic race, especially among the Gauls and Britons.
• A member of a social and benevolent order, founded in London in 1781, and professedly based on the traditions of the ancient Druids. Lodges or groves of the society are established in other countries.
Druidess
n.
• A female Druid; a prophetess.
Druidish
a.
• Druidic.
Druidism
n.
• The system of religion, philosophy, and instruction, received and taught by the Druids; the rites and ceremonies of the Druids.
Drum
n.
(Mus.) An instrument of percussion, consisting either of a hollow cylinder, over each end of which is stretched a piece of skin or vellum, to be beaten with a stick; or of a metallic hemisphere (kettledrum) with a single piece of skin to be so beaten; the common instrument for marking time in martial music; one of the pair of tympani in an orchestra, or cavalry band.
• Anything resembling a drum in form
• A sheet iron radiator, often in the shape of a drum, for warming an apartment by means of heat received from a stovepipe, or a cylindrical receiver for steam, etc.
• A small cylindrical box in which figs, etc., are packed.
(Anat.) The tympanum of the ear; — often, but incorrectly, applied to the tympanic membrane
(Arch.) One of the cylindrical, or nearly cylindrical, blocks, of which the shaft of a column is composed; also, a vertical wall, whether circular or polygonal in plan, carrying a cupola or dome
(Mach.) A cylinder on a revolving shaft, generally for the purpose of driving several pulleys, by means of belts or straps passing around its periphery; also, the barrel of a hoisting machine, on which the rope or chain is wound.
• A noisy, tumultuous assembly of fashionable people at a private house; a rout.
• A tea party; a kettledrum.
v. i.
• To beat a drum with sticks; to beat or play a tune on a drum.
• To beat with the fingers, as with drumsticks; to beat with a rapid succession of strokes; to make a noise like that of a beaten drum; as, the ruffed grouse drums with his wings.
• To throb, as the heart.
• To go about, as a drummer does, to gather recruits, to draw or secure partisans, customers, etc,; — with for.
v. t.
• To execute on a drum, as a tune.
(With out) To expel ignominiously, with beat of drum; as, to drum out a deserter or rogue from a camp, etc.
(With up) To assemble by, or as by, beat of drum; to collect; to gather or draw by solicitation; as, to drum up recruits; to drum up customers.
Drumbeat
n.
• The sound of a beaten drum; drum music.
Drumble
v. i.
• To be sluggish or lazy; to be confused.
• To mumble in speaking.
Drumfish
n.
(Zool.) any fish of the family Sciaenidae, which makes a loud noise by means of its air bladder; — called also drum.
Drumhead
n.
• The parchment or skin stretched over one end of a drum.
• The top of a capstan which is pierced with sockets for levers used in turning it.
Drumlin
n.
(Geol.) A hill of compact, unstratified, glacial drift or till, usually elongate or oval, with the larger axis parallel to the former local glacial motion.
Drumly
a.
• Turbid; muddy.
Drummer
n.
• One whose office is to best the drum, as in military exercises and marching.
• One who solicits custom; a commercial traveler.
(Zool.) A fish that makes a sound when caught
• The squeteague
• A California sculpin.
(Zool.) A large West Indian cockroach (Blatta gigantea) which drums on woodwork, as a sexual call.
Drumming
n.
• The act of beating upon, or as if upon, a drum; also, the noise which the male of the ruffed grouse makes in spring, by beating his wings upon his sides.
Drumstick
n.
• A stick with which a drum is beaten.
• Anything resembling a drumstick in form, as the tibiotarsus, or second joint, of the leg of a fowl.
Drunk
a.
• Intoxicated with, or as with, strong drink; inebriated; drunken; — never used attributively, but always predicatively; as, the man is drunk (not, a drunk man).
• Drenched or saturated with moisture or liquid.
n.
• A drunken condition; a spree.
Drunkard
n.
• One who habitually drinks strong liquors immoderately; one whose habit it is to get drunk; a toper; a sot.
Drunken
a.
• Overcome by strong drink; intoxicated by, or as by, spirituous liquor; inebriated.
• Saturated with liquid or moisture; drenched.
• Pertaining to, or proceeding from, intoxication.
Drunkenhead
n.
• Drunkenness.
Drunkenly
adv.
• In a drunken manner.
Drunkenness
n.
• The state of being drunken with, or as with, alcoholic liquor; intoxication; inebriety; — used of the casual state or the habit.
• Disorder of the faculties, resembling intoxication by liquors; inflammation; frenzy; rage.
Drupaceous
a.
(Bot.) Producing, or pertaining to, drupes; having the form of drupes; as, drupaceous trees or fruits.
Drupal
a.
(Bot.) Drupaceous.
Drupe
n.
(Bot.) A fruit consisting of pulpy, coriaceous, or fibrous exocarp, without valves, containing a nut or stone with a kernel. The exocarp is succulent in the plum, cherry, apricot, peach, etc.; dry and subcoriaceous in the almond; and fibrous in the cocoanut.
Druse
n.
(Min.) A cavity in a rock, having its interior surface studded with crystals and sometimes filled with water; a geode.
n.
• One of a people and religious sect dwelling chiefly in the Lebanon mountains of Syria.
Dry
a.
• Free from moisture; having little humidity or none; arid; not wet or moist; deficient in the natural or normal supply of moisture, as rain or fluid of any kind; — said especially: (a) Of the weather: Free from rain or mist.
• Of vegetable matter: Free from juices or sap; not succulent; not green; as, dry wood or hay
• Of animals: Not giving milk; as, the cow is dry
• Of persons: Thirsty; needing drink
• Of the eyes: Not shedding tears
(Med.) Of certain morbid conditions, in which there is entire or comparative absence of moisture; as, dry gangrene; dry catarrh
• Destitute of that which interests or amuses; barren; unembellished; jejune; plain.
• Characterized by a quality somewhat severe, grave, or hard; hence, sharp; keen; shrewd; quaint; as, a dry tone or manner; dry wit.
(Fine Arts) Exhibiting a sharp, frigid preciseness of execution, or the want of a delicate contour in form, and of easy transition in coloring.
v. t.
• To make dry; to free from water, or from moisture of any kind, and by any means; to exsiccate; as, to dry the eyes; to dry one's tears; the wind dries the earth; to dry a wet cloth; to dry hay.
v. i.
• To grow dry; to become free from wetness, moisture, or juice; as, the road dries rapidly.
• To evaporate wholly; to be exhaled; — said of moisture, or a liquid; — sometimes with up; as, the stream dries, or dries up.
• To shrivel or wither; to lose vitality.
Dryad
n.
(Class. Myth.) A wood nymph; a nymph whose life was bound up with that of her tree.
Dryandra
n.
(Bot.) A genus of shrubs growing in Australia, having beautiful, hard, dry, evergreen leaves.
Dryas
n.
(Class. Myth.) A dryad.
Dryer
n.
• See Drier.
Dryfoot
n.
• The scent of the game, as far as it can be traced.
Drying
a.
• Adapted or tending to exhaust moisture; as, a drying wind or day; a drying room.
• Having the quality of rapidly becoming dry.
Dryly
adv.
• In a dry manner; not succulently; without interest; without sympathy; coldly.
Dryness
n.
• The state of being dry.
Drynurse
v. t.
• To feed, attend, and bring up without the breast.
Dryobalanops
n.
(Bot.) The genus to which belongs the single species D. Camphora, a lofty resinous tree of Borneo and Sumatra, yielding Borneo camphor and camphor oil.
Drysalter
n.
• A dealer in salted or dried meats, pickles, sauces, etc., and in the materials used in pickling, salting, and preserving various kinds of food Hence drysalters usually sell a number of saline substances and miscellaneous drugs.
Drysaltery
n.
• The articles kept by a drysalter; also, the business of a drysalter.
Duad
n.
• A union of two; duality.
Dual
a.
• Expressing, or consisting of, the number two; belonging to two; as, the dual number of nouns, etc. , in Greek.
Dualin
n.
(Chem.) An explosive substance consisting essentially of sawdust or wood pulp, saturated with nitroglycerin and other similar nitro compounds. It is inferior to dynamite, and is more liable to explosion.
Dualism
n.
• State of being dual or twofold; a twofold division; any system which is founded on a double principle, or a twofold distinction
(Philos.) A view of man as constituted of two original and independent elements, as matter and spirit
(Theol.) A system which accepts two gods, or two original principles, one good and the other evil
• The doctrine that all mankind are divided by the arbitrary decree of God, and in his eternal foreknowledge, into two classes, the elect and the reprobate
(Physiol.) The theory that each cerebral hemisphere acts independently of the other.
Dualist
n.
• One who believes in dualism; a ditheist.
• One who administers two offices.
Dualistic
a.
• Consisting of two; pertaining to dualism or duality.
Duality
n.
• The quality or condition of being two or twofold; dual character or usage.
Duan
n.
• A division of a poem corresponding to a canto; a poem or song.
Duarchy
n.
• Government by two persons.
Dub
v. t.
• To confer knight.
• To invest with any dignity or new character; to entitle; to call.
• To clothe or invest; to ornament; to adorn.
• To strike, rub, or dress smooth; to dab; as: (a) To dress with an adz; as, to dub a stick of timber smooth.
• To strike cloth with teasels to raise a nap
• To rub or dress with grease, as leather in the process of cyrrying it
• To prepare for fighting, as a gamecock, by trimming the hackles and cutting off the comb and wattles
v. i.
• To make a noise by brisk drumbeats.
n.
• A blow.
n.
• A pool or puddle.
Dubb
n.
(Zool.) The Syrian bear.
Dubber
n.
• One who, or that which, dubs.
n.
• A globular vessel or bottle of leather, used in India to hold ghee, oil, etc.
Dubbing
n.
• The act of dubbing, as a knight, etc.
• The act of rubbing, smoothing, or dressing; a dressing off smooth with an adz.
• A dressing of flour and water used by weavers; a mixture of oil and tallow for dressing leather; daubing.
• The body substance of an angler's fly.
Dubiety
n.
• Doubtfulness; uncertainty; doubt.
Dubiosity
n.
• The state of being doubtful; a doubtful statement or thing.
Dubious
a.
• Doubtful or not settled in opinion; being in doubt; wavering or fluctuating; undetermined.
• Of uncertain event or issue; as, in dubious battle.
Dubiously
adv.
• In a dubious manner.
Dubiousness
n.
• State of being dubious.
Dubitable
a.
• Liable to be doubted; uncertain.
Dubitancy
n.
• Doubt; uncertainty.
Dubitate
v. i.
• To doubt.
Dubitation
n.
• Act of doubting; doubt.
Dubitative
a.
• Tending to doubt; doubtful.
Duboisia
n.
(Med.) Same as Duboisine.
Duboisine
n.
(Med.) An alkaloid obtained from the leaves of an Australian tree (Duboisia myoporoides), and regarded as identical with hyoscyamine. It produces dilation of the pupil of the eye.
Ducal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a duke.
Ducally
adv.
• In the manner of a duke, or in a manner becoming the rank of a duke.
Ducat
n.
• A coin, either of gold or silver, of several countries in Europe; originally, one struck in the dominions of a duke.
Ducatoon
n.
• A silver coin of several countries of Europe, and of different values.
Duchess
n.
• The wife or widow of a duke; also, a lady who has the sovereignty of a duchy in her own right.
Duchy
n.
• The territory or dominions of a duke; a dukedom.
Duck
n.
• A pet; a darling.
n.
• A linen (or sometimes cotton) fabric, finer and lighter than canvas, — used for the lighter sails of vessels, the sacking of beds, and sometimes for men's clothing.
(Naut.) The light clothes worn by sailors in hot climates.
v. t.
• To thrust or plunge under water or other liquid and suddenly withdraw.
• To plunge the head of under water, immediately withdrawing it; as, duck the boy.
• To bow; to bob down; to move quickly with a downward motion. " Will duck his head aside.
v. i.
• To go under the surface of water and immediately reappear; to dive; to plunge the head in water or other liquid; to dip.
• To drop the head or person suddenly; to bow.
n.
(Zool.) Any bird of the subfamily Anatinae, family Anatidae.
• A sudden inclination of the bead or dropping of the person, resembling the motion of a duck in water.
Ducker
n.
• One who, or that which, ducks; a plunger; a diver.
• A cringing, servile person; a fawner.
Ducking
n. & a.
• , from Duck, v. t. & i.
Duckling
n.
• A young or little duck.
Duckweed
n.
(Bot.) A genus (Lemna) of small plants, seen floating in great quantity on the surface of stagnant pools fresh water, and supposed to furnish food for ducks; — called also duckmeat.
Duct
n.
• Any tube or canal by which a fluid or other substance is conducted or conveyed.
(Anat.) One of the vessels of an animal body by which the products of glandular secretion are conveyed to their destination.
(Bot.) A large, elongated cell, either round or prismatic, usually found associated with woody fiber.
• Guidance; direction.
Ductible
a.
• Capable of being drawn out
Ductile
a.
• Easily led; tractable; complying; yielding to motives, persuasion, or instruction; as, a ductile people.
• Capable of being elongated or drawn out, as into wire or threads.
Ductilimeter
n.
• An instrument for accurately determining the ductility of metals.
Ductility
n.
• The property of a metal which allows it to be drawn into wires or filaments.
• Tractableness; pliableness.
Duction
n.
• Guidance.
Ductless
a.
• Having to duct or outlet; as, a ductless gland.
Ductor
n.
• One who leads.
(Mach.) A contrivance for removing superfluous ink or coloring matter from a roller.
Ducture
n.
• Guidance.
Dudder
v. t.
• To confuse or confound with noise.
v. i.
• To shiver or tremble; to dodder.
n.
• A peddler or hawker, especially of cheap and flashy goods pretended to be smuggled; a duffer.
Duddery
n.
• A place where rags are bought and kept for sale.
Dude
n.
• A kind of dandy; especially, one characterized by an ultrafashionable style of dress and other affectations.
Dudeen
n.
• A short tobacco pipe.
Dudgeon
n.
• The root of the box tree, of which hafts for daggers were made.
• The haft of a dagger.
• A dudgeon-hafted dagger; a dagger.
n.
• Resentment; ill will; anger; displeasure.
a.
• Homely; rude; coarse.
Dudish
a.
• Like, or characterized of, a dude.
Duds
n. pl.
• Old or inferior clothes; tattered garments.
• Effects, in general.
Due
a.
• Owed, as a debt; that ought to be paid or done to or for another; payable; owing and demandable.
• Justly claimed as a right or property; proper; suitable; becoming; appropriate; fit.
• Such as (a thing) ought to be; fulfilling obligation; proper; lawful; regular; appointed; sufficient; exact; as, due process of law; due service; in due time.
• Appointed or required to arrive at a given time; as, the steamer was due yesterday.
• Owing; ascribable, as to a cause.
adv.
• Directly; exactly; as, a due east course.
n.
• That which is owed; debt; that which one contracts to pay, or do, to or for another; that which belongs or may be claimed as a right; whatever custom, law, or morality requires to be done; a fee; a toll.
• Right; just title or claim.
v. t.
• To endue.
Duebill
n.
(Com.) A brief written acknowledgment of a debt, not made payable to order, like a promissory note.
Dueful
a.
• Fit; becoming.
Duel
n.
• A combat between two persons, fought with deadly weapons, by agreement. It usually arises from an injury done or an affront given by one to the other.
v. i. & t.
• To fight in single combat.
Dueler
n.
• One who engages in a duel.
Dueling
n.
• e act or practice of fighting in single combat. Also adj.
Duelist
n.
• One who fights in single combat.
Duelo
n.
• A duel; also, the rules of dueling.
Dueness
n.
• Quality of being due; debt; what is due or becoming.
Duenna
n.
• The chief lady in waiting on the queen of Spain.
• An elderly lady holding a station between a governess and companion, and appointed to have charge over the younger ladies in a Spanish or a Portuguese family.
• Any old woman who is employed to guard a younger one; a governess.
Duet
n.
(Mus.) A composition for two performers, whether vocal or instrumental.
Duettino
n.
• A duet of short extent and concise form.
Duff
n.
• Dough or paste.
• A stiff flour pudding, boiled in a bag; — a term used especially by seamen; as, plum duff.
Duffel
n.
• A kind of coarse woolen cloth, having a thick nap or frieze.
Duffer
n.
• A peddler or hawker, especially of cheap, flashy articles, as sham jewelry; hence, a sham or cheat.
• A stupid, awkward, inefficient person.
Dufrenite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a blackish green color, commonly massive or in nodules. It is a hydrous phosphate of iron.
Dug
n.
• A teat, pap, or nipple; — formerly that of a human mother, now that of a cow or other beast.
imp. & p. p.
• of Dig.
Dugong
n.
(Zool.) An aquatic herbivorous mammal (Halicore dugong), of the order Sirenia, allied to the manatee, but with a bilobed tail. It inhabits the Red Sea, Indian Ocean, East Indies, and Australia.
Dugout
n.
• A canoe or boat dug out from a large log.
• A place dug out.
• A house made partly in a hillside or slighter elevation.
Dugway
n.
• A way or road dug through a hill, or sunk below the surface of the land.
Duke
n.
• A leader; a chief; a prince.
• In England, one of the highest order of nobility after princes and princesses of the royal blood and the four archbishops of England and Ireland.
• In some European countries, a sovereign prince, without the title of king.
v. i.
• To play the duke.
Dukedom
n.
• The territory of a duke.
• The title or dignity of a duke.
Dukeling
n.
• A little or insignificant duke.
Dukeship
n.
• The quality or condition of being a duke; also, the personality of a duke.
Dulcamara
n.
(Bot.) A plant (Solanum Dulcamara).
Dulcamarin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside extracted from the bittersweet (Solanum Dulcamara), as a yellow amorphous substance. It probably occasions the compound taste.
Dulce
v. t.
• To make sweet; to soothe.
Dulceness
n.
• Sweetness.
Dulcet
a.
• Sweet to the taste; luscious.
• Sweet to the ear; melodious; harmonious.
Dulciana
n.
(Mus.) A sweet-toned stop of an organ.
Dulcification
n.
• The act of dulcifying or sweetening.
Dulcified
a.
• Sweetened; mollified.
Dulcifluous
a.
• Flowing sweetly.
Dulcify
v. t.
(Pharm.) To sweeten; to free from acidity, saltness, or acrimony.
• Fig. : To mollify; to sweeten; to please.
Dulciloquy
n.
• A soft manner of speaking.
Dulcimer
n.
(Mus.) An instrument, having stretched metallic wires which are beaten with two light hammers held in the hands of the performer.
• An ancient musical instrument in use among the Jews. Dan. iii. 5. It is supposed to be the same with the psaltery.
Dulcinea
n.
• A mistress; a sweetheart.
Dulcite
n.
(Chem.) A white, sugarlike substance, C6H8.(OH)2, occurring naturally in a manna from Madagascar, and in certain plants, and produced artificially by the reduction of galactose and lactose or milk sugar.
Dulcitude
n.
• Sweetness.
Dulcorate
v. t.
• To sweeten; to make less acrimonious.
Dulcoration
n.
• The act of sweetening.
Duledge
n.
(Mil.) One of the dowels joining the ends of the fellies which form the circle of the wheel of a gun carriage.
Dulia
n.
(R. C. Ch.) An inferior kind of veneration or worship, given to the angels and saints as the servants of God.
Dull
a.
• Slow of understanding; wanting readiness of apprehension; stupid; doltish; blockish.
• Slow in action; sluggish; unready; awkward.
• Insensible; unfeeling.
• Not keen in edge or point; lacking sharpness; blunt.
• Not bright or clear to the eye; wanting in liveliness of color or luster; not vivid; obscure; dim; as, a dull fire or lamp; a dull red or yellow; a dull mirror.
• Heavy; gross; cloggy; insensible; spiritless; lifeless; inert.
• Furnishing little delight, spirit, or variety; uninteresting; tedious; cheerless; gloomy; melancholy; depressing; as, a dull story or sermon; a dull occupation or period; hence, cloudy; overcast; as, a dull day.
v. t.
• To deprive of sharpness of edge or point.
• To make dull, stupid, or sluggish; to stupefy, as the senses, the feelings, the perceptions, and the like.
• To render dim or obscure; to sully; to tarnish.
• To deprive of liveliness or activity; to render heavy; to make inert; to depress; to weary; to sadden.
v. i.
• To become dull or stupid.
Dullard
n.
• A stupid person; a dunce.
a.
• Stupid.
Duller
n.
• One who, or that which, dulls.
Dullhead
n.
• A blockhead; a dolt.
Dullish
a.
• Somewhat dull; uninteresting; tiresome.
Dullness
n.
• The state of being dull; slowness; stupidity; heaviness; drowsiness; bluntness; obtuseness; dimness; want of luster; want of vividness, or of brightness.
Dullsome
a.
• Dull.
Dully
adv.
• In a dull manner; stupidly; slowly; sluggishly; without life or spirit.
Dulse
n.
(Bot.) A seaweed of a reddish brown color, which is sometimes eaten, as in Scotland. The true dulse is Sarcophyllis edulis; the common is Rhodymenia. [Written also dillisk.]
Dulwilly
n.
(Zool.) The ring plover.
Duly
adv.
• In a due, fit, or becoming manner; as it (anything) ought to be; properly; regularly.
Dumal
a.
• Pertaining to, or set with, briers or bushes; brambly.
Dumb
a.
• Destitute of the power of speech; unable; to utter articulate sounds; as, the dumb brutes.
• Not willing to speak; mute; silent; not speaking; not accompanied by words; as, dumb show.
• Lacking brightness or clearness, as a color.
v. t.
• To put to silence.
Dumbledor
n.
(Zool.) A bumblebee; also, a cockchafer.
Dumbly
adv.
• In silence; mutely.
Dumbness
n.
• The quality or state of being dumb; muteness; silence; inability to speak.
Dumetose
a.
(Bot.) Dumose.
Dumfound
v. t.
• To strike dumb; to confuse with astonishment.
Dumfounder
v. t.
• To dumfound; to confound.
Dummador
n.
• A dumbledor.
Dummerer
n.
• One who feigns dumbness.
Dummy
a.
• Silent; mute; noiseless; as a dummy engine.
• Fictitious or sham; feigned; as, a dummy watch.
n.
• One who is dumb.
• A sham package in a shop, or one which does not contain what its exterior indicates.
• An imitation or copy of something, to be used as a substitute; a model; a lay figure; as, a figure on which clothing is exhibited in shop windows; a blank paper copy used to show the size of the future book, etc.
(Drama) One who plays a merely nominal part in any action; a sham character.
• A thick-witted person; a dolt.
(Railroad) A locomotive with condensing engines, and, hence, without the noise of escaping steam; also, a dummy car.
(Card Playing) The fourth or exposed hand when three persons play at a four-handed game of cards.
• A floating barge connected with a pier.
Dump
n.
• A thick, ill-shapen piece; a clumsy leaden counter used by boys in playing chuck farthing.
n.
• A dull, gloomy state of the mind; sadness; melancholy; low spirits; despondency; ill humor; — now used only in the plural.
• Absence of mind; revery.
• A melancholy strain or tune in music; any tune.
• An old kind of dance.
v. t.
• To knock heavily; to stump.
• To put or throw down with more or less of violence; hence, to unload from a cart by tilting it; as, to dump sand, coal, etc.
n.
• A car or boat for dumping refuse, etc.
• A ground or place for dumping ashes, refuse, etc.
• That which is dumped.
(Mining) A pile of ore or rock.
Dumpage
n.
• The act of dumping loads from carts, especially loads of refuse matter; also, a heap of dumped matter.
• A fee paid for the privilege of dumping loads.
Dumpiness
n.
• The state of being dumpy.
Dumpish
a.
• Dull; stupid; sad; moping; melancholy.
Dumple
v. t.
• To make dumpy; to fold, or bend, as one part over another.
Dumpling
n.
• A roundish mass of dough boiled in soup, or as a sort of pudding; often, a cover of paste inclosing an apple or other fruit, and boiled or baked; as, an apple dumpling.
Dumpy
a.
• Short and thick; of low stature and disproportionately stout.
• Sullen or discontented.
Dun
n.
• A mound or small hill.
v. t.
• To cure, as codfish, in a particular manner, by laying them, after salting, in a pile in a dark place, covered with salt grass or some like substance.
v. t. & i.
• To ask or beset, as a debtor, for payment; to urge importunately.
n.
• One who duns; a dunner.
• An urgent request or demand of payment; as, he sent his debtor a dun.
a.
• Of a dark color; of a color partaking of a brown and black; of a dull brown color; swarthy.
Dunbird
n.
(Zool.) The pochard; — called also dunair, and dunker, or dun-curre.
• An American duck; the ruddy duck.
Dunce
n.
• One backward in book learning; a child or other person dull or weak in intellect; a dullard; a dolt.
Duncedom
n.
• The realm or domain of dunces.
Duncery
n.
• Dullness; stupidity.
Duncical
a.
• Like a dunce; duncish.
Duncify
v. t.
• To make stupid in intellect.
Duncish
a.
• Somewhat like a dunce.
Dunder
n.
• The lees or dregs of cane juice, used in the distillation of rum.
Dunderhead
n.
• A dunce; a numskull; a blockhead.
Dune
n.
• A low hill of drifting sand usually formed on the coats, but often carried far inland by the prevailing winds.
Dunfish
n.
• Codfish cured in a particular manner, so as to be of a superior quality.
Dung
n.
• The excrement of an animal.
v. t.
• To manure with dung.
(Calico Print.) To immerse or steep, as calico, in a bath of hot water containing cow dung; — done to remove the superfluous mordant.
v. i.
• To void excrement.
Dungaree
n.
• A coarse kind of unbleached cotton stuff.
Dungeon
n.
• A close, dark prison, common, under ground, as if the lower apartments of the donjon or keep of a castle, these being used as prisons.
v. t.
• To shut up in a dungeon.
Dungfork
n.
• A fork for tossing dung.
Dunghill
n.
• A heap of dung.
• Any mean situation or condition; a vile abode.
Dungmeer
n.
• A pit where dung and weeds rot for manure.
Dungy
a.
• Full of dung; filthy; vile; low.
Dungyard
n.
• A yard where dung is collected.
Dunker
n.
• One of a religious denomination whose tenets and practices are mainly those of the Baptists, but partly those of the Quakers; — called also Tunkers, Dunkards, Dippers, and, by themselves, Brethren, and German Baptists.
Dunlin
n.
(Zool.) A species of sandpiper (Tringa alpina); — called also churr, dorbie, grass bird, and red-backed sandpiper. It is found both in Europe and America.
Dunnage
n.
(Naut.) Fagots, boughs, or loose materials of any kind, laid on the bottom of the hold for the cargo to rest upon to prevent injury by water, or stowed among casks and other cargo to prevent their motion.
Dunner
n.
• One employed in soliciting the payment of debts.
Dunnish
a.
• Inclined to a dun color.
Dunnock
n.
(Zool.) The hedge sparrow or hedge accentor.
Dunny
a.
• Deaf; stupid.
Dunt
n.
• A blow.
Dunted
a.
• Beaten; hence, blunted.
Dunter
n.
(Zool.) A porpoise.
Duo
n.
(Mus.) A composition for two performers; a duet.
Duodecennial
a.
• Consisting of twelve years.
Duodecimal
a.
• Proceeding in computation by twelves; expressed in the scale of twelves.
n.
• A twelfth part; as, the duodecimals of an inch.
(Arch.) A system of numbers, whose denominations rise in a scale of twelves, as of feet and inches. The system is used chiefly by artificers in computing the superficial and solid contents of their work.
Duodecimfid
a.
• Divided into twelve parts.
Duodecimo
a.
• Having twelve leaves to a sheet; as, a duodecimo from, book, leaf, size, etc.
n.
• A book consisting of sheets each of which is folded into twelve leaves; hence, indicating, more or less definitely, a size of a book; — usually written 12mo or 12°.
Duodecuple
a.
• Consisting of twelves.
Duodenal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the duodenum; as, duodenal digestion.
Duodenary
a.
• Containing twelve; twelvefold; increasing by twelves; duodecimal.
Duodenum
n.
(Anat.) The part of the small intestines between the stomach and the jejunum.
Duoliteral
a.
• Consisting of two letters only; biliteral.
Duomo
n.
• A cathedral.
Dup
v. t.
• To open; as, to dup the door.
Dupable
a.
• Capable of being duped.
Dupe
n.
• One who has been deceived or who is easily deceived; a gull; as, the dupe of a schemer.
v. t.
• To deceive; to trick; to mislead by imposing on one's credulity; to gull; as, dupe one by flattery.
Duper
n.
• One who dupes another.
Dupery
n.
• The act or practice of duping.
Dupion
n.
• A double cocoon, made by two silkworms.
Duple
a.
• Double.
Duplex
a.
• Double; twofold.
Duplicate
a.
• Double; twofold.
n.
• That which exactly resembles or corresponds to something else; another, correspondent to the first; hence, a copy; a transcript; a counterpart.
(Law) An original instrument repeated; a document which is the same as another in all essential particulars, and differing from a mere copy in having all the validity of an original.
v. t.
• To double; to fold; to render double.
• To make a duplicate of (something); to make a copy or transcript of.
(Biol.) To divide into two by natural growth or spontaneous action; as, infusoria duplicate themselves.
Duplication
n.
• The act of duplicating, or the state of being duplicated; a doubling; a folding over; a fold.
(Biol.) The act or process of dividing by natural growth or spontaneous action; as, the duplication of cartilage cells.
Duplicative
a.
• Having the quality of duplicating or doubling.
(Biol.) Having the quality of subdividing into two by natural growth.
Duplicature
n.
• A doubling; a fold, as of a membrane.
Duplicity
n.
• Doubleness; a twofold state.
• Doubleness of heart or speech; insincerity; a sustained form of deception which consists in entertaining or pretending to entertain one of feelings, and acting as if influenced by another; bad faith.
(Law) The use of two or more distinct allegations or answers, where one is sufficient.
• In indictments, the union of two incompatible offenses.
Dur
a.
(Mus.) Major; in the major mode; as, C dur, that is, C major.
Dura
n.
• Short form for Dura mater.
Durability
n.
• The state or quality of being durable; the power of uninterrupted or long continuance in any condition; the power of resisting agents or influences which tend to cause changes, decay, or dissolution; lastingness.
Durable
a.
• Able to endure or continue in a particular condition; lasting; not perishable or changeable; not wearing out or decaying soon; enduring; as, durable cloth; durable happiness.
Durableness
n.
• Power of lasting, enduring, or resisting; durability.
Durably
adv.
• In a lasting manner; with long continuance.
Dural
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the dura, or dura mater.
Duramen
n.
(Bot.) The heartwood of an exogenous tree.
Durance
n.
• Continuance; duration.
• Imprisonment; restraint of the person; custody by a jailer; duress. Shak.
• A stout cloth stuff, formerly made in imitation of buff leather and used for garments; a sort of tammy or everlasting.
• In modern manufacture, a worsted of one color used for window blinds and similar purposes
Durancy
n.
• Duration.
Durante
prep.
(Law) During; as, durante vita, during life; durante bene placito, during pleasure.
Duration
n.
• The state or quality of lasting; continuance in time; the portion of time during which anything exists.
Durative
a.
• Continuing; not completed; implying duration.
Durbar
n.
• An audience hall; the court of a native prince; a state levee; a formal reception of native princes, given by the governor general of India.
Dure
a.
• Hard; harsh; severe; rough; toilsome.
v. i.
• To last; to continue; to endure.
Dureful
a.
• Lasting.
Dureless
a.
• Not lasting.
Durene
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, crystalline, aromatic hydrocarbon, C6H2(CH3)4, off artificial production, with an odor like camphor.
Duress
n.
• Hardship; constraint; pressure; imprisonment; restraint of liberty.
(Law) The state of compulsion or necessity in which a person is influenced, whether by the unlawful restrain of his liberty or by actual or threatened physical violence, to incur a civil liability or to commit an offense.
v. t.
• To subject to duress.
Duressor
n.
(Law) One who subjects another to duress
Durga
n.
(Myth.) Same as Doorga.
Durham
n.
• One or a breed of short-horned cattle, originating in the county of Durham, England. The Durham cattle are noted for their beef-producing quality.
During
prep.
• In the time of; as long as the action or existence of; as, during life; during the space of a year.
Durio
n.
(Bot.) A fruit tree (D. zibethinus, the only species known) of the Indian Archipelago. It bears the durian.
Durity
n.
• Hardness; firmness.
• Harshness; cruelty.
Durometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring the degree of hardness; especially, an instrument for testing the relative hardness of steel rails and the like.
Durous
a.
• Hard.
Durra
n.
(Bot.) A kind of millet, cultivated throughout Asia, and introduced into the south of Europe; a variety of Sorghum vulgare; — called also Indian millet, and Guinea corn.
Durst
imp.
• of Dare.
Durukuli
n.
(Zool.) A small, nocturnal, South American monkey (Nyctipthecus trivirgatus).
Durylic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, allied to, or derived from, durene; as, durylic acid.
Duse
n.
• A demon or spirit.
Dusk
a.
• Tending to darkness or blackness; moderately dark or black; dusky.
n.
• Imperfect obscurity; a middle degree between light and darkness; twilight; as, the dusk of the evening.
• A darkish color.
v. t.
• To make dusk.
v. i.
• To grow dusk.
Dusken
v. t.
• To make dusk or obscure.
Duskily
adv.
• In a dusky manner.
Duskiness
n.
• The state of being dusky.
Duskish
a.
• Somewhat dusky.
Duskness
n.
• Duskiness.
Dusky
a.
• Partially dark or obscure; not luminous; dusk; as, a dusky valley.
• Tending to blackness in color; partially black; dark-colored; not bright; as, a dusky brown.
• Gloomy; sad; melancholy.
• Intellectually clouded.
Dust
n.
• Fine, dry particles of earth or other matter, so comminuted that they may be raised and wafted by the wind; that which is crumbled too minute portions; fine powder; as, clouds of dust; bone dust.
• A single particle of earth or other matter.
• The earth, as the resting place of the dead.
• The earthy remains of bodies once alive; the remains of the human body.
• Figuratively, a worthless thing.
• Figuratively, a low or mean condition.
• Gold dust
• Coined money; cash.
v. t.
• To free from dust; to brush, wipe, or sweep away dust from; as, to dust a table or a floor.
• To sprinkle with dust.
• To reduce to a fine powder; to levigate.
Dustbrush
n.
• A brush of feathers, bristles, or hair, for removing dust from furniture.
Duster
n.
• One who, or that which, dusts; a utensil that frees from dust
(Paper Making) A revolving wire-cloth cylinder which removes the dust from rags, etc.
(Milling) A blowing machine for separating the flour from the bran.
• A light over-garment, worn in traveling to protect the clothing from dust.
Dustiness
n.
• The state of being dusty.
Dustless
a.
• Without dust; as a dustless path.
Dustman
p.
• One whose employment is to remove dirt and defuse.
Dustpan
n.
• A shovel-like utensil for conveying away dust brushed from the floor.
Dusty
a.
• Filled, covered, or sprinkled with dust; clouded with dust; as, a dusty table; also, reducing to dust.
• Like dust; of the color of dust; as a dusty white.
Dutch
a.
• Pertaining to Holland, or to its inhabitants.
n.
• The people of Holland; Dutchmen.
• The language spoken in Holland.
Dutchman
n.
• A native, or one of the people, of Holland.
Duteous
a.
• Fulfilling duty; dutiful; having the sentiments due to a superior, or to one to whom respect or service is owed; obedient; as, a duteous son or daughter.
• Subservient; obsequious.
Dutiable
a.
• Subject to the payment of a duty; as dutiable goods.
Dutied
a.
• Subjected to a duty.
Dutiful
a.
• Performing, or ready to perform, the duties required by one who has the right to claim submission, obedience, or deference; submissive to natural or legal superiors; obedient, as to parents or superiors; as, a dutiful son or daughter; a dutiful ward or servant; a dutiful subject.
• Controlled by, proceeding from, a sense of duty; respectful; deferential; as, dutiful affection.
Duty
n.
• That which is due; payment.
• That which a person is bound by moral obligation to do, or refrain from doing; that which one ought to do; service morally obligatory.
• Hence, any assigned service or business; as, the duties of a policeman, or a soldier; to be on duty.
• Specifically, obedience or submission due to parents and superiors.
• Respect; reverence; regard; act of respect; homage.
(Engin.) The efficiency of an engine, especially a steam pumping engine, as measured by work done by a certain quantity of fuel; usually, the number of pounds of water lifted one foot by one bushel of coal (94 lbs. old standard), or by 1 cwt. (112 lbs., England, or 100 lbs., United States).
(Com.) Tax, toll, impost, or customs; excise; any sum of money required by government to be paid on the importation, exportation, or consumption of goods.
Duumvir
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) One of two Roman officers or magistrates united in the same public functions.
Duumviral
a.
• Of or belonging to the duumviri or the duumvirate.
Duumvirate
n.
• The union of two men in the same office; or the office, dignity, or government of two men thus associated, as in ancient Rome.
Dux
n.
(Mus.) The scholastic name for the theme or subject of a fugue, the answer being called the comes, or companion.
Duykerbok
n.
(Zool.) A small South African antelope (Cephalous mergens); — called also impoon, and deloo.
Dvergr
n.
(Scand. Myth.) A dwarf supposed to dwell in rocks and hills and to be skillful in working metals.
Dwale
n.
(Bot.) The deadly nightshade (Atropa Belladonna), having stupefying qualities.
(Her.) The tincture sable or black when blazoned according to the fantastic system in which plants are substituted for the tinctures.
• A sleeping potion; an opiate.
Dwang
n.
(Carp.) A piece of wood set between two studs, posts, etc., to stiffen and support them.
(Mech.) A kind of crowbar.
• A large wrench.
Dwarf
n.
• An animal or plant which is much below the ordinary size of its species or kind; especially, a diminutive human being.
v. t.
• To hinder from growing to the natural size; to make or keep small; to stunt.
v. i.
• To become small; to diminish in size.
Dwarfish
a.
• Like a dwarf; below the common stature or size; very small; petty; as, a dwarfish animal, shrub.
Dwarfling
n.
• A diminutive dwarf.
Dwarfy
a.
• Much undersized.
Dwell
v. i.
• To delay; to linger.
• To abide; to remain; to continue.
• To abide as a permanent resident, or for a time; to live in a place; to reside.
v. t.
• To inhabit.
Dweller
n.
• An inhabitant; a resident; as, a cave dweller.
Dwelling
n.
• Habitation; place or house in which a person lives; abode; domicile.
Dwelt
imp. & p. p.
• of Dwell.
Dwindle
v. i.
• To diminish; to become less; to shrink; to waste or consume away; to become degenerate; to fall away.
v. t.
• To make less; to bring low.
• To break; to disperse.
n.
• The process of dwindling; dwindlement; decline; degeneracy.
Dwindlement
n.
• The act or process of dwindling; a dwindling.
Dwine
v. i.
• To waste away; to pine; to languish.
Dyad
n.
• Two units treated as one; a couple; a pair.
(Chem.) An element, atom, or radical having a valence or combining power of two.
a.
(Chem.) Having a valence or combining power of two; capable of being substituted for, combined with, or replaced by, two atoms of hydrogen; as, oxygen and calcium are dyad elements.
Dyadic
a.
• Pertaining to the number two; of two parts or elements.
Dyaks
n. pl.
• (Ethnol.) The aboriginal and most numerous inhabitants of Borneo. They are partially civilized, but retain many barbarous practices.
Dyas
n.
(Geol.) A name applied in Germany to the Permian formation, there consisting of two principal groups.
Dye
v. t.
• To stain; to color; to give a new and permanent color to, as by the application of dyestuffs.
n.
• Color produced by dyeing.
• Material used for dyeing; a dyestuff.
n.
• Same as Die, a lot.
Dyehouse
n.
• A building in which dyeing is carried on.
Dyeing
n.
• The process or art of fixing coloring matters permanently and uniformly in the fibers of wool, cotton, etc.
Dyer
n.
• One whose occupation is to dye cloth and the like.
Dyestuff
n.
• A material used for dyeing.
Dyewood
n.
• Any wood from which coloring matter is extracted for dyeing.
Dying
a.
• In the act of dying; destined to death; mortal; perishable; as, dying bodies.
• Of or pertaining to dying or death; as, dying bed; dying day; dying words; also, simulating a dying state.
n.
• The act of expiring; passage from life to death; loss of life.
Dyingly
adv.
• In a dying manner; as if at the point of death.
Dyingness
n.
• The state of dying or the stimulation of such a state; extreme languor; languishment.
Dyke
n.
• See Dike. The spelling dyke is restricted by some to the geological meaning.
Dynactinometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring the intensity of the photogenic (light-producing) rays, and computing the power of object glasses.
Dynam
n.
• A unit of measure for dynamical effect or work; a foot pound.
Dynameter
n.
• A dynamometer.
(Opt.) An instrument for determining the magnifying power of telescopes, consisting usually of a doubleimage micrometer applied to the eye end of a telescope for measuring accurately the diameter of the image of the object glass there formed; which measurement, compared with the actual diameter of the glass, gives the magnifying power.
Dynametrical
a.
• Pertaining to a dynameter.
Dynamically
adv.
• In accordance with the principles of dynamics or moving forces.
Dynamics
n.
• That branch of mechanics which treats of the motion of bodies (kinematics) and the action of forces in producing or changing their motion (kinetics). Dynamics is held by some recent writers to include statics and not kinematics.
• The moving moral, as well as physical, forces of any kind, or the laws which relate to them.
(Mus.) That department of musical science which relates to, or treats of, the power of tones.
Dynamism
n.
• The doctrine of Leibnitz, that all substance involves force.
Dynamist
n.
• One who accounts for material phenomena by a theory of dynamics.
Dynamitard
n.
• A political dynamiter.
Dynamite
n.
(Chem.) An explosive substance consisting of nitroglycerin absorbed by some inert, porous solid, as infusorial earth, sawdust, etc. It is safer than nitroglycerin, being less liable to explosion from moderate shocks, or from spontaneous decomposition.
Dynamiter
n.
• One who uses dynamite; esp., one who uses it for the destruction of life and property.
Dynamiting
n.
• Destroying by dynamite, for political ends.
Dynamitism
n.
• The work of dynamiters.
Dynamization
(Homeop.) The act of setting free the dynamic powers of a medicine, as by shaking the bottle containing it.
Dynamo
n.
• A dynamo-electric machine.
Dynamograph
n.
(Physiol.) A dynamometer to which is attached a device for automatically registering muscular power.
Dynamometer
n.
• An apparatus for measuring force or power; especially, muscular effort of men or animals, or the power developed by a motor, or that required to operate machinery.
Dynamometry
n.
• The art or process of measuring forces doing work.
Dynast
n.
• A ruler; a governor; a prince.
• A dynasty; a government.
Dynasta
n.
• A tyrant.
Dynastic
a.
• Of or relating to a dynasty or line of kings.
Dynastical
a.
• Dynastic.
Dynastidan
n.
(Zool.) One of a group of gigantic, horned beetles, including Dynastus Neptunus, and the Hercules beetle (D. Hercules) of tropical America, which grow to be six inches in length.
Dynasty
n.
• Sovereignty; lordship; dominion.
• A race or succession of kings, of the same line or family; the continued lordship of a race of rulers.
Dyne
n.
(Physics) The unit of force, in the C. G. S. (Centimeter Gram Second) system of physical units; that is, the force which, acting on a gram for a second, generates a velocity of a centimeter per second.
Dysaesthesia
n.
(Med.) Impairment of any of the senses, esp. of touch.
Dyscrasia
n.
(Med.) An ill habit or state of the constitution; — formerly regarded as dependent on a morbid condition of the blood and humors.
Dyscrasite
n.
(Min.) A mineral consisting of antimony and silver.
Dyscrasy
n.
• Dycrasia.
Dysentery
n.
(Med.) A disease attended with inflammation and ulceration of the colon and rectum, and characterized by griping pains, constant desire to evacuate the bowels, and the discharge of mucus and blood.
Dysgenesic
a.
• Not procreating or breeding freely; as, one race may be dysgenesic with respect to another.
Dysgenesis
n.
(Biol.) A condition of not generating or breeding freely; infertility; a form homogenesis in which the hybrids are sterile among themselves, but are fertile with members of either parent race.
Dyslogistic
a.
• Unfavorable; not commendatory; — opposed to eulogistic.
Dysluite
n.
(Min.) A variety of the zinc spinel or gahnite.
Dyslysin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A resinous substance formed in the decomposition of cholic acid of bile; — so called because it is difficult to solve.
Dysmenorrhea
n.
(Med.) Difficult and painful menstruation.
Dysnomy
n.
• Bad legislation; the enactment of bad laws.
Dysodile
n.
(Min.) An impure earthy or coaly bitumen, which emits a highly fetid odor when burning.
Dyspeptic
n.
• A person afflicted with dyspepsia.
Dyspeptone
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) An insoluble albuminous body formed from casein and other proteid substances by the action of gastric juice.
Dysphoria
n.
(Med.) Impatience under affliction; morbid restlessness; dissatisfaction; the fidgets.
Dyspn
n.
(Med.) Difficulty of breathing.
Dyspnoic
a.
(Med.) Affected with shortness of breath; relating to dyspna.
Dysteleology
n.
(Biol.) The doctrine of purposelessness; a term applied by Haeckel to that branch of physiology which treats of rudimentary organs, in view of their being useless to the life of the organism.
Dystocia
n.
(Med.) Difficult delivery pr parturition.
Dystome
a.
(Min.) Cleaving with difficulty.
Dysuric
a.
• Pertaining to, or afflicted with, dysury.
Dziggetai
n.
(Zool.) The kiang, a wild horse or wild ass of Thibet (Asinus hemionus).

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