Dictionary Of The English Language "Cont"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
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Contabescent
a.
• Wasting away gradually.
Contact
n.
• A close union or junction of bodies; a touching or meeting.
(Geom.) The property of two curves, or surfaces, which meet, and at the point of meeting have a common direction.
(Mining) The plane between two adjacent bodies of dissimilar rock.
Contaction
n.
• Act of touching.
Contagion
n.
(Med.) The transmission of a disease from one person to another, by direct or indirect contact.
• That which serves as a medium or agency to transmit disease; a virus produced by, or exhalation proceeding from, a diseased person, and capable of reproducing the disease.
• The act or means of communicating any influence to the mind or heart; as, the contagion of enthusiasm.
• Venom; poison.
Contagioned
a.
• Affected by contagion.
Contagionist
n.
• One who believes in the contagious character of certain diseases, as of yellow fever.
Contagious
a.
(Med.) Communicable by contact, by a virus, or by a bodily exhalation; catching; as, a contagious disease.
• Conveying or generating disease; pestilential; poisonous; as, contagious air.
• Spreading or communicable from one to another; exciting similar emotions or conduct in others.
Contagiously
adv.
• In a contagious manner.
Contagiousness
n.
• Quality of being contagious.
Contagium
n.
• Contagion; contagious matter.
Contain
v. t.
• To hold within fixed limits; to comprise; to include; to inclose; to hold.
• To have capacity for; to be able to hold; to hold; to be equivalent to; as, a bushel contains four pecks.
• To put constraint upon; to restrain; to confine; to keep within bounds.
v. i.
• To restrain desire; to live in continence or chastity.
Containable
a.
• Capable of being contained or comprised.
Containant
n.
• A container.
Container
n.
• One who, or that which, contains.
Containment
n.
• That which is contained; the extent; the substance.
Contaminable
a.
• Capable of being contaminated.
Contaminate
v. t.
• To soil, stain, or corrupt by contact; to tarnish; to sully; to taint; to pollute; to defile.
a.
• Contaminated; defiled; polluted; tainted.
Contamination
n.
• The act or process of contaminating; pollution; defilement; taint; also, that which contaminates.
Contamitive
a.
• Tending or liable to contaminate.
Contango
n.
(Stock Exchange) The premium or interest paid by the buyer to the seller, to be allowed to defer paying for the stock purchased until the next fortnightly settlement day.
(Law) The postponement of payment by the buyer of stock on the payment of a premium to the seller.
Contection
n.
• A covering.
Contek
n.
• Quarrel; contention; contest.
Contemn
v. t.
• To view or treat with contempt, as mean and despicable; to reject with disdain; to despise; to scorn.
Contemner
n.
• One who contemns; a despiser; a scorner.
Contemningly
adv.
• Contemptuously.
Contemper
v. t.
• To modify or temper; to allay; to qualify; to moderate; to soften.
Contemperate
v. t.
• To temper; to moderate.
Contemperation
n.
• The act of tempering or moderating.
• Proportionate mixture or combination.
Contemperature
n.
• The condition of being tempered; proportionate mixture; temperature.
Contemplance
n.
• Contemplation.
Contemplant
a.
• Given to contemplation; meditative.
Contemplate
v. t.
• To look at on all sides or in all its bearings; to view or consider with continued attention; to regard with deliberate care; to meditate on; to study.
• To consider or have in view, as contingent or probable; to look forward to; to purpose; to intend.
v. i.
• To consider or think studiously; to ponder; to reflect; to muse; to meditate.
Contemplation
n.
• The act of the mind in considering with attention; continued attention of the mind to a particular subject; meditation; musing; study.
• Holy meditation.
• The act of looking forward to an event as about to happen; expectation; the act of intending or purposing.
Contemplatist
n.
• A contemplator.
Contemplative
a.
• Pertaining to contemplation; addicted to, or employed in, contemplation; meditative.
• Having the power of contemplation; as, contemplative faculties.
n.
(R. C. Ch.) A religious or either sex devoted to prayer and meditation, rather than to active works of charity.
Contemplatively
adv.
• With contemplation; in a contemplative manner.
Contemplativeness
n.
• The state of being contemplative; thoughtfulness.
Contemplator
n.
• One who contemplates.
Contemporaneity
n.
• The state of being contemporaneous.
Contemporaneous
a.
• Living, existing, or occurring at the same time; contemporary.
Contemporaneously
adv.
• At the same time with some other event.
Contemporariness
n.
• Existence at the same time; contemporaneousness.
Contemporary
a.
• Living, occuring, or existing, at the same time; done in, or belonging to, the same times; contemporaneous.
• Of the same age; coeval.
n.
Contempt
n.
• The act of contemning or despising; the feeling with which one regards that which is esteement mean, vile, or worthless; disdain; scorn.
• The state of being despised; disgrace; shame.
• An act or expression denoting contempt.
(Law) Disobedience of the rules, orders, or process of a court of justice, or of rules or orders of a legislative body; disorderly, contemptuous, or insolent language or behavior in presence of a court, tending to disturb its proceedings, or impair the respect due to its authority.
Contemptibility
n.
• The quality of being contemptible; contemptibleness.
Contemptible
a.
• Worthy of contempt; deserving of scorn or disdain; mean; vile; despicable.
• Despised; scorned; neglected; abject.
• Insolent; scornful; contemptuous.
Contemptibleness
n.
• The state or quality of being contemptible, or of being despised.
Contemptibly
adv.
• In a contemptible manner.
Contemptuous
a.
• Manifecting or expressing contempt or disdain; scornful; haughty; insolent; disdainful.
Contemptuously
adv.
• In a contemptuous manner; with scorn or disdain; despitefully.
Contemptuousness
n.
• Disposition to or manifestion of contempt; insolence; haughtiness.
Contend
v. i.
• To strive in opposition; to contest; to dispute; to vie; to quarrel; to fight.
• To struggle or exert one's self to obtain or retain possession of, or to defend.
• To strive in debate; to engage in discussion; to dispute; to argue.
v. t.
• To struggle for; to contest.
Contendent
n.
• n antagonist; a contestant.
Contender
n.
• One who contends; a contestant.
Contendress
n.
• A female contestant.
Contenement
n.
(Law) That which is held together with another thing; that which is connected with a tenetment, or thing holden, as a certin quantity of land ajacent to a dwelling, and necessary to the reputable enjoyment of the dwelling; appurtenance.
Content
a.
• Contained within limits; hence, having the desires limited by that which one has; not disposed to repine or grumble; satisfied; contented; at rest.
n.
• That which is contained; the thing or things held by a receptacle or included within specified limits; as, the contents of a cask or bale or of a room; the contents of a book.
• Power of containing; capacity; extent; size.
(Geom.) Area or quantity of space or matter contained within certain limits; as, solid contents; superficial contents.
v. t.
• To satisfy the desires of; to make easy in any situation; to appease or quiet; to gratify; to please.
• To satisfy the expectations of; to pay; to requite.
n.
• Rest or quietness of the mind in one's present condition; freedom from discontent; satisfaction; contentment; moderate happiness.
• Acquiescence without examination.
• That which contents or satisfies; that which if attained would make one happy.
(Eng. House of Lords) An expression of assent to a bill or motion; an affirmate vote; also, a member who votes "Content.".
Contentation
n.
• Content; satisfaction.
Contented
a.
• Content; easy in mind; satisfied; quiet; willing.
Contentful
a.
• Full of content.
Contention
n.
• A violent effort or struggle to obtain, or to resist, something; contest; strife.
• Strife in words; controversy; altercation quarrel; dispute; as, a bone of contention.
• Vehemence of endeavor; eagerness; ardor; zeal.
• A point maintained in an argument, or a line of argument taken in its support; the subject matter of discussion of strife; a position taken or contended for.
Contentious
a.
• Fond of contention; given to angry debate; provoking dispute or contention; quarrelsome.
• Relating to contention or strife; involving or characterized by contention.
(Law) Contested; litigated; litigious; having power to decide controversy.
Contentless
a.
• Discontented; dissatisfied.
Contently
adv.
• In a contented manner.
Contentment
n.
• The state of being contented or satisfied; content.
• The act or process of contenting or satisfying; as, the contentment of avarice is impossible.
• Gratification; pleasure; satisfaction.
Contents
n. pl.
• pl. of Content.
Conterminable
a.
• Having the same bounds; terminating at the same time or place; conterminous.
Conterminal
a.
• Conterminous.
Conterminant
a.
• Having the same limits; ending at the same time; conterminous.
Conterminate
a.
• Having the same bounds; conterminous.
Conterminous
a.
• Having the same bounds, or limits; bordering upon; contiguous.
Contertionist
n.
• One who makes or practices contortions.
Contesseration
n.
• An assemblage; a collection; harmonious union.
Contest
v. t.
• To make a subject of dispute, contention, litigation, or emulation; to contend for; to call in question; to controvert; to oppose; to dispute.
• To strive earnestly to hold or maintain; to struggle to defend; as, the troops contested every inch of ground.
(Law) To make a subject of litigation; to defend, as a suit; to dispute or resist; as a claim, by course of law; to controvert.
v. i.
• To engage in contention, or emulation; to contend; to strive; to vie; to emulate; — followed usually by with.
n.
• Earnest dispute; strife in argument; controversy; debate; altercation.
• Earnest struggle for superiority, victory, defense, etc.; competition; emulation; strife in arms; conflict; combat; encounter.
Contestable
a.
• Capable of being contested; debatable.
Contestant
n.
• One who contests; an opponent; a litigant; a disputant; one who claims that which has been awarded to another.
Contestation
n.
• The act of contesting; emulation; rivalry; strife; dispute.
• Proof by witness; attestation; testimony.
Contestingly
adv.
• In a contending manner.
Contex
v. t.
• To context.
Context
a.
• Knit or woven together; close; firm.
n.
• The part or parts of something written or printed, as of Scripture, which precede or follow a text or quoted sentence, or are so intimately associated with it as to throw light upon its meaning.
v. t.
• To knit or bind together; to unite closely.
Contextural
a.
• Pertaining to contexture or arrangement of parts; producing contexture; interwoven.
Contexture
n.
• The arrangement and union of the constituent parts of a thing; a weaving together of parts; structural character of a thing; system; constitution; texture.
Contextured
a.
• Formed into texture; woven together; arranged; composed.
Conticent
a.
• Silent.
Contignation
n.
• The act or process of framing together, or uniting, as beams in a fabric.
• A framework or fabric, as of beams.
Contiguate
a.
• Contiguous; touching.
Contiguity
n.
• The state of being contiguous; intimate association; nearness; proximity.
Contiguous
a.
• In actual contact; touching; also, adjacent; near; neighboring; adjoining.
Continent
a.
• Serving to restrain or limit; restraining; opposing.
• Exercising restraint as to the indulgence of desires or passions; temperate; moderate.
n.
• That which contains anything; a receptacle.
• One of the grand divisions of land on the globe; the main land; specifically (Phys. Geog.), a large body of land differing from an island, not merely in its size, but in its structure, which is that of a large basin bordered by mountain chains; as, the continent of North America.
Continental
a.
• Of or pertaining to a continent.
• Of or pertaining to the main land of Europe, in distinction from the adjacent islands, especially England; as, a continental tour; a continental coalition.
n.
(Amer. Hist.) A soldier in the Continental army, or a piece of the Continental currency.
Continently
adv.
• In a continent manner; chastely; moderately; temperately.
Contingency
n
• Union or connection; the state of touching or contact.
• The quality or state of being contingent or casual; the possibility of coming to pass.
• An event which may or may not occur; that which is possible or probable; a fortuitous event; a chance.
• An adjunct or accessory.
(Law) A certain possible event that may or may not happen, by which, when happening, some particular title may be affected.
Contingent
a.
• Possible, or liable, but not certain, to occur; incidental; casual.
• Dependent on that which is undetermined or unknown; as, the success of his undertaking is contingent upon events which he can not control.
(Law) Dependent for effect on something that may or may not occur; as, a contingent estate.
n.
• An event which may or may not happen; that which is unforeseen, undetermined, or dependent on something future; a contingency.
• That which falls to one in a division or apportionment among a number; a suitable share; proportion; esp., a quota of troops.
Contingently
adv.
• In a contingent manner; without design or foresight; accidentally.
Contingentness
n.
• The state of being contingent; fortuitousness.
Continuable
a.
• Capable of being continued
Continual
a.
• Proceeding without interruption or cesstaion; continuous; unceasing; lasting; abiding.
• Occuring in steady and rapid succession; very frequent; often repeated.
Continually
adv.
• Without cessation; unceasingly; continuously; as, the current flows continually.
• In regular or repeated succession; very often.
Continuance
n.
• A holding on, or remaining in a particular state; permanence, as of condition, habits, abode, etc.; perseverance; constancy; duration; stay.
• Uninterrupted succession; continuation; constant renewell; perpetuation; propagation.
• A holding together; continuity.
(Law) The adjournment of the proceedings in a cause from one day, or from one stated term of a court, to another.
• The entry of such adjuornment and the grounds thereof on the record.
Continuant
a.
• Continuing; prolonged; sustained; as, a continuant sound.
n.
• A continuant sound; a letter whose sound may be prolonged.
Continuate
a.
• Immediately united together; intimately connocted.
• Uninterrupted; unbroken; continual; continued.
Continuation
n.
• That act or state of continuing; the state of being continued; uninterrupted extension or succession; prolongation; propagation.
• That which extends, increases, supplements, or carries on; as, the continuation of a story.
Continuative
n.
(Logic) A term or expression denoting continuance.
(Gram.) A word that continues the connection of sentences or subjects; a connective; a conjunction.
Continuator
n.
• One who, or that which, continues; esp., one who continues a series or a work; a continuer.
Continue
v. i.
• To remain ina given place or condition; to remain in connection with; to abide; to stay.
• To be permanent or durable; to endure; to last.
• To be steadfast or constant in any course; to persevere; to abide; to endure; to persist; to keep up or maintain a particular condition, course, or series of actions; as, the army continued to advance.
v. t.
• To unite; to connect.
• To protract or extend in duration; to preserve or persist in; to cease not.
• To carry onward or extend; to prolong or produce; to add to or draw out in length.
• To retain; to suffer or cause to remain; as, the trustees were continued; also, to suffer to live.
Continued
p.p. & a.
• Having extension of time, space, order of events, exertion of energy, etc.; extended; protacted; uninterrupted; also, resumed after interruption; extending through a succession of issues, session, etc.; as, a continued story.
Continuedly
adv.
• Continuously.
Continuer
n.
• One who continues; one who has the power of perseverance or persistence.
Continuity
n.
• the state of being continuous; uninterupted connection or succession; close union of parts; cohesion; as, the continuity of fibers.
Continuo
n.
(Mus.) Basso continuo, or continued bass.
Continuous
a.
• Without break, cessation, or interruption; without intervening space or time; uninterrupted; unbroken; continual; unceasing; constant; continued; protracted; extended; as, a continuous line of railroad; a continuous current of electricity.
(Bot.) Not deviating or varying from uninformity; not interrupted; not joined or articulated.
Continuously
adv.
• In a continuous maner; without interruption.
Contline
n.
(Ropemaking) The space between the strands on the outside of a rope.
(Naut.) The space between the bilges of two casks stowed side by side.
Contort
v. t.
• To twist, or twist together; to turn awry; to bend; to distort; to wrest.
Contorted
a.
• Twisted, or twisted together.
(Bot.) Twisted back upon itself, as some parts of plants.
• Arranged so as to overlap each other; as, petals in contorted or convolute aestivation.
Contortion
n.
• A twisting; a writhing; wry motion; a twist; as, the contortion of the muscles of the face.
Contortive
a.
• Expressing contortion.
Contortuplicate
a.
(Bot.) Plaited lengthwise and twisted in addition, as the bud of the morning-glory.
Contour
n.
• The outline of a figure or body, or the line or lines representing such an outline; the line that bounds; periphery.
(Mil.) The outline of a horizontal section of the ground, or of works of fortification.
Contourne'
a.
(Her.) Turned in a direction which is not the usual one; — said of an animal turned to the sinister which is usually turned to the dexter, or the like.
Contourniated
a.
(Numis.) Having furrowed edges, as if turned in a lathe.
Contra
• A Latin adverb and preposition, signifying against, contrary, in opposition, etc., entering as a prefix into the composition of many English words. Cf. Counter, adv. & pref.
Contraband
n.
• Illegal or prohobited traffic.
• Goods or merchandise the importation or exportation of which is forbidden.
• A negro slave, during the Civil War, escaped to, or was brought within, the Union lines. Such slave was considered contraband of war.
a.
• Prohibited or excluded by law or treaty; forbidden; as, contraband goods, or trade.
v. t.
• To import illegaly, as prohibited goods; to smuggle.
• To declare prohibited; to forbid.
Contrabandism
n.
• Traffic in contraband gods; smuggling.
Contrabandist
n.
• One who traffic illegaly; a smuggler.
Contrabass
• , n. (Mus.) Double bass; — applied to any instrument of the same deep range as the stringed double bass; as, the contrabass ophicleide; the cotrabass tuba or bombardon.
Contrabasso
n.
(Mus.) The largest kind of bass viol.
Contract
v. t.
• To draw together or nearer; to reduce to a less compass; to shorten, narrow, or lesen; as, to contract one's shpere of action.
• To draw together so as to wrinkle; to knit.
• To bring on; to incur; to acquire; as, to contract a habit; to contract a debt; to contract a disease.
• To enter into, with mutual obligations; to make a bargain or covenant for.
• To betroth; to affiance.
(Gram.) To shorten by omitting a letter or letters or by reducing two or more vowels or syllables to one.
v. i.
• To be drawn together so as to be diminished in size or extent; to shrink; to be reduced in compass or in duration; as, iron contracts in cooling; a rope contracts when wet.
• To make an agreement; to covenant; to agree; to bargain; as, to contract for carrying the mail.
a.
• Contracted: as, a contract verb.
a.
• Contracted; affianced; betrothed.
n.
(Law) The agreement of two or more persons, upon a sufficient consideration or cause, to do, or to abstain from doing, some act; an agreement in which a party undertakes to do, or not to do, a particular thing; a formal bargain; a compact; an interchange of legal rights.
• A formal writing which contains the agreement of parties, with the terms and conditions, and which serves as a proof of the obligation.
• The act of formally betrothing a man and woman.
Contracted
a.
• Drawn together; shrunken; wrinkled; narrow; as, a contracted brow; a contracted noun.
• Narrow; illiberal; selfish; as, a contracted mind; contracted views.
• Bargained for; betrothed; as, a contracted peace.
Contractedness
n.
• The state of being contracted; narrowness; meannes; selfishness.
Contractibility
n.
• Capability of being contracted; quality of being contractible; as, the contractibiliy and dilatability of air.
Contractible
a.
• Capable of contraction.
Contractibleness
n.
• Contractibility.
Contractile
a.
• tending to contract; having the power or property of contracting, or of shrinking into shorter or smaller dimensions; as, the contractile tissues.
Contractility
n.
• The quality or property by which bodies shrink or contract.
(Physiol.) The power possessed by the fibers of living muscle of contracting or shortening.
Contraction
n.
• The act or process of contracting, shortening, or shrinking; the state of being contracted; as, contraction of the heart, of the pupil of the eye, or of a tendion; the contraction produced by cold.
(Math.) The process of shortening an operation.
• The act of incurring or becoming subject to, as liabilities, obligation, debts, etc.; the process of becoming subject to; as, the contraction of a disease.
• Something contracted or abbreviated, as a word or phrase; — as, plenipo for plenipotentiary; crim. con. for criminal conversation, etc.
(Gram.) The shortening of a word, or of two words, by the omission of a letter or letters, or by reducing two or more vowels or syllables to one; as, ne'er for never; can't for can not; don't for do not; it's for it is.
• A marriage contract.
Contractor
n.
• One who contracts; one of the parties to a bargain; one who covenants to do anything for another; specifically, one who contracts to perform work on a rather large scale, at a certain price or rate, as in building houses or making a railroad.
Contracture
n.
(Med.) A state of permanent rigidity or contraction of the muscles, generally of the flexor muscles.
Contradance
n.
• A dance in which the partners are arranged face to face, or in opposite lines.
Contradict
v. t.
• To assert the contrary of; to oppose in words; to take issue with; to gainsay; to deny the truth of, as of a statement or a speaker; to impugn.
• To be contrary to; to oppose; to resist.
v. i.
• To oppose in words; to gainsay; to deny, or assert the contrary of, something.
Contradictable
a.
• Capable of being contradicting.
Contradicter
n.
• one who contradicts.
Contradiction
n.
• An assertion of the contrary to what has been said or affirmed; denial of the truth of a statement or assertion; contrary declaration; gainsaying.
• Direct opposition or repugnancy; inconsistency; incongruity or contrariety; one who, or that which, is inconsistent.
Contradictional
a.
• Contradictory; inconsistent; opposing.
Contradictions
a.
• Filled with contradictions; inconsistent.
• Inclined to contradict or cavil
Contradictive
a.
• Contradictory; inconsistent.
Contradictor
n.
• A contradicter.
Contradictorily
adv.
• In a contradictory manner.
Contradictoriness
n.
• The quality of being contradictory; opposition; inconsistency.
Contradictory
a.
• Affirming the contrary; implying a denial of what has been asserted; also, mutually contradicting; inconsistent.
• Opposing or opposed; repugnant.
n.
• A proposition or thing which denies or opposes another; contrariety.
(Logic) propositions with the same terms, but opposed to each other both in quality and quantity.
Contradistinct
a.
• Distinguished by opposite qualities.
Contradistinction
n.
• Distinction by contrast.
Contradistinctive
a.
• having the quality of contradistinction; distinguishing by contrast.
Contradistinguish
v. t.
• To distinguish by a contrast of opposite qualities.
Contrafagetto
n.
(Mus.) The double bassoon, an octave deeper than the bassoon.
Contrafissure
n.
(Med.) A fissure or fracture on the side opposite to that which received the blow, or at some distance from it.
Contrahent
a.
• Entering into covenant; contracting; as, contrahent parties.
Contraindicant
n.
(Med.) Something, as a symptom, indicating that the usual mode of treatment is not to be followed.
Contraindicate
v. t.
(Med.) To indicate, as by a symptom, some method of treatment contrary to that which the general tenor of the case would seem to require.
Contraindication
n.
(med.) An indication or symptom which forbids the method of treatment usual in such cases.
Contralto
n.
(Mus.) The part sung by the highest male or lowest female voices; the alto or counter tenor.
• the voice or singer performing this part; as, her voice is a contralto; she is a contralto.
a.
(Mus.) Of or pertaining to a contralto, or to the part in music called contralto; as, a contralto voice.
Contramure
n.
(fort.) An outer wall.
Contranatural
a.
• Opposed to or against nature; unnatural.
Contraposition
n.
• A placing over against; opposite position.
(Logic) A so-called immediate inference which consists in denying the original subject of the contradictory predicate; e.g.: Every S is P; therefore, no Not-P is S.
Contrapuntal
a.
(Mus.) Pertaining to, or according to the rules of, counterpoint.
Contrapuntist
n.
(Mus.) One skilled in counterpoint.
Contraremonstrant
n.
• One who remonstrates in opposition or answer to a remonstraint.
Contrariant
a.
• Contrary; opposed; antagonistic; inconsistent; contradictory.
Contrariantly
adv.
• Contrarily.
Contraries
n. pl.
(Logic) Propositions which directly and destructively contradict each other, but of which the falsehood of one does not establish the truth of the other.
Contrariety
n.
• The state or quality of being contrary; opposition; repugnance; disagreement; antagonism.
• Something which is contrary to, or inconsistent with, something else; an inconsistency.
Contrarily
or
• (), adv. In a contrary manner; in opposition; on the other side; in opposite ways.
Contrariness
n.
• state or quality of being contrary; opposition; inconsistency; contrariety; perverseness; obstinancy.
Contrarious
a.
• Showing contrariety; repugnant; perverse.
Contrariously
adv.
• Contrarily; oppositely.
Contrarotation
n.
• Circular motion in a direction contrary to some other circular motion.
Contrarry
v. t.
• To contradict or oppose; to thwart.
Contrary
a.
• Opposite; in an opposite direction; in opposition; adverse; as, contrary winds.
• Opposed; contradictory; repugnant; inconsistent.
• Given to opposition; perverse; forward; wayward; as, a contrary disposition; a contrary child.
(Logic) Affirming the opposite; so opposed as to destroy each other; as, contrary propositions.
n.
• A thing that is of contrary or opposite qualities.
• An opponent; an enemy.
• the opposite; a proposition, fact, or condition incompatible with another; as, slender proofs which rather show the contrary.
Contrast
v. i.
• To stand in opposition; to exhibit difference, unlikeness, or opposition of qualities.
v. t.
• To set in opposition, or over against, in order to show the differences between, or the comparative excellences and defects of; to compare by difference or contrariety of qualities; as, to contrast the present with the past.
(Fine Arts) To give greater effect to, as to a figure or other object, by putting it in some relation of opposition to another figure or object.
Contrastimulant
a.
• Counteracting the effects of stimulants; relating to a course of medical treatment based on a theory of contrastimulants.
n.
(Med.) An agent which counteracts the effect of a stimulant.
Contrate
a.
• Having cogs or teeth projecting parallel to the axis, instead of radiating from it.
Contratenor
n.
(Mus.) Counter tenor; contralto.
Contrative
a.
• Tending to contract; having the property or power or power of contracting.
Contratiwise
adv.
• On the contrary; oppositely; on the other hand.
• In a contrary order; conversely.
Contravallation
n.
(Fort.) A trench guarded with a parapet, constructed by besiegers, to secure themselves and check sallies of the besieged.
Contravene
v. t.
• To meet in the way of opposition; to come into conflict with; to oppose; to contradict; to obstruct the operation of; to defeat.
• To violate; to nullify; to be inconsistent with; as, to contravene a law.
Contravener
n.
• One who contravenes.
Contravention
n.
• The act of contravening; opposition; obstruction; transgression; violation.
Contraversion
n.
• A turning to the opposite side; antistrophe.
Contraxt
n.
• The act of contrasting, or the state of being contrasted; comparison by contrariety of qualities.
• Opposition or dissimilitude of things or qualities; unlikeness, esp. as shown by juxtaposition or comparison.
(Fine Arts) The opposition of varied forms, colors, etc., which by such juxtaposition more vividly express each other's pecularities.
Contrayerva
n.
(Bot.) A species of Dorstenia (D. Contrayerva), a South American plant, the aromatic root of which is sometimes used in medicine as a gentle stimulant and tonic.
Contrecoup
n.
(med.) A concussion or shock produced by a blow or other injury, in a part or region opposite to that at which the blow is received, often causing rupture or disorganisation of the parts affected.
Contretemps
n.
• An unexpected and untoward accident; something inopportune or embarassing; a hitch.
Contributable
a.
• Capable of being contributed.
Contributary
a.
• Contributory.
• Tributary; contributing.
Contribute
v. t.
• To give or grant i common with others; to give to a common stock or for a common purpose; to furnish or suply in part; to give (money or other aid) for a specified object; as, to contribute food or fuel for the poor.
v. i.
• To give a part to a common stock; to lend assistance or aid, or give something, to a common purpose; to have a share in any act or effect.
• To give or use one's power or influence for any object; to assist.
Contributer
n.
• One who, or that which, contributes; specifically, one who writes articles for a newspaper or magazine.
Contribution
n.
• The act of contributing.
• That which is contributed; — either the portion which an individual furnishes to the common stock, or the whole which is formed by the gifts of individuals.
(Mil.) An irregular and arbitrary imposition or tax leved on the people of a town or country.
(Law) Payment, by each of several jointly liable, of a share in a loss suffered or an amount paid by one of their number for the common benefit.
Contributional
a.
• Pertaining to, or furnishing, a contribution.
Contributive
a.
• Contributing, or tending to contribute.
Contributory
a.
• Contributing to the same stock or purpose; promoting the same end; bringing assistance to some joint design, or increase to some common stock; contributive.
n.
• One who contributes, or is liable to be called upon to contribute, as toward the discharge of a common indebtedness.
Contrist
v. t.
• To make sad.
Contristate
v. t. & i.
• To make sorrowful.
Contrite
a.
• Thoroughly bruised or broken.
• Broken down with grief and penitence; deeply sorrowful for sin because it is displeasing to God; humbly and thoroughly penitent.
n.
• A contrite person.
v.
• In a contrite manner.
Contriteness
n.
• Deep sorrow and penitence for sin; contrition.
Contrition
n.
• The act of grinding or ribbing to powder; attrition; friction; rubbing.
• The state of being contrite; deep sorrow and repentance for sin, because sin is displeasing to God; humble penitence; through repentance.
Contriturate
v. t.
• To triturate; to pulverize.
Contrivance
n.
• The act or faculty of contriving, inventing, devising, or planning.
• The thing contrived, invented, or planned; disposition of parts or causes by design; a scheme; plan; atrifice; arrangement.
Contrivble
a.
• Capable of being contrived, planned, invented, or devised.
Contrive
v. t.
• To form by an exercise of ingenuity; to devise; to invent; to design; to plan.
v. i.
• To make devices; to form designs; to plan; to scheme; to plot.
Contrivement
n.
• Contrivance; invention; arrangement; design; plan.
Contriver
n.
• One who contrives, devises, plans, or schemas.
Control
n.
• A duplicate book, register, or account, kept to correct or check another account or register; a counter register.
• That which serves to check, restrain, or hinder; restraint.
• Power or authority to check or restrain; restraining or regulating influence; superintendence; government; as, children should be under parental control.
v. t.
• To check by a counter register or duplicate account; to prove by counter statements; to confute.
• To exercise restraining or governing influence over; to check; to counteract; to restrain; to regulate; to govern; to overpower.
Controllability
n.
• Capability of being controlled; controllableness.
Controllable
a.
• Capable of being controlled, checked, or restrained; amenable to command.
Controllableness
n.
• Capability of being controlled.
Controller
n.
• One who, or that which, controls or restraines; one who has power or authority to regulate or control; one who governs.
• An officer appointed to keep a counter register of accounts, or to examine, rectify, or verify accounts.
(Naut.) An iron block, usually bolted to a ship's deck, for controlling the running out of a chain cable. The links of the cable tend to drop into hollows in the block, and thus hold fast until disengaged.
Controllership
n.
• The office of a controller.
Controlment
n.
• The power or act of controlling; the state of being rstrained; control; restraint; regulation; superintendence.
• Opposition; resistance; hostility.
Controversal
a.
• Turning or looking opposite ways.
• Controversal.
Controversary
a.
• Controversial.
Controverse
n.
• Controversy.
v. t.
• To dispute; to controvert.
Controverser
n.
• A disputant.
Controversial
a.
• Relating to, or consisting of, controversy; disputatious; polemical; as, controversial divinity.
Controversialist
n.
• One who carries on a controversy; a disputant.
Controversially
adv.
• In a controversial manner.
Controversion
n.
• Act of controverting; controversy.
Controversor
n.
• A controverser.
Controversy
n.
• Contention; dispute; debate; discussion; agitation of contrary opinions.
• Quarrel; strife; cause of variance; difference.
• A suit in law or equity; a question of right.
Controvert
v. t.
• To make matter of controversy; to dispute or oppose by reasoning; to contend against in words or writings; to contest; to debate.
Controverter
n.
• One who controverts; a controversial writer; a controversialist.
Controvertible
a.
• Capable of being controverted; disputable; admitting of question.
Controvertist
n.
• One skilled in or given to controversy; a controversialist.
Contumacious
a.
• Exhibiting contumacy; contemning authority; obstinate; perverse; stubborn; disobedient.
(Law) Willfully disobedient to the summous or prders of a court.
Contumacy
n.
• Stubborn perverseness; pertinacious resistance to authority.
(Law) A willful contempt of, and disobedience to, any lawful summons, or to the rules and orders of court, as a refusal to appear in court when legally summoned.
Contumelious
a.
• Exhibiting contumely; rudely contemptuous; insolent; disdainful.
• Shameful; disgraceful.
Contumely
n.
• Rudeness compounded of haughtiness and contempt; scornful insolence; despiteful treatment; disdain; contemptuousness in act or speech; disgrace.
Contuse
v. t.
• To beat, pound, or together.
• To bruise; to injure or disorganize a part without breaking the skin.
Contusion
n.
• The act or process of beating, bruising, or pounding; the state of being beaten or bruised.
(Med.) A bruise; an injury attended with more or less disorganization of the subcutaneous tissue and effusion of blood beneath the skin, but without apparent wound.
Conundrum
n.
• A kind of riddle based upon some fanciful or fantastic resemblance between things quite unlike; a puzzling question, of which the answer is or involves a pun.
• A question to which only a conjectural answer can be made.
Conure
n.
(Zool.) An American parrakeet of the genus Conurus. Many species are known.
Conus
n.
• A cone.
(Zool.) A Linnean genus of mollusks having a conical shell.
n.
Conusable
a.
• Cognizable; liable to be tried or judged.
Convalesce
v. i.
• To recover health and strength gradually, after sickness or weakness; as, a patient begins to convalesce.
Convalesced
a.
• Convalescent.
Convalescent
a.
• Recovering from siclness or debility; partially restored to health or strength.
• Of or pertaining to convalescence.
n.
• One recovering from sickness.
Convalescently
adv.
• In the manner of a convalescent; with increasing strength or vigor.
Convallamarin
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline, poisonous substance, regarded as a glucoside, extracted from the lily of the valley (Convallaria Majalis). Its taste is first bitter, then sweet.
Convallaria
n.
(Bot. & Med.) The lily of the valley.
Convallarin
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline glucoside, of an irritating taste, extracted from the convallaria or lily of the valley.
Convection
n.
• The act or process of conveying or transmitting.
(Physics) A process of transfer or transmission, as of heat or electricity, by means of currents in liquids or gases, resulting from changes of temperature and other causes.
Convective
a.
• Caused or accomplished by convection; as, a convective discharge of electricity.
Convectively
adv.
• In a convective manner.
Convellent
a.
• Tending to tear or pull up.
Convenable
a.
• Capable of being convened or assembled.
a.
• Consistent; accordant; suitable; proper; as, convenable remedies.
Convenance
n.
• That which is suitable, agreeable, or convenient.
Convene
v. i.
• To come together; to meet; to unite.
• To come together, as in one body or for a public purpose; to meet; to assemble.
v. t.
• To cause to assemble; to call together; to convoke.
• To summon judicially to meet or appear.
Convener
n.
• One who convenes or meets with others.
• One who calls an assembly together or convenes a meeting; hence, the chairman of a committee or other organized body.
Convenient
a.
• Fit or adapted; suitable; proper; becoming; appropriate.
• Affording accommodation or advantage; well adapted to use; handly; as, a convenient house; convenient implements or tools.
• Seasonable; timely; opportune; as, a convenient occasion; a convenient season.
• Near at hand; easy of access.
Conveniently
adv.
• In a convenient manner, form, or situation; without difficulty.
Convent
n.
• A coming together; a meeting.
• An association or community of recluses devoted to a religious life; a body of monks or nuns.
• A house occupied by a community of religious recluses; a monastery or nunnery.
v. i.
• To meet together; to concur.
• To be convenient; to serve.
v. t.
• To call before a judge or judicature; to summon; to convene.
Conventical
a.
• Of or from, or pertaining to, a convent.
Conventicle
n.
• A small assembly or gathering; esp., a secret assembly.
Conventicler
n.
• One who supports or frequents conventicles.
Conventicling
a.
• Belonging or going to, or resembling, a conventicle.
Convention
n.
• The act of coming together; the state of being together; union; coalition.
• General agreement or concurrence; arbitrary custom; usage; conventionality.
• A meeting or an assembly of persons, esp. of delegates or representatives, to accomplish some specific object, — civil, social, political, or ecclesiastical.
(Eng. Hist) An extraordinary assembly of the parkiament or estates of the realm, held without the king's writ, — as the assembly which restored Charles II. to the throne, and that which declared the throne to be abdicated by James II.
• An agreement or contract less formal than, or preliminary to, a traety; an informal compact, as between commanders of armies in respect to suspension of hostilities, or between states; also, a formal agreement between governments or sovereign powers; as, a postal convetion between two governments.
Conventional
a.
• Formed by agreement or compact; stipulated.
• Growing out of, or depending on, custom or tacit agreement; sanctioned by general concurrence or usage; formal.
(Fine Arts) Based upon tradition, whether religious and historical or of artistic rules.
• Abstracted; removed from close representation of nature by the deliberate selection of what is to be represented and what is to be rejected; as, a conventional flower; a conventional shell. Cf. Conventionalize, v. t.
Conventionalily
adv.
• In a conventional manner.
Conventionalism
n.
• That which is received or established by convention or arbitrary agreement; that which is in accordance with the fashion, tradition, or usage.
(Fine Arts) The principles or practice of conventionalizing.
Conventionalist
n.
• One who adheres to a convention or treaty.
• One who is governed by conventionalism.
Conventionality
n.
• The state of being conventional; adherence to social formalities or usages; that which is established by conventional use; one of the customary usages of social life.
Conventionalization
n.
(Fine Arts) The act of making conventional.
• The state of being conventional.
Conventionalize
v. i.
(Fine Arts) To make designs in art, according to conventional principles. Cf. Conventionalize, v. t., 2.
Conventionalizw
v. t.
• To make conventional; to bring under the influence of, or cause to conform to, conventional rules; to establish by usage.
(Fine Arts) To represent by selecting the important features and those which are expressible in the medium employed, and omitting the others.
• To represent according to an established principle, whether religious or traditional, or based upon certain artistic rules of supposed importance.
Conventionary
a.
• Acting under contract; settled by express agreement; as, conventionary tenants.
Conventioner
n.
• One who belongs to a convention or assembly.
Conventionist
n.
• One who enters into a convention, covenant, or contract.
Conventual
a.
• Of or pertaining to a convent; monastic.
n.
• One who lives in a convent; a monk or num; a recluse.
Converge
v. i.
• To tend to one point; to incline and approach nearer together; as, lines converge.
v. t.
• To cause to tend to one point; to cause to incline and approach nearer together.
Convergent
a.
• tending to one point of focus; tending to approach each other; converging.
Converging
a.
• Tending to one point; approaching each other; convergent; as, converging lines.
Conversable
a.
• Qualified for conversation; disposed to converse; sociable; free in discourse.
Conversableness
n.
• The quality of being conversable; disposition to converse; sociability.
Conversably
adv.
• In a conversable manner.
Conversance
n.
• The state or quality of being conversant; habit of familiarity; familiar acquaintance; intimacy.
Conversancy
n.
• Conversance
Conversant
a.
• Having frequent or customary intercourse; familiary associated; intimately acquainted.
• Familiar or acquainted by use or study; well-informed; versed; — generally used with with, sometimes with in.
• Concerned; occupied.
n.
• One who converses with another; a convenser.
Conversantly
adv.
• In a familiar manner.
Conversation
n.
• General course of conduct; behavior.
• Familiar intercourse; intimate fellowship or association; close acquaintance.
• Commerce; intercourse; traffic.
• Colloqual discourse; oral interchange of sentiments and observations; informal dialogue.
• Sexual intercourse; as, criminal conversation.
Conversational
a.
• Pertaining to conversation; in the manner of one conversing; as, a conversational style.
Conversationalist
n.
• A conversationist.
Conversationed
a.
• Acquainted with manners and deportment; behaved.
Conversationism
n.
• A word or phrase used in conversation; a colloqualism.
Conversationist
n.
• One who converses much, or who excels in conversation.
Conversative
a.
• Relating to intercourse with men; social; — opposed to contemplative.
Converse
v. i.
• To keep company; to hold intimate intercourse; to commune; — followed by with.
• To engage, in familiar colloqui; to interchange thoughts and opinions in a free, informal manner; to chat; — followed by with before a person; by on, about, concerning, etc., before a thing.
• To have knowledge of, from long intercourse or study; — said of things.
n.
• Frequent intercourse; familiar communion; intimate association.
• Familiar discourse; free interchange of thoughts or views; conversation; chat.
• , a. Turned about; reversed in order or relation; reciprocal; as, a converse proposition.
n.
(Logic) A proposition which arises from interchanging the terms of another, as by putting the predicate for the subject, and the subject for the predicate; as, no virtue is vice, no vice is virtue.
(Math.) A proposition in which, after a conclusion from something supposed has been drawn, the order is inverted, making the conclusion the supposition or premises, what was first supposed becoming now the conclusion or inference. Thus, if two sides of a sides of a triangle are equal, the angles opposite the sides are equal; and the converse is true, i.e., if these angles are equal, the two sides are equal.
Conversely
adv.
• In a converse manner; with change of order or relation; reciprocally.
Converser
n.
• One who engages in conversation.
Conversible
a.
• Capable of being converted or reversed.
Conversion
n.
• The act of turning or changing from one state or condition to another, or the state of being changed; transmutation; change.
• The act of changing one's views or course, as in passing from one side, party, or from of religion to another; also, the state of being so changed.
(Law) An appropriation of, and dealing with the property of another as if it were one's own, without right; as, the conversion of a horse.
(Logic) The act of interchanging the terms of a proposition, as by putting the subject in the place of the predicate, or the contrary.
(Math.) A change or reduction of the form or value of a proposition; as, the conversion of equations; the conversion of proportions.
(Mil.) A change of front, as a body of troops attacked in the flank.
• A change of character or use, as of smoothbore guns into rifles.
(Theol.) A spiritual and moral change attending a change of belief with conviction; a change of heart; a change from the service of the world to the service of God; a change of the ruling disposition of the soul, involving a transformation of the outward life.
Conversive
a.
• Capable of being converted or changed.
• Ready to converse; social.
Convert
v. t.
• To cause to turn; to turn.
• To change or turn from one state or condition to another; to alter in form, substance, or quality; to transform; to transmute; as, to convert water into ice.
• To change or turn from one belief or course to another, as from one religion to another or from one party or sect to another.
• To produce the spiritual change called conversion in (any one); to turn from a bad life to a good one; to change the heart and moral character of (any one) from the controlling power of sin to that of holiness.
• To apply to any use by a diversion from the proper or intended use; to appropriate dishonestly or illegally.
• To exchange for some specified equivalent; as, to convert goods into money.
(Logic) To change (one proposition) into another, so that what was the subject of the first becomes the predicate of the second.
• To turn into another language; to translate.
v. i.
• To be turned or changed in character or direction; to undergo a change, physically or morally.
n.
• A person who is converted from one opinion or practice to another; a person who is won over to, or heartily embraces, a creed, religious system, or party, in which he has not previously believed; especially, one who turns from the controlling power of sin to that of holiness, or from unbelief to Christianity.
• A lay friar or brother, permitted to enter a monastery for the service of the house, but without orders, and not allowed to sing in the choir.
Convertend
n.
(Logic) Any proposition which is subject to the process of conversion; — so called in its relation to itself as converted, after which process it is termed the conversae.
Converter
n.
• One who converts; one who makes converts.
(Steel Manuf.) A retort, used in the Bessemer process, in which molten cast iron is decarburized and converted into steel by a blast of air forced through the liquid metal.
Convertibility
n.
• The condition or quality of being convertible; capability of being exchanged; convertibleness.
Convertible
a.
• Capable of being converted; susceptible of change; transmutable; transformable.
• Capable of being exchanged or interchanged; reciprocal; interchangeable.
Convertibleness
n.
• The state of being convertible; convertibility.
Convertibly
adv.
• In a convertible manner.
Convertite
n.
• A convert.
Convex
a.
• Rising or swelling into a spherical or rounded form; regularly protuberant or bulging; — said of a spherical surface or curved line when viewed from without, in opposition to concave.
n.
• A convex body or surface.
Convexed
a.
• Made convex; protuberant in a spherical form.
Convexedly
dv.
• In a convex form; convexly.
Convexedness
n.
• Convexity.
Convexity
n.
• The state of being convex; the exterior surface of a convex body; roundness.
Convexly
adv.
• In a convex form; as, a body convexly shaped.
Convexness
n.
• The state of being convex; convexity.
Convey
v. t.
• To carry from one place to another; to bear or transport.
• To cause to pass from one place or person to another; to serve as a medium in carrying (anything) from one place or person to another; to transmit; as, air conveys sound; words convey ideas.
• To transfer or deliver to another; to make over, as property; more strictly (Law), to transfer (real estate) or pass (a title to real estate) by a sealed writing.
• To impart or communicate; as, to convey an impression; to convey information.
• To manage with privacy; to carry out.
• To carry or take away secretly; to steal; to thieve.
• To accompany; to convoy.
v. i.
• To play the thief; to steal.
Conveyable
a.
• Capable of being conveyed or transferred.
Conveyance
n.
• The act of conveying, carrying, or transporting; carriage.
• The instrument or means of carrying or transporting anything from place to place; the vehicle in which, or means by which, anything is carried from one place to another; as, stagecoaches, omnibuses, etc., are conveyances; a canal or aqueduct is a conveyance for water.
• The act or process of transferring, transmitting, handing down, or communicating; transmission.
(Law) The act by which the title to property, esp. real estate, is transferred; transfer of ownership; an instrument in writing (as a deed or mortgage), by which the title to property is conveyed from one person to another.
• Dishonest management, or artifice.
Conveyancer
n.
(Law) One whose business is to draw up conveyances of property, as deeds, mortgages, leases, etc.
Conveyancing
n.
(Law) The business of a conveyancer; the act or business of drawing deeds, leases, or other writings, for transferring the title to property from one person to another.
Conveyer
n.
• One who, or that which, conveys or carries, transmits or transfers.
• One given to artifices or secret practices; a juggler; a cheat; a thief.
Conveyor
n.
(Mach.) A contrivance for carrying objects from place to place; esp., one for conveying grain, coal, etc., — as a spiral or screw turning in a pipe or trough, an endless belt with buckets, or a truck running along a rope.
Conviciate
v. i.
• To utter reproaches; to raise a clamor; to rail.
Convicinity
n.
• Immediate vicinity; neighborhood.
Convicious
a.
• Expressing reproach; abusive; railing; taunting.
Convict1ible
a.
• Capable of being convicted.
Convict
p.a.
• Proved or found guilty; convicted.
n.
• A person proved guilty of a crime alleged against him; one legally convicted or sentenced to punishment for some crime.
• A criminal sentenced to penal servitude.
v. t.
• To prove or find guilty of an offense or crime charged; to pronounce guilty, as by legal decision, or by one's conscience.
• To prove or show to be false; to confute; to refute.
• To demonstrate by proof or evidence; to prove.
• To defeat; to doom to destruction.
Conviction
n.
• The act of convicting; the act of proving, finding, or adjudging, guilty of an offense.
(Law) A judgment of condemnation entered by a court having jurisdiction; the act or process of finding guilty, or the state of being found guilty of any crime by a legal tribunal.
• The act of convincing of error, or of compelling the admission of a truth; confutation.
• The state of being convinced or convicted; strong persuasion or belief; especially, the state of being convicted of sin, or by one's conscience.
Convictism
n.
• The policy or practice of transporting convicts to penal settlements.
Convictive
a.
• Convincing.
Convince
v. t.
• To overpower; to overcome; to subdue or master.
• To overcome by argument; to force to yield assent to truth; to satisfy by proof.
• To confute; to prove the fallacy of.
• To prove guilty; to convinct.
Convincement
n.
• Act of convincing, or state of being convinced; conviction.
Convincer
n.
• One who, or that which, convinces; one who wins over by proof.
Convincible
a.
• Capable of being convinced or won over.
• Capable of being confuted and disproved by argument; refutable.
Convincingly
adv.
• in a convincing manner; in a manner to compel assent.
Convincingness
n.
• The power of convincing, or the quality of being convincing.
Convival
a.
• pertaining to a feast or to festivity; convivial.
Convive
v. i.
• To feast together; to be convivial.
n.
• A quest at a banquet.
Convivial
a.
• Of or relating to a feast or entertainment, or to eating and drinking, with accompanying festivity; festive; social; gay; jovial.
Convivialist
n.
• A person of convivial habits.
Conviviality
n.
• The good humor or mirth indulged in upon festive occasions; a convivial spirit or humor; festivity.
Convivially
adv.
• In a convivial manner.
Convocate
v. t.
• To convoke; to call together.
Convocation
n.
• The act of calling or assembling by summons.
• An assembly or meeting.
(Ch. of Eng.) An assembly of the clergy, by their representatives, to consult on ecclesiastical affairs.
(Oxf. University) An academical assembly, in which the business of the university is transacted.
Convocational
a.
• Of or pertaining to a convocation.
Convocationist
n.
• An advocate or defender of convocation.
Convoke
v. t.
• To call together; to summon to meet; to assemble by summons.
Convolute
a.
(Bot.) Rolled or wound together, one part upon another; — said of the leaves of plants in aestivation.
Convoluted
a.
• Having convolutions.
• Folded in tortuous windings.
Convolution
n.
• The act of rolling anything upon itself, or one thing upon another; a winding motion.
• The state of being rolled upon itself, or rolled or doubled together; a tortuous or sinuous winding or fold, as of something rolled or folded upon itself.
(Anat.) An irregular, tortuous folding of an organ or part; as, the convolutions of the intestines; the cerebral convolutions.
Convolve
v. t.
• To roll or wind together; to roll or twist one part on another.
Convolvulaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the family of plants of which the bindweed and the morning-glory are common examples.
Convolvulin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside occurring in jalap (the root of a convolvulaceous plant), and extracted as a colorless, tasteless, gummy mass of powerful purgative properties.
Convolvulus
n.
(Bot.) A large genus of plants having monopetalous flowers, including the common bindweed (C. arwensis), and formerly the morning-glory, but this is now transferred to the genus Ipomaea.
Convoy
v. t.
• To accompany for protection, either by sea or land; to attend for protection; to escort; as, a frigate convoys a merchantman.
n.
• The act of attending for defense; the state of being so attended; protection; escort.
• A vessel or fleet, or a train or trains of wagons, employed in the transportation of munitions of war, money, subsistence, clothing, etc., and having an armed escort.
• A protection force accompanying ships, etc., on their way from place to place, by sea or land; an escort, for protection or guidance.
• Conveyance; means of transportation.
• A drag or brake applied to the wheels of a carriage, to check their velocity in going down a hill.
Convulse
v. t.
• To contract violently and irregulary, as the muscular parts of an animal body; to shake with irregular spasms, as in excessive laughter, or in agony from grief or pain.
• To agitate greatly; to shake violently.
Convulsion
n.
(Med.) An unnatural, violent, and unvoluntary contraction of the muscular parts of an animal body.
• Any violent and irregular motion or agitation; a violent shaking; a tumult; a commotion.
Convulsional
a.
• Pertaining to, or having, convulsions; convulsionary.
Convulsionary
a.
• Pertaining to convulsion; convulsive. "Convulsionary struggles." Sir W. Scott.
n.
• A convulsionist.
Convulsionist
n.
• One who has convulsions; esp., one of a body of fanatics in France, early in the eighteenth century, who went into convulsions under the influence of religious emotion; as, the Convulsionists of St. Medard.
Convulsive
a.
• Producing, or attended with, convulsions or spasms; characterized by convulsions; convulsionary.
Convulsively
adv.
• in a convulsive manner.
Cony
n.
(Zool.) A rabbit, esp., the European rabbit (Lepus cuniculus)
• The chief hare.
• A simpleton.
(Zool.) An important edible West Indian fish (Epinephelus apua); the hind of Bermuda.
• A local name of the burbot.
Conylene
n.
• An oily substance, C8H14, obtained from several derivatives of conine.
Conyrine
n.
(Chem.) A blue, fluorescent, oily base (regarded as a derivative of pyridine), obtained from conine.
Coo
v. i.
• To make a low repeated cry or sound, like the characteristic note of pigeons or doves.
• To show affection; to act in a loving way.
Cook
v. i.
• To make the noise of the cuckoo.
v. t.
• To throw.
n.
• One whose occupation is to prepare food for the table; one who dresses or cooks meat or vegetables for eating.
(Zool.) A fish, the European striped wrasse.
v. t.
• To prepare, as food, by boiling, roasting, baking, broiling, etc.; to make suitable for eating, by the agency of fire or heat.
• To concoct or prepare; hence, to tamper with or alter; to garble; — often with up; as, to cook up a story; to cook an account.
v. i.
• To prepare food for the table.
Cookbook
n.
• A book of directions and receipts for cooking; a cookery book.
Cookee
n.
• A female cook.
Cookery
n.
• The art or process of preparing food for the table, by dressing, compounding, and the application of heat.
• A delicacy; a dainty.
Cookmaid
n.
• A female servant or maid who dresses provisions and assists the cook.
Cookroom
n.
• A room for cookery; a kitchen; the galley or caboose of a ship.
Cookshop
n.
• An eating house.
Cooky
n.
• A small, flat, sweetened cake of various kinds.
Cool
a.
• Moderately cold; between warm and cold; lacking in warmth; producing or promoting coolness.
• Not ardent, warm, fond, or passionate; not hasty; deliberate; exercising self-control; self-possessed; dispassionate; indifferent; as, a cool lover; a cool debater.
• Not retaining heat; light; as, a cool dress.
• Manifesting coldness or dislike; chilling; apathetic; as, a cool manner.
• Quietly impudent; negligent of propriety in matters of minor importance, either ignorantly or willfully; presuming and selfish; audacious; as, cool behavior.
• Applied facetiously, in a vague sense, to a sum of money, commonly as if to give emphasis to the largeness of the amount.
n.
• A moderate state of cold; coolness; — said of the temperature of the air between hot and cold; as, the cool of the day; the cool of the morning or evening.
v. t.
• To make cool or cold; to reduce the temperature of; as, ice cools water.
• To moderate the heat or excitement of; to allay, as passion of any kind; to calm; to moderate.
v. i.
• To become less hot; to lose heat.
• To lose the heat of excitement or passion; to become more moderate.
Cooler
n.
• That which cools, or abates heat or excitement.
• Anything in or by which liquids or other things are cooled, as an ice chest, a vessel for ice water, etc.
Coolie
n.
• Same as Cooly.
Cooling
p.a.
• Adapted to cool and refresh; allaying heat.
Coolish
a.
• Somewhat cool.
Coolly
a.
• Coolish; cool.
adv.
• In a cool manner; without heat or excessive cold; without passion or ardor; calmly; deliberately; with indifference; impudently.
Coolness
n.
• The state of being cool; a moderate degree of cold; a moderate degree, or a want, of passion; want of ardor, zeal, or affection; calmness.
• Calm impudence; self-possession.
Coolung
n.
(Zool.) The great gray crane of India (Grus cinerea).
Coom
n.
• Soot; coal dust; refuse matter, as the dirty grease which comes from axle boxes, or the refuse at the mouth of an oven.
Coomb
n.
• A dry measure of four bushels, or half a quarter.
Coon
n.
(Zool.) A raccoon.
Coontie
n.
(Bot.) A cycadaceous plant of Florida and the West Indies, the Zamia integrifolia, from the stems of which a kind of sago is prepared.
Coop
n.
• A barrel or cask for liquor.
• An inclosure for keeping small animals; a pen; especially, a grated box for confining poultry.
• A cart made close with boarde; a tumbrel.
v. t.
• To confine in a coop; hence, to shut up or confine in a narrow compass; to cramp; — usually followed by up, sometimes by in.
• To work upon in the manner of a cooper.
Cooper
n.
• One who makes barrels, hogsheads, casks, etc.
v. t.
• To do the work of a cooper upon; as, to cooper a cask or barrel.
Cooper
n.
• Work done by a cooper in making or repairing barrels, casks, etc.; the business of a cooper.
Cooperage
n.
• Work done by a cooper.
• The price paid for coopers; work.
• A place where coopers' work is done.
Cooperant
a.
• Operating together; as, cooperant forces.
Cooperate
v. i.
• To act or operate jointly with another or others; to concur in action, effort, or effect.
Cooperation
n.
• The act of cooperating, or of operating together to one end; joint operation; concurrent effort or labor.
(Polit. Econ.) The association of a number of persons for their benefit.
Cooperative
a.
• Operating jointly to the same end.
Cooperator
n.
• One who labors jointly with others to promote the same end.
Coopery
a.
• Relating to a cooper; coopered.
n.
• The occupation of a cooper.
Coopt
v. t.
• To choose or elect in concert with another.
Cooptate
v. t.
• To choose; to elect; to coopt.
Cooptation
n.
• The act of choosing; selection; choice.
Coordain
v. t.
• To ordain or appoint for some purpose along with another.
Coordinance
n.
• Joint ordinance.
Coordinate
a.
• Equal in rank or order; not subordinate.
n.
• A thing of the same rank with another thing; one two or more persons or things of equal rank, authority, or importance.
(Math.) Lines, or other elements of reference, by means of which the position of any point, as of a curve, is defined with respect to certain fixed lines, or planes, called coordinate axes and coordinate planes.
Coordinately
adv.
• In a coordinate manner.
Coordinateness
n.
• The state of being coordinate; equality of rank or authority.
Coordination
n.
• The act of coordinating; the act of putting in the same order, class, rank, dignity, etc.; as, the coordination of the executive, the legislative, and the judicial authority in forming a government; the act of regulating and combining so as to produce harmonious results; harmonious adjustment; as, a coordination of functions.
• The state of being coordinate, or of equal rank, dignity, power, etc.
Coordinative
a.
(Gram.) Expressing coordination.
Coot
n.
(Zool.) A wading bird with lobate toes, of the genus Fulica.
• The surf duck or scoter. In the United States all the species of (Edemia are called coots.
• A stupid fellow; a simpleton; as, a silly coot.
Cooter
n.
(Zool.) A fresh-water tortoise (Pseudemus concinna) of Florida.
• The box tortoise.
Cootfoot
n.
(Zool.) The pharalope; — so called because its toes are like the coot's.
Cootthay
n.
• A striped satin made in India.
Cop
n.
• The top of a thing; the head; a crest.
• A conical or conical-ended mass of coiled thread, yarn, or roving, wound upon a spindle, etc.
• A tube or quill upon which silk is wound.
(Mil. Arch.) same as Merlon.
• A policeman.
Copal
• A resinous substance flowing spontaneously from trees of Zanzibar, Madagascar, and South America (Trachylobium Hornemannianum, T. verrocosum, and Hymenaea Courbaril), and dug from earth where forests have stood in Africa; — used chiefly in making varnishes.
Coparcenary
n.
(Law) Partnership in inheritance; joint heirship; joint right of sucession to an inheritance.
Coparcener
n.
(Law) One who has an equal portion with others of an inheritance.
Coparceny
n.
(Law) An equal share of an inheritance.
Copart
v. t.
• To share.
Copartment
n.
• A compartment.
Copartner
n.
• One who is jointly concerned with one or more persons in business, etc.; a partner; an associate; a partaker; a sharer.
Copartnership
n.
• The state of being a copartner or of having a joint interest in any matter.
• A partnership or firm; as, A. and B. have this day formed a copartnership.
Copartnery
n.
• the state of being copartners in any undertaking.
Copatain
a.
• Having a high crown, or a point or peak at top.
Copatriot
n.
• A joint patriot.
Cope
n.
• A covering for the head.
• Anything regarded as extended over the head, as the arch or concave of the sky, the roof of a house, the arch over a door.
• An ecclesiastical vestment or cloak, semicircular in form, reaching from the shoulders nearly to the feet, and open in front except at the top, whereit is united by a band or clasp. It is worn in processions and on some other occasions.
• An ancient tribute due to the lord of the soil, out of the lead mines in derbyshire, England.
(Founding) The top part of a flask or mold; the outer part of a loam mold.
v. i.
• To form a cope or arch; to bend or arch; to bow.
v. t.
(Falconry) To pare the beak or talons of (a hawk).
v. i.
• To exchange or barter.
• To encounter; to meet; to have to do with.
• To enter into or maintain a hostile contest; to struggle; to combat; especially, to strive or contend on equal terms or with success; to match; to equal; — usually followed by with.
v. t.
• To bargain for; to buy.
• To make return for; to requite; to repay.
• To match one's self against; to meet; to encounter.
Copeck
n.
• A Russian copper coin.
Coped
a.
• Clad in a cope.
Copeman
n.
• A chapman; a dealer; a merchant.
Copepod
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Copepoda.
n.
• One of the Copepoda.
Copepoda
n.
(Zool.) An order of Entomastraca, including many minute Crustacea, both freshwater and marine.
Copernican
a.
• Pertaining to Copernicus, a Prussian by birth (b. 1473, d. 1543), who taught the world the solar system now received, called the Copernican system.
Copesmate
n.
• An associate or companion; a friend; a partner.
Copestone
n.
(Arch.) A stone for coping.
Copier
n.
• One who copies; one who writes or transcribes from an original; a transcriber.
• An imitator; one who imitates an example; hence, a plagiarist.
Coping
n.
(Arch.) The highest or covering course of masonry in a wall, often with sloping edges to carry off water; — sometimes called capping.
Copious
a.
• Large in quantity or amount; plentiful; abundant; fruitful.
Copiously
adv.
• In a copious manner.
Copiousness
n.
• The state or quality of being copious; abudance; plenty; also, diffuseness in style.
Copist
n.
• A copier.
Copland
n.
• A piece of ground terminating in a point or acute angle.
Coplaner
a.
(Math.) Situated in one plane.
Coplatry
a.
• Pertaining to copulation; tending or serving to unite; copulative.
(Zool.) Used in sexual union; as, the copulatory organs of insects.
Coportion
n.
• Equal share.
Copped
a.
• Rising to a point or head; conical; pointed; crested.
Copper
n.
• A common metal of a reddish color, both ductile and malleable, and very tenacious. It is one of the best conductors of heat and electricity. Symbol Cu. Atomic weight 63.3. It is one of the most useful metals in itself, and also in its alloys, brass and bronze.
• A coin made of copper; a penny, cent, or other minor coin of copper.
• A vessel, especially a large boiler, made of copper.
(Naut.) the boilers in the galley for cooking; as, a ship's coppers.
v. t.
• To cover or coat with copper; to sheathe with sheets of copper; as, to copper a ship.
Copperas
n.
• Green vitriol, or sulphate of iron; a green crystalline substance, of an astringent taste, used in making ink, in dyeing black, as a tonic in medicine, etc. It is made on a large scale by the oxidation of iron pyrites. Called also ferrous sulphate.
Copperhead
n.
(Zool.) A poisonous American serpent (Ancistrodon conotortrix), closely allied to the rattlesnake, but without rattles; — called also copper-belly, and red viper.
• A nickname applied to a person in the Northern States who sympathized with the South during the Civil War.
Coppering
n.
• The act of covering with copper.
• An envelope or covering of copper.
Copperish
a.
• Containing, or partaking of the nature of, copper; like copper; as, a copperish taste.
Copperplate
n.
• A plate of polished copper on which a design or writing is engraved.
• An impression on paper taken from such a plate.
Coppersmith
n.
• One whose occupation is to manufacture copper utensils; a worker in copper.
Copperworm
n.
(Zool.) The teredo; — so called because it injures the bottoms of vessels, where not protected by copper.
• The ringworm.
Coppery
a.
• Mixed with copper; containing copper, or made of copper; like copper.
Coppice
n.
• A grove of small growth; a thicket of brushwood; a wood cut at certain times for fuel or other purposes.
Coppin
n.
• A cop of thread.
Copple
n.
• Something rising in a conical shape; specifically, a hill rising to a point.
Coppled
a.
• Rising to a point; conical; copped.
Copplestone
n.
• A cobblestone.
Copra
n.
(Com.) The dried meat of the cocoanut, from which cocoanut oil is expressed.
Coprolite
n.
(Paleon.) A piece of petrified dung; a fossil excrement.
Coprolitic
a.
• Containing, pertaining to, or of the nature of, coprolites.
Coprophagan
n.
(Zool.) A kind of beetle which feeds upon dung.
Coprophagous
a.
(Zool.) Feeding upon dung, as certain insects.
Cops
n.
• The connecting crook of a harrow.
Copse
n.
• A wood of small growth; a thicket of brushwood.
v. t.
• To trim or cut; — said of small trees, brushwood, tufts of grass, etc.
• To plant and preserve, as a copse.
Copsewood
n.
• Brushwood; coppice.
Copsy
a.
• Characterized by copses.
Coptic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Copts.
n.
• The language of the Copts.
Copts
n. pl.
(Etnol.) An Egyptian race thought to be descendants of the ancient Egyptians.
• The principal sect of Christians in Egypt and the valley of the Nile.
Copula
n.
(Logic & Gram.) The word which unites the subject and predicate.
(Mus.) The stop which connects the manuals, or the manuals with the pedals; — called also coupler.
Copulate
a.
• Joined; associated; coupled.
(Gram.) Joining subject and predicate; copulative.
v. i.
• To unite in sexual intercourse; to come together in the act of generation.
Copulation
n.
• The act of coupling or joining; union; conjunction.
• The coming together of male and female in the act of generation; sexual union; coition.
Copulative
a.
• Serving to couple, unite, or connect; as, a copulative conjunction like "and".
n.
• Connection.
(Gram.) A copulative conjunction.
Copulatively
adv.
• In a copulative manner.
Copy
n.
• An abundance or plenty of anything.
• An imitation, transcript, or reproduction of an original work; as, a copy of a letter, an engraving, a painting, or a statue.
• An individual book, or a single set of books containing the works of an author; as, a copy of the Bible; a copy of the works of Addison.
• That which is to be imitated, transcribed, or reproduced; a pattern, model, or example; as, his virtues are an excellent copy for imitation.
(print.) Manuscript or printed matter to be set up in type; as, the printers are calling for more copy.
• A writing paper f a particular size. Same as Bastard.
• Copyhold; tenure; lease.
v. t.
• To make a copy or copies of; to write; print, engrave, or paint after an original; to duplicate; to reproduce; to transcribe; as, to copy a manuscript, inscription, design, painting, etc.; — often with out, sometimes with off.
• To imitate; to attempt to resemble, as in manners or course of life.
v. i.
• To make a copy or copies; to imitate.
• To yield a duplicate or transcript; as, the letter did not copy well.
Copygraph
n.
• A contrivance for producing manifold copies of a writing or drawing.
Copyhold
n.
(Eng. Law) A tenure of estate by copy of court roll; or a tenure for which the tenant has nothing to show, except the rolls made by the steward of the lord's court.
• Land held in copyhold.
Copyholder
n.
(Eng. Law) One possessed of land in copyhold.
(print.) A device for holding copy for a compositor.
• One who reads copy to a proof reader.
Copying
a. & n.
• From Copy, v.
Copyist
n.
• A copier; a transcriber; an imitator; a plagiarist.
Copyright
n.
• The right of an author or his assignee, under statute, to print and publish his literary or artistic work, exclusively of all other persons. This right may be had in maps, charts, engravings, plays, and musical compositions, as well as in books.
v. t.
• To secure a copyright on.
Coquelicot
n.
(Bot.) The wild poppy, or red corn rose.
• The color of the wild poppy; a color nearly red, like orange mixed with scarlet.
Coquet
v. t.
• To attempt to attract the notice, admiration, or love of; to treat with a show of tenderness or regard, with a view to deceive and disappoint.
v. i.
• To trifle in love; to stimulate affection or interest; to play the coquette; to deal playfully instead of seriously; to play (with); as, we have coquetted with political crime.
Coquetry
n.
• Attempts to attract admoration, notice, or love, for the mere gratification of vanity; trifling in love.
Coquette
n.
• A vain, trifling woman, who endeavors to attract admiration from a desire to grafity vanity; a flirt; — formerly sometimes applied also to men.
(Zool.) A tropical humming bird of the genus Lophornis, with very elegant neck plumes. Several species are known.
Coquettish
a.
• Practicing or exhibiting coquetry; alluring; enticing.
Coquettishly
adv.
• In a coquettish manner.
Coquimbite
n.
• A mineral consisting principally of sulphate of iron; white copperas; — so called because found in the province of Coquimbo, Chili.
Coquina
n.
• A soft, whitish, coral-like stone, formed of broken shells and corals, found in the southern United States, and used for roadbeds and for building material, as in the fort at St. Augustine, Florida.
Cor/niculate
a.
• Horned; having horns.
(Bot.) Having processes resembling small horns.
Cor
n.
• A Hebrew measure of capacity; a homer.
Cora
n.
(Zool.) The Arabian gazelle (Gazella Arabica), found from persia to North Africa.
Coracle
n.
• A boat made by covering a wicker frame with leather or oilcloth. It was used by the ancient Britons, and is still used by fisherman in Wales and some parts of Ireland. Also, a similar boat used in Thibet and in Egypt.
Coracoid
a.
• Shaped like a crow's beak.
(Anat.) Pertaining to a bone of the shoulder girdle in most birds, reptiles, and amphibians, which is reduced to a process of the scapula in most mammals.
n.
• The coracoid bone or process.
Coral
n.
(Zool.) The hard parts or skeleton of various Anthozoa, and of a few Hydrozoa. Similar structures are also formed by some Bryozoa.
• The ovaries of a cooked lobster; — so called from their color.
• A piece of coral, usually fitted with small bells and other appurtenances, used by children as a plaything.
Coraled
a.
• Having coral; covered with coral.
Corallaceous
a.
• Like coral, or partaking of its qualities.
Corallian
n.
(Geol.) A deposit of coralliferous limestone forming a portion of the middle division of the oolite; — called also coral-rag.
Coralliferous
a.
• Containing or producing coral.
Coralliform
a.
• resembling coral in form.
Coralligena
n.
(Zool.) Same as Anthozoa.
Coralligenous
a.
• producing coral; coraligerous; coralliferous.
Coralligerous
a
• Producing coral; coraliferous.
Corallin
n.
(Chem.) A yellow coal-tar dyestuff which probably consists chiefly of rosolic acid.
Coralline
a.
• Composed of corallines; as, coralline limestone.
n.
(Bot.) A submarine, semicalcareous or calcareous plant, consisting of many jointed branches.
(Zool.) Formerly any slender coral-like animal; — sometimes applied more particulary to bryozoan corals.
Corallinite
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil coralline.
Corallite
n.
(Min.) A mineral substance or petrifaction, in the form of coral.
(Zool.) One of the individual members of a compound coral; or that part formed by a single coral animal.
Coralloid
a.
• Having the form of coral; branching like coral.
Coralloidal
a.
• resembling coral; coralloid.
Corallum
n.
(Zool.) The coral or skeleton of a zoophyte, whether calcareous of horny, simple or compound.
Coralwort
n.
(Bot.) A cruciferous herb of certain species of Dentaria; — called also toothwort, tooth violet, or pepper root.
Coranach
n.
• A lamentation for the dead; a dirge.
Corb
n.
• A basket used in coal mines, etc. see Corf.
(Arch.) An ornament in a building; a corbel.
Corban
n.
(Jewish Antiq.) An offering of any kind, devoted to God and therefore not be appropriated to any other use; esp., an offering in fulfillment of a vow.
• An alms basket; a vessel to receive gifts of charity; a treasury of the church, where offerings are deposited.
Corbe
a.
• Crooked.
Corbel
n.
(Arch.) A bracket supporting a superincumbent object, or receiving the spring of an arch. Corbels were employed largely in Gothic architecture.
v. t.
• To furnish with a corbel or corbels; to support by a corbel; to make in the form of a corbel.
Corbell
n.
(Arch.) A sculptured basket of flowers; a corbel.
(Fort.) Small gabions.
Corbiestep
n.
(Arch.) One of the steps in which a gable wall is often finished in place of a continuous slope; — also called crowstep.
Corchorus
n.
(Bot.) The common name of the kerria Japonica or Japan globeflower, a yellow-flowered, perennial, rosaceous plant, seen in old-fashioned gardens.
Cord
n.
• A string, or small rope, composed of several strands twisted together.
• A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; — originally measured with a cord or line.
• Fig.: Any moral influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord; an enticement; as, the cords of the wicked; the cords of sin; the cords of vanity.
(Anat.) Any structure having the appearance of a cord, esp. a tendon or a nerve.
v. t.
• To bind with a cord; to fasten with cords; to connect with cords; to ornament or finish with a cord or cords, as a garment.
• To arrange (wood, etc.) in a pile for measurement by the cord.
Cordage
n.
• Ropes or cords, collectively; hence, anything made of rope or cord, as those parts of the rigging of a ship which consist of ropes.
Cordal
n.
• Same as Cordelle.
Cordate
a.
(Bot.) Heart-shaped; as, a cordate leaf.
Cordately
adv.
• In a cordate form.
Corded
a.
• Bound or fastened with cords.
• Piled in a form for measurement by the cord.
• Made of cords.
• Striped or ribbed with cords; as, cloth with a corded surface.
(Her.) Bound about, or wound, with cords.
Cordelier
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A Franciscan; — so called in France from the girdle of knotted cord worn by all Franciscans.
(Fr. Hist.) A member of a French political club of the time of the first Revolution, of which Danton and Marat were members, and which met in an old Cordelier convent in Paris.
Cordeling
a.
• Twisting.
Cordelle
n.
• A twisted cord; a tassel.
Cordial
a.
• Proceeding from the heart.
• Hearty; sincere; warm; affectionate.
• Tending to revive, cheer, or invigorate; giving strength or spirits.
n.
• Anything that comforts, gladdens, and exhilarates.
(Med) Any invigorating and stimulating preparation; as, a peppermint cordial.
(Com.) Aromatized and sweetened spirit, used as a beverage; a liqueur.
Cordiality
n.
• Relation to the heart.
• Sincere affection and kindness; warmth of regard; heartiness.
Cordialize
v. t.
• To make into a cordial.
• To render cordial; to reconcile.
v. i.
• To grow cordial; to feel or express cordiality.
Cordially
adv.
• In a cordial manner.
Cordialness
n.
• Cordiality.
Cordillera
n.
(Geol.) A mountain ridge or chain.
Cordiner
n.
• A cordwainer.
Cordoform
a.
• Heart-shaped.
Cordon
n.
• A cord or ribbon bestowed or borne as a badge of honor; a broad ribbon, usually worn after the manner of a baldric, constituting a mark of a very high grade in an honorary order. Cf. Grand cordon.
• The cord worn by a Franciscan friar.
(Fort.) The coping of the scarp wall, which projects beyong the face of the wall a few inches.
(Mil.) A line or series of sentinels, or of military posts, inclosing or guarding any place or thing.
• A rich and ornamental lace or string, used to secure a mantle in some costumes of state.
Cordonnet
n.
• Doubled and twisted thread, made of coarse silk, and used for tassels, fringes, etc.
Cordovan
n.
• Same as Cordwain. in England the name is applied to leather made from horsehide.
Corduroy
n.
• A sort of cotton velveteen, having the surface raised in ridges.
• Trousers or breeches of corduroy.
v. t.
• To form of logs laid side by side. "Roads were corduroyed." Gemn. W.T. Sherman.
Cordwain
n.
• A term used in the Middle Ages for Spanish leather (goatskin tanned and dressed), and hence, any leather handsomely finished, colored, gilded, or the like.
Cordwainer
n.
• A worker in cordwain, or cordovan leather; a shoemaker.
Core
n.
• A body of individuals; an assemblage.
n.
(Mining.) A miner's underground working time or shift.
n.
• A Hebrew dry measure; a cor or homer.
n.
• The heart or inner part of a thing, as of a column, wall, rope, of a boil, etc.; especially, the central part of fruit, containing the kernels or seeds; as, the core of an apple or quince.
• The center or inner part, as of an open space; as, the core of a ssquare.
• The most important part of a thing; the essence; as, the core of a subject.
(Founding) The prtion of a mold which shapes the interior of a cylinder, tube, or other hollow casting, or which makes a hole in or through a casting; a part of the mold, made separate from and inserted in it, for shaping some part of the casting, the form of which is not determined by that of the pattern.
• A disorder of sheep occasioned by worms in the liver.
(Anat.) The bony process which forms the central axis of the horns in many animals.
v. t.
• To take out the core or inward parts of; as, to core an apple.
• To form by means of a core, as a hole in a casting.
Coreopsis
n.
(Bot.) A genus of herbaceous composite plants, having the achenes two-horned and remotely resembling some insect; tickseed. C. tinctoria, of the Western plains, the commonest plant of the genus, has been used in dyeing.
Corer
n.
• That which cores; an instrument for coring fruit; as, an apple corer.
Corf
n.
• A basket.
(Mining) A large basket used in carrying or hoisting coal or ore.
• A wooden frame, sled, or low-wheeled wagon, to convey coal or ore in the mines.
Coriaceous
a.
• Consisting of or resembling, leather; leatherlike; tough.
(Bot.) Stiff, like leather or parchment.
Coriander
n
(Bot.) An umbelliferous plant, the Coriandrum sativum, the fruit or seeds of which have a strong smell and a spicy taste, and in medicine are considered as stomachic and carminative.
Coridine
n.
• A colorless or yellowish oil, C10H15N, of a leathery odor, occuring in coal tar, Dippel's oil, tobacco smoke, etc., regarded as an organic base, homologous with pyridine. Also, one of a series of metameric compounds of which coridine is a type.
Corinne
n.
(Zool.) The common gazelle (Gazella dorcas).
Corinth
n.
• A city of Greece, famed for its luxury and extravagance.
• A small fruit; a currant.
Corinthiac
a.
• Pertaining to Corinth.
Corinthian
a.
• Of or relating to Corinth.
(Arch.) Of or pertaining to the Corinthian order of architecture, invented by the Greeks, but more commonly used by the Romans.
• Debauched in character or practice; impure.
• Of or pertaining to an amateur sailor or yachtsman; as, a corinthian race (one in which the contesting yachts must be manned by amateurs.)
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Corinth.
• A gay, licentious person.
Corium
n.
• Armor made of leather, particularly that used by the Romans; used also by Enlish soldiers till the reign of Edward I.
(Anat.) Same as Dermis.
• The deep layer of mucous membranes beneath the epithelium.
Corival
n.
• A rival; a corrival.
v. t.
• To rival; to pretend to equal.
Cork
n.
• The outer layer of the bark of the cork tree (Quercus Suber), of which stoppers for bottles and casks are made.
• A stopper for a bottle or cask, cut out of cork.
• A mass of tabular cells formed in any kind of bark, in greater or less abundance.
v. t.
• To stop with a cork, as a bottle.
• To furnish or fit with cork; to raise on cork.
Corkage
n.
• The charge made by innkeepers for drawing the cork and taking care of bottles of wine bought elsewhere by a guest.
Corked
a.
• having acquired an unpleasant taste from the cork; as, a bottle of wine is corked.
Corkiness
n.
• The quality of being corky.
Corkscrew
n.
• An instrument with a screw or a steel spiral for drawing corks from bottles.
v. t.
• To press forward in a winding way; as, to corksrew one's way through a crowd.
Corkwing
n.
(Zool.) A fish; the goldsinny.
Corky
a.
• Consisting of, or like, cork; dry shriveled up.
• Tasting of cork.
Corm
n.
(Bot.) A solid bulb-shaped root, as of the crocus.
(Biol.) Same as Cormus, 2.
Cormogeny
n.
(Biol.) The embryological history of groups or families of individuals.
Cormophylogeny
n.
(Biol.) The phylogeny of groups or families of individuals.
Cormorant
n.
(Zool.) Any species of Phalacrocorax, a genus of sea birds having a sac under the beak; the shag. Cormorants devour fish voraciously, and have become the emblem of gluttony. They are generally black, and hence are called sea ravens, and coalgeese.
• A voracious eater; a glutton, or gluttonous servant.
Cormoraut
a.
• Ravenous; voracious.
Cormus
n.
(Biol.) A vegetable or animal made up of a number of individuals, such as, for example, would be formed by a process of budding from a parent stalk wherre the buds remain attached.
Corn
n.
• A thickening of the epidermis at some point, esp. on the toees, by friction or pressure. It is usually painful and troublesome.
n.
• A single seed of certain plants, as wheat, rye, barley, and maize; a grain.
• The various farinaceous grains of the cereal grasses used for food, as wheat, rye, barley, maize, oats.
• The plants which produce corn, when growing in the field; the stalks and ears, or the stalks, ears, and seeds, after reaping and before thrashing.
• A small, hard particle; a grain.
v. t.
• To preserve and season with salt in grains; to sprinkle with salt; to cure by salting; now, specifically, to salt slightly in brine or otherwise; as, to corn beef; to corn a tongue.
• To form into small grains; to granulate; as, to corn gunpowder.
• To feed with corn or (in Sctland) oats; as, to corn horses.
• To render intoxicated; as, ale strong enough to corn one.
Cornage
n.
(Law) Anancient tenure of land, which obliged the tenant to give notice of an invasion by blowing a horn.
Cornamute
n.
• A cornemuse.
Cornbind
n.
(Bot.) A weed that binds stalks of corn, as Convolvulus arvensis, Polygonum Convolvulus.
Corncob
n.
• The cob or axis on which the kernels of Indian corn grow.
Corncrake
n.
(Zool.) A bird (Crex crex or C. pratensis) which frequents grain fields; the European crake or land rail; — called also corn bird.
Corncrib
n.
• A crib for storing corn.
Corncutter
n.
• A machine for cutting up stalks of corn for food of cattle.
• An implement consisting of a long blade, attached to a handle at nearly a right angle, used for cutting down the stalks of Indian corn.
Corndodger
n.
• A cake made of the meal of Indian corn, wrapped in a covering of husks or paper, and baked under the embers.
Cornea
n.
(Anat.) The transparent part of the coat of the eyeball which covers the iris and pupil and admits light to the interior.
Corneal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the cornea.
Cornel
n.
(Bot.) The cornelian cherry (Cornus Mas), a European shrub with clusters of small, greenish flowers, followed by very acid but edible drupes resembling cherries.
• Any species of the genus Cornus, as C. florida, the flowering cornel; C. stolonifera, the osier cornel; C. Canadensis, the dwarf cornel, or bunchberry.
Cornelian
n.
(Min.) Same as Carnelian.
Cornemuse
n.
• A wind instrument nearly identical with the bagpipe.
Corneocalcareous
a.
(Zool.) Formed of a mixture of horny and calcareous materials, as some shells and corals.
• Horny on one side and calcareous on the other.
Corneouss
a.
• Of a texture resembling horn; horny; hard.
Corner
n.
• The point where two converging lines meet; an angle, either external or internal.
• The space in the angle between converging lines or walls which meet in a point; as, the chimney corner.
• An edge or extremity; the part farthest from the center; hence, any quarter or part.
• A secret or secluded place; a remote or out of the way place; a nook.
• Direction; quarter.
• The state of things produced by a combination of persons, who buy up the whole or the available part of any stock or species of property, which compels those who need such stock or property to buy of them at their own price; as, a corner in a railway stock.
v. t.
• To drive into a corner.
• To drive into a position of great difficaulty or hopeless embarrassment; as, to corner a person in argument.
• To get command of (a stock, commodity, etc.), so as to be able to put one's own price on it; as, to corner the shares of a railroad stock; to corner petroleum.
Cornercap
n.
• The chief ornament.
Cornered
p. a.
• 1 Having corners or angles.
• In a possition of great difficulty; brought to bay.
Cornerwise
adv.
• With the corner in front; diagonally; not square.
Cornet
n.
(Mus.) An obsolete rude reed instrument (Ger. Zinken), of the oboe family. (b) A brass instrument, with cupped mouthpiece, and furnished with valves or pistons, now used in bands, and, in place of the trumpet, in orchestras. (c) A certain organ stop or register.
• A cap of paper twisted at the end, used by retailers to inclose small wares.
(Mil.) A troop of cavalry; — so called from its being accompanied by a cornet player.
• The standard of such a troop.
• The lowest grade of commissioned officer in a British cavalry troop, who carried the standard. The office was abolished in 1871.
• A headdress
• A square cap anciently worn as a mark of certain professions.
• A part of a woman's headdress, in the 16th century.
Cornetcy
n.
• The commission or rank of a cornet.
Corneter
n.
• One who blows a cornet.
Corneule
n.
(Zool.) One of the corneas of a compound eye in the invertebrates.
Cornfield
n.
• A field where corn is or has been growing; — in England, a field of wheat, rye, barley, or oats; in America, a field of Indian corn.
Cornfloor
n.
• A thrashing floor.
Cornflower
n.
(Bot.) A conspicuous wild flower (Centaurea Cyanus), growing in grainfields.
Cornic
a.
• Pertaining to, derived from, or resembling, the dogwood (Cornus florida).
Cornice
n.
(Arch.) Any horizontal, molded or otherwise decorated projection which crowns or finishes the part to which it is affixed; as, the cornice of an order, pedestal, door, window, or house.
Corniced
a.
• Having a cornice.
Cornicle
n.
• A little horn.
Cornicular
n.
• A secretary or clerk.
Corniculum
n.
(Anat.) A small hornlike part or process.
Corniferous
a.
(Geol.) Of or pertaining to the lowest period of the Devonian age.(See the Diagram, under Geology.) The Corniferous period has been so called from the numerous seams of hornstone which characterize the later part of the period, as developed in the State of New York.
Cornific
a.
• Producing horns; forming horn.
Cornification
n.
• Conversion into, or formation of, horn; a becoming like horn.
Cornified
a.
(Anat.) Converted into horn; horny.
Corniform
a.
• Having the shape of a horn; horn-shaped.
Cornigerous
a.
• Horned; having horns; as, cornigerous animals.
Cornin
n.
(Chem.) A bitter principle obtained from dogwood (Cornus florida), as a white crystalline substance; — called also cornic acid.
• An extract from dogwood used as a febrifuge.
Corniplume
n.
(Zool.) A hornlike tuft of feathers on the head of some birds.
Cornish
a.
• Of or pertaining to Cornwall, in England.
n.
• The dialect, or the people, of Cornwall.
Cornist
n.
• A performer on the cornet or horn.
Cornloft
n.
• A loft for corn; a granary.
Cornmuse
n.
• A cornemuse.
Cornopean
n.
(Mus.) An obsolete name for the cornet-a-piston.
Cornsheller
n.
• A machine that separates the kernels of corn from the cob.
Cornshuck
n.
• The husk covering an ear of Indian corn.
Cornstalk
n.
• A stalk of Indian corn.
Cornstarch
n.
• Starch made from Indian corn, esp. a fine white flour used for puddings, etc.
Cornu
n
• A horn, or anything shaped like or resembling a horn.
Cornucopia
n.
• The horn of plenty, from which fruits and flowers are represented as issuing. It is an emblem of abundance.
(Bot.) A genus of grasses bearing spikes of flowers resembling the cornucopia in form.
Cornute
v. t.
• To bestow horns upon; to make a cuckold of; to cuckold.
Cornuto
n.
• A man that wears the horns; a cuckold.
Cornutor
n.
• A cuckold maker.
Corny
a.
• Strong, stiff, or hard, like a horn; resembling horn.
a.
• Producing corn or grain; furnished with grains of corn.
• Containing corn; tasting well of malt.
• Tipsy.
Corocore
n.
• A kind of boat of various forms, used in the Indian Archipelago.
Corody
n.
(Old Law) An allowance of meat, drink, or clothing due from an abbey or other religious house for the sustenance of such of the king's servants as he may designate to receive it.
Corol
n.
(Bot.) A corolla.
Corolla
n.
(Bot.) The inner envelope of a flower; the part which surrounds the organs of fructification, consisting of one or more leaves, called petals. It is usually distinguished from the calyx by the fineness of its texture and the gayness of its colors.
Corollaceous
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, a corolla; having the form or texture of a corolla.
Corollary
n.
• That which is given beyond what is actually due, as a garland of flowers in addition to wages; surplus; something added or superfluous.
• Something which follows from the demonstration of a proposition; an additional inference or deduction from a demonstrated proposition; a consequence.
Corollet
n.
(Bot.) A floret in an aggregate flower.
Corolline
a.
• Of or pertaining to a corolla.
Coromandel
n.
(Geol.) The west coast, or a portion of the west coast, of the Bay of Bengal.
Corona
n.
• A crown or garland bestowed among the Romans as a reward for distinguished services.
(Arch.) The projecting part of a Classic cornice, the under side of which is cut with a recess or channel so as to form a drip.
(Anat.) The upper surface of some part, as of a tooth or the skull; a crown.
(Zool.) The shelly skeleton of a sea urchin.
(Astrol.) A peculiar luminous apearance, or aureola, which surrounds the sun, and which is seen only when the sun is totally eclipsed by the moon.
(Bot.) An inner appendage to a petal or a corolla, often forming a special cup, as in the daffodil and jonquil.
• Any crownlike appendage at the top of an organ.
(Meteorol.) A circle, usually colored, seen in peculiar states of the atmosphere around and close to a luminous body, as the sun or moon.
• A peculiar phase of the aurora borealis, formed by the concentration or convergence of luminous beams around the point in the heavens indicated by the direction of the dipping needle.
• A crown or circlet suspended from the roof or vaulting of churches, to hold tapers lighted on solemn occasions. It is sometimes formed of double or triple circlets, arranged pyramidically. Called also corona lucis.
(Mus.) A character [&pause;] called the pause or hold.
Coronal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a corona (in any of the senses).
• Of or pertaining to a king's crown, or coronation.
• Of or pertaining to the top of the head or skull.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the shell of a sea urchin.
n.
• A crown; wreath; garland.
• The frontal bone, over which the ancients wore their coronae or garlands.
Coronamen
n.
(Zool.) The upper margin of a hoof; a coronet.
Coronary
a.
• Of or pertaining to a crown; ferming, or adapted to form, a crown or garland.
(Anat.) Resembling, or situated like, a crown or circlet; as, the coronary arteries and veins of the heart.
n.
• A small bone in the foot of a horse.
Coronation
n.
• The act or solemnity of crowning a sovereign; the act of investing a prince with the insignia of royalty, on his succeeding to the sovereignty.
• The pomp or assembly at a coronation.
Coronel
n.
• A colonel.
n.
(Anc. Armor) The iron head of a tilting spear, divided into two, three, or four blunt points.
Coroner
n.
• An officer of the peace whose principal duty is to inquire, with the help of a jury, into the cause of any violent, sudden or mysterious death, or death in prison, usually on sight of the body and at the place where the death occurred.
Coronet
n.
• An ornamental or honorary headdress, having the shape and character of a crown; particularly, a crown worn as the mark of high rank lower than sovereignty. The word is used by Shakespeare to denote also a kingly crown.
(Far.) The upper part of a horse's hoof, where the horn terminates in skin.
(Anc. Armor) The iron head of a tilting spear; a coronel.
Coroneted
a.
• Wearing, or entitled to wear, a coronet; of noble birth or rank.
Coroniform
a.
• Having the form of a crown or coronet; resembling a crown.
Coronilla
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants related to the clover, having their flowers arranged in little heads or tufts resembling coronets.
Coronis
n.
• In Greek grammar, a sign ['] sometimes placed over a contracted syllable.
• The curved line or flourish at the end of a book or chapter; hence, the end.
Coronoid
a.
(Anat.) Resembling the beak of a crow; as, the coronoid process of the jaw, or of the ulna.
Coronule
n.
(Bot.) A coronet or little crown of a seed; the downy tuft on seeds.
Coroun
v. & n.
• Crown.
Corporal
n.
(Mil.) A noncommissioned officer, next below a sergeant. In the United States army he is the lowest noncomissioned officer in a company of infantry. He places and relieves sentinels.
a.
• Belonging or relating to the body; bodily.
• Having a body or substance; not spiritual; material. In this sense now usually written corporeal.
Corporality
n.
• The state of being or having a body; bodily existence; corporeality; — opposed to spirituality.
• A confraternity; a guild.
Corporally
adv.
• In or with the body; bodily; as, to be corporally present.
Corporalship
n.
(Mil.) A corporal's office.
Corporas
n.
• The corporal, or communion cloth.
Corporate
a.
• Formed into a body by legal enactment; united in an association, and endowed by law with the rights and liabilities of an individual; incorporated; as, a corporate town.
• Belonging to a corporation or incorporated body.
• United; general; collectively one.
v. t.
• To incorporate.
v. i.
• To become incorporated.
Corporately
adv.
• In a corporate capacity; acting as a coprporate body.
• In, or as regarda, the body.
Corporation
n.
• A body politic or corporate, formed and authorized by law to act as a single person, and endowed by law with the capacity of succession; a society having the capacity of transacting business as an individual.
Corporator
n.
• A member of a corporation, esp. one of the original members.
Corporature
n.
• The state of being embodied; bodily existence.
Corporeal
a.
• Having a body; consisting of, or pertaining to, a material body or substance; material; — opposed to spiritual or immaterial.
Corporealism
n.
• Materialism.
Corporealist
n.
• One who denies the reality of spiritual existences; a materialist.
Corporeality
n.
Corporeally
adv.
• In the body; in a bodily form or manner.
Corporealness
n.
• Corporeality; corporeity.
Corporeity
n.
• The state of having a body; the state of being corporeal; materiality.
Corporify
v. t.
• To embody; to form into a body.
Corposant
n.
• St. Elmo's fire.
Corps
n. sing. & pl.
• The human body, whether living or dead.
• A body of men; esp., an organized division of the military establishment; as, the marine corps; the corps of topographical engineers; specifically, an army corps.
• A body or code of laws.
(Eccl.) The land with which a prebend or other ecclesiastical office is endowed.
Corpse
n.
• A human body in general, whether living or dead; — sometimes contemptuosly.
• The dead body of a human being; — used also Fig.
Corpulent
a.
• Very fat; obese.
• Solid; gross; opaque.
Corpulently
adv.
• In a corpulent manner.
Corpus
n.
• A body, living or dead; the corporeal substance of a thing.
Corpuscle
n.
• A minute particle; an atom; a molecule.
(Anat.) A protoplasmic animal cell; esp., such as float free, like blood, lymph, and pus corpuscles; or such as are imbedded in an intercellular matrix, like connective tissue and cartilage corpuscles.
Corpuscular
a.
• Pertaining to, or composed of, corpuscles, or small particles.
Corpuscularian
a.
• Corpuscular.
n.
• An adherent of the corpuscular philosophy.
Corpuscule
n.
• A corpuscle.
Corpusculous
a.
• Corpuscular.
Corrade
v. t.
• To gnaw into; to wear away; to fret; to consume.
(Geol.) To erode, as the bed of a stream.
Corradial
a.
• Radiating to or from the same point.
Corradiate
v. t.
• To converge to one point or focus, as light or rays.
Corradiation
n.
• A conjunction or concentration of rays in one point.
Corral
n.
• A pen for animals; esp., an inclosure made with wagons, by emigrants in the vicinity of hostile Indians, as a place of security for horses, cattle, etc.
v. t.
• To surround and inclose; to coop up; to put into an inclosed space; — primarily used with reference to securing horses and cattle in an inclosure of wagons while traversing the plains, but in the Southwestern United States now colloquially applied to the capturing, securing, or penning of anything.
Corrasion
n.
(Geol.) The erosion of the bed of a stream by running water, principally by attrition of the detritus carried along by the stream, but also by the solvent action of the water.
Corrasive
a.
• Corrosive.
Correct
a.
• Set right, or made straight; hence, conformable to truth, rectitude, or propriety, or to a just standard; nnot faulty or imperfect; free from error; as, correct behavior; correct views.
v. t.
• To make right; to bring to the standard of truth, justice, or propriety; to rectify; as, to correct manners or principles.
• To remove or retrench the faults or errors of; to amend; to set right; as, to correct the proof (that is, to mark upon the margin the changes to be made, or to make in the type the changes so marked).
• To bring back, or attempt to bring back, to propriety in morals; to reprove or punish for faults or deviations from moral rectitude; to chastise; to discipline; as, a child should be corrected for lying.
• To counteract the qualities of one thing by those of another; — said of whatever is wrong or injurious; as, to correct the acidity of the stomach by alkaline preparations.
Correctify
v. t.
• To correct.
Correction
n.
• The act of correcting, or making that right which was wrong; change for the better; amendment; rectification, as of an erroneous statement.
• The act of reproving or punishing, or that which is intended to rectify or to cure faults; punishment; discipline; chastisement.
• That which is substituted in the place of what is wrong; an emendation; as, the corrections on a proof sheet should be set in the margin.
• Abatement of noxious qualities; the counteraction of what is inconvenient or hurtful in its effects; as, the correction of acidity in the stomach.
• An allowance made for inaccuracy in an instrument; as, chronometer correction; compass correction.
Correctional
a.
• Tending to, or intended for, correction; used for correction; as, a correctional institution.
Correctioner
n.
• One who is, or who has been, in the house of correction.
Corrective
a.
• Having the power to correct; tending to rectify; as, corrective penalties.
• Qualifying; limiting.
n.
• That which has the power of correcting, altering, or counteracting what is wrong or injurious; as, alkalies are correctives of acids; penalties are correctives of immoral conduct.
• Limitation; restriction.
Correctly
adv.
• In a correct manner; exactly; acurately; without fault or error.
Correctness
n.
• The state or quality of being correct; as, the correctness of opinions or of manners; correctness of taste; correctness in writing or speaking; the correctness of a text or copy.
Corrector
n.
• One who, or that which, corrects; as, a corrector of abuses; a corrector of the press; an alkali is a corrector of acids.
Correctory
a.
• Containing or making correction; corrective.
Correctress
n.
• A woman who corrects.
Corregidor
n.
• The chief magistrate of a Spanish town.
Correi
n.
• A hollow in the side of a hill, where game usually lies.
Correlatable
a.
• Such as can be correlated; as, correlatable phenomena.
Correlate
v. i.
• To have reciprocal or mutual relations; to be mutually related.
v. t.
• To put in relation with each other; to connect together by the disclosure of a mutual relation; as, to correlate natural phenomens.
n.
• One who, or that which, stands in a reciprocal relation to something else, as father to son; a correlative.
Correlation
n.
• Reciprocal relation; corresponding similarity or parallelism of relation or law; capacity of being converted into, or of giving place to, one another, under certain conditions; as, the correlation of forces, or of zymotic diseases.
Correlative
a.
• Having or indicating a reciprocal relation.
n.
• One who, or that which, stands in a reciprocal relation, or is correlated, to some other person or thing.
(Gram.) The antecedent of a pronoun.
Correlatively
adv.
• In a correlative relation.
Correlativeness
n.
• Quality of being correlative.
Correligionist
n.
• A co-religionist.
Correption
n.
• Chiding; reproof; reproach.
Correspond
v. i.
• To be like something else in the dimensions and arrangement of its parts; — followed by with or to; as, concurring figures correspond with each other throughout.
• To be adapted; to be congruous; to suit; to agree; to fit; to answer; — followed by to.
• To have intercourse or communion; especially, to hold intercourse or to communicate by sending and receiving letters; — followed by with.
Correspondence
n.
• Friendly intercourse; reciprocal exchange of civilities; especially, intercourse between persons by means of letters.
• The letters which pass between correspondents.
• Mutual adaptation, relation, or agreement, of one thing to another; agreement; congruity; fitness; relation.
Correspondency
n.
• Same as Correspondence, 3.
Correspondent
a.
• Suitable; adapted; fit; corresponding; congruous; conformable; in accord or agreement; obedient; willing.
n.
• One with whom intercourse is carried on by letter.
• One who communicates information, etc., by letter or telegram to a newspaper or periodical.
(Com.) One who carries on commercial intercourse by letter or telegram with a person or firm at a distance.
Correspondently
adv.
• In a a corresponding manner; conformably; suitably.
Corresponding
a.
• Answering; conformable; agreeing; suiting; as, corresponding numbers.
• Carrying on intercourse by letters.
Correspondingly
adv.
• In a corresponding manner; conformably.
Corresponsive
a.
• Corresponding; conformable; adapted.
Corridor
n.
(Arch.) A gallery or passageway leading to several apartments of a house.
(Fort.) The covered way lying round the whole compass of the fortifications of a place.
Corrie
n.
• Same as Correi.
Corrigendum
n.
• A fault or error to be corrected.
Corrigent
n.
(Med.) A substance added to a medicine to mollify or modify its action.
Corrigibility
n.
• Quality of being corrigible; capability of being corrected; corrigibleness.
Corrigible
a.
• Capable of being set right, amended, or reformed; as, a corrigible fault.
• Submissive to correction; docile.
• Deserving chastisement; punishable.
• Having power to correct; corrective.
Corrigibleness
n.
• The state or quality of being corrigible; corrigibility.
Corrival
n.
• A fellow rival; a competitor; a rival; also, a companion.
a.
• Having rivaling claims; emulous; in rivalry.
v. i. & t.
• To compete with; to rival.
Corrivalry
n.
• Corivalry.
Corrivalship
n.
• Corivalry.
Corrivate
v. t.
• To cause to flow together, as water drawn from several streams.
Corrivation
n.
• The flowing of different streams into one.
Corroborant
a.
• Strengthening; supporting; corroborating.
n.
• Anything which gives strength or support; a tonic.
Corroborate
v. t.
• To make strong, or to give additional strength to; to strengthen.
• To make more certain; to confirm; to establish.
a.
• Corroborated.
Corroboration
n.
• The act of corroborating, strengthening, or confirming; addition of strength; confirmation; as, the corroboration of an argument, or of information.
• That which corroborates.
Corroborative
a.
• Tending to strengthen of confirm.
n.
• A medicine that strengthens; a corroborant.
Corroboratory
a.
• Tending to strengthen; corroborative; as, corroboratory facts.
Corrode
v. t.
• To eat away by degrees; to wear away or diminish by gradually separating or destroying small particles of, as by action of a strong acid or a caustic alkali.
• To consume; to wear away; to prey upon; to impair.
v. i.
• To have corrosive action; to be subject to corrosion.
Corrodent
a.
• Corrosive.
n.
• Anything that corrodes.
Corrodiate
v. t.
• To eat away by degrees; to corrode.
Corrodibility
n.
• The qualityof being corrodible.
Corrodible
a.
• Capable of being corroded; corrosible.
Corrosibility
n.
• Corrodibility.
Corrosible
a.
• Corrodible.
Corrosibleness
n.
• The quality or state of being corrosible.
Corrosion
n.
• The action or effect of corrosive agents, or the process of corrosive change; as, the rusting of iron is a variety of corrosion.
Corrosive
a.
• Eating away; having the power of gradually wearing, changing, or destroying the texture or substance of a body; as, the corrosive action of an acid. "Corrosive liquors." Grew. "Corrosive famine."Thomson.
• Having the quality of fretting or vexing.
n.
• That which has the quality of eating or wearing away gradually.
• That which has the power of fretting or irritating.
Corroval
n.
• A dark brown substance of vegetable origin, allied to curare, and used by the natives of New Granada as an arrow poison.
Corrovaline
n.
(Chem.) A poisonous alkaloid extracted from corroval, and characterized by its immediate action in paralyzing the heart.
Corrugant
a.
• Having the power of contracting into wrinkles.
Corrugate
a.
• Wrinkled; crumpled; furrowed; contracted into ridges and furrows.
v. t.
• To form or shape into wrinkles or folds, or alternate ridges and grooves, as by drawing, contraction, pressure, bending, or otherwise; to wrinkle; to purse up; as, to corrugate plates of iron; to corrugate the forehead.
Corrugation
n.
• The act corrugating; contraction into wrinkles or alternate ridges and grooves.
Corrugator
n.
(Anat.) A muscle which contracts the skin of the forehead into wrinkles.
Corrugent
a.
(Anat.) Drawing together; contracting; — said of the corrugator.
Corrump
v. t.
• To corrupt.
Corrumpable
a.
• Corruptible.
Corrupt
a.
• Changed from a sound to a putrid state; spoiled; tainted; vitiated; unsound.
• Changed from a state of uprightness, correctness, truth, etc., to a worse state; vitiated; depraved; debased; perverted; as, corrupt language; corrupt judges.
• Abounding in errors; not genuine or correct; as, the text of the manuscript is corrupt.
v. t.
• To change from a sound to a putrid or putrescent state; to make putrid; to putrefy.
• To change from good to bad; to vitiate; to deprave; to pervert; to debase; to defile.
• To draw aside from the path of rectitude and duty; as, to corrupt a judge by a bribe.
• To debase or render impure by alterations or innovations; to falsify; as, to corrupt language; to corrupt the sacred text.
• To waste, spoil, or consume; to make worthless.
v. i.
• To become putrid or tainted; to putrefy; to rot.
• To become vitiated; to lose putity or goodness.
Corrupter
n.
• One who corrupts; one who vitiates or taints; as, a corrupter of morals.
Corruptful
a.
• Tending to corrupt; full of corruption.
Corruptibility
n.
• The quality of being corruptible; the possibility or liability of being corrupted; corruptibleness.
Corruptible
a.
• Capable of being made corrupt; subject to decay.
• Capable of being corrupted, or morally vitiated; susceptible of depravation.
n.
• That which may decay and perish; the human body.
Corruptingly
adv.
• In a manner that corrupts.
Corruption
n.
• The act of corrupting or making putrid, or state of being corrupt or putrid; decomposition or disorganization, in the process of putrefaction; putrefaction; deterioration.
• The product of corruption; putrid matter.
• The act of corrupting or of impairing integrity, virtue, or moral principle; the state of being corrupted or debased; loss of purity or integrity; depravity; wickedness; impurity; bribery.
• The act of changing, or of being changed, for the worse; departure from what is pure, simple, or correct; as, a corruption of style; corruption in language.
Corruptionist
n.
• One who corrupts, or who upholds corruption.
Corruptive
a.
• Having the quality of taining or vitiating; tending to produce corruption.
Corruptless
a.
• Not susceptible of corruption or decay; incorruptible.
Corruptly
adv.
• In a corrupt manner; by means of corruption or corrupting influences; wronfully.
Corruptness
n.
• The quality of being corrupt.
Corruptress
n.
• A woman who corrupts.
Corsac
n.
(Zool.) The corsak.
Corsage
n.
• The waist or bodice of a lady's dress; as. a low corsage.
Corsair
n.
• A pirate; one who cruises about without authorization from any government, to seize booty on sea or land.
• A piratical vessel.
Corsak
n.
(Zool.) A small foxlike mammal (Cynalopex corsac), found in Central Asia.
Corse
n.
• A living body or its bulk.
• A corpse; the dead body of a human being.
Corselet
n.
• Armor for the body, as, the body breastplate and backpiece taken together; — also, used for the entire suit of the day, including breastplate and backpiece, tasset and headpiece.
(Zool.) The thorax of an insect.
Corsepresent
n.
(Engl.Law) An offering made to the church at the interment of a dead body.
Corset
n.
• In the Middle Ages, a gown or basque of which the body was close fitting, worn by both men and women.
• An article of dress inclosing the chest and waist worn (chiefly by women) to support the body or to modify its shape; stays.
v. t.
• To inclose in corsets.
Corslet
n.
• A corselet.
Corsned
n.
(AS. Laws) The morsel of execration; a species of ordeal consisting in the eating of a piece of bread consecrated by imprecation. If the suspected person ate it freely, he was pronounced innocent; but if it stuck in his throat, it was considered as a proof of his guilt.
Cortege
n.
• A train of attendants; a procession.
Cortes
n. pl.
• The legislative assembly, composed of nobility, clergy, and representatives of cities, which in Spain and in Portugal answers, in some measure, to the Parliament of Great Britain.
Cortex
n.
• Bark, as of a tree; hence, an outer covering.
(Med.) Bark; rind; specifically, cinchona bark.
(Anat.) The outer or superficial part of an organ; as, the cortex or gray exterior substance of the brain.
Cortical
a.
• Belonging to, or consisting of, bark or rind; resembling bark or rind; external; outer; superficial; as, the cortical substance of the kidney.
Corticifer
n.
(Zool.) One of the Gorgoniacea; — so called because the fleshy part surrounds a solid axis, like a bark.
Corticiferous
a.
• Producing bark or something that resembling that resembles bark.
(Zool.) Having a barklike cnenchyms.
Corticiform
a.
• Resembling, or having the form of, bark or rind.
Corticine
n.
• A material for carpeting or floor covering, made of ground cork and caoutchouc or India rubber.
Corticose
a.
• Abounding in bark; resembling bark; barky.
Corticous
a.
• Relating to, or resembling, bark; corticose.
Cortile
n.
• An open internal courtyard inclosed by the walls of a large dwelling house or other large and stately building.
Corundum
n.
(Min.) The earth alumina, as found native in a crystalline state, including sapphire, which is the fine blue variety; the oriental ruby, or red sapphire; the oriental amethyst, or purple sapphire; and adamantine spar, the hair-brown variety. It is the hardest substance found native, next to the diamond.
Coruscant
a.
• Glittering in flashes; flashing.
Coruscate
v. i.
• To glitter in flashes; to flash.
Coruscation
n.
• A sudden flash or play of light.
• A flash of intellectual brilliancy.
Corvee
n.
(Feudal Law) An obligation to perform certain services, as the repair of roads, for the lord or sovereign.
Corven
• p. p. of Carve.
Corvetto
n.
(Min.) A curvet.
Corvine
a.
• Of or pertaining to the crow; crowlike.
Corybant
n.
• One of the priests of Cybele in Phrygia. The rites of the Corybants were accompanied by wild music, dancing, etc.
Corybantiasm
n.
(Med.) A kind of frenzy in which the patient is tormented by fantastic visions and want of sleep.
Corybantic
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the Corybantes or their rites; frantic; frenzied; as, a corybantic dance.
Corymb
n.
(Bot.) A flat-topped or convex cluster of flowers, each on its own footstalk, and arising from different points of a common axis, the outermost blossoms expanding first, as in the hawthorn.
• Any flattish flower cluster, whatever be the order of blooming, or a similar shaped cluster of fruit.
Corymbed
a.
(Bot.) Corymbose.
Corymbiferous
a.
(Bot.) Bearing corymbs of flowers or fruit.
Corymbose
a.
(Bot.) Consisting of corymbs, or resembling them in form.
Corymbosely
adv.
• In corymbs.
Coryph
n.
(Drama) A ballet dancer.
Coryphaenoid
a.
(Zool.) Belonging to, or like, the genus Coryphaena.
Coryphene
n.
(Zool.) A fish of the genus Coryphaena.
Corypheus
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) The conductor, chief, or leader of the dramatic chorus; hence, the chief or leader of a party or interest.
Coryphodon
n.
(Palen.) A genus of extinct mammals from the eocene tertiary of Europe and America. Its species varied in size between the tapir and rhinoceros, and were allied to those animals, but had short, plantigrade, five-toed feet, like the elephant.
Coryphodont
a.
(Paleon.) Pertaining to, or resembling, the genus Coryphodon.
Coryza
n.
(Med.) Nasal catarrh.
Coscinomancy
n.
• Divination by means of a suspended sieve.
Coscoroba
n.
(Zool.) A large, white, South American duck, of the genus Cascoroba, resembling a swan.
Cosecant
n.
(Trig.) The secant of the complement of an arc or angle.
Cosening
n.
(O. Eng. Law) Anything done deceitfully, and which could not be properly designated by any special name, whether belonging to contracts or not.
Cosentient
a.
• Perceiving together.
Cosher
v. t.
(Old Law) To levy certain exactions or tribute upon; to lodge and eat at the expense of.
• To treat with hospitality; to pet.
Cosherer
n.
• One who coshers.
Coshering
n.
(Old Law) A feudal prerogative of the lord of the soil entitling him to lodging and food at his tenant's house.
Cosier
n.
• A tailor who botches his work.
Cosignificative
a.
• Having the same signification.
Cosignitary
a.
• Signing some important public document with another or with others; as, a treaty violated by one of the cosignitary powers.
n.
• One who signs a treaty or public document along with others or another; as, the cosignitaries of the treaty of Berlin.
Cosinage
n.
(Law) Collateral relationship or kindred by blood; consanguinity.
• A writ to recover possession of an estate in lands, when a stranger has entered, after the death of the grandfather's grandfather, or other distant collateral relation.
Cosine
n.
(Trig.) The sine of the complement of an arc or angle.
Cosmetic
n.
• Any external application intended to beautify and improve the complexion.
Cosmically
adv.
• With the sun at rising or setting; as, a star is said to rise or set cosmically when it rises or sets with the sun.
• Universally.
Cosmogonist
n.
• One who treats of the origin of the universe; one versed in cosmogony.
Cosmogony
n.
• The creation of the world or universe; a theory or account of such creation; as, the poetical cosmogony of Hesoid; the cosmogonies of Thales, Anaxagoras, and Plato.
Cosmographer
n.
• One who describes the world or universe, including the heavens and the earth.
Cosmographically
adv.
• In a cosmographic manner; in accordance with cosmography.
Cosmography
n.
• A description of the world or of the universe; or the science which teaches the constitution of the whole system of worlds, or the figure, disposition, and relation of all its parts.
Cosmolabe
n.
• An instrument resembling the astrolabe, formerly used for measuring the angles between heavenly bodies; — called also pantacosm.
Cosmolatry
n.
• Worship paid to the world.
Cosmoline
n.
(Chem.) A substance obtained from the residues of the distillation of petroleum, essentially the same as vaseline, but of somewhat stiffer consistency, and consisting of a mixture of the higher paraffines; a kind of petroleum jelly.
Cosmological
a.
• Of or pertaining to cosmology.
Cosmologist
n.
• One who describes the universe; one skilled in cosmology.
Cosmology
n.
• The science of the world or universe; or a treatise relating to the structure and parts of the system of creation, the elements of bodies, the modifications of material things, the laws of motion, and the order and course of nature.
Cosmometry
n.
• The art of measuring the world or the universe.
Cosmoplastic
a.
• Pertaining to a plastic force as operative in the formation of the world independently of God; world-forming.
Cosmopolitanism
n.
• The quality of being cosmopolitan; cosmopolitism.
Cosmopolitical
a.
• Having the character of a cosmopolite.
Cosmopolitism
n.
• The condition or character of a cosmopolite; disregard of national or local peculiarities and prejudices.
Cosmorama
n.
• An exhibition in which a series of views in various parts of the world is seen reflected by mirrors through a series of lenses, with such illumination, etc., as will make the views most closely represent reality.
Cosmoramic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cosmorama.
Cosmos
n.
• The universe or universality of created things; — so called from the order and harmony displayed in it.
• The theory or description of the universe, as a system displaying order and harmony.
Cosmosphere
n.
• An apparattus for showing the position of the earth, at any given time, with respect to the fixed stars. It consist of a hollow glass globe, on which are depicted the stars and constellations, and within which is a terrestrial globe.
Cosmotheism
n.
• Same as Pantheism.
Cosmothetic
a.
(Metaph.) Assuming or positing the actual existence or reality of the physical or external world.
Cosovereign
n.
• A joint sovereign.
Coss
n.
• A Hindoo measure of distance, varying from one and a half to two English miles.
n.
• A thing (only in phrase below).
Cossack
n.
• One of a warlike, pastoral people, skillful as horsemen, inhabiting different parts of the Russian empire and furnishing valuable contingents of irregular cavalry to its armies, those of Little Russia and those of the Don forming the principal divisions.
Cossas
n.
• Plain India muslin, of various qualities and widths.
Cosset
n.
• A lamb reared without the aid of the dam. Hence: A pet, in general.
v. t.
• To treat as a pet; to fondle.
Cost
n.
• A rib; a side; a region or coast.
v. t.
• To require to be given, expended, or laid out therefor, as in barter, purchase, acquisition, etc.; to cause the cost, expenditure, relinquishment, or loss of; as, the ticket cost a dollar; the effort cost his life.
• To require to be borne or suffered; to cause.
n.
• The amount paid, charged, or engaged to be paid, for anything bought or taken in barter; charge; expense; hence, whatever, as labor, self-denial, suffering, etc., is requisite to secure benefitt.
• Loss of any kind; detriment; pain; suffering.
(Law) Expenses incurred in litigation.
Costa
n.
(Anat.) A rib of an animal or a human being.
(Bot.) A rib or vein of a leaf, especially the midrib.
(Zool.) The anterior rib in the wing of an insect.
• One of the riblike longitudinal ridges on the exterior of many corals.
Costage
n.
• Expense; cost.
Costal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the ribs or the sides of the body; as, costal nerves.
(Bot. & Zool.) Relating to a costa, or rib.
Costard
n.
• An apple, large and round like the head.
• The head; — used contemptuously.
Costardmonger
n.
• A costermonger.
Costean
v. i.
• To search after lodes.
Costeaning
n.
• The process by which miners seek to discover metallic lodes. It consist in sinking small pits through the superficial deposits to the solid rock, and then driving from one pit to another across the direction of the vein, in such manner as to cross all the veins between the two pits.
Costellate
a.
• Finely ribbed or costated.
Coster
n.
• One who hawks about fruit, green vegetables, fish, etc.
Costermonger
n.
• An apple seller; a hawker of, or dealer in, any kind of fruit or vegetables; a fruiterer.
Costiferous
a.
(Anat.) Rib-bearing, as the dorsal vertebrae.
Costive
a.
• Retaining fecal matter in the bowels; having too slow a motion of the bowels; constipated.
• Reserved; formal; close; cold.
• Dry and hard; impermeable; unyielding.
Costively
adv.
• In a costive manner.
Costiveness
n.
• An unnatural retention of the fecal matter of the bowels; constipation.
• Inability to express one's self; stiffness.
Costless
a.
• Costing nothing.
Costlewe
a.
• Costly.
Costliness
n.
• The quality of being costy; expensiveness; sumptuousness.
Costly
a.
• Of great cost; expensive; dear.
• Gorgeous; sumptuous.
Costmary
n.
(Bot.) A garden plant (Chrysanthemum Balsamita) having a strong balsamic smell, and nearly allied to tansy. It is used as a pot herb and salad plant and in flavoring ale and beer. Called also alecost.
Costotome
n.
• An instrument (chisel or shears) to cut the ribs and open the thoracic cavity, in post-mortem examinations and dissections.
Costrel
n.
• A bottle of leather, earthenware, or wood, having ears by which it was suspended at the side.
Costume
n.
• Dress in general; esp., the distinctive style of dress of a people, class, or period.
• Such an arrangement of accessories, as in a picture, statue, poem, or play, as is appropriate to the time, place, or other circumstances represented or described.
• A character dress, used at fancy balls or for dramatic purposes.
Costumer
n.
• One who makes or deals in costumes, as for theaters, fancy balls, etc.
Cosupreme
n.
• A partaker of supremacy; one jointly supreme.
Cosurety
n.
• One who is surety with another.
Cot
n.
• A small house; a cottage or hut.
• A pen, coop, or like shelter for small domestic animals, as for sheep or pigeons; a cote.
• A cover or sheath; as, a roller cot (the clothing of a drawing roller in a spinning frame); a cot for a sore finger.
• A small, rudely-formed boat.
n.
• A sleeping place of limited size; a little bed; a cradle; a piece of canvas extended by a frame, used as a bed.
Cotangent
n.
(Trig.) The tangent of the complement of an arc or angle.
Cotarnine
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline substance, C12H13NO3, obtained as a product of the decomposition of narcotine. It has weak basic properties, and is usually regarded as an alkaloid.
Cote
n.
• A cottage or hut.
• A shed, shelter, or inclosure for small domestic animals, as for sheep or doves.
v. t.
• To go side by side with; hence, to pass by; to outrun and get before; as, a dog cotes a hare.
v. t.
• To quote.
Cotemporaneous
a.
• Living or being at the same time; contemporaneous.
Cotemporary
a.
• Living or being at the same time; contemporary.
n.
• One who lives at the same time with another; a contemporary.
Cotenant
n.
• A tenant in common, or a joint tenant.
Coterie
n.
• A set or circle of persons who meet familiarly, as for social, literary, or other purposes; a clique.
Coterminous
a.
• Bordering; conterminous; — followed by with.
Cotgare
n.
• Refuse wool.
Cothurn
n.
• A buskin anciently used by tragic actors on the stage; hence, tragedy in general.
Cothurnus
n.
• Same as Cothurn.
Coticular
a.
• Pertaining to whetstones; like or suitable for whetstones.
Cotidal
a.
• Marking an equality in the tides; having high tide at the same time.
Cotinga
n.
(Zool.) A bird of the family Cotingidae, including numerous bright-colored South American species; — called also chatterers.
Cotland
n.
• Land appendant to a cot or cottage, or held by a cottager or cotter.
Cotquean
n.
• A man who busies himself with affairs which properly belong to women.
• A she-cuckold; a cucquean; a henhussy.
Cotqueanity
n.
• The condition, character, or conduct of a cotquean.
Cotrustee
n.
• A joint trustee.
Cotswold
n.
• An open country abounding in sheepcotes, as in the Cotswold hills, in Gloucestershire, England.
Cottage
n.
• A small house; a cot; a hut.
Cottaged
a.
• Set or covered with cottages.
Cottagely
a.
• Cottagelike; suitable for a cottage; rustic.
Cottager
n.
• One who lives in a cottage.
(Law) One who lives on the common, without paying any rent, or having land of his own.
Cottelene
n.
• A product from cottonseed, used as lard.
Cotter
n.
• A piece of wood or metal, commonly wedge-shaped, used for fastening together parts of a machine or structure. It is driven into an opening through one or all of the parts. In the United States a cotter is commonly called a key.
• A toggle.
v. t.
• To fasten with a cotter.
Cottier
n.
• In Great Britain and Ireland, a person who hires a small cottage, with or without a plot of land. Cottiers commonly aid in the work of the landlord's farm.
Cottise
n.
(Her.) A diminutive of the bendlet, containing one half its area or one quarter the area of the bend. When a single cottise is used alone it is often called a cost.
Cottised
a.
(Her.) Set between two cottises, — said of a bend; or between two barrulets, — said of a bar or fess.
Cottoid
a.
(Zool.) Like a fish of the genus Cottus.
n.
• A fish belonging to, or resembling, the genus Cottus.
Cotton
n.
• A soft, downy substance, resembling fine wool, consisting of the unicellular twisted hairs which grow on the seeds of the cotton plant. Long-staple cotton has a fiber sometimes almost two inches long; short-staple, from two thirds of an inch to an inch and a half.
• The cotton plant.
• Cloth made of cotton.
v. i.
• To rise with a regular nap, as cloth does.
• To go on prosperously; to succeed.
• To unite; to agree; to make friends; — usually followed by with.
• To take a liking to; to stick to one as cotton; — used with to.
Cottonade
n.
• A somewhat stoun and thick fabric of cotton.
Cottonary
a.
• Relating to, or composed of, cotton; cottony.
Cottonous
a.
• Resembling cotton.
Cottontail
n.
(Zool.) The American wood rabbit (Lepus sylvaticus); — also called Molly cottontail.
Cottonwood
n.
(Bot.) An American tree of the genus Populus or polar, having the seeds covered with abundant cottonlike hairs; esp., the P. monilifera and P. angustifolia of the Western United States.
Cottony
a.
• Covered with hairs or pubescence, like cotton; downy; nappy; woolly.
• Of or pertaining to cotton; resembling cotton in appearance or character; soft, like cotton.
Cottrel
n.
• A trammel, or hook to support a pot over a fire.
Cotyledon
n.
(Anat.) One of the patches of villi found in some forms of placenta.
(Bot.) A leaf borne by the caulicle or radicle of an embryo; a seed leaf.
Cotyledonal
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a cotyledon.
Cotyledonary
a.
• Having a cotyledon; tufted; as, the cotyledonary placenta of the cow.
Cotyledonous
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cotyledon or cotyledons; having a seed lobe.
Cotyliform
a.
(Zool.) Shaped like a cotyle or a cup.
Cotyligerous
a.
(Zool.) Having cotyles.
Cotyloid
a.
(Anat.) Shaped like a cup; as, the cotyloid cavity, which receives the head of the thigh bone.
• Pertaining to a cotyloid cavity; as, the cotyloid ligament, or notch.
Couage
v. t.
• To inspire with courage.
Coucal
n.
(Zool.) A large, Old World, ground cuckoo of the genus Centropus, of several species.
Couch
v. t.
• To lay upon a bed or other resting place.
• To arrauge or dispose as in a bed; — sometimes followed by the reflexive pronoun.
• To lay or deposit in a bed or layer; to bed.
(Paper Making) To transfer (as sheets of partly dried pulp) from the wire clotch mold to a felt blanket, for further drying.
• To conceal; to include or involve darkly.
• To arrange; to place; to inlay.
• To put into some form of language; to express; to phrase; — used with in and under.
(Med.) To treat by pushing down or displacing the opaque lens with a needle; as, to couch a cataract.
v. i.
• To lie down or recline, as on a bed or other place of rest; to repose; to lie.
• To lie down for concealment; to hide; to be concealed; to be included or involved darkly.
• To bend the body, as in reverence, pain, labor, etc.; to stoop; to crouch.
n.
• A bed or place for repose or sleep; particularly, in the United States, a lounge.
• Any place for repose, as the lair of a beast, etc.
• A mass of steeped barley spread upon a floor to germinate, in malting; or the floor occupied by the barley; as, couch of malt.
(Painting & Gilding) A preliminary layer, as of color, size, etc.
Couchancy
n.
• State of lying down for repose.
Couchant
a.
• Lying down with head erect; squatting.
(Her.) Lying down with the head raised, which distinguishes the posture of couchant from that of dormant, or sleeping; — said of a lion or other beast.
Couche
a.
(Her.) Not erect; inclined; — said of anything that is usually erect, as an escutcheon.
• Lying on its side; thus, a chevron couche is one which emerges from one side of the escutcheon and has its apex on the opposite side, or at the fess point.
Couched
a.
(Her.) Same as Couch.
Couchee
n.
• A reception held at the time of going to bed, as by a sovereign or great prince.
Coucher
n.
• One who couches.
(Paper Manuf.) One who couches paper.
(O. Eng. Law) A factor or agent resident in a country for traffic.
Couching
n.
(Med.) The operation of putting down or displacing the opaque lens in cataract.
• Embroidering by laying the materials upon the surface of the foundation, instead of drawing them through.
Couchless
a.
• Having no couch or bed.
Coudage
n.
• Mass of clouds; cloudiness.
Coudee
n.
• A measure of length; the distance from the elbow to the end of the middle finger; a cubit.
Cougar
n.
(Zool.) An American feline quadruped (Felis concolor), resembling the African panther in size and habits. Its color is tawny, without spots; hence writers often called it the American lion. Called also puma, panther, mountain lion, and catamount.
Cough
v. i.
• To expel air, or obstructing or irritating matter, from the lungs or air passages, in a noisy and violent manner.
v. t.
• To expel from the lungs or air passages by coughing; — followed by up; as, to cough up phlegm.
• To bring to a specified state by coughing; as, he coughed himself hoarse.
n.
• A sudden, noisy, and violent expulsion of air from the chest, caused by irritation in the air passages, or by the reflex action of nervous or gastric disorder, etc.
• The more or less frequent repetition of coughing, constituting a symptom of disease.
Cougher
n.
• One who coughs.
Could
imp.
• Was, should be, or would be, able, capable, or susceptible. Used as an auxiliary, in the past tense or in the conditional present.
Coulee
n.
• A stream
(Geol.) a stream of lava. Also, in the Western United States, the bed of a stream, even if dry, when deep and having inclined sides; distinguished from a canon, which has precipitous sides.
Coulisse
n.
• A piece of timber having a groove in which something glides.
• One of the side scenes of the stage in a theater, or the space included between the side scenes.
Couloir
n.
• A deep gorge; a gully.
(Hydraul. Engin.) A dredging machine for excavating canals, etc.
Coulomb
n.
(Physics) The standard unit of quantity in electrical measurements. It is the quantity of electricity conveyed in one second by the current produced by an electro-motive force of one volt acting in a circuit having a resistance of one ohm, or the quantitty transferred by one ampere in one second. Formerly called weber.
Coulter
n.
• Same as Colter.
Coulterneb
n.
(Zool.) The puffin.
Coumaric
a.
• Relating to, derived from, or like, the Dipterix odorata, a tree of Guiana.
Coumarin
n.
(Chem.) The concrete essence of the tonka bean, the fruit of Dipterix (formerly Coumarouna) odorata and consisting essentially of coumarin proper, which is a white crystalline substance, C9H6O2, of vanilla-like odor, regarded as an anhydride of coumaric acid, and used in flavoring. Coumarin in also made artificially.
Council
n.
• An assembly of men summoned or convened for consultation, deliberation, or advice; as, a council of physicians for consultation in a critical case.
• A body of man elected or appointed to constitute an advisory or a legislative assembly; as, a governor's council; a city council.
• Act of deliberating; deliberation; consultation.
Councilist
n.
• One who belong to a council; one who gives an opinion.
Councilman
n.
• A member of a council, especially of the common council of a city; a councilor.
Councilor
n.
• A member of a council.
Counsel
n.
• Interchange of opinions; mutual advising; consultation.
• Examination of consequences; exercise of deliberate judgment; prudence.
• Result of consultation; advice; instruction.
• Deliberate purpose; design; intent; scheme; plan.
• A secret opinion or purpose; a private matter.
• One who gives advice, especially in legal matters; one professionally engaged in the trial or management of a cause in court; also, collectively, the legal advocates united in the management of a case; as, the defendant has able counsel.
v. t.
• To give advice to; to advice, admonish, or instruct, as a person.
• To advise or recommend, as an act or course.
Counselable
a.
• Willing to receive counsel or follow advice.
• Suitable to be advised; advisable, wise.
Counselor
n.
• One who counsels; an adviser.
• A member of council; one appointed to advise a sovereign or chief magistrate.
• One whose profession is to give advice in law, and manage causes for clients in court; a barrister.
Counselorship
n.
• The function and rank or office of a counselor.
Count
v. t.
• To tell or name one by one, or by groups, for the purpose of ascertaining the whole number of units in a collection; to number; to enumerate; to compute; to reckon.
• To place to an account; to ascribe or impute; to consider or esteem as belonging.
• To esteem; to account; to reckon; to think, judge, or consider.
v. i.
• To number or be counted; to possess value or carry weight; hence, to increase or add to the strength or influence of some party or interest; as, every vote counts; accidents count for nothing.
• To reckon; to rely; to depend; — with on or upon.
• To take account or note; — with
(Eng. Law) To plead orally; to argue a matter in court; to recite a count.
n.
• The act of numbering; reckoning; also, the number ascertained by counting.
• An object of interest or account; value; estimation.
(Law) A formal statement of the plaintiff's case in court; in a more technical and correct sense, a particular allegation or charge in a declaration or indictment, separately setting forth the cause of action or prosecution.
n.
• A nobleman on the continent of Europe, equal in rank to an English earl.
Countable
a.
• Capable of being numbered.
Countenance
v. t.
• To encourage; to favor; to approve; to aid; to abet.
• To make a show of; to pretend.
Countenancer
n.
• One who countenances, favors, or supports.
Counter
• A prefix meaning contrary, opposite, in opposition; as, counteract, counterbalance, countercheck.
n.
• One who counts, or reckons up; a calculator; a reckoner.
• A piece of metal, ivory, wood, or bone, used in reckoning, in keeping account of games, etc.
• Money; coin; — used in contempt.
• A prison; either of two prisons formerly in London.
• A telltale; a contrivance attached to an engine, printing press, or other machine, for the purpose of counting the revolutions or the pulsations.
n.
• A table or board on which money is counted and over which business is transacted; a long, narrow table or bench, on which goods are laid for examination by purchasers, or on which they are weighed or measured.
adv.
• Contrary; in opposition; in an opposite direction; contrariwise; — used chiefly with run or go.
• In the wrong way; contrary to the right course; as, a hound that runs counter.
• At or against the front or face.
a.
• Contrary; opposite; contrasted; opposed; adverse; antagonistic; as, a counter current; a counter revolution; a counter poison; a counter agent; counter fugue.
n.
(Naut.) The after part of a vessel's body, from the water line to the stern, — below and somewhat forward of the stern proper.
(Mus.) Same as Contra. Formerly used to designate any under part which served for contrast to a principal part, but now used as equivalent to counter tenor.
(Far.) The breast, or thet part of a horse between the shoulders and under the neck.
• The back leather or heel part of a boot.
n.
• An encounter.
v. i.
(Boxing) To return a blow while receiving one, as in boxing.
Counteract
v. t.
• To act in opposition to; to hinder, defeat, or frustrate, by contrary agency or influence; as, to counteract the effect of medicines; to counteract good advice.
Counteractibely
adv.
• By counteraction.
Counteraction
n.
• Action in opposition; hindrance resistance.
Counteractive
a.
• Tending to counteract.
n.
• One who, or that which, counteracts.
Counterbalance
v. t.
• To oppose with an equal weight or power; to counteract the power or effect of; to countervail; to equiponderate; to balance.
n.
• A weight, power, or agency, acting against or balancing another
• A mass of metal in one side of a driving wheel or fly wheel, to balance the weight of a crank pin, etc., on the opposite side of the wheel
• A counterpoise to balance the weight of anything, as of a drawbridge or a scale beam.
Counterbore
n.
• A flat-bottomed cylindrical enlargement of the mouth of a hole, usually of slight depth, as for receiving a cylindrical screw head.
• A kind of pin drill with the cutting edge or edges normal to the axis; — used for enlarging a hole, or for forming a flat-bottomed recess at its mouth.
v. t.
• To form a counterbore in, by boring, turning, or drilling; to enlarge, as a hole, by means of a counterbore.
Counterbrace
v. t.
(Naut.) To brace in opposite directions; as, to counterbrace the yards, i. e., to brace the head yards one way and the after yards another.
(Engin.) To brace in such a way that opposite strains are resisted; to apply counter braces to.
Counterbuff
v. t.
• To strike or drive back or in an opposite direction; to stop by a blow or impulse in front.
n.
• A blow in an opposite direction; a stroke that stops motion or cause a recoil.
Countercast
n.
• A trick; a delusive contrivance.
Countercaster
n.
• A caster of accounts; a reckoner; a bookkeeper; — used conteptuously.
Counterchange
v. t.
• To give and receive; to cause to change places; to exchange.
• To checker; to diversify, as in heraldic counterchanging.
n.
• Exchange; reciprocation.
Counterchanged
a.
• Exchanged.
(Her.) Having the tinctures exchanged mutually; thus, if the field is divided palewise, or and azure, and cross is borne counterchanged, that part of the cross which comes on the azure side will be or, and that on the or side will be azure.
Countercharge
n.
• An opposing charge.
Countercharm
v. t.
• To destroy the effect of a charm upon.
n.
• That which has the power of destroying the effect of a charm.
Countercheck
v. t.
• To oppose or check by some obstacle; to check by a return check.
n.
• A check; a stop; a rebuke, or censure to check a reprover.
• Any force or device designed to restrain another restraining force; a check upon a check.
Counterclaim
n.
(Law) A claim made by a person as an offset to a claim made on him.
Countercurrent
a.
• Running in an opposite direction.
n.
• A current running in an opposite direction to the main current.
Counterdraw
v. t.
• To copy, as a design or painting, by tracing with a pencil on oiled paper, or other transparent substance.
Counterfeit
a.
• Representing by imitation or likeness; having a resemblance to something else; portrayed.
• Fabricated in imitation of something else, with a view to defraud by passing the false copy for genuine or original; as, counterfeit antiques; counterfeit coin.
• Assuming the appearance of something; false; spurious; deceitful; hypocritical; as, a counterfeit philanthropist.
n.
• That which resembles or is like another thing; a likeness; a portrait; a counterpart.
• That which is made in imitation of something, with a view to deceive by passing the false for the true; as, the bank note was a counterfeit.
• One who pretends to be what he is not; one who personates another; an impostor; a cheat.
v. t.
• To imitate, or put on a semblance of; to mimic; as, to counterfeit the voice of another person.
• To imitate with a view to deceiving, by passing the copy for that which is original or genuine; to forge; as, to counterfeit the signature of another, coins, notes, etc.
v. i.
• To carry on a deception; to dissemble; to feign; to pretend.
• To make counterfeits.
Counterfeiter
n.
• One who counterfeits; one who copies or imitates; especially, one who copies or forges bank notes or coin; a forger.
• One who assumes a false appearance or semblance; one who makes false pretenses.
Counterfeitly
adv.
• By forgery; falsely.
Counterfesance
n.
• The act of forging; forgery.
Counterfleury
a.
(Her.) Counterflory.
Counterflory
a.
(Her.) Adorned with flowers (usually fleurs-de-lis) so divided that the tops appear on one side and the bottoms on the others; — said of any ordinary.
Counterfoil
n.
• That part of a tally, formerly in the exchequer, which was kept by an officer in that court, the other, called the stock, being delivered to the person who had lent the king money on the account; — called also counterstock.
• The part of a writing (as the stub of a bank check) in which are noted the main particulars contained in the corresponding part, which has been issued.
Counterforce
n.
• An opposing force.
Counterfort
n.
(Fort.) A kind of buttress of masonry to strengthen a revetment wall.
• A spur or projection of a mountain.
Countergage
n.
(Carp.) An adjustable gage, with double points for transferring measurements from one timber to another, as the breadth of a mortise to the place where the tenon is to be made.
Counterguard
n.
(Fort.) A low outwork before a bastion or ravelin, consisting of two lines of rampart parallel to the faces of the bastion, and protecting them from a breaching fire.
Counterirritate
v. t.
(Med.) To produce counter irritation in; to treat with one morbid process for the purpose of curing another.
Counterjumper
n.
• A salesman in a shop; a shopman; — used contemtuously.
Counterman
n.
• A man who attends at the counter of a shop to sell goods.
Countermand
v. t.
• To revoke (a former command); to cancel or rescind by giving an order contrary to one previously given; as, to countermand an order for goods.
• To prohibit; to forbid.
• To oppose; to revoke the command of.
n.
• A contrary order; revocation of a former order or command.
Countermandable
a.
• Capable of being countermanded; revocable.
Countermarch
v. i.
(Mil.) To march back, or to march in reversed order.
n.
• A marching back; retrocession.
(Mil.) An evolution by which a body of troops change front or reverse the direction of march while retaining the same men in the front rank; also, a movement by which the rear rank becomes the front one, either with or without changing the right to the left.
• A change of measures; alteration of conduct.
Countermark
n.
• A mark or token added to those already existing, in order to afford security or proof; as, an additional or special mark put upon a package of goods belonging to several persons, that it may not be opened except in the presence of all; a mark added to that of an artificer of gold or silver work by the Goldsmiths' Company of London, to attest the standard quality of the gold or silver; a mark added to an ancient coin or medal, to show either its change of value or that it was taken from an enemy.
(Far.) An artificial cavity made in the teeth of horses that have outgrown their natural mark, to disguise their age.
v. t.
• To apply a countenmark to; as, to countermark silverware; to countermark a horse's teeth.
Countermine
n.
(Mil.) An underground gallery excavated to intercept and destroy the mining of an enemy.
• A stratagem or plot by which another sratagem or project is defeated.
v. t.
(Mil.) To oppose by means or a countermine; to intercept with a countermine.
• To frustrate or counteract by secret measures.
v. i.
• To make a countermine or counterplot; to plot secretly.
Countermove
v. t. & i.
• To move in a contrary direction to.
Countermure
n.
(Fort.) A wall raised behind another, to supply its place when breached or destroyed. Cf. Contramure.
v. t.
• To fortify with a wall behind another wall.
Counternatural
a.
• Contrary to nature.
Counterpane
n.
• A coverlet for a bed, — originally stitched or woven in squares or figures.
n.
(O. Law) A duplicate part or copy of an indenture, deed, etc., corresponding with the original; — now called counterpart.
Counterpart
n.
• A part corresponding to another part; anything which answers, or corresponds, to another; a copy; a duplicate; a facsimile.
(Law) One of two corresponding copies of an instrument; a duplicate.
• A person who closely resembles another.
• A thing may be applied to another thing so as to fit perfectly, as a seal to its impression; hence, a thing which is adapted to another thing, or which suplements it; that which serves to complete or complement anything; hence, a person or thing having qualities lacking in another; an opposite.
Counterpassant
a.
(Her.) Passant in opposite directions; — said of two animals.
Counterplead
v. t.
• To plead the contrary of; to plead against; to deny.
Counterplot
v. t.
• To oppose, as another plot, by plotting; to attempt to frustrate, as a stratagem, by stratagem.
n.
• A plot or artifice opposed to another.
Counterpoint
n.
• An opposite point
n.
(Mus.) The setting of note against note in harmony; the adding of one or more parts to a given canto fermo or melody
• The art of polyphony, or composite melody, i. e., melody not single, but moving attended by one or more related melodies.
• Music in parts; part writing; harmony; polyphonic music.
n.
• A coverlet; a cover for a bed, often stitched or broken into squares; a counterpane.
Counterpoise
v. t.
• To act against with equal weight; to equal in weght; to balance the weight of; to counterbalance.
• To act against with equal power; to balance.
n.
• A weight sufficient to balance another, as in the opposite scale of a balance; an equal weight.
• An equal power or force acting in opposition; a force sufficient to balance another force.
• The relation of two weights or forces which balance each other; equilibrum; equiponderance.
Counterpole
n.
• The exact opposite.
Counterponderate
v. t.
• TO equal in weight; to counterpoise; to equiponderate.
Counterprove
v. t.
• To take a counter proof of, or a copy in reverse, by taking an impression directly from the face of an original.
Counterrolment
n.
• A counter account.
Counterscale
n.
• Counterbalance; balance, as of one scale against another.
Counterscarf
n.
(Fort.) The exterior slope or wall of the ditch; — sometimes, the whole covered way, beyond the ditch, with its parapet and glacis; as, the enemy have lodged themselves on the counterscarp.
Counterseal
v. t.
• To seal or ratify with another or others.
Countersecure
v. t.
• To give additional security to or for.
Countershaft
n.
(Mach.) An intermediate shaft; esp., one which receives motion from a line shaft in a factory and transmits it to a machine.
Countersign
v. t.
• To sign on the opposite side of (an instrument or writing); hence, to sign in addition to the signature of a principal or superior, in order to attest the authenticity of a writing.
a.
• The signature of a secretary or other officer to a writing signed by a principal or superior, to attest its authenticity.
(Mil.) A private signal, word, or phrase, which must be given in order to pass a sentry; a watchword.
Countersink
v. t.
• To chamfer or form a depression around the top of (a hole in wood, metal, etc.) for the reception of the head of a screw or bolt below the surface, either wholly or in part; as, to countersink a hole for a screw.
• To cause to sink even with or below the surface; as, to countersink a screw or bolt into woodwork.
n.
• An enlargement of the upper part of a hole, forming a cavity or depression for receiving the head of a screw or bolt.
• A drill or cutting tool for countersinking holes.
Counterstand
n.
• Resistance; opposition; a stand against.
Counterstep
n.
• A contrary method of procedure; opposite course of action.
Counterstroke
n.
• A stroke or blow in return.
Countersunk
p. p. & a.
• Chamfered at the top; — said of a hole.
• Sunk into a chamfer; as, a countersunk bolt.
• Beveled on the lower side, so as to fit a chamfered countersink; as, a countersunk nailhead.
Countersway
n.
• A swaying in a contrary direction; an opposing influence.
Counterterm
n.
• A term or word which is the opposite of, or antithesis to, another; an antonym; — the opposite of synonym; as, "foe" is the counterterm of "friend".
Countertime
n.
(Man.) The resistance of a horse, that interrupts his cadence and the measure of his manege, occasioned by a bad horseman, or the bad temper of the horse.
• Resistance; opposition.
Countertrippant
a.
(Her.) Trippant in opposite directions.
Countertripping
a.
(Her.) Same as Countertrippant.
Counterturn
n.
• The critical moment in a play, when, contrary to expectation, the action is embroiled in new difficulties.
Countervail
v. t.
• To act against with equal force, power, or effect; to thwart or overcome by such action; to furnish an equivalent to or for; to counterbalance; to compensate.
n.
• Power or value sufficient to obviate any effect; equal weight, strength, or value; equivalent; compensation; requital.
Counterview
n.
• An opposite or opposing view; opposition; a posture in which two persons front each other.
• A position in which two dissimilar things illustrate each other by opposition; contrast.
Countervote
v. t.
• To vote in opposition ti; to balance or overcome by viting; to outvote.
Counterwalt
v. t.
• To wait or watch for; to be on guard against.
Counterweigh
v. t.
• To weigh against; to counterbalance.
Counterwheel
v. t.
(Mil.) To cause to wheel or turn in an opposite direction.
Counterwork
v. t.
• To work in oppositeion to; to counteract.
Countess
n.
• The wife of an earl in the British peerage, or of a count in the Continental nobility; also, a lady possessed of the same dignity in her own right.
Countless
a.
• Incapable of being counted; not ascertainable; innumerable.
Countor
n.
(O. Eng. Law) An advocate or professional pleader; one who counted for his client, that is, orally pleaded his cause.
Countreplete
v. t.
• To counterplead.
Countretaille
n.
• A counter tally; correspondence (in sound).
Countrified
p. a.
• Having the appearance and manners of a rustic; rude.
Countrify
v. t.
• To give a rural appearance to; to cause to appear rustic.
Country
n.
• A tract of land; a region; the territory of an independent nation; (as distinguished from any other region, and with a personal pronoun) the region of one's birth, permanent residence, or citizenship.
• Rural regions, as opposed to a city or town.
• The inhabitants or people of a state or a region; the populace; the public. Hence: (a) One's constituents. (b) The whole body of the electors of state; as, to dissolve Parliament and appeal to the country.
(Law) A jury, as representing the citizens of a country.
• The inhabitants of the district from which a jury is drawn.
(Mining.) The rock through which a vein runs.
a.
• Pertaining to the regions remote from a city; rural; rustic; as, a country life; a country town; the country party, as opposed to city.
• Destitute of refinement; rude; unpolished; rustic; not urbane; as, country manners.
• Pertaining, or peculiar, to one's own country.
Countryman
n.
• One born in the same country with another; a compatriot; — used with a possessive pronoun.
• One who dwells in the country, as distinguished from a townsman or an inhabitant of a city; a rustic; a husbandman or farmer.
Countryside
n.
• A particular rural district; a country neighborhood.
Countrywoman
n.
• A woman born, or dwelling, in the country, as opposed to the city; a woman born or dwelling in the same country with another native or inhabitant.
Counttenance
n.
• Appearance or expression of the face; look; aspect; mien.
• The face; the features.
• Approving or encouraging aspect of face; hence, favor, good will, support; aid; encouragement.
• Superficial appearance; show; pretense.
County
n.
• An earldom; the domain of a count or earl.
• A circuit or particular portion of a state or kingdom, separated from the rest of the territory, for certain purposes in the administration of justice and public affairs; — called also a shire.
• A count; an earl or lord.
Coup
n.
• A sudden stroke; an unexpected device or stratagem; — a term used in various ways to convey the idea of promptness and force.
Coupe
n.
• The front compartment of a French diligence; also, the front compartment (usually for three persons) of a car or carriage on British railways.
• A four-wheeled close carriage for two persons inside, with an outside seat for the driver; — so called because giving the appearance of a larger carriage cut off.
Couped
a.
(Her.) Cut off smoothly, as distinguished from erased; — used especially for the head or limb of an animal.
Coupee
n.
• A motion in dancing, when one leg is a little bent, and raised from the floor, and with the other a forward motion is made.
Couple
n.
• That which joins or links two things together; a bond or tie; a coupler.
• Two of the same kind connected or considered together; a pair; a brace. "A couple of shepherds." Sir P. Sidney. "A couple of drops" Adduson. "A couple of miles." Dickens. "A couple of weeks." Carlyle.
• A male and female associated together; esp., a man and woman who are married or betrothed.
(Elec.) One of the pairs of plates of two metals which compose a voltaic battery; — called a voltaic couple or galvanic couple.
(Mech.) Two rotations, movements, etc., which are equal in amount but opposite in direction, and acting along parallel lines or around parallel axes.
v. t.
• To link or tie, as one thing to another; to connect or fasten together; to join.
• To join in wedlock; to marry.
v. i.
• To come together as male and female; to copulate.
Couplement
n.
• Union; combination; a coupling; a pair.
Coupler
n.
• One who couples; that which couples, as a link, ring, or shackle, to connect cars.
Couplet
n.
• Two taken together; a pair or couple; especially two lines of verse that rhyme with each other.
Coupling
n.
• The act of bringing or coming together; connection; sexual union.
(Mach.) A device or contrivance which serves to couple or connect adjacent parts or objects; as, a belt coupling, which connects the ends of a belt; a car coupling, which connects the cars in a train; a shaft coupling, which connects the ends of shafts.
Coupon
n.
(Com.) A certificate of interest due, printed at the bottom of transferable bonds (state, railroad, etc.), given for a term of years, designed to be cut off and presented for payment when the interest is due; an interest warrant.
• A section of a ticket, showing the holder to be entitled to some specified accomodation or service, as to a passage over a designated line of travel, a particular seat in a theater, or the like.
Coupure
n.
(Fort.) A passage cut through the glacis to facilitate sallies by the besieged.
Courage
n.
• The heart; spirit; temper; disposition.
• Heart; inclination; desire; will.
• That quality of mind which enables one to encounter danger and difficulties with firmness, or without fear, or fainting of heart; valor; boldness; resolution.
Courageous
a.
• Possessing, or characterized by, courage; brave; bold.
Courageously
adv.
• In a courageous manner.
Courageousness
n.
• The quality of being courageous; courage.
Courant
a.
(Her.) Represented as running; — said of a beast borne in a coat of arms.
n.
• A piece of music in triple time; also, a lively dance; a coranto.
• A circulating gazette of news; a newspaper.
Couranto
n.
• A sprightly dance; a coranto; a courant.
Courap
n.
(Med.) A skin disease, common in India, in which there is perpetual itching and eruption, esp. of the groin, breast, armpits, and face.
Courb
a.
• Curved; rounded.
v. i.
• To bend; to stop; to bow.
Courche
n.
• A square piece of linen used formerly by women instead of a cap; a kerchief.
Courier
n.
• A messenger sent with haste to convey letters or dispatches, usually on public busuness.
• An attendant on travelers, whose business it is to make arrangements for their convenience at hotels and on the way.
Courlan
n.
(Zool.) A South American bird, of the genus Aramus, allied to the rails.
Course
n.
• The act of moving from one point to another; progress; passage.
• THe ground or path traversed; track; way.
• Motion, considered as to its general or resultant direction or to its goal; line progress or advance.
• Progress from point to point without change of direction; any part of a progress from one place to another, which is in a straight line, or on one direction; as, a ship in a long voyage makes many courses; a course measured by a surveyor between two stations; also, a progress without interruption or rest; a heat; as, one course of a race.
• Motion considered with reference to manner; or derly progress; procedure in a certain line of thought or action; as, the course of an argument.
• Customary or established sequence of evants; re currence of events according to natural laws.
• Method of procedure; manner or way of conducting; conduct; behavior.
• A series of motions or acts arranged in order; a succession of acts or practices connectedly followed; as, a course of medicine; a course of lectures on chemistry.
• The succession of one to another in office or duty; order; turn.
• That part of a meal served at one time, with its accompaniments.
(Arch.) A continuous level range of brick or stones of the same height throughout the face or faces of a building.
(Naut.) The lowest sail on any mast of a square-rigged vessel; as, the fore course, main course, etc.
(Physiol.) The menses.
v. t.
• To run, hunt, or chase after; to follow hard upon; to pursue.
• To cause to chase after or pursue game; as, to course greyhounds after deer.
• To run through or over.
v. i.
• To run as in a race, or in hunting; to pursue the sport of coursing; as, the sportsmen coursed over the flats of Lancashire.
• To move with speed; to race; as, the blood courses through the veins.
Coursed
a.
• Hunted; as, a coursed hare.
• Arranged in courses; as, coursed masonry.
Courser
n.
• One who courses or hunts.
• A swift or spirited horse; a racer or a war horse; a charger.
(Zool.) A grallatorial bird of Europe (Cursorius cursor), remarkable for its speed in running. Sometimes, in a wider sense, applied to running birds of the Ostrich family.
Coursey
n.
(Naut.) A space in the galley; a part of the hatches.
Coursing
n.
• The pursuit or running game with dogs that follow by sight instead of by scent.
Court
n.
• An inclosed space; a courtyard; an uncovered area shut in by the walls of a building, or by different building; also, a space opening from a street and nearly surrounded by houses; a blind alley.
• The residence of a sovereign, prince, nobleman, or ether dignitary; a palace.
• The collective body of persons composing the retinue of a sovereign or person high in aithority; all the surroundings of a sovereign in his regal state.
• Any formal assembling of the retinue of a sovereign; as, to hold a court.
• Attention directed to a person in power; conduct or address designed to gain favor; courtliness of manners; civility; compliment; flattery.
(Law) The hall, chamber, or place, where justice is administered.
• The persons officially assembled under authority of law, at the appropriate time and place, for the administration of justice; an official assembly, legally met together for the transaction of judicial business; a judge or judges sitting for the hearing or trial of causes.
• A tribunal established for the administration of justice.
• The judge or judges; as distinguished from the counsel or jury, or both.
• The session of a judicial assembly.
• Any jurisdiction, civil, military, or ecclesiastical.
• A place arranged for playing the game of tennis; also, one of the divisions of a tennis court.
v. t.
• To endeavor to gain the favor of by attention or flattery; to try to ingratiate one's self with.
• To endeavor to gain the affections of; to seek in marriage; to woo.
• To attempt to gain; to solicit; to seek.
• To invite by attractions; to allure; to attract.
v. i.
• To play the lover; to woo; as, to go courting.
Courtbred
a.
• Bred, or educated, at court; polished; courtly.
Courtehouse
n.
• A house in which established courts are held, or a house appropriated to courts and public meetings.
• A county town; — so called in Virginia and some others of the Southern States.
Courteous
a.
• Of courtlike manners; pertaining to, or exxpressive of, courtesy; characterized by courtesy; civil; obliging; well bred; polite; affable; complaisant.
Courteously
adv.
• In a courteous manner.
Courteousness
n.
• The quality of being courteous; politeness; courtesy.
Courtepy
n.
• A short coat of coarse cloth.
Courter
n.
• One who courts; one who plays the lover, or who solicits in marriage; one who flatters and cajoles.
Courtesan
n.
• A woman who prostitutes herself for hire; a prostitute; a harlot.
Courtesanship
n.
• Harlotry.
Courtesy
n.
• Politeness; civility; urbanity; courtliness.
• An act of civility or respect; an act of kindness or favor performed with politeness.
• Favor or indulgence, as distinguished from right; as, a title given one by courtesy.
n.
• An act of civility, respect, or reverence, made by women, consisting of a slight depression or dropping of the body, with bending of the kness.
v. i.
• To make a respectful salutation or movement of respect; esp. (with reference to women), to bow the body slightly, with bending of the knes.
v. t.
• To treat with civility.
Courtier
n.
• One who is in attendance at the court of a prince; one who has an appointment at court.
• One who courts or solicits favor; one who flatters.
Courtiery
n.
• The manners of a courtier; courtliness.
Courtlike
a.
• After the manner of a court; elegant; polite; courtly.
Courtliness
n.
• The quality of being courtly; elegance or dignity of manners.
Courtling
n.
• A sycophantic courtier.
Courtly
a.
• Relating or belonging to a court.
• Elegant; polite; courtlike; flattering.
• Disposed to favor the great; favoring the policy or party of the court; obsequious.
adv.
• In the manner of courts; politely; gracefully; elegantly.
Courtship
n.
• The act of paying court, with the intent to solicit a favor.
• The act of wooing in love; solicitation of woman to marriage.
• Courtliness; elegance of manners; courtesy.
• Court policy; the character of a courtier; artifice of a court; court-craft; finesse.
Courtyard
n.
• A court or inclosure attached to a house.
Couscous
n.
• A kind of food used by the natives of Western Africa, made of millet flour with flesh, and leaves of the baobab; — called also lalo.
Couscousou
n.
• A favorite dish in Barbary.
Cousin
n.
• One collaterally related more remotely than a brother or sister; especially, the son or daughter of an uncle or aunt.
• A title formerly given by a king to a nobleman, particularly to those of the council. In English writs, etc., issued by the crown, it signifies any earl.
n.
• Allied; akin.
Cousinage
n.
• Relationship; kinship.
Cousinhood
n.
• The state or condition of a cousin; also, the collective body of cousins; kinsfolk.
Cousinly
a.
• Like or becoming a cousin.
Cousinry
n.
• A body or collection of cousins; the whole number of persons who stand in the relation of cousins to a given person or persons.
Cousinship
n.
• The relationship of cousins; state of being cousins; cousinhood.
Coussinet
n.
(Arch.) A stone placed on the impost of a pier for receiving the first stone of an arch.
• That part of the Ionic capital between the abacus and quarter round, which forms the volute.
Couteau
n.
• A knife; a dagger.
Couth
imp. & p. p.
• Could; was able; knew or known; understood.
Couvade
n.
• A custom, among certain barbarous tribes, that when a woman gives birth to a child her husband takes to his bed, as if ill.
Covariant
n.
(Higher Alg.) A function involving the coefficients and the variables of a quantic, and such that when the quantic is lineally transformed the same function of the new variables and coefficients shall be equal to the old function multiplied by a factor. An invariant is a like function involving only the coefficients of the quantic.
Cove
n.
• A retired nook; especially, a small, sheltered inlet, creek, or bay; a recess in the shore.
• A strip of prairie extending into woodland; also, a recess in the side of a mountain.
(Arch.) A concave molding.
• A member, whose section is a concave curve, used especially with regard to an inner roof or ceiling, as around a skylight.
v. t.
(Arch.) To arch over; to build in a hollow concave form; to make in the form of a cove.
v. t.
• To brood, cover, over, or sit over, as birds their eggs.
n.
• A boy or man of any age or station.
Covenable
a.
• Fit; proper; suitable.
Covenably
adv.
• Fitly; suitably.
Covenant
n.
• A mutual agreement of two or more persons or parties, or one of the stipulations in such an agreement.
(Eccl. Hist.) An agreement made by the Scottish Parliament in 1638, and by the English Parliament in 1643, to preserve the reformed religion in Scotland, and to extirpate popery and prelacy; — usually called the "Solemn League and Covenant."
(Theol.) The promises of God as revealed in the Scriptures, conditioned on certain terms on the part of man, as obedience, repentance, faith, etc.
• A solemn compact between members of a church to maintain its faith, discipline, etc.
(Law) An undertaking, on sufficient consideration, in writing and under seal, to do or to refrain from some act or thing; a contract; a stipulation; also, the document or writing containing the terms of agreement.
• A form of action for the violation of a promise or contract under seal.
v. i.
• To agree (with); to enter into a formal agreement; to bind one's self by contract; to make a stipulation.
v. t.
• To grant or promise by covenant.
Covenantee
n.
(Law) The person in whose favor a covenant is made.
Covenanter
n.
• One who makes a covenant.
(Eccl. Hist.) One who subscribed and defended the "Solemn League and Covenant.
Covenanting
a.
• Belonging to a covenant. Specifically, belonging to the Scotch Covenanters.
Covenantor
n.
(Law) The party who makes a covenant.
Covent
n.
• A convent or monastery.
Coventry
n.
• A town in the county of Warwick, England.
Cover
v. t.
• To overspread the surface of (one thing) with another; as, to cover wood with paint or lacquer; to cover a table with a cloth.
• To envelop; to clothe, as with a mantle or cloak.
• To invest (one's self with something); to bring upon (one's self); as, he covered himself with glory.
• To hide sight; to conceal; to cloak; as, the snemy were covered from our sight by the woods.
• To brood or sit on; to incubate.
• To shelter, as from evil or danger; to protect; to defend; as, the cavalry covered the retreat.
• To remove from remembrance; to put away; to remit.
• To extend over; to be sufficient for; to comprehend, include, or embrace; to account for or solve; to counterbalance; as, a mortgage which fully covers a sum loaned on it; a law which covers all possible cases of a crime; receipts than do not cover expenses.
• To put the usual covering or headdress on.
• To copulate with (a female); to serve; as. a horse covers a mare; — said of the male.
n.
• Anything which is laid, set, or spread, upon, about, or over, another thing; an envelope; a lid; as, the cover of a book.
• Anything which weils or conceals; a screen; disguise; a cloack.
• Shelter; protection; as, the troops fought under cover of the batteries; the woods afforded a good cover.
(Huntig) The woods, underbrush, etc., which shelter and conceal game; covert; as, to beat a cover; to ride to cover.
(Steam Engine) The lap of a slide valve.
• A tablecloth, and the other table furniture; esp., the table furniture for the use of one person at a meal; as, covers were laid for fifty guests.
v. i.
• To spread a table for a meal; to prepare a banquet.
Coverchief
n.
• A covering for the head.
Covercle
n.
• A small cover; a lid.
Covered
a.
• Under cover; screened; sheltered; not exposed; hidden.
Coverer
n.
• One who, or that which, covers.
Covering
n.
• Anything which covers or conceals, as a roof, a screen, a wrapper, clothing, etc.
Coverlet
n.
• The uppermost cover of a bed or of any piece of furniture.
Coverlid
n.
• A coverlet.
Covert
a.
• Covered over; private; hid; secret; disguised.
• Sheltered; not open or exposed; retired; protected; as, a covert nook.
(Law) Under cover, authority or protection; as, a feme covert, a married woman who is considered as being under the protection and control of her husband.
n.
• A place that covers and protects; a shelter; a defense.
(Zool.) One of the special feathers covering the bases of the quills of the wings and tail of a bird.
Covertly
adv.
• Secretly; in private; insidiously.
Covertness
n.
• Secrecy; privacy.
Coverture
n.
• Covering; shelter; defence; hiding.
(Law) The condition of a woman during marriage, because she is considered under the cover, influence, power, and protection of her husband, and therefore called a feme covert, or femme couverte.
Covet
v. i.
• To have or indulge inordinate desire.
Covet
v. t.
• To wish for with eagerness; to desire possession of; — used in a good sen.
• To long for inordinately or unlawfully; to hanker after (something forbidden).
Covetable
a.
• That may be coveted; desirable.
Coveter
n.
• One who covets.
Covetise
n.
• Avarice.
Covetiveness
n.
(Phren.) Acquisitiveness.
Covetous
a.
• Very desirous; eager to obtain; — used in a good sense.
• Inordinately desirous; excessively eager to obtain and possess (esp. money); avaricious; — in a bad sense.
Covetously
adv.
• In a covetous manner.
Covetousness
n.
• Strong desire.
• A strong or inordinate desire of obtaining and possessing some supposed good; excessive desire for riches or money; — in a bad sense.
Covey
n.
• A brood or hatch of birds; an old bird with her brood of young; hence, a small flock or number of birds together; — said of game; as, a covey of partridges.
• A company; a bevy; as, a covey of girls.
v. i.
• To brood; to incubate.
n.
• A pantry.
Covin
n.
(Law) A collusive agreement between two or more persons to prejudice a third.
• Deceit; fraud; artifice.
Covinous
a.
(Law) Deceitful; collusive; fraudulent; dishonest.
Cow
n.
• A chimney cap; a cowl
n.
• The mature female of bovine animals.
• The female of certain large mammals, as whales, seals, etc.
v. t.
• To depress with fear; to daunt the spirits or courage of; to overawe.
n.
(Mining) A wedge, or brake, to check the motion of a machine or car; a chock.
Cowan
n.
• One who works as a mason without having served a regular apprenticeship.
Coward
a.
(Her.) Borne in the escutcheon with his tail doubled between his legs; — said of a lion.
• Destitute of courage; timid; cowardly.
• Belonging to a coward; proceeding from, or expressive of, base fear or timidity.
n.
• A person who lacks courage; a timid or pusillanimous person; a poltroon.
v. t.
• To make timoroys; to frighten.
Cowardice
n.
• Want of courage to face danger; extreme timidity; pusillanimity; base fear of danger or hurt; lack of spirit.
Cowardie
n.
• Cowardice.
Cowardish
a.
• Cowardly.
Cowardize
v. t.
• To render cowardly
Cowardliness
n.
• Cowardice.
Cowardly
a.
• Wanting courage; basely or weakly timid or fearful; pusillanimous; spiritless.
• Proceeding from fear of danger or other consequences; befitting a coward; dastardly; base; as, cowardly malignity.
adv.
• In the manner of a coward.
Cowardship
n.
• Cowardice.
Cowbane
n.
(Bot.) A poisonous umbelliferous plant; in England, the Cicuta virosa; in the United States, the Cicuta maculata and the Archemora rigida.
Cowberry
n.
(Bot.) A species of Vaccinium (V. Vitis-id), which bears acid red berries which are sometimes used in cookery; — locally called mountain cranberry.
Cowbird
n.
(Zool.) The cow blackbird (Molothrus ater), an American starling. Like the European cuckoo, it builds no nest, but lays its eggs in the nests of other birds; — so called because frequently associated with cattle.
Cowblakes
n. pl.
• Dried cow dung used as fuel.
Cowboy
n.
• A cattle herder; a drover; specifically, one of an adventurous class of herders and drovers on the plains of the Western and Southwestern United States.
• One of the marauders who, in the Revolutionary War infested the neutral ground between the American and British lines, and committed depredations on the Americans.
Cowcatxjer
n.
• A strong inclined frame, usually of wrought-iron bars, in front of a locomotive engine, for catching or throwing off obstructions on a railway, as cattle; the pilot.
Cowen
v. i.
• To deceive; to cheat; to act deceitfully.
Cower
v. i.
• To stoop by bending the knees; to crouch; to squat; hence, to quail; to sink through fear.
v. t.
• To cherish with care.
Cowfish
n.
(Zool.) The grampus.
• A California dolphin (Tursiops Gillii).
• A marine plectognath fish (Ostracoin quadricorne, and allied species), having two projections, like horns, in front; — called also cuckold, coffer fish, trunkfish.
Cowhage
n.
(Bot.) A leguminous climbing plant of the genus Mucuna, having crooked pods covered with sharp hairs, which stick to the fingers, causing intolerable itching. The spiculae are sometimes used in medicine as a mechanical vermifuge.
Cowhearted
a.
• Cowardly.
Cowherd
n.
• One whose occupation is to tend cows.
Cowhide
n.
• The hide of a cow.
• Leather made of the hide of a cow.
• A coarse whip made of untanned leather.
v. t.
• To flog with a cowhide.
Cowish
a.
• Timorous; fearful; cowardly.
n.
(Bot.) An umbelliferous plant (Peucedanum Cous) with edible tuberous roots, found in Oregon.
Cowl
n.
• A monk's hood; — usually attached to the gown. The nname was also applied to the hood and garment together.
• A cowl-shaped cap, commonly turning with the wind, used to improve the draft of a chimney, ventilatingshaft, etc.
• A wire cap for the smokestack of a locomotive.
n.
• A vessel carried on a pole between two persons, for conveyance of water.
Cowled
a.
• Wearing a cowl; hooded; as, a cowled monk.
Cowleech
n.
• One who heals disease of cows; a cow doctor.
Cowleeching
n.
• Healing the distemper of cows.
Cowlick
n.
• A tuft of hair turned up or awry (usually over the forehead), as if licked by a cow.
Cowlike
a.
• Resembling a cow.
Cowlstaff
n.
• A staff or pole on which a vessel is supported between two persons.
Coworker
n.
• One who works with another; a coperator.
Cowpea
n.
• The seed of one or more leguminous plants of the genus Dolichos; also, the plant itself. Many varieties are cultivated in the southern part of the United States.
Cowpox
n.
(Med.) A pustular eruptive disease of the cow, which, when communicated to the human system, as by vaccination, protects from the smallpox; vaccinia; — called also kinepox, cowpock, and kinepock.
Cowquake
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants (Briza); quaking grass.
Cowrie
n.
(Bot.) Same as Kauri.
Cowslip
n.
(Bot.) A common flower in England (Primula veris) having yellow blossoms and appearing in early spring. It is often cultivated in the United States.
• In the United States, the marsh marigold (Caltha palustris), appearing in wet places in early spring and often used as a pot herb. It is nearer to a buttercup than to a true cowslip.
Cowslipped
a.
• Adorned with cowslips.
Cowweed
n.
(Bot.) Same as Cow parsley.
Cowwheat
n.
(Bot.) A weed of the genus Melampyrum, with black seeds, found on European wheatfields.
Cox
n.
• A coxcomb; a simpleton; a gull.
Coxcomb
n.
• A strip of red cloth notched like the comb of a cock, which licensed jesters formerly wore in their caps.
• The cap itself.
• The top of the head, or the head itself
• A vain, showy fellow; a conceited, silly man, fond of display; a superficial pretender to knowledge or accomplishments; a fop.
(Bot.) A name given to several plants of different genera, but particularly to Celosia cristata, or garden cockscomb. Same as Cockscomb.
Coxcombical
a.
• Befitting or indicating a coxcomb; like a coxcomb; foppish; conceited.
Coxcombly
a.
• like a coxcomb.
Coxcombry
n.
• The manners of a coxcomb; foppishness.
Coxcomical
a.
• Coxcombical.
Coxcomically
adv.
• Conceitedly.
Coxxa
n.
(Zool.) The first joint of the leg of an insect or crustacean.
Coy
a.
• Quiet; still.
• Shrinking from approach or familiarity; reserved; bashful; shy; modest; — usually applied to women, sometimes with an implication of coquetry.
• Soft; gentle; hesitating.
v. t.
• To allure; to entice; to decoy.
• To caress with the hand; to stroke.
v. i.
• To behave with reserve or coyness; to shrink from approach or familiarity.
• To make difficulty; to be unwilling.
Coyish
a.
• Somewhat coy or reserved.
Coyly
adv.
• In a coy manner; with reserve.
Coyness
n.
• The quality of being coy; feigned o bashful unwillingness to become familiar; reserve.
Coyote
n.
(Zool.) A carnivorous animal (Canis latrans), allied to the dog, found in the western part of North America; — called also prairie wolf. Its voice is a snapping bark, followed by a prolonged, shrill howl.
Coypu
n.
(Zool.) A South American rodent (Myopotamus coypus), allied to the beaver. It produces a valuable fur called nutria.
Coystrel
n.
• Same as Coistril.
Coz
n.
• A contraction of cousin.
Cozen
v. t.
• To cheat; to defrand; to beguile; to deceive, usually by small arts, or in a pitiful way.
Cozenage
n.
• The art or practice of cozening; artifice; fraud.
Cozener
n.
• One who cheats or defrauds.
Cozily
adv.
• Snugly; comfortably.
Coziness
n.
• The state or quality of being cozy.
Cozy
a.
• Snug; comfortable; easy; contented.
• Chatty; talkative; sociable; familiar.
n.
• A wadded covering for a teakettle or other vessel to keep the contents hot.
Crab
n.
(Zool.) One of the brachyuran Crustacea. They are mostly marine, and usually have a broad, short body, covered with a strong shell or carapace. The abdomen is small and curled up beneath the body.
• The zodiacal constellation Cancer.
(Bot.) A crab apple; — so named from its harsh taste.
• A cudgel made of the wood of the crab tree; a crabstick.
(Mech.) A movable winch or windlass with powerful gearing, used with derricks, etc.
• A form of windlass, or geared capstan, for hauling ships into dock, etc.
• A machine used in ropewalks to stretch the yarn.
• A claw for anchoring a portable machine.
v. t.
• To make sour or morose; to embitter.
• To beat with a crabstick.
v. i.
(Naut.) To drift sidewise or to leeward, as a vessel.
a.
• Sour; rough; austere.
Crabbed
a.
• Characterized by or manifesting, sourness, peevishness, or moroseness; harsh; cross; cynical; — applied to feelings, disposition, or manners.
• Characterized by harshness or roughness; unpleasant; — applied to things; as, a crabbed taste.
• Obscure; difficult; perplexing; trying; as, a crabbed author.
• Cramped; irregular; as, crabbed handwriting.
Crabber
n.
• One who catches crabs.
Crabbing
n.
• The act or art of catching crabs.
(Falconry) The foghting of hawks with each other.
(Woolem Manuf.) A process of scouring clocth beween rolls in a machine.
Crabbish
a.
• Somewhat sour or cross.
Crabby
a.
• Crabbed; difficult, or perplexing.
Crabeater
n.
(Zool.) The cobia.
• An etheostomoid fish of the southern United States (Hadropterus nigrofasciatus).
• A small European heron (Ardea minuta, and other allied species).
Craber
n.
(Zool.) The water rat.
Crabfaced
a.
• Having a sour, disagreeable countenance.
Crabsidle
v. i.
• To move sidewise, as a crab. .
Crabstick
n.
• A stick, cane, or cudgel, made of the wood of the carb tree.
Crache
v.
• To scratch.
Crack
v. t.
• To break or burst, with or without entire separation of the parts; as, to crack glass; to crack nuts.
• To rend with grief or pain; to affect deeply with sorrow; hence, to disorder; to distract; to craze.
• To cause to sound suddenly and sharply; to snap; as, to crack a whip.
• To utter smartly and sententiously; as, to crack a joke.
• To cry up; to extol; — followed by up
v. i.
• To burst or open in chinks; to break, with or without quite separating into parts.
• To be ruined or impaired; to fail.
• To utter a loud or sharp, sudden sound.
• To utter vain, pompous words; to brag; to boast; — with of.
n.
• A partial separation of parts, with or without a perceptible opening; a chink or fissure; a narrow breach; a crevice; as, a crack in timber, or in a wall, or in glass.
• Ropture; flaw; breach, in a moral sense.
• A sharp, sudden sound or report; the sound of anything suddenly burst or broken; as, the crack of a falling house; the crack of thunder; the crack of a whip.
• The tone of voice when changed at puberty.
• Mental flaw; a touch of craziness; partial insanity; as, he has a crack.
• A crazy or crack-brained person.
• A boast; boasting.
• Breach of chastity.
• A boy, generally a pert, lively boy.
• A brief time; an instant; as, to be with one in a crack.
• Free conversation; friendly chat.
a.
• Of superior excellence; having qualities to be boasted of.
Cracked
a.
• Coarsely ground or broken; as, cracked wheat.
• Crack-brained.
Cracker
n.
• One who, or that which, cracks.
• A noisy boaster; a swaggering fellow.
• A small firework, consisting of a little powder inclossed in a thick paper cylinder with a fuse, and exploding with a sharp noise; — often called firecracker.
• A thin, dry biscuit, often hard or crisp; as, a Boston cracker; a Graham cracker; a soda cracker; an oyster cracker.
• A nickname to designate a poor white in some parts of the Southern United States.
(Zool.) The pintail duck.
(Mach.) A pair of fluted rolls for grinding caoutchouc.
Crackle
v. i.
• To make slight cracks; to make small, sharp, sudden noises, rapidly or frequently repeated; to crepitate; as, burning thorns crackle.
n.
• The noise of slight and frequent cracks or reports; a crackling.
(Med.) A kind of crackling sound or r&acir;le, heard in some abnormal states of the lungs; as, dry crackle; moist crackle.
(Fine Arts) A condition produced in certain porcelain, fine earthenware, or glass, in which the glaze or enamel appears to be cracked in all directions, making a sort of reticulated surface; as, Chinese crackle; Bohemian crackle.
Crackled
a.
(Fine Arts) Covered with minute cracks in the glaze; — said of some kinds of porcelain and fine earthenware.
Crackling
n.
• The making of small, sharp cracks or reports, frequently repeated.
• The well-browned, crisp rind of roasted pork.
• Food for dogs, made from the refuse of tallow melting.
Cracknel
n.
• A hard brittle cake or biscuit.
Cracksman
n.
• A burglar.
Cracovian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Cracow in Poland.
Cracovienne
n.
(Mus.) A lively Polish dance, in 2-4 time.
Cracowes
n. pl.
• Long-toed boots or shoes formerly worn in many parts of Europe; — so called from Cracow, in Poland, where they were first worn in the fourteenth century.
Cradgedness
n.
• The quality or state of being cragged; cragginess.
Cradle
n.
• A bed or cot for a baby, oscillating on rockers or swinginng on pivots; hence, the place of origin, or in which anything is nurtured or protected in the earlier period of existence; as, a cradle of crime; the cradle of liberty.
• Infancy, or very early life.
(Agric.) An implement consisting of a broad scythe for cutting grain, with a set of long fingers parallel to the scythe, designed to receive the grain, and to lay it eventlyin a swath.
(Engraving) A tool used in mezzotint engraving, which, by a rocking motion, raises burrs on the surface of the plate, so preparing the ground.
• A framework of timbers, or iron bars, moving upon ways or rollers, used to support, lift, or carry ships or other vessels, heavy guns, etc., as up an inclined plane, or across a strip of land, or in launching a ship.
(Med.) A case for a broken or dislocated limb.
• A frame to keep the bedclothes from conntact with the person.
(Mining) A machine on rockers, used in washing out auriferous earth; — also called a rocker.
• A suspended scaffold used in shafts.
(Carp.) The ribbing for vaulted ceilings and arches intended to be covered with plaster.
(Naut.) The basket or apparatus in which, when a line has been made fast to a wrecked ship from the shore, the people are brought off from the wreck.
v. t.
• To lay to rest, or rock, as in a cradle; to lull or quiet, as by rocking.
• To nurse or train in infancy.
• To cut and lay with a cradle, as grain.
• To transport a vessel by means of a cradle.
v. i.
• To lie or lodge, as in a cradle.
Cradling
n.
• The act of using a cradle.
(Coopering) Cutting a cask into two pieces lengthwise, to enable it to pass a narrow place, the two parts being afterward united and rehooped.
(Carp.) The framework in arched or coved ceilings to which the laths are nailed.
Craft
n.
• Strength; might; secret power.
• Art or skill; dexterity in particular manual employment; hence, the occupation or employment itself; manual art; a trade.
• Those engaged in any trade, taken collectively; a guild; as, the craft of ironmongers.
• Cunning, art, or skill, in a bad sense, or applied to bad purposes; artifice; guile; skill or dexterity employed to effect purposes by deceit or shrewd devices.
(Naut.) A vessel; vessels of any kind; — generally used in a collective sense.
v.t.
• To play tricks; to practice artifice.
Craftily
adv.
• With craft; artfully; cunningly.
Craftiness
n.
• Dexterity in devising and effecting a purpose; cunning; artifice; stratagem.
Craftless
a.
• Without craft or cunning.
Craftsman
n.
• One skilled in some trade or manual occupation; an artificer; a mechanic.
Craftsmanship
n.
• The work of a craftsman.
Craftsmaster
n.
• One skilled in his craft or trade; one of superior cunning.
Crafty
a.
• Relating to, or characterized by, craft or skill; dexterous.
• Possessing dexterity; skilled; skillful.
• Skillful at deceiving others; characterized by craft; cunning; wily.
Crag
n.
• A steep, rugged rock; a cough, broken cliff, or point of a rock, on a ledge.
(Geol.) A partially compacted bed of gravel mixed with shells, of the Tertiary age.
n.
• The neck or throat
• The neck piece or scrag of mutton.
Cragged
a.
• Full of crags, or steep, broken cks; abounding with prominences, points, and inequalities; rough; rugged.
Cragginess
n.
• The state of being craggy.
Craggy
a.
• Full of crags; rugged with projecting points of rocks; as, the craggy side of a mountain.
Cragsman
n.
• One accustomed to climb rocks or crags; esp., one who makes a business of climbing the cliffs overhanging the sea to get the eggs of sea birds or the birds themselves.
Crail
n.
• A creel or osier basket.
Crake
v. t. & i.
• To cry out harshly and loudly, like the bird called crake.
• To boast; to speak loudly and boastfully.
n.
• A boast.
n.
(Zool.) Any species or rail of the genera Crex and Porzana; — so called from its singular cry.
Craker
n.
• One who boasts; a braggart.
Cram
v. t.
• To press, force, or drive, particularly in filling, or in thrustung one thing into another; to stuff; to crowd; to fill to superfluity; as, to cram anything into a basket; to cram a room with people.
• To fill with food to satiety; to stuff.
• To put hastily through an extensive course of memorizing or study, as in preparation for an examination; as, a pupil is crammed by his tutor.
v. i.
• To eat greedly, and to satiety; to stuff.
• To make crude preparation for a special occasion, as an examination, by a hasty and extensive course of memorizing or study.
n.
• The act of cramming.
• Innformation hastily memorized; as. a cram from an examination.
(Weaving) A warp having more than two threads passing through each dent or split of the reed.
Crambe
n.
• A game in which one person gives a word, to which another finds a rhyme.
• A werd rhyming with another word.
Crammer
n.
• One who crams; esp., one who prepares a pupil hastily for an exxamination, or a pupil who is thus prepared.
Cramp
n.
• That which confines or contracts; a restraint; a shakle; a hindrance.
(Masonry) A device, usually of iron bent at the ends, used to hold together blocks of stone, timbers, etc.; a cramp iron.
(Carp.) A rectangular frame, with a tightening screw, used for compressing the jionts of framework, etc.
• A piece of wood having a curve corresponding to that of the upper part of the instep, on which the upper leather of a boot is stretched to give it the requisite shape.
(Med.) A spasmodic and painful involuntary contraction of a muscle or muscles, as of the leg.
v. t.
• To compress; to restrain from free action; to confine and contract; to hinder.
• To fasten or hold with, or as with, a cramp.
• Hence, to bind together; to unite.
• To form on a cramp; as, to cramp boot legs.
• To afflict with cramp.
a.
Crampet
n.
(Mil.) A cramp iron or cramp ring; a chape, as of a scabbard.
Crampfish
n.
(Zool.) The torpedo, or electric ray, the touch of which gives an electric shock.
Crampon
n.
(Bot.) An arial rootlet for support in climbing, as of ivy.
Cramponee
a.
(Her.) Having a cramp or square piece at the end; — said of a cross so furnished.
Crampoons
n. pl.
• A clutch formed of hooked pieces of iron, like double calipers, for raising stones, lumber, blocks of ice, etc.
• Iron insruments with sharp points, worn on the shoes to assist in gaining or keeping a foothold.
Crampy
• Affected with cramp.
• Productive of, or abounding in, cramps.
Cranage
n.
• The liberty of using a crane, as for loading and unloading vessels.
• The money or price paid for the use of a crane.
Cranberry
n.
(Bot.) A red, acid berry, much used for making sauce, etc.; also, the plant producing it (several species of Vaccinum or Oxycoccus.) The high cranberry or cranberry tree is a species of Viburnum (V. Opulus), and the other is sometimes called low cranberry or marsh cranberry to distinguish it.
Crane
n.
(Zool.) A wading bird of the genus Grus, and allied genera, of various species, having a long, straight bill, and long legs and neck.
• A machine for raising and lowering heavy weights, and, while holding them suspended, transporting them through a limited lateral distance. In one form it consists of a projecting arm or jib of timber or iron, a rotating post or base, and the necessary tackle, windlass, etc.; — so called from a fancied similarity between its arm and the neck of a crane.
• An iron arm with horizontal motion, attached to the side or back of a fireplace, for supporting kettles, etc., over a fire.
• A siphon, or bent pipe, for drawing liquors out of a cask.
(Naut.) A forked post or projecting bracket to support spars, etc., — generally used in pairs.
v. t.
• To cause to rise; to raise or lift, as by a crane; — with up.
• To stretch, as a crane stretches its neck; as, to crane the neck disdainfully.
Crania
n.
(Zool.) A genus of living Brachiopoda; — so called from its fancied resemblance to the cranium or skull.
Cranial
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the cranium.
Cranioclasm
n.
(Med.) The crushing of a child's head, as with the cranioclast or craniotomy forceps in cases of very difficult delivery.
Cranioclast
n.
(Med.) An instrument for crushing the head of a fetus, to facilitate delivery in difficult eases.
Craniofacial
a.
• Of or pertaining to the cranium and face; as, the craniofacial angle.
Craniognomy
n.
• The science of the form and characteristics of the skull.
Craniological
a.
• Of or pertaining to craniology.
Craniologist
n.
• One proficient in craniology; a phrenologist.
Craniology
n.
• The department of science (as of ethnology or archaeology) which deals with the shape, size, proportions, indications, etc., of skulls; the study of skulls.
Craniometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring the size of skulls.
Craniometry
n.
• The art or act of measuring skulls.
Cranioscopist
n.
• One skilled in, or who practices, cranioscopy.
Cranioscopy
n.
• Scientific examination of the cranium.
Craniota
n. pl.
(Zool.) A comprehensive division of the Vertebrata, including all those that have a skull.
Craniotomy
n.
(Med.) The operation of opening the fetal head, in order to effect delivery.
Cranium
n.
• The skull of an animal; especially, that part of the skull, either cartilaginous or bony, which immediately incloses the brain; the brain case or brainpan.
Crank
n.
(Mach.) A bent portion of an axle, or shaft, or an arm keyed at right angles to the end of a shaft, by which motion is imparted to or received from it; also used to change circular into reciprocating motion, or reciprocating into circular motion.
• Any bend, turn, or winding, as of a passage.
• A twist or turn in speech; a conceit consisting in a change of the form or meaning of a word.
• A twist or turn of the mind; caprice; whim; crotchet; also, a fit of temper or passion.
• A person full of crotchets; one given to fantastic or impracticable projects; one whose judgment is perverted in respect to a particular matter.
• A sick person; an invalid.
a.
• Sick; infirm.
(Naut.) Liable to careen or be overest, as a ship when she is too narrow, or has not sufficient ballast, or is loaded too high, to carry full sail.
• Full of spirit; brisk; lively; sprightly; overconfident; opinionated.
v. i.
• To run with a winding course; to double; to crook; to wind and turn.
Crankbird
n.
(Zool.) A small European woodpecker (Picus minor).
Cranked
a.
• Formed with, or having, a bend or crank; as, a cranked axle.
Crankiness
n.
• Crankness.
Crankle
v. t.
• To break into bends, turns, or angles; to crinkle.
v. i.
• To bend, turn, or wind.
n.
• A bend or turn; a twist; a crinkle.
Crankness
n.
(Naut.) Liability to be overset; — said of a ship or other vessel.
• Sprightliness; vigor; health.
Cranky
a.
• Full of spirit; crank.
• Addicted to crotchets and whims; unreasonable in opinions; crotchety.
• Unsteady; easy to upset; crank.
Crannied
a.
• Having crannies, chinks, or fissures; as, a crannied wall.
Cranny
n.
• A small, narrow opening, fissure, crevice, or chink, as in a wall, or other substance.
(Glass Making) A tool for forming the necks of bottles, etc.
v. i.
• To crack into, or become full of, crannies.
• To haunt, or enter by, crannies.
a.
• Quick; giddy; thoughtless.
Crantara
n.
• The fiery cross, used as a rallying signal in the Highlands of Scotland.
Crants
n.
• A garland carried before the bier of a maiden.
Crapaudine
a.
(Arch.) Turning on pivots at the top and bottom; — said of a door.
n.
(Far.) An ulcer on the coronet of a horse.
Crape
n.
• A thin, crimped stuff, made of raw silk gummed and twisted on the mill. Black crape is much used for mourning garments, also for the dress of some clergymen.
v. t.
• To form into ringlets; to curl; to crimp; to friz; as, to crape the hair; to crape silk.
Crapefish
n.
• Salted codfish hardened by pressure.
Crapnel
n.
• A hook or drag; a grapnel.
Crappie
n.
(Zool.) A kind of fresh-water bass of the genus Pomoxys, found in the rivers of the Southern United States and Mississippi valley. There are several species.
Crapple
n.
• A claw.
Craps
n.
• A gambling game with dice.
Crapulence
n.
• The sickness occasioned by intemperance; surfeit.
Crapy
a.
• Resembling crape.
Crare
n.
• A slow unwieldy trading vessel.
Crase
v. t.
• To break in pieces; to crack.
Crash
v. t.
• To break in pieces violently; to dash together with noise and violence.
v. i.
• To make a loud, clattering sound, as of many things falling and breaking at once; to break in pieces with a harsh noise.
• To break with violence and noise; as, the chimney in falling crashed through the roof.
n.
• A loud, sudden, confused sound, as of manu things falling and breaking at once.
• Ruin; failure; sudden breaking down, as of a business house or a commercial enterprise.
n.
• Coarse, heavy, narrow linen cloth, used esp. for towels.
Crashing
n.
• The noise of many things falling and breaking at once.
Crasis
n.
(Med.) A mixture of constituents, as of the blood; constitution; temperament.
(Gram.) A contraction of two vowels (as the final and initial vowels of united words) into one long vowel, or into a dipthong; synaeresis; as, cogo for coago.
Craspedota
n. pl.
(Zool.) The hydroid or naked-eyed medusae.
Craspedote
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Craspedota.
Crass
a.
• Cross; thick; dense; coarse; not elaborated or refined. "Crass and fumid exhalations." Sir. T. Browne. "Crass ignorance" Cudworth.
Crassitude
n.
• Crossness; coarseness; thickness; density.
Crassness
n.
• Grossness.
Crastination
n.
• Procrastination; a putting off till to-morrow.
Crataegus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of small, hardy trees, including the hawthorn, much used for ornamental purposes.
Cratch
n.
• A manger or open frame for hay; a crib; a rack.
Crate
n.
• A large basket or hamper of wickerwork, used for the transportation of china, crockery, and similar wares.
• A box or case whose sides are of wooden slats with interspaces, — used especially for transporting fruit.
v. t.
• To pack in a crate or case for transportation; as, to crate a sewing machine; to crate peaches.
Crater
n.
• The basinlike opening or mouth of a volcano, through which the chief eruption comes; similarly, the mouth of a gevser, about which a cone of silica is often built up.
(Mil.) The pit left by the explosion of a mine.
(Astron.) A constellation of the southen hemisphere; — called also the Cup.
Crateriform
a.
(Bot.) Having the form of a shallow bowl; — said of a corolla.
Craterous
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, a crater.
Cratureless
a.
• Without created beings; alone.
Craunch
v. t. & i.
• To crush with the teeth; to chew with violence and noise; to crunch.
Cravat
n.
• A neckcloth; a piece of silk, fine muslin, or other cloth, worn by men about the neck.
Cravatted
a.
• Wearing a cravat.
Crave
v. t.
• To ask with earnestness or importunity; to ask with submission or humility; to beg; to entreat; to beseech; to implore.
• To call for, as a gratification; to long for; hence, to require or demand; as, the stomach craves food.
v. i.
• To desire strongly; to feel an insatiable longing; as, a craving appetite.
Craven
a.
• Cowardly; fainthearted; spiritless.
n.
• A recreant; a coward; a weak-hearted, spiritless fellow.
v. t.
• To make recreant, weak, spiritless, or cowardly.
Craver
n.
• One who craves or begs.
Craving
n.
• Vehement or urgent desire; longing for; beseeching.
Craw
n.
(Zool.) The crop of a bird.
• The stomach of an animal.
Crawford
n.
• A Crawford peach; a well-known freestone peach, wich yellow flesh, first raised by Mr. William Crawford, of New Jersey.
Crawl
v. i.
• To move slowly by drawing the body along the ground, as a worm; to move slowly on hands and kness; to creep.
• Hence, to move or advance in a feeble, slow, or timorous manner.
• To advance slowly and furtively; to insinuate one's self; to advance or gain influence by servile or obsequious conduct.
• To have a sensation as of insect creeping over the body; as, the flesh crawls.
n.
• The act or motion of crawling;low motion, as of a creeping animal.
n.
• A pen or inclosure of stakes and hurdles on the seacoast, for holding fish.
Crawler
n.
• One who, or that which, crawls; a creeper; a reptile.
Crawly
a.
• Creepy.
Crayon
n.
• An implement for drawing, made of clay and plumbago, or of some preparation of chalk, usually sold in small prisms or cylinders.
• A crayon drawing.
(Electricity) A pencil of carbon used in producing electric light.
v. t.
• To sketch, as with a crayon; to sketch or plan.
Craze
v. t.
• To break into pieces; to crush; to grind to powder.
• To weaken; to impair; to render decrepit.
• To derange the intellect of; to render insane.
v. i.
• To be crazed, or to act or appear as e that is crazed; to rave; to become insane.
• To crack, as the glazing of porcelain or pottery.
n.
• Craziness; insanity.
• A strong habitual desire or fancy; a crotchet.
• A temporary passion or infatuation, as for same new amusement, pursuit, or fashion; as, the bric-a-brac craze; the aesthetic craze.
Crazedness
n.
• A broken state; decrepitude; an impaired state of the intellect.
Crazily
adv.
• In a crazy manner.
Craziness
n.
• The state of being broken down or weakened; as, the craziness of a ship, or of the limbs.
• The state of being broken in mind; imbecility or weakness of intellect; derangement.
Crazy
a.
• Characterized by weakness or feeblness; decrepit; broken; falling to decay; shaky; unsafe.
• Broken, weakened, or dissordered in intellect; shattered; demented; deranged.
• Inordinately desirous; foolishly eager.
Creable
a.
• Capable of being created.
Creaght
n.
• A drove or herd.
Creak
v. i.
• To make a prolonged sharp grating or ssqueaking sound, as by the friction of hard substances; as, shoes creak.
v. t.
• To produce a creaking sound with.
n.
• Thew sound produced by anuthing that creaks; a creaking.
Creaking
n.
• A harsh grating or squeaking sound, or the act of making such a sound.
Cream
n.
• The rich, oily, and yellowish part of milk, which, when the milk stands unagitated, rises, and collects on the surface. It is the part of milk from which butter is obtained.
• The part of any liquor that rises, and collects on the surface.
• A delicacy of several kinds prepared for the table from cream, etc., or so as to resemble cream.
• A cosmetic; a creamlike medicinal preparation.
• The best or choicest part of a thing; the quintessence; as. the cream of a jest or story; the cream of a collection of books or pictures.
v. t.
• To skim, or take off by skimming, as cream.
• To take off the best or choicest part of.
• To furnish with, or as with, cream.
v. i.
• To form or become covered with cream; to become thick like cream; to assume the appearance of cream; hence, to grow stiff or formal; to mantle.
Creamcake
n.
(Cookery) A kind of cake filled with custard made of cream, eggs, etc.
Creamery
n.
• A place where butter and cheese are made, or where milk and cream are put up in cans for market.
• A place or apparatus in which milk is set for raising cream.
• An establishment where cream is sold.
Creaminess
n.
• The quality of being creamy.
Creamy
a.
• Full of, or containing, cream; resembling cream, in nature, appearance, or taste; creamlike; unctuous. "Creamy bowis." Collins. "Lines of creamy spray." Tennyson. "Your creamy words but cozen." Beau & Fl.
Creance
n.
• Faith; belief; creed.
(Falconry) A fine, small line, fastened to a hawk's leash, when it is first lured.
v. i. & t.
• To get on credit; to borrow.
Creant
a.
• Creative; formative.
Crease
n.
• A line or mark made by folding or doubling any pliable substance; hence, a similar mark, howewer produced.
(Cricket) One of the lines serving to define the limits of the bowler and the striker.
v. t.
• To make a crease or mark in, as by folding or doubling.
Creaser
n.
• A tool, or a sewing-mashine attachment, for making lines or creases on leather or cloth, as guides to sew by.
• A tool for making creases or beads, as in sheet iron, or for rounding small tubes.
(Bookbinding) A tool for making the band impression distinct on the back.
Creasing
n.
(Arch.) A layer of tiles forming a corona for a wall.
Creasy
a.
• Full of creases.
Creat
n.
(Man.) An usher to a riding master.
Creatable
a.
• That may be created.
Create
a.
• Created; composed; begotte.
v. t.
• To bring into being; to form out of nothing; to cause to exist.
• To effect by the agency, and under the laws, of causation; to be the occasion of; to cause; to produce; to form or fashion; to renew.
• To invest with a new form, office, or character; to constitute; to appoint; to make; as, to create one a peer.
Creatic
a.
• Relating to, or produced by, flesh or animal food; as, creatic nausea.
Creatin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A white, crystalline, nitrogenous substance found abundantly in muscle tissue.
Creatinin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A white, crystalline, nitrogenous body closely related to creatin but more basic in its properties, formed from the latter by the action of acids, and occurring naturally in muscle tissue and in urine.
Creation
n.
• The act of creating or causing to exist. Specifically, the act of bringing the universe or this world into existence.
• That which is created; that which is produced or caused to exist, as the world or some original work of art or of the imagination; nature.
• The act of constituting or investing with a new character; appointment; formation.
Creational
a.
• Of or pertaining to creation.
Creationism
n.
• The doctrine that a soul is specially created for each human being as soon as it is formed in the womb; — opposed to traducianism.
Creative
a.
• Having the power to create; exerting the act of creation.
Creativeness
n.
• The qualiyu of being creative.
Creatorship
n.
• State or condition of a creator.
Creatress
n.
• She who creates.
Creatrix
n.
• A creatress.
Creatural
a.
• Belonging to a creature; having the qualities of a creature.
Creature
n.
• Anything created; anything not self-existent; especially, any being created with life; an animal; a man.
• A human being, in pity, contempt, or endearment; as, a poor creature; a pretty creature.
• A person who owes his rise and fortune to another; a servile dependent; an instrument; a tool.
• A general term among farmers for horses, oxen, etc.
Creaturely
a.
• Creatural; characteristic of a creature.
Creatureship
n.
• The condition of being a creature.
Creaturize
v. t.
• To make like a creature; to degrade
Creaze
n.
(Mining) The tin ore which collects in the central part of the washing pit or buddle.
Crebricostate
a.
(Zool.) Marked with closely set ribs or ridges.
Crebrisulcate
a.
(Zool.) Marked with closely set transverse furrows.
Crebritude
n.
• Frequency.
Crebrous
a.
• Frequent; numerous.
Creche
n.
• A public nursery, where the young children of poor women are cared for during the day, while their mothers are at work.
Credence
n.
• Reliance of the mind on evidence of facts derived from other sources than personal knowledge; belief; credit; confidence.
• That which gives a claim to credit, belief, or confidence; as, a letter of credence.
(Eccl.) The small table by the side of the altar or communion table, on which the bread and wine are placed before being consecrated.
• A cupboard, sideboard, or cabinet, particularly one intended for the display of rich vessels or plate, and consisting chiefly of open shelves for that purpose.
v. t.
• To give credence to; to believe.
Credendum
n.
(Theol.) A thing to be believed; an article of faith; — distinguished from agendum, a practical duty.
Credent
a.
• Believing; giving credence; credulous.
• Having credit or authority; credible.
Credential
a.
• Giving a title or claim to credit or confidence; accrediting.
n.
• That which gives a title to credit or confidence.
• Testimonials showing that a person is entitled to credit, or has right to exercise official power, as the letters given by a government to an ambassador or envoy, or a certificate that one is a duly elected delegate.
Credibility
n.
• The quality of being credible; credibleness; as, the credibility of facts; the credibility of witnesses.
Credible
a.
• Capable of being credited or believed; worthy of belief; entiled to confidence; trustworthy.
Credibleness
n.
• The quality or state of being credible; worthness of belief; credibility.
Credibly
adv.
• In a manner inducing belief; as, I have been credibly informed of the event.
Credit
n.
• Reliance on the truth of something said or done; belief; faith; trust; confidence.
• Reputation derived from the confidence of others; esteem; honor; good name; estimation.
• A ground of, or title to, belief or confidence; authority derived from character or reputation.
• That which tends to procure, or add to, reputation or esteem; an honor.
• Influence derived from the good opinion, confidence, or favor of others; interest.
(Com.) Trust given or received; expectation of future playment for property transferred, or of fulfillment or promises given; mercantile reputation entitling one to be trusted; — applied to individuals, corporations, communities, or nations; as, to buy goods on credit.
• The time given for payment for lands or goods sold on trust; as, a long credit or a short credit.
(Bookkeeping) The side of an account on which are entered all items reckoned as values received from the party or the category named at the head of the account; also, any one, or the sum, of these items; — the opposite of debit; as, this sum is carried to one's credit, and that to his debit; A has several credits on the books of B.
v. t.
• To confide in the truth of; to give credence to; to put trust in; to believe.
• To bring honor or repute upon; to do credit to; to raise the estimation of.
(Bookkeeping) To enter upon the credit side of an account; to give credit for; as, to credit the amount paid; to set to the credit of; as, to credit a man with the interest paid on a bond.
Creditable
a.
• Worthy of belief.
• Deserving or possessing reputation or esteem; reputable; estimable.
• Bringing credit, reputation, or honor; honorable; as, such conduct is highly creditable to him.
Creditableness
n.
• The quality of being creditable.
Creditably
adv.
• In a creditable manner; reputably; with credit.
Creditor
n.
• One who credits, believes, or trusts.
• One who gives credit in business matters; hence, one to whom money is due; — correlative to debtor.
Credo
n.
• The creed, as sung or read in the Roman Catholic church.
Credulity
n.
• Readiness of belief; a disposition to believe on slight evidence.
Credulous
a.
• Apt to believe on slight evidence; easly imposed upon; unsuspecting.
• Believed too readily.
Credulously
adv.
• With credulity.
Credulousness
n.
• Readiness to believe on slight evidence; credulity.
Creed
n.
• A definite summary of what is believed; esp., a summary of the articles of Christian faith; a confession of faith for public use; esp., one which is brief and comprehensive.
• Any summary of principles or opinions professed or adhered to.
v. t.
• To believe; to credit.
Creedless
a.
• Without a creed.
Creek
n.
• A small inlet or bay, narrower and extending further into the land than a cove; a recess in the shore of the sea, or of a river.
• A stream of water smaller than a river and larger than a brook.
• Any turn or winding.
Creekfish
n.
(Zool.) The chub sucker.
Creeks
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe or confederacy of North American Indians, including the Muskogees, Seminoles, Uchees, and other subordinate tribes. They formerly inhabited Georgia, Florida, and Alabama.
Creeky
a.
• Containing, or abounding in, creeks; characterized by creeks; like a creek; winding.
Creel
n.
• An osier basket, such as anglers use.
(Spinning) A bar or set of bars with skewers for holding paying-off bobbins, as in the roving machine, throstle, and mule.
Creep
v. t.
• To move along the ground, or on any other surface, on the belly, as a worm or reptile; to move as a child on the hands and knees; to crawl.
• To move slowly, feebly, or timorously, as from unwillingness, fear, or weakness.
• To move in a stealthy or secret manner; to move imperceptibly or clandestinely; to steal in; to insinuate itself or one's self; as, age creeps upon us.
• To slip, or to become slightly displaced; as, the collodion on a negative, or a coat of varnish, may creep in drying; the quicksilver on a mirror may creep.
• To move or behave with servility or exaggerated humility; to fawn; as, a creeping sycophant.
• To grow, as a vine, clinging to the ground or to some other support by means of roots or rootlets, or by tendrils, along its length.
• To have a sensation as of insects creeping on the skin of the body; to crawl; as, the sight made my flesh creep.
• To drag in deep water with creepers, as for recovering a submarine cable.
n.
• The act or process of creeping.
• A distressing sensation, or sound, like that occasioned by the creeping of insects.
(Mining) A slow rising of the floor of a gallery, occasioned by the pressure of incumbent strata upon the pillars or sides; a gradual movement of mining ground.
Creeper
n.
• One who, or that which, creeps; any creeping thing.
(Bot.) A plant that clings by rootlets, or by tendrils, to the ground, or to trees, etc.; as, the Virginia creeper (Ampelopsis quinquefolia).
(Zool.) A small bird of the genus Certhia, allied to the wrens. The brown or common European creeper is C. familiaris, a variety of which (var. Americana) inhabits America; — called also tree creeper and creeptree. The American black and white creeper is Mniotilta varia.
• A kind of patten mounted on short pieces of iron instead of rings; also, a fixture with iron points worn on a shoe to prevent one from slipping.
• A spurlike device strapped to the boot, which enables one to climb a tree or pole; — called often telegraph creepers.
• A small, low iron, or dog, between the andirons.
• An instrument with iron hooks or claws for dragging at the bottom of a well, or any other body of water, and bringing up what may lie there.
• Any device for causing material to move steadily from one part of a machine to another, as an apron in a carding machine, or an inner spiral in a grain screen.
(Arch.) Crockets.
Creephole
n.
• A hole or retreat onto which an animal may creep, to escape notice or danger.
• A subterfuge; an excuse.
Creepie
n.
• A low stool.
Creepiness
n.
• An uneasy sensation as of insects creeping on the skin.
Creeping
a.
• Crawling, or moving close to the ground.
• Growing along, and clinging to, the ground, or to a wall, etc., by means of rootlets or tendrils.
Creepingly
adv.
• by creeping slowly; in the manner of a reptile; insidiously; cunningly.
Creeple
n.
• A creeping creature; a reptile.
• One who is lame; a cripple.
Creepy
a.
• Crawly; having or producing a sensation like that caused by insects creeping on the skin.
Crees
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) An Algonquin tribe of Indians, inhabiting a large part of British America east of the Rocky Mountains and south of Hudson's Bay.
Creese
n.
• A dagger or short sword used by the Malays, commonly having a serpentine blade.
Crefting
n.
• Croftland.
(Textile Manuf.) Exposing linen to the sun, on the grass, in the process of bleaching.
Cremaillere
n.
(Fort.) An indented or zigzaged line of intrenchment.
Cremaster
n.
(Anat.) A thin muscle which serves to draw up the testicle.
(Zool.) The apex of the last abdominal segment of an insect.
Cremasteric
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the cremaster; as, the cremasteric artery.
Cremate
v. t.
• To burn; to reduce to ashes by the action of fire, either directly or in an oven or retort; to incremate or incinerate; as, to cremate a corpse, instead of burying it.
Cremation
n.
• A burning; esp., the act or practice of cremating the dead.
Cremationist
n.
• One who advocates the practice of cremation.
Cremator
n.
• One who, or that which, cremmates or consumes to ashes.
Crematory
a.
• Pertaining to, or employed in, cremation.
Cremocarp
n.
(Bot.) The peculiar fruit of fennel, carrott, parsnip, and the like, consisting of a pair of carpels pendent from a supporting axis.
Cremona
n.
• A superior kind of violin, formerly made at Cremona, in Italy.
Cremor
n.
• Cream; a substance resembling cream; yeast; scum.
Crenation
n.
(Bot.) A rounded tooth on the edge of a leaf.
• The condition of being crenate.
Crenature
n.
(Bot.) A rounded tooth or notch of a crenate leaf, or any part that is crenate; — called also crenelle.
• The state of being crenated or notched.
Crenelate
v. t.
• To furnish with crenelles.
• To indent; to notch; as, a crenelated leaf.
Crenelation
n.
• The act of crenelating, or the state of being crenelated; an indentation or an embrasure.
Crenelled
a.
(Bot.) Same as Crenate.
Crenulation
n.
• A minute crenation.
• The state of being minutely scalloped.
Creole
n.
• One born of European parents in the American colonies of France or Spain or in the States which were once such colonies, esp. a person of French or Spanish descent, who is a native inhabitant of Louisiana, or one of the States adjoining, bordering on the Gulf of of Mexico.
a.
• Of or pertaining to a Creole or the Creoles.
Creosol
n.
(Chem.) A colorless liquid resembling phenol or carbolic acid, homologous with pyrocatechin, and obtained from beechwood tar and gum guaiacum.
Creosote
n.
(Chem.) Wood-tar oil; an oily antiseptic liquid, of a burning smoky taste, colorless when pure, but usually colored yellow or brown by impurity or exposure. It is a complex mixture of various phenols and their ethers, and is obtained by the distillation of wood tar, especially that of beechwood.
v. t.
• To saturate or impregnate with creosote, as timber, for the prevention of decay.
Crepe
n.
• Same as Crape.
Crepitant
a.
• Having a crackling sound; crackling; rattling.
Crepitate
v. i.
• To make a series of small, sharp, rapidly repeated explosions or sounds, as salt in fire; to crackle; to snap.
Crepitation
n.
• The act of crepitating or crackling.
(Med.) A grating or crackling sensation or sound, as that produced by rubbing two fragments of a broken bone together, or by pressing upon cellular tissue containing air.
• A crepitant rale.
Crepitus
n.
(Med.) The noise produced bu a sudden discharge of wind from the bowels.
• Same as Crepitation, 2.
Crepon
n.
• A thin stuff made of the finest wool or silk, or of wool and silk.
Crept
• imp. & p. p. of Creep.
Crescence
n.
• Increase; enlargement.
Crescendo
a. & adv.
(Mus.) With a constantly increasing volume of voice; with gradually increasing strength and fullness of tone; — a direction for the performance of music, indicated by the mark, or by writing the word on the score.
n.
(Mus.) A gradual increase in the strength and fullness of tone with which a passage is performed.
• A pssage to be performed with constantly increasing volume of tone.
Crescent
n.
• The increasing moon; the moon in her first quarter, or when defined by a concave and a convex edge; also, applied improperly to the old or decreasing moon in a like state.
• Anything having the shape of a crescent or new moon.
• A representation of the increasing moon, often used as an emblem or badge
• A symbol of Artemis, or Diana.
• The ancient symbol of Byzantium or Constantinople.
• The emblem of the Turkish Empire, adopted after the taking of Constantinople.
• Any one of three orders of knighthood; the first instituted by Charles I., king of Naples and Sicily, in 1268; the second by Rene of Anjou, in 1448; and the third by the Sultan Selim III., in 1801, to be conferred upon foreigners to whom Turkey might be indebted for valuable services.
(Her.) The emblem of the increasing moon with horns directed upward, when used in a coat of arms; — often used as a mark of cadency to distinguish a second son and his descendants.
a.
• Shaped like a crescent.
• Increasing; growing.
v. t.
• To form into a crescent, or something resembling a crescent.
• To adorn with crescents.
Crescentic
a.
• Crescent-shaped.
Crescentwise
adv.
• In the form of a crescent; like a crescent.
Crescive
a.
• Increasing; growing.
Cresol
n.
(Chem.) Any one of three metameric substances, CH3.C6H4.OH, homologous with and resembling phenol. They are obtained from coal tar and wood tar, and are colorless, oily liquids or solids.
Cresorcin
n.
(Chem.) Same as Isorcin.
Cress
n.
(Bot.) A plant of various species, chiefly cruciferous. The leaves have a moderately pungent taste, and are used as a salad and antiscorbutic.
Cresselle
n.
(Eccl.) A wooden rattle sometimes used as a substitute for a bell, in the Roman Catholic church, during the latter part of Holy Week, or the last week of Lent.
Cresset
n.
• An open frame or basket of iron, filled with combustible material, to be burned as a beacon; an open lamp or firrepan carried on a pole in nocturnal processions.
(Coopering) A small furnace or iron cage to hold fire for charring the inside of a cask, and making the staves flexible.
Cressy
a.
• Abounding in cresses.
Crest
n.
• A tuft, or other excrescence or natural ornament, growing on animal's head; the comb of a cock; the swelling on the head of a serpent; the lengthened feathers of the crown or nape of bird, etc.
• The plume of feathers, or other decoration, worn on a helmet; the distinctive ornament of a helmet, indicating the rank of the weare; hence, also, the helmet.
(Her.) A bearing worn, not upon the shield, but usually above it, or separately as an ornament for plate, liveries, and the like. It is a relic of the ancient cognizance.
• The upper curve of a horse's neck.
• The ridge or top of wave.
• The summit of a hill or mountain ridge.
• The helm or head, as typical of a high spirit; pride; courage.
(Arch.) The ornamental finishing which surmounts the ridge of a roof, canopy, etc.
(Engin.) The top line of a slope or embankment.
v. t.
• To furnish with, or surmount as, a crest; to serve as a crest for. Page 344 2. To mark with lines or streaks, like, or regarded as like, waving plumes.
v. i.
• To form a crest.
Crested
a.
• Having a crest.
(Zool.) Having a crest of feathers or hair upon the head.
(Bott.) Bearing any elevated appendage like a crest, as an elevated line or ridge, or a tuft.
Crestfallen
a.
• With hanging head; hence, dispirited; dejected; cowed.
• Having the crest, or upper part of the neck, hanging to one side; — said of a horse.
Cresting
n.
(Arch.) An ornamental finish on the top of a wall or ridge of a roof.
Crestless
a.
• Without a crest or escutcheon; of low birth.
Cresylic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, cresol, creosote, etc.
Cretaceous
a.
• Having the qualities of chalk;abounding with chalk; chalky; as, cretaceous rocks and formations.
Cretaceously
adv.
• In a chalky manner; as chalk.
Cretan
a.
• Pertaining to Crete, or Candia.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Crete or Candia.
Crete
n.
• A Cretan
Cretic
n.
(Gr. & Lat. Pros.) A poetic foot, composed of one short syllable between two long ones (—).
Creticism
n.
• Falsehood; lying; cretism.
Cretin
n.
• One afflicted with cretinism.
Cretinism
n.
• A condition of endemic or inherited idiocy, accompanied by physical degeneracy and deformity (usually with goiter), frequent in certain mountain valleys, esp. of the Alps.
Cretinous
a.
• Having the characteristics of a cretin.
Cretism
n.
• A Cretan practice; iying; a falsehood.
Cretonne
n.
• A strong white fabric with warp of hemp and welt of flax.
• A fabric with cotton warp and woolen weft.
• A kind of chintz with a glossy surface.
Cretor
n.
• One who creates, produces, or constitutes. Specifically, the Supreme Being.
Cretose
a.
• Chalky; cretaceous.
Creux
n.
• Used in English only in the expression en creux. Thus, engraving en creux is engraving in intaglio, or by sinking or hollowing out the design.
Crevalle
n.
(Zool.) The cavally or jurel.
• The pompano (Trachynotus Carolinus).
Crevasse
n.
• A deep crevice or fissure, as in embankment; one of the clefts or fissure by which the mass of a glacier is divided.
• A breach in the levee or embankment of a river, caused by the pressure of the water, as on the lower Mississippi.
Crevet
n.
• A crucible or melting pot; a cruset.
Crevice
n.
• A narrow opening resulting from a split or crack or the separation of a junction; a cleft; a fissure; a rent.
v. t.
• To crack; to flaw.
Creviced
a.
• Having a crevice or crevices; as, a creviced structure for storing ears of corn.
Crevis
n.
(Zool.) The crawfish.
Crew
n.
(Zool.) The Manx shearwater.
n.
• A company of people associated together; an assemblage; a throng.
• The company of seamen who man a ship, vessel, or at; the company belonging to a vessel or a boat.
• In an extended sense, any small body of men associated for a purpose; a gang; as (Naut.), the carpenter's crew; the boatswain's crew.
• imp. of Crow
Crewel
n.
• Worsted yarn,, slackly twisted, used for embroidery.
Crewelwork
n.
• Embroidery in crewels, commonly done upon some plain material, such as linen.
Crib
n.
• A manger or rack; a feeding place for animals.
• A stall for oxen or other cattle.
• A small inclosed bedstead or cot for a child.
• A box or bin, or similar wooden structure, for storing grain, salt, etc.; as, a crib for corn or oats.
• A hovel; a hut; a cottage.
(Mining) A structure or frame of timber for a foundation, or for supporting a roof, or for lining a shaft.
• A structure of logs to be anchored with stones; — used for docks, pier, dams, etc.
• A small raft of timber.
• A small theft; anything purloined;; a plagiaris; hence, a translation or key, etc., to aid a student in preparing or reciting his lessons.
• A miner's luncheon.
(Card Playing) The discarded cards which the dealer can use in scoring points in cribbage.
v. t.
• To shut up or confine in a narrow habitation; to cage; to cramp.
• To pilfer or purloin; hence, to steal from an author; to appropriate; to plagiarize; as, to crib a line from Milton.
v. i.
• To crowd together, or to be confined, as in a crib or in narrow accommodations.
• To make notes for dishonest use in recitation or examination.
• To seize the manger or other solid object with the teeth and draw in wind; — said of a horse.
Cribbage
n.
• A game of cards, played by two or four persons, in which there is a crib. (See Crib, 11.) It is characterized by a great variety of chances.
Cribbing
n.
• The act of inclosing or confining in a crib or in close quarters.
• Purloining; stealing; plagiarizing.
(Mining) A framework of timbers and plank backing for a shaft lining, to prevent caving, percolation of water, etc.
• A vicious habit of a horse; crib-biting. The horse lays hold of the crib or manger with his teeth and draws air into the stomach with a grunting sound.
Cribble
n.
• A coarse sieve or screen.
• Coarse flour or meal.
v. t.
• To cause to pass through a sieve or riddle; to sift.
a.
• Coarse; as, cribble bread.
Cribellum
n.
(Zool.) A peculiar perforated organ of certain spiders (Ciniflonidae), used for spinning a special kind of silk.
Cribrate
a.
• Cribriform.
Cribration
n.
(Pharmacy) The act or process of separating the finer parts of drugs from the coarser by sifting.
Cribriform
a.
• Resembling, or having the form of, a sieve; pierced with hokes; as, the cribriform plate of the ethmoid bone; a cribriform compress.
Cribrose
a.
• Perforated like a sieve; cribriform.
Cric
n.
• The ring which turns inward and condenses the flame of a lamp.
Crick
n.
• The creaking of a door, or a noise resembling it.
n.
• A painful, spasmodic affection of the muscles of some part of the body, as of the neck or back, rendering it difficult to move the part.
• A small jackscrew.
Cricket
n.
(Zool.) An orthopterous insect of the genus Gryllus, and allied genera. The males make chirping, musical notes by rubbing together the basal parts of the veins of the front wings.
n.
• A low stool.
• A game much played in England, and sometimes in America, with a ball, bats, and wickets, the players being arranged in two contesting parties or sides.
(Arch.) A small false roof, or the raising of a portion of a roof, so as to throw off water from behind an obstacle, such as a chimney.
v. i.
• To play at cricket.
Cricketer
n.
• One who plays at cricket.
Cricoid
a.
(Anat.) Resembling a ring; — said esp. of the cartilage at the larynx, and the adjoining parts.
Cricothyroid
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining both to the cricoid and the thyroid cartilages.
Cried
• imp. & p. p. of Cry.
Crier
n.
• One who cries; one who makes proclamation. Specifically, an officer who proclams the orders or directions of a court, or who gives public notice by loud proclamation; as, a town-crier.
Crim
v. t.
• To fold or plait in regular undulation in such a way that the material will retain the shape intended; to give a wavy apperance to; as, to crimp the border of a cap; to crimp a ruffle. Cf. Crisp.
• To pinch and hold; to seize.
• Hence, to entrap into the military or naval service; as, to crimp seamen.
(Cookery) To cause to contract, or to render more crisp, as the flesh of a fish, by gashing it, when living, with a knife; as, to crimp skate, etc.
Crime
n.
• Any violation of law, either divine or human; an omission of a duty commanded, or the commission of an act forbidden by law.
• Gross violation of human law, in distinction from a misdemeanor or trespass, or other slight offense. Hence, also, any aggravated offense against morality or the public welfare; any outrage or great wrong.
• Any great wickedness or sin; iniguity.
• That which occasion crime.
Crimeful
a.
• Criminal; wicked; contrary to law, right, or dury.
Crimeless
a.
• Free from crime; innocent.
Criminal
a.
• Guilty of crime or sin.
• Involving a crime; of the nature of a crime; — said of an act or of conduct; as, criminal carelessness.
• Relating to crime; — opposed to civil; as, the criminal code.
n.
• One who has commited a crime; especially, one who is found guilty by verdict, confession, or proof; a malefactor; a felon.
Criminalist
n.
• One versed in criminal law.
Criminality
n.
• The quality or state of being criminal; that which constitutes a crime; guiltiness; guilt.
Criminally
adv.
• In violation of law; wickedly.
Criminalness
n.
• Criminality.
Criminate
v. t.
• To accuse of, or charge with, a crime.
• To involve in a crime or in its consequences; to render liable to a criminal charge.
Crimination
n.
• The act of accusing; accusation; charge; complaint.
Criminative
a.
• Charging with crime; accusing; criminatory.
Criminatory
a.
• Relating to, or involving, crimination; accusing; as, a criminatory conscience.
Criminology
n.
• A treatise on crime or the criminal population.
Criminous
a.
• Criminal; involving great crime or grave charges; very wicked; heinous.
Crimp
a.
• Easily crumbled; friable; brittle.
• Weak; inconsistent; contradictory.
n.
• A coal broker.
• One who decoys or entraps men into the military or naval service.
• A keeper of a low lodging house where sailors and emigrants are entrapped and fleeced.
• Hair which has been crimped; — usually in pl.
• A game at cards.
Crimpage
n.
• The act or practice of crimping; money paid to a crimp for shipping or enlisting men.
Crimper
n.
• One who, or that which, crimps; as: (a) A curved board or frame over which the upper of a boot or shoe is stretched to the required shape. (b) A device for giving hair a wavy apperance. (c) A machine for crimping or ruffling textile fabrics.
Crimple
v. t.
• To cause to shrink or draw together; to contract; to curl.
Crimpy
a.
• Having a crimped appearance; frizzly; as, the crimpy wool of the Saxony sheep.
Crimson
n.
• A deep red color tinged with blue; also, red color in general.
a.
• Of a deep red color tinged with blue; deep red.
v. t.
• To dye with crimson or deep red; to redden.
b. t.
• To become crimson; to blush.
Crinal
a.
• Of or pertaining to the hair.
Crinated
a.
• Having hair; hairy.
Crinatory
a.
• Crinitory.
Crincum
n.
• A twist or bend; a turn; a whimsey.
Crined
a.
(Her.) Having the hair of a different tincture from the rest of the body; as, a charge crined of a red tincture.
Cringe
v. t.
• To draw one's self together as in fear or servility; to bend or crouch with base humility; to wince; hence; to make court in a degrading manner; to fawn.
v. t.
• To contract; to draw together; to cause to shrink or wrinkle; to distort.
n.
• Servile civility; fawning; a shrinking or bowing, as in fear or servility.
Cringeling
n.
• One who cringes meanly; a fawner.
Cringer
n.
• One who cringes.
Cringingly
adv.
• In a cringing manner.
Cringle
n.
• A withe for fastening a gate.
(Naut.) An iron or pope thimble or grommet worked into or attached to the edges and corners of a sail; — usually in the plural. The cringles are used for making fast the bowline bridles, earings, etc.
Crinicultural
a.
• Relating to the growth of hair.
Crinigerous
a.
• Bearing hair; hairy.
Crinital
a.
• Same as Crinite, 1.
Crinite
a.
• Having the appearance of a tuft of hair; having a hairlike tail or train.
(Bot.) Bearded or tufted with hairs.
Crinitory
a.
• Of or relating to hair; as, a crinitory covering.
Crinkle
v. t.
• To form with short turns, bends, or wrinkles; to mold into inequalites or sinuosities; to cause to wrinkle or curl.
v. i.
• To turn or wind; ti run in and out in many short bends or turns; to curl; to run in wavws; to wrinkle; also, to rustle, as stiff cloth when moved.
n.
• A winding or turn; wrinkle; sinuosity.
Crinkled
a.
• Having short bends, turns, or wrinkles; wrinkled; wavy; zigzag.
Crinkly
a.
• Having crinkles; wavy; wrinkly.
Crinoid
a.
(Zool.) Crinoidal.
n.
• One of the Crinoidea.
Crinoidal
a.
(Zool.) Of pertaining to crinoids; consisting of, or containing, crinoids.
Crinoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A large class of Echinodermata, including numerous extinct families and genera, but comparatively few living ones. Most of the fossil species, like some that are recent, were attached by a jointed stem.
Crinoidean
n.
(Zool) One of the Crinoidea.
Crinoline
n.
• A kind of stiff cloth, used chiefly by women, for underskirts, to expand the gown worn over it; — so called because originally made of hair.
• A lady's skirt made of any stiff material; latterly, a hoop skirt.
Crinose
a.
• Hairy.
Crinosity
n.
• Hairiness.
Crinum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of bulbous plants, of the order Amaryllidace, cultivated as greenhouse plants on account of their beauty.
Criosphinx
n.
• A sphinx with the head of a ram.
Cripple
n.
• One who creeps, halts, or limps; one who has lost, or never had, the use of a limb or limbs; a lame person; hence, one who is partially disabled.
a.
• Lame; halting.
v. t.
• To deprive of the use of a limb, particularly of a leg or foot; to lame.
• To deprive of strength, activity, or capability for service or use; to disable; to deprive of resources; as, to be financially crippled.
Crippled
a.
• Lamed; lame; disabled; impeded.
Crippleness
n.
• Lameness.
Crippler
n.
• A wooden tool used in graining leather.
Crippling
n.
• Spars or timbers set up as a support against the side of a building.
Cripply
a.
• Lame; disabled; in a crippled condition.
Crisis
n.
• The point of time when it is to be decided whether any affair or course of action must go on, or be modified or terminate; the decisive moment; the turning point.
(Med.) That change in a disease which indicates whether the result is to be recovery or death; sometimes, also, a striking change of symptoms attended by an outward manifestation, as by an eruption or sweat.
Crisp
a.
• Curling in stiff curls or ringlets; as, crisp hair.
• Curled with the ripple of the water.
• Brittle; friable; in a condition to break with a short, sharp fracture; as, crisp snow.
• Possessing a certain degree of firmness and freshness; in a fresh, unwilted condition.
• Lively; sparking; effervescing.
• Brisk; crackling; cheerful; lively.
v. t.
• To curl; to form into ringlets, as hair, or the nap of cloth; to interweave, as the branches of trees.
• To cause to undulate irregularly, as crape or water; to wrinkle; to cause to ripple. Cf. Crimp.
• To make crisp or brittle, as in cooking.
v. i.
• To undulate or ripple. Cf. Crisp, v. t.
n.
• That which is crisp or brittle; the state of being crisp or brittle; as, burned to a crisp; specifically, the rind of roasted pork; crackling.
Crispation
n.
• The act or process of curling, or the state of being curled.
• A very slight convulsive or spasmodic contraction of certain muscles, external or internal.
Crispature
n.
• The state of being crispate.
Crisper
n.
• One who, or that which, crisps or curls; an instrument for making little curls in the nap of cloth, as in chinchilla.
Crispin
n.
• A shoemaker; — jocularly so called from the patron sant of the craft.
• A member of a union or association of shoemakers.
Crisply
adv.
• In a crisp manner.
Crispness
n.
• The state or quality of being crisp.
Crispy
a.
• Formed into short, close ringlets; frizzed; crisp; as, crispy locks.
• Crisp; brittle; as. a crispy pie crust.
Crissal
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the crissum; as, crissal feathers.
• Having highly colored under tail coverts; as, the crissal thrasher.
Crisscross
n.
• A mark or cross, as the signature of a person who is unable to write.
• A child's game played on paper or on a slate, consisting of lines arranged in the form of a cross.
v. t.
• To mark or cover with cross lines; as, a paper was crisscrossed with red marks.
adv.
• In opposite directions; in a way to cross something else; crossing one another at various angles and in various ways.
• With opposition or hindrance; at cross purposes; contrarily; as, things go crisscross.
Crissum
n.
(Zool.) That part of a bird, or the feathers, surrounding the cloacal opening; the under tail coverts.
Cristallology
n.
• The science of the crystalline structure of inorganic bodies.
Cristate
a.
(Bot. & Zool.) Crested.
Criterion
n.
• A standard of judging; any approved or established rule or test, by which facts, principles opinions, and conduct are tried in forming a correct judgment respecting them.
Crith
n.
(Chem.) The unit for estimating the weight of ariform substances; — the weight of a liter of hydrogen at 0 centigrade, and with a tension of 76 centimeters of mercury. It is 0.0896 of a gram, or 1.38274 grains.
Crithomancu
n.
• A kind of divination by means of the dough of the cakes offered in the ancient sacrifices, and the meal strewed over the victims.
Critic
n.
• One skilled in judging of the merits of literary or artistic works; a connoisseur; an adept; hence, one who examines literary or artistic works, etc., and passes judgment upon them; a reviewer.
• One who passes a rigorous or captious judgment; one who censures or finds fault; a harsh examiner or judge; a caviler; a carper.
• The art of criticism.
• An act of criticism; a critique.
a.
• Of or pertaining to critics or criticism; critical.
v. i.
• To criticise; to play the critic.
Critical
a.
• Qualified to criticise, or pass judgment upon, literary or artistic productions.
• Pertaining to criticism or the critic's art; of the nature of a criticism; accurate; as, critical knowledge; a critical dissertation.
• Inclined to make nice distinctions, or to exercise careful judgment and selection; exact; nicely judicious.
• Inclined to criticise or find fault; fastidious; captious; censorious; exacting.
• Characterized by thoroughness and a reference to principles, as becomes a critic; as, a critical analysis of a subject.
• Pertaining to, or indicating, a crisis, turning point, or specially important juncture; important as regards consequences; hence, of doubtful issue; attended with risk; dangerous; as, the critical stage of a fever; a critical situation.
Critically
adv.
• In a critical manner; with nice discernment; accurately; exactly.
• At a crisis; at a critical time; in a situation. place, or condition of decisive consequence; as, a fortification critically situated.
Criticalness
n.
• The state or quality of being critical, or of occurring at a critical time.
• Accuracy in examination or decision; exactness.
Criticisable
a.
• Capable of being criticised.
Criticise
v. t.
• To examine and judge as a critic; to pass literary or artistic judgment upon; as, to criticise an author; to criticise a picture.
• To express one's views as to the merit or demerit of; esp., to animadvert upon; to find fault with; as, to criticise conduct.
v. i.
• To act as a critic; to pass literary or artistic judgment; to play the critic; — formerly used with on or upon.
• To discuss the merits or demerits of a thing or person; esp., to find fault.
Criticiser
n.
• One who criticises; a critic.
Criticism
n.
• The rules and principles which regulate the practice of the critic; the art of judging with knowledge and propriety of the beauties and faults of a literary performance, or of a production in the fine arts; as, dramatic criticism.
• The act of criticising; a critical judgment passed or expressed; a critical observation or detailed examination and review; a critique; animadversion; censure.
Critique
n.
• The art of criticism.
• A critical examination or estimate of a work of literature or art; a critical dissertation or essay; a careful and through analysis of any subject; a criticism; as, Kant's "Critique of Pure Reason."
• A critic; one who criticises.
v. t.
• To criticise or pass judgment upon.
Critticaster
n.
• A contemptible or vicious critic.
Crizzel
n.
• A kind of roughness on the surface of glass, which clouds its transparency.
Croak
v. i.
• To make a low, hoarse noise in the throat, as a frog, a raven, or a crow; hence, to make any hoarse, dismal sound.
• To complain; especially, to grumble; to forebode evil; to utter complaints or forebodings habitually.
v. t.
• To utter in a low, hoarse voice; to announce by croaking; to forebode; as, to croak disaster.
n.
• The coarse, harsh sound uttered by a frog or a raven, or a like sound.
Croaker
n.
• One who croaks, murmurs, grumbles, or complains unreasonably; one who habitually forebodes evil.
(Zool.) A small American fish (Micropogon undulatus), of the Atlantic coast.
• An American fresh-water fish (Aplodinotus grunniens); — called also drum.
• The surf fish of California.
Croat
n.
• A native of Croatia, in Austria; esp., one of the native Slavic race.
• An irregular soldier, generally from Croatia.
Croatian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Croatia.
n.
• A Croat.
Crocein
n.
(Chem.) A name given to any one of several yellow or scarlet dyestuffs of artificial production and complex structure. In general they are diazo and sulphonic acid derivatives of benzene and naphthol.
Croceous
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or like, saffron; deep reddish yellow.
Crocetin
n.
(Chem.) A dyestuff, obtained from the Chinese croicin, which produces a brilliant yellow.
Croche
n.
• A little bud or knob at the top of a deer's antler.
Crochet
n.
• A kind of knitting done by means of a hooked needle, with worsted, silk, or cotton; crochet work. Commonly used adjectively.
v. t. & i.
• To knit with a crochet needle or hook; as, to rochett a shawl.
Crociary
n.
(Eccl.) One who carries the cross before an archbishop.
Crocidolite
n.
(Min.) A mineral occuring in silky fibers of a lavender blue color. It is related to hornblende and is essentially a silicate of iron and soda; — called also blue asbestus. A silicified form, in which the fibers penetrating quartz are changed to oxide of iron, is the yellow brown tiger-eye of the jewelers.
Crocin
n.
(Chem.) The coloring matter of Chinese yellow pods, the fruit of Gardenia grandiflora.
• A red powder (called also polychroite), which is made from the saffron (Crocus sativus).
Crock
n.
• The loose black particles collected from combustion, as on pots and kettles, or in a chimney; soot; smut; also, coloring matter which rubs off from cloth.
v. t.
• To soil by contact, as with soot, or with the coloring matter of badly dyed cloth.
v. i.
• To give off crock or smut.
n.
• A low stool.
n.
• Any piece of crockery, especially of coarse earthenware; an earthen pot or pitcher.
v. t.
• To lay up in a crock; as, to crock butter.
Crocker
n.
• A potter.
Crockery
n.
• Earthenware; vessels formed of baked clay, especially the coarser kinds.
Crocket
n.
(Arch.) An ornament often resembling curved and bent foliage, projecting from the sloping edge of a gable, spire, etc.
• A croche, or knob, on the top of a stag's antler.
Crocketed
a.
(Arch.) Ornamented with crockets.
Crocketing
n.
(Arch.) Ornamentation with crockets.
Crocky
a.
• Smutty.
Crocodile
n.
(Zool.) A large reptile of the genus Crocodilus, of several species. They grow to the length of sixteen or eighteen feet, and inhabit the large rivers of Africa, Asia, and America. The eggs, laid in the sand, are hatched by the sun's heat. The best known species is that of the Nile (C. vulgaris, or C. Niloticus). The Florida crocodile (C. Americanus) is much less common than the alligator and has longer jaws. The name is also sometimes applied to the species of other related genera, as the gavial and the alligator.
(Logic) A fallacious dilemma, mythically supposed to have been first used by a crocodile.
Crocodilia
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of reptiles including the crocodiles, gavials, alligators, and many extinct kinds.
Crocodilian
a.
(Zool.) Like, or pertaining to, the crocodile; characteristic of the crocodile.
n.
• One of the Crocodilia.
Crocodility
n.
(Logic) A caption or sophistical mode of arguing.
Crocoisite
n.
(Min.) Same as Crocoite.
Crocoite
n.
(Min.) Lead chromate occuring in crystals of a bright hyacinth red color; — called also red lead ore.
Croconate
n.
(Chem.) A salt formed by the union of croconic acid with a base.
Croconic
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling saffron; having the color of saffron; as, croconic acid.
• Pertaining to, or derived from, croconic acid.
Crocose
n.
(Chem.) A white crystalline sugar, metameric with glucose, obtained from the coloring matter of saffron.
Crocus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of iridaceous plants, with pretty blossoms rising separately from the bulb or corm. C. vernus is one of the earliest of spring-blooming flowers; C. sativus produces the saffron, and blossoms in the autumn.
(Chem.) A deep yellow powder; the oxide of some metal calcined to a red or deep yellow color; esp., the oxide of iron (Crocus of Mars or colcothar) thus produced from salts of irron, and used as a polishing powder.
Croesus
n.
• A king of Lydia who flourished in the 6th century b. c., and was renowned for his vast wealth; hence, a common appellation for a very rich man; as, he is veritable Croesus.
Croft
n.
• A small, inclosed field, adjoining a house; a small farm.
Crofter
n.
• One who rents and tills a small farm or helding; as, the crofters of Scotland.
Croftland
n.
• Land of superior quality, on which successive crops are raised.
Croise
n.
• A pilgrim bearing or wearing a cross.
• A crusader.
Croissante
a.
(Her.) Terminated with crescent; — said of a cross the ends of which are so terminated.
Croker
n.
• A cultivator of saffron; a dealer in saffron.
Croma
n.
(Mus.) A quaver.
Cromlech
n.
(Archol.) A monument of rough stones composed of one or more large ones supported in a horizontal position upon others. They are found chiefly in countris inhabited by the ancient Celts, and are of a period anterior to the introduction of Christianity into these countries.
Cromorna
n.
(Mus.) A certain reed stop in the organ, of a quality of tone resembling that of the oboe.
Crone
n.
• An old ewe.
• An old woman; — usually in contempt.
Cronel
n.
• The iron head of a tilting spear.
Cronet
n.
• The coronet of a horse.
Cronian
a.
• Saturnian; — applied to the North Polar Sea.
Cronstedtite
n.
(Min.) A mineral consisting principally of silicate of iron, and crystallizing in hexagonal prisms with perfect basal cleavage; — so named from the Swedish mineralogist Cronstedt.
Crony
n.
• A crone.
• An intimate companion; a familiar frend
Croodle
v. i.
• To cower or cuddle together, as from fear or cold; to lie close and snug together, as pigs in straw.
• To fawn or coax.
• To coo.
Crook
n.
• A bend, turn, or curve; curvature; flexure.
• Any implement having a bent or crooked end. Especially: (a) The staff used by a shepherd, the hook of which serves to hold a runaway sheep. (b) A bishop's staff of office. Cf. Pastoral stafu.
• A pothook.
• An artifice; trick; tricky device; subterfuge.
(Mus.) A small tube, usually curved, applied to a trumpet, horn, etc., to change its pitch or key.
• A person given to fraudulent practices; an accomplice of thieves, forgers, etc.
v. t.
• To turn from a straight line; to bend; to curve.
• To turn from the path of rectitude; to pervert; to misapply; to twist.
v. i.
• To bend; to curve; to wind; to have a curvature.
Crookack
a.
• Hunched.
Crookback
n.
• A crooked back; one who has a crooked or deformed back; a hunchback.
Crookbill
n.
(Zool) A New Zealand plover (Anarhynchus frontalis), remarkable for having the end of the beak abruptly bent to the right.
Crooked
a.
• Characterized by a crook or curve; not straight; turning; bent; twisted; deformed.
• Not straightforward; deviating from rectitude; distorted from the right.
• False; dishonest; fraudulent; as, crooked dealings.
Crookedly
adv.
• In a curved or crooked manner; in a perverse or untoward manner.
Crookedness
n.
• The condition or quality of being crooked; hence, deformity of body or of mind; deviation from moral rectitude; perverseness.
Crooken
v. t.
• To make crooked.
Croon
v. i.
• To make a continuous hollow moan, as cattle do when in pain.
• To hum or sing in a low tone; to murmur softly.
v. t.
• To sing in a low tone, as if to one's self; to hum.
• To soothe by singing softly.
n.
• A low, continued moan; a murmur.
• A low singing; a plain, artless melody.
Crop
n.
• The pouchlike enlargement of the gullet of birds, serving as a receptacle for food; the craw.
• The top, end, or highest part of anything, especially of a plant or tree.
• That which is cropped, cut, or gathered from a single felld, or of a single kind of grain or fruit, or in a single season; especially, the product of what is planted in the earth; fruit; harvest.
• Grain or other product of the field while standing.
• Anything cut off or gathered.
• Hair cut close or short, or the act or style of so cutting; as, a convict's crop.
(Arch.) A projecting ornament in carved stone. Specifically, a finial.
(Mining.) Tin ore prepared for smelting.
• Outcrop of a vein or seam at the surface.
• A riding whip with a loop instead of a lash.
v. t.
• To cut off the tops or tips of; to bite or pull off; to browse; to pluck; to mow; to reap.
• Fig.: To cut off, as if in harvest.
• To cause to bear a crop; as, to crop a field.
v. i.
• To yield harvest.
Cropful
a.
• Having a full crop or belly; satiated.
Cropper
n.
• One that crops.
• A variety of pigeon with a large crop; a pouter.
(Mech.) A machine for cropping, as for shearing off bolts or rod iron, or for facing cloth.
• A fall on one's head when riding at full speed, as in hunting; hence, a sudden failure or collapse.
Cropsick
a.
• Sick from excess in eating or drinking.
Cropusculine
a.
• Crepuscular.
Croquet
n.
• An open-air game in which two or more players endeavor to drive wooden balls, by means of mallets, through a series of hoops or arches set in the ground according to some pattern.
• The act of croqueting.
v. t.
• In the game of croquet, to drive away an opponent's ball, after putting one's own in contact with it, by striking one's own ball with the mallet.
Crore
n.
• Ten millions; as, a crore of rupees (which is nearly $5,000,000).
Crosier
n.
• The pastoral staff of a bishop (also of an archbishop, being the symbol of his office as a shepherd of the flock of God.
Crosiered
a.
• Bearing a crosier.
Cross
n.
• A gibbet, cosisting of two pieces of timber placed transversely upon one another, in various forms, as a T, or +, with the horizontal piece below the upper end of the upright, or as an X. It was anciently used in the execution of criminals.
• The sign or mark of the cross, made with the finger, or in ink, etc., or actually represented in some material; the symbol of Christ's death; the ensign and chosen symbol of Christianity, of a Christian people, and of Christendom.
• Affiction regarded as a test of patience or virtue; trial; disappointment; opposition; misfortune.
• A piece of money stamped with the figure of a cross, also, that side of such a piece on which the cross is stamped; hence, money in general.
• An appendage or ornament or anything in the form of a cross; a badge or ornamental device of the general shape of a cross; hence, such an ornament, even when varying considerably from that form; thus, the Cross of the British Order of St. George and St. Michael consist of a central medallion with seven arms radiating from it.
(Arch.) A monument in the form of a cross, or surmounted bu a cross, set up in a public place; as, a market cross; a boundary cross; Charing Cross in London.
(Her.) A common heraldic bearing, of which there are many varieties.
• The crosslike mark or symbol used instead of a signature by those unable to write.
• Church lands.
• A line drawn across or through another line.
• Hence: A mixing of breeds or stock, especially in cattle breeding; or the product of such intermixture; a hybrid of any kind.
(Surveying) An instrument for laying of offsets perpendicular to the main course.
(Mech.) A pipe-fitting with four branches the axes of which usually form's right angle.
a.
• Not parallel; lying or falling athwart; transverse; oblique; intersecting.
• Not accordant with what is wished or expected; interrupting; adverse; contrary; thwarting; perverse.
• Characterized by, or in a state of, peevishness, fretfullness, or ill humor; as, a cross man or woman.
• Made in an opposite direction, or an inverse relation; mutually inverse; interchanged; as, cross interrogatories; cross marriages, as when a brother and sister marry persons standing in the same relation to each other.
prep.
• Athwart; across. A fox was taking a walk one night cross a village.
v. t.
• To put across or athwart; to cause to intersect; as, to cross the arms.
• To lay or draw something, as a line, across; as, to cross the letter t.
• To pass from one side to the other of; to pass or move over; to traverse; as, to cross a stream.
• To pass, as objects going in an opposite direction at the same time.
• To run counter to; to thwart; to obstruct; to hinder; to clash or interfere with.
• To interfere and cut off; to debar.
• To make the sign of the cross upon; — followed by the reflexive pronoun; as, he crossed himself.
• To cancel by marking crosses on or over, or drawing a line across; to erase; — usually with out, off, or over; as, to cross out a name.
• To cause to interbreed; — said of different stoocks or races; to mix the breed of.
v. i.
• To lie or be athwart.
• To move or pass from one side to the other, or from place to place; to make a transit; as, to cross from New York to Liverpool.
• To be inconsistent.
• To interbreed, as races; to mix distinct breeds.
Crossbar
n.
• A transverse bar or piece, as a bar across a door, or as the iron bar or stock which passes through the shank of an anchor to insure its turning fluke down.
Crossbarred
a.
• Secured by, or furnished with, crossbars.
• Made or patterned in lines crossing each other; as, crossbarred muslin.
Crossbeak
n.
(Zool.) Same as Crossbill.
Crossbeam
n.
(Arch.) A girder.
(Naut.) A beam laid across the bitts, to which the cable is fastened when riding at anchor.
Crossbill
(Law) A bill brought by a defendant, in an equity or chancery suit, against the plaintiff, respecting the matter in question in that suit.
n.
(Zool.) A bird of the genus Loxia, allied to the finches. Their mandibles are strongly curved and cross each other; the crossbeak.
Crossbite
n.
• A deeption; a cheat.
b. t.
• To deceive; to trick; to gull.
Crossbones
n. pl.
• A representation of two of the leg bones or arm bones of a skeleton, laid crosswise, often surmounted with a skull, and serving as a symbol of death.
Crossbow
n.
(Archery) A weapon, used in discharging arrows, formed by placing a bow crosswise on a stock.
Crossbower
n.
• A crossbowman.
Crossbowman
n.
• One who shoots with a crossbow.
Crossbred
a.
(Stock Breeding) Produced by mixing distinct breeds; mongrel.
Crossbreed
n.
• A breed or an animal produced from parents of different breeds; a new variety, as of plants, combining the qualites of two parent varieties or stocks.
• Anything partaking of the natures of two different things; a hybrid.
Crosscut
• , v. t. To cut across or through; to intersect.
n.
• A short cut across; a path shorter than by the high road.
(Mining) A level driven across the course of a vein, or across the main workings, as from one gangway to another.
Crossette
n.
(Arch.) A return in one of the corners of the architrave of a door or window; — called also ancon, ear, elbow.
• The shoulder of a joggled keystone.
Crossfish
n.
(Zool.) A starfish.
Crossflow
v. i.
• To flow across, or in a contrary direction.
Crossgrained
a.
• Having the grain or fibers run diagonally, or more or less transversely an irregularly, so as to interfere with splitting or planing.
• Perverse; untractable; contrary.
Crosshatching
n.
• In drawing and line engraving, shading with lines that cross one another at an angle.
Crosshead
n.
(Mach.) A beam or bar across the head or end of a rod, etc., or a block attached to it and carrying a knuckle pin; as the solid crosspiece running between parallel slides, which receives motion from the piston of a steam engine and imparts it to the connecting rod, which is hinged to the crosshead.
Crossing
n.
• The act by which anything is crossed; as, the crossing of the ocean.
• The act of making the sign of the cross.
• The act of interbreeding; a mixing of breeds.
• Intersection, as of two paths or roads.
• A place where anything (as a stream) is crossed; a paved walk across a street.
• Contradiction; thwarting; obstruction.
Crossjack
n.
(Naut.) The lowest square sail, or the lower yard of the mizzenmast.
Crosslegged
a.
• Having the legs crossed.
Crosslet
n.
• A small cross.
• A crucible.
a.
(Her.) Crossed again; — said of a cross the arms of which are crossed. SeeCross-crosslet.
Crossly
adv.
• Athwart; adversely; unfortunately; peevishly; fretfully; with ill humor.
Crossnath
v. t.
• To shade by means of crosshatching.
Crossness
n.
• The quality or state of being cross; peevishness; fretfulness; ill humor.
Crossopterygian
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Crossopterygii.
n.
• One of the Crossopterygii.
Crossopterygii
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of ganoid fishes including among living species the bichir (Polypterus).
Crosspatch
n.
• An ill-natured person.
Crosspiece
n.
• A piece of any structure which is fitted or framed crosswise.
(Naut.) A bar or timber connecting two knightheads or two bitts.
Crossroad
n.
• A road that crosses another; an obscure road intersecting or avoiding the main road.
Crossrow
n.
• The alphabet; — called also Christcross-row.
• A row that crosses others.
Crossruff
n.
(Whist) The play in whist where partners trump each a different suit, and lead to each other for that purpose; — called also seesaw.
Crosstrees
n. pl.
(Naut.) Pieces of timber at a masthead, to which are attached the upper shrouds. At the head of lower masts in large vessels, they support a semicircular platform called the "top."
Crosswise
adv.
• In the form of a cross; across; transversely.
Crosswort
n.
(Bot.) A name given to several inconspicuous plants having leaves in whorls of four, as species of Crucianella, Valantia, etc.
Crotalaria
n.
(Bot.) A genus of leguminous plants; rattlebox.
Crotaline
a.
(Zool.) Resembling, or pertaining to, the Crotalidae, or Rattlesnake family.
Crotalo
n.
• A Turkish musical instrument.
Crotalum
n.
(Mus.) A kind of castanet used by the Corybantes.
Crotalus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of poisonous serpents, including the rattlesnakes.
Crotaphite
n.
(Anat.) The temple or temporal fossa. Also used adjectively.
Crotaphitic
n.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the temple; temporal.
Crotch
n.
• The angle formed by the parting of two legs or branches; a fork; the point where a trunk divides; as, the crotch of a tree.
(Naut.) A stanchion or post of wood or iron, with two arms for supporting a boom, spare yards, etc.; — called also crane and crutch.
Crotched
a.
• Having a crotch; forked.
• Cross; peevish.
Crotchet
n.
• A forked support; a crotch.
(Mus.) A time note, with a stem, having one fourth the value of a semibreve, one half that of a minim, and twice that of a quaver; a quarter note.
(Fort.) An indentation in the glacis of the covered way, at a point where a traverse is placed.
(Mil.) The arrangement of a body of troops, either forward or rearward, so as to form a line nearly perpendicular to the general line of battle.
(Print.) A bracket.
(Med.) An instrument of a hooked form, used in certain cases in the extraction of a fetus.
• A perverse fancy; a whim which takes possession of the mind; a conceit.
v. i.
• To play music in measured time.
Crotcheted
a.
• Marked or measured by crotchets; having musical notation.
Crotchetiness
n.
• The state or character of being crotchety, or whimsical.
Crotchety
a.
• Given to crotchets; subject to whims; as, a crotchety man.
Croton
n.
(Bot.) A genus of euphorbiaceous plants belonging to tropical countries.
Crotonic
a.
• Of or pertaining to, or derived from, a plant of the genus Croton, or from croton oil.
Crotonine
n.
(Chem.) A supposed alkaloid obtained from croton oil by boiling it with water and magnesia, since found to be merely a magnesia soap of the oil.
Crotonylene
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, volatile, pungent liquid, C4H6, produced artificially, and regarded as an unsaturated hydrocarbon of the acetylene series, and analogous to crotonic acid.
Crottles
n. pl.
• A name given to various lichens gathered for dyeing.
Crouch
v. i.
• To bend down; to stoop low; to lie close to the ground with the logs bent, as an animal when waiting for prey, or in fear.
• To bend servilely; to stoop meanly; to fawn; to cringe.
v. t.
• To sign with the cross; to bless.
• To bend, or cause to bend, as in humility or fear.
Crouched
a.
• Marked with the sign of the cross.
Crouke
n.
• A crock; a jar.
Croup
n.
• The hinder part or buttocks of certain quadrupeds, especially of a horse; hence, the place behind the saddle.
n.
(Med.) An inflammatory affection of the larynx or trachea, accompanied by a hoarse, ringing cough and stridulous, difficult breathing; esp., such an affection when associated with the development of a false membrane in the air passages (also called membranous croup).
Croupade
n.
(Man.) A leap in which the horse pulls up his hind legs toward his belly.
Croupal
a.
• Croupy.
Croupier
n.
• One who presides at a gaming table and collects the stakes.
• One who, at a public dinner party, sits at the lower end of the table as assistant chairman.
Croupous
a.
(Med.) Relating to or resembling croup; especially, attended with the formation of a deposit or membrance like that found in membranous croup; as, croupous laryngitis.
Croupy
a.
• Of or pertaining to croup; resembling or indicating croup; as, a croupy cough.
Crouse
a.
• Brisk; lively; bold; self-complacent.
Croustade
n.
(Cookery) Bread baked in a mold, and scooped out, to serve minces upon.
Crouton
n.
(Cookery) Bread cut in various forms, and fried lightly in butter or oil, to garnish hashes, etc.
Crow
v. i.
• To make the shrill sound characteristic of a cock, either in joy, gayety, or defiance.
• To shout in exultation or defiance; to brag.
• To utter a sound expressive of joy or pleasure.
n.
(Zool.) A bird, usually black, of the genus Corvus, having a strong conical beak, with projecting bristles. It has a harsh, croaking note.
• A bar of iron with a beak, crook, or claw; a bar of iron used as a lever; a crowbar.
• The cry of the cock.
• The mesentery of a beast; — so called by butchers.
Crowbar
n.
• A bar of iron sharpened at one end, and used as a lever.
Crowberry
n.
(Bot.) A heathlike plant of the genus Empetrum, and its fruit, a black, scarcely edible berry; — also called crakeberry.
Crowd
v. t.
• To push, to press, to shove.
• To press or drive together; to mass together.
• To fill by pressing or thronging together; hence, to encumber by excess of numbers or quantity.
• To press by solicitation; to urge; to dun; hence, to treat discourteously or unreasonably.
v. i.
• To press together or collect in numbers; to swarm; to throng.
• To urge or press forward; to force one's self; as, a man crowds into a room.
n.
• A number of things collected or closely pressed together; also, a number of things adjacent to each other.
• A number of persons congregated or collected into a close body without order; a throng.
• The lower orders of people; the populace; the vulgar; the rabble; the mob.
n.
• An ancient instrument of music with six strings; a kind of violin, being the oldest known stringed instrument played with a bow.
v. t.
• To play on a crowd; to fiddle.
Crowder
n.
• One who plays on a crowd; a fiddler.
n.
• One who crowds or pushes.
Crowdy
n.
• A thick gruel of oatmeal and milk or water; food of the porridge kind.
Crowflower
n.
(Bot.) A kind of campion; according to Gerarde, the Lychnis Flos-cuculi.
Crowfoot
n.
(Bot.) The genus Ranunculus, of many species; some are common weeds, others are flowering plants of considerable beauty.
(Naut.) A number of small cords rove through a long block, or euphroe, to suspend an awning by.
(Mil.) A caltrop. [Written also crow's-foot.] 4. (Well Boring) A tool with a side claw for recovering broken rods, etc.
Crowkeeper
n.
• A person employed to scare off crows; hence, a scarecrow.
Crown
• p. p. of Crow.
n.
• A wreath or garland, or any ornamental fillet encircling the head, especially as a reward of victory or mark of honorable distinction; hence, anything given on account of, or obtained by, faithful or successful effort; a reward.
• A royal headdress or cap of sovereignty, worn by emperors, kings, princes, etc.
• The person entitled to wear a regal or imperial crown; the sovereign; — with the definite article.
• Imperial or regal power or dominion; sovereignty.
• Anything which imparts beauty, splendor, honor, dignity, or finish.
• Highest state; acme; consummation; perfection.
• The topmost part of anything; the summit.
• The topmost part of the head (see Illust. of Bird.); that part of the head from which the hair descends toward the sides and back; also, the head or brain.
• The part of a hat above the brim.
(Anat.) The part of a tooth which projects above the gum; also, the top or grinding surface of a tooth.
(Arch.) The vertex or top of an arch; — applied generally to about one third of the curve, but in a pointed arch to the apex only.
(Bot.) Same as Corona.
(Naut.) That part of an anchor where the arms are joined to the shank.
• The rounding, or rounded part, of the deck from a level line.
• The bights formed by the several turns of a cable.
• The upper range of facets in a rose diamond.
• The dome of a furnace.
(Geom.) The area inclosed between two concentric perimeters.
(Eccl.) A round spot shaved clean on the top of the head, as a mark of the clerical state; the tonsure.
• A size of writing paper.
• A coin stamped with the image of a crown; hence,a denomination of money; as, the English crown, a silver coin of the value of five shillings sterling, or a little more than $1.20; the Danish or Norwegian crown, a money of account, etc., worth nearly twenty-seven cents.
• An ornaments or decoration representing a crown; as, the paper is stamped with a crown.
v. t.
• To cover, decorate, or invest with a crown; hence, to invest with royal dignity and power.
• To bestow something upon as a mark of honor, dignity, or recompense; to adorn; to dignify.
• To form the topmost or finishing part of; to complete; to consummate; to perfect.
(Mech.) To cause to round upward; to make anything higher at the middle than at the edges, as the face of a machine pulley.
(Mil.) To effect a lodgment upon, as upon the crest of the glacis, or the summit of the breach.
Crowned
p. p. & a.
• Having or wearing a crown; surmounted, invested, or adorned, with a crown, wreath, garland, etc.; honored; rewarded; completed; consummated; perfected. "Crowned with one crest." Shak. "Crowned with conquest." Milton.
• Great; excessive; supreme.
Crowner
n.
• One who, or that which, crowns.
• A coroner.
Crownet
n.
• A coronet.
• The ultimate end and result of an undertaking; a chief end.
Crownless
a.
• Without a crown.
Crownlet
n.
• A coronet.
Crownpiece
n.
• A piece or part which passes over the head, as in a bridle.
Crownwork
n.
(Fort.) A work consisting of two or more bastioned fronts, with their outworks, covering an enceinte, a bridgehead, etc., and connected by wings with the main work or the river bank.
Crows
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians of the Dakota stock, living in Montana; — also called Upsarokas.
Crowstone
n.
(Arch.) The top stone of the gable end of a house.
Crowth
n.
• An ancient musical instrument.
Crowtoe
n.
(Bot.) The Lotus corniculatus.
• An unidentified plant, probably the crowfoot.
Croylstone
n.
(Min.) Crystallized cawk, in which the crystals are small.
Croze
n.
• A cooper's tool for making the grooves for the heads of casks, etc.; also, the groove itself.
Croziered
a.
• Crosiered.
Crucial
a.
• Having the form of a cross; appertaining to a cross; cruciform; intersecting; as, crucial ligaments; a crucial incision.
• Severe; trying or searching, as if bringing to the cross; decisive; as, a crucial test.
Cruciate
a.
• Tormented.
(Bot.) Having the leaves or petals arranged in the form of a cross; cruciform.
v. t.
• To torture; to torment.
Cruciation
n.
• The act of torturing; torture; torment.
Crucible
n.
• A vessel or melting pot, composed of some very refractory substance, as clay, graphite, platinum, and used for melting and calcining substances which require a strong degree of heat, as metals, ores, etc.
• A hollow place at the bottom of a furnace, to receive the melted metal.
• A test of the most decisive kind; a severe trial; as, the crucible of affliction.
Crucifer
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the order Cruciferae.
Cruciferous
a.
• Bearing a cross.
(Bot.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a family of plants which have four petals arranged like the arms of a cross, as the mustard, radish, turnip, etc.
Crucifier
n.
• One who crucifies; one who subjects himself or another to a painful trial.
Crucifix
n.
• A representation in art of the figure of Christ upon the cross; esp., the sculptured figure affixed to a real cross of wood, ivory, metal, or the like, used by the Roman Catholics in their devotions.
• The cross or religion of Christ.
Crucifixion
n.
• The act of nailing or fastening a person to a cross, for the purpose of putting him to death; the use of the cross as a method of capital punishment.
• The state of one who is nailed or fastened to a cross; death upon a cross.
• Intense suffering or affliction; painful trial.
Cruciform
a.
• Cross-shaped; (Bot.) having four parts arranged in the form of a cross.
Crucify
v. t.
• To fasten to a cross; to put to death by nailing the hands and feet to a cross or gibbet.
• To destroy the power or ruling influence of; to subdue completely; to mortify.
• To vex or torment.
Crucigerous
a.
• Bearing the cross; marked with the figure of a cross.
Cruddle
v. i.
• To curdle.
Crude
a.
• In its natural state; not cooked or prepared by fire or heat; undressed; not altered, refined, or prepared for use by any artificial process; raw; as, crude flesh.
• Unripe; not mature or perfect; immature.
• Not reduced to order or form;unfinished; not arranged or prepared; ill-considered; immature.
• Undigested; unconcocted; not brought into a form to give nourishment.
• Having, or displaying, superficial and undigested knowledge; without culture or profudity; as, a crude reasoner.
(Paint.) Harsh and offensive, as a color; tawdry or in bad taste, as a combination of colors, or any design or work of art.
Crudely
adv.
• In a crude, immature manner.
Crudeness
n.
• A crude, undigested, or unprepared state; rawness; unripeness; immatureness; unfitness for a destined use or purpose; as, the crudeness of iron ore; crudeness of theories or plans.
Crudity
n.
• The condition of being crude; rawness.
• That which is in a crude or undigested state; hence, superficial, undigested views, not reduced to order or form.
Crudy
a.
• Coagulated.
a.
• Characterized by crudeness; raw.
Cruel
a.
• Disposed to give pain to others; willing or pleased to hurt, torment, or afflict; destitute of sympathetic kindness and pity; savage; inhuman; hard-hearted; merciless.
• Causing, or fitted to cause, pain, grief, or misery.
• Attended with cruetly; painful; harsh.
Cruelly
adv.
• In a cruel manner.
• Extremly; very.
Cruelness
n.
• Cruelty.
Cruels
n. pl.
• Glandular scrofulous swellings in the neck.
Cruelty
n.
• The attribute or quality of being cruel; a disposition to give unnecessary pain or suffering to others; inhumanity; barbarity.
• A cruel and barbarous deed; inhuman treatment; the act of willfully causing unnecessary pain.
Cruentate
a.
• Smeared with blood.
Cruentous
a.
• Bloody; cruentate.
Cruet
n.
• A bottle or vessel; esp., aviai or small glass bottle for holding vinegar, oil, pepper, or the like, for the table; a caster.
(Eccl.) A vessel used to hold wine, oil, or water for the service of the altar.
Cruise
v. i.
• To sail back and forth on the ocean; to sail, as for the potection of commerce, in search of an enemy, for plunder, or for pleasure.
• To wander hither and thither on land.
n.
• A voyage made in various directions, as of an armed vessel, for the protection of other vessels, or in search of an enemy; a sailing to and fro, as for exploration or for pleasure.
Cruiser
n.
• One who, or a vessel that, cruises; — usually an armed vessel.
Cruive
n.
• A kind of weir or dam for trapping salmon; also, a hovel.
Crull
a.
• Curly; curled.
Cruller
n.
• A kind of sweet cake cut in strips and curled or twisted, and fried crisp in boiling fat.
Crumb
n.
• A small fragment or piece; especially, a small piece of bread or other food, broken or cut off.
• Fig.: A little; a bit; as, a crumb of comfort.
• The soft part of bread.
v. t.
• To break into crumbs or small pieces with the fingers; as, to crumb bread.
Crumbcloth
n.
• A cloth to be laid under a dining table to receive falling fragments, and keep the carpet or floor clean.
Crumble
v. t.
• To break into small pieces; to cause to fall in pieces.
v. i.
• To fall into small pieces; to break or part into small fragments; hence, to fall to decay or ruin; to become disintegrated; to perish.
Crumbly
a.
• EAsily crumbled; friable; brittle.
Crumenal
n.
• A purse.
Crummable
a.
• Capable of being crumbed or broken into small pieces.
Crummy
a.
• Full of crumb or crumbs.
• Soft, as the crumb of bread is; not crusty.
Crump
a.
• Crooked; bent.
• Hard or crusty; dry baked; as, a crump loaf.
Crumpet
n.
• A kind of large. thin muffin or cake, light and spongy, and cooked on a griddle or spider.
Crumple
v. t.
• To draw or press into wrinkles or folds to crush together; to rumple; as, to crumple paper.
v. i.
• To contract irregularly; to show wrinkless after being crushed together; as, leaves crumple.
Crumpy
a.
• Brittle; crisp.
Crunch
v. i.
• To chew with force and noise; to craunch.
• To grind or press with violence and noise.
• To emit a grinding or craunching noise.
v. t.
• To crush with the teeth; to chew with a grinding noise; to craunch; as, to crunch a biscuit.
Crunodal
a.
(Geom.) Possessing, or characterized by, a crunode; — used of curves.
Crunode
n.
(Geom.) A point where one branch of a curve crosses another branch.
Cruor
n.
• The coloring matter of the blood; the clotted portion of coagulated blood, containing the coloring matter; gore.
Cruorin
n.
(Physiol.) The coloring matter of the blood in the living animal; haemoglobin.
Crup
a.
• Short; brittle; as, crup cake.
Crupper
n.
• The buttocks or rump of a horse.
• A leather loop, passing under a horse's tail, and buckled to the saddle to keep it from slipping forwards.
v. t.
• To fit with a crupper; to place a crupper upon; as, to crupper a horse.
Crural
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the thigh or leg, or to any of the parts called crura; as, the crural arteries; crural arch; crural canal; crural ring.
Crus
n.
(Anat.) That part of the hind limb between the femur, or thigh, and the ankle, or tarsus; the shank.
• Often applied, especially in the plural, to parts which are supposed to resemble a pair of legs; as, the crura of the diaphragm, a pair of muscles attached to it; crura cerebri, two bundles of nerve fibers in the base of the brain, connecting the medulla and the forebrain.
Crusade
n.
• Any one of the military expeditions undertaken by Christian powers, in the 11th, 12th, and 13th centuries, for the recovery of the Holy Land from the Mohammedans.
• Any enterprise undertaken with zeal and enthusiasm; as, a crusade against intemperance.
• A Portuguese coin.
v. i.
• To engage in a crusade; to attack in a zealous or hot-headed manner.
Crusader
n.
• One engaged in a crusade; as, the crusaders of the Middle Ages.
Crusading
a.
• Of or pertaining to a crusade; as, a crusading spirit.
Crusado
n.
• An old Portuguese coin, worth about seventy cents.
Cruse
n.
• A cup or dish.
• A bottle for holding water, oil, honey, etc.
Cruset
n.
• A goldsmith's crucible or melting pot.
Crush
v. t.
• To press or bruise between two hard bodies; to squeeze, so as to destroy the natural shape or integrity of the parts, or to force together into a mass; as, to crush grapes.
• To reduce to fine particles by pounding or grinding; to comminute; as, to crush quartz.
• To overwhelm by pressure or weight; to beat or force down, as by an incumbent weight.
• To oppress or burden grievously.
• To overcome completely; to subdue totally.
v. i.
• To be or become broken down or in, or pressed into a smaller compass, by external weight or force; as, an eggshell crushes easily.
n.
• A violent collision or compression; a crash; destruction; ruin.
• Violent pressure, as of a crowd; a crowd which produced uncomfortable pressure; as, a crush at a peception.
Crusher
n.
• One who, or that which, crushes.
Crushing
a.
• That crushes; overwhelming.
Crust
n.
• The hard external coat or covering of anything; the hard exterior surface or outer shell; an incrustation; as, a crust of snow.
(Cookery) The hard exterior or surface of bread, in distinction from the soft part or crumb; or a piece of bread grown dry or hard.
• The cover or case of a pie, in distinction from the soft contents.
• The dough, or mass of doughy paste, cooked with a potpie; — also called dumpling.
(Geol.) The exterior portion of the earth, formerly universally supposed to inclose a molten interior.
(Zool.) The shell of crabs, lobsters, etc.
(Med.) A hard mass, made up of dried secretions blood, or pus, occurring upon the surface of the body.
• An incrustation on the interior of wine bottles, the result of the ripening of the wine; a deposit of tartar, etc.
v. t.
• To cover with a crust; to cover or line with an incrustation; to incrust.
v. i.
• To gather or contract into a hard crust; to become incrusted.
Crusta
n.
• A crust or shell.
• A gem engraved, or a plate embossed in low relief, for inlaying a vase or other object.
Crustacea
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the classes of the arthropods, including lobsters and crabs; — so called from the crustlike shell with which they are covered.
Crustacean
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Crustacea; crustaceous.
n.
• An animal belonging to the class Crustacea.
Crustaceological
a.
• Pertaining to crustaceology.
Crustaceologist
n.
• One versed in crustaceology; a crustalogist.
Crustaceology
n.
• That branch of Zoology which treats of the Crustacea; malacostracology; carcinology.
Crustaceous
a.
• Pertaining to, or of the nature of, crust or shell; having a crustlike shell.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Crustacea; crustacean.
Crustaceousness
n.
• The state or quality of being crustaceous or having a crustlike shell.
Crustal
a.
• Relating to a crust.
Crustalogical
a.
• Pertaining to crustalogy.
Crustalogist
n.
• One versed in crustalogy.
Crustalogy
n.
• Crustaceology.
Crustated
a.
• Covered with a crust; as, crustated basalt.
Crustation
n.
• An adherent crust; an incrustation.
Crusted
a.
• Incrusted; covered with, or containing, crust; as, old, crusted port wine.
Crustific
a.
• Producing or forming a crust or skin.
Crustily
adv.
• In a crusty or surly manner; morosely.
Crustiness
n.
• The state or quality of having crust or being like crust; hardness.
• The quality of being crusty or surly.
Crusty
a.
• Having the nature of crust; pertaining to a hard covering; as, a crusty coat; a crusty surface or substance.
• Having a hard exterior, or a short, rough manner, though kind at heart; snappish; peevish; surly.
Crut
n.
• The rough, shaggy part of oak bark.
Crutch
n.
• A staff with a crosspiece at the head, to be placed under the arm or shoulder, to support the lame or infirm in walking.
• A form of pommel for a woman's saddle, consisting of a forked rest to hold the leg of the rider.
(Naut.) A knee, or piece of knee timber
• A forked stanchion or post; a crotch.
v. t.
• To support on crutches; to prop up.
Crutched
a.
• Supported upon crutches.
• Marked with the sign of the cross; crouched.
Crux
n.
• Anything that is very puzzling or difficult to explain.
Cry
v. i.
• To make a loud call or cry; to call or exclaim vehemently or earnestly; to shout; to vociferate; to proclaim; to pray; to implore.
• To utter lamentations; to lament audibly; to express pain, grief, or distress, by weeping and sobbing; to shed tears; to bawl, as a child.
• To utter inarticulate sounds, as animals.
v. t.
• To utter loudly; to call out; to shout; to sound abroad; to declare publicly.
• To cause to do something, or bring to some state, by crying or weeping; as, to cry one's self to sleep.
• To make oral and public proclamation of; to declare publicly; to notify or advertise by outcry, especially things lost or found, goods to be sold, ets.; as, to cry goods, etc.
• Hence, to publish the banns of, as for marriage.
n.
• A loud utterance; especially, the inarticulate sound produced by one of the lower animals; as, the cry of hounds; the cry of wolves.
• Outcry; clamor; tumult; popular demand.
• Any expression of grief, distress, etc., accompanied with tears or sobs; a loud sound, uttered in lamentation.
• Loud expression of triumph or wonder or of popular acclamation or favor.
• Importunate supplication.
• Public advertisement by outcry; proclamation, as by hawkers of their wares.
• Common report; fame.
• A word or phrase caught up by a party or faction and repeated for effect; as, the party cry of the Tories.
• A pack of hounds.
• A pack or company of persons; — in contempt.
• The cracklling noise made by block tin when it is bent back and forth.
Cryal
n.
• The heron
Cryer
n.
• The female of the hawk; a falcon-gentil.
Crying
a.
• Calling for notice; compelling attention; notorious; heinous; as, a crying evil.
Cryohydrate
n.
(Chem.) A substance, as salt, ammonium chloride, etc., which crystallizes with water of crystallization only at low temperatures, or below the freezing point of water.
Cryolite
n.
(Min.) A fluoride of sodium and aluminum, found in Greenland, in white cleavable masses; — used as a source of soda and alumina.
Cryophorus
n.
(Chem.) An instrument used to illustrate the freezing of water by its own evaporation. The ordinary form consist of two glass bulbs, connected by a tube of the same material, and containing only a quantity of water and its vapor, devoid of air. The water is in one of the bulbs, and freezes when the other is cooled below 32° Fahr.
Crypt
n.
• A vault wholly or partly under ground; especially, a vault under a church, whether used for burial purposes or for a subterranean chapel or oratory.
(Anat.) A simple gland, glandular cavity, or tube; a follicle; as, the cryps of Lieberkhn, the simple tubular glands of the small intestines.
Cryptal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to crypts.
Cryptically
adv.
• Secretly; occultly.
Cryptidine
n.
(Chem.) One of the quinoline bases, obtained from coal tar as an oily liquid, C11H11N; also, any one of several substances metameric with, and resembling, cryptidine proper.
Cryptobranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of the Amphibia; the Derotremata.
• A group of nudibranch mollusks.
Cryptobranchiate
a.
(Zool.) Having concealed or rudimentary gills.
Cryptocrystalline
a.
(Geol.) Indistinctly crystalline; — applied to rocks and minerals, whose state of aggregation is so fine that no distinct particles are visible, even under the microscope.
Cryptogam
n.
(Bot.) A plant belonging to the Cryptogamia.
Cryptogamia
n.
(Bot.) The series or division of flowerless plants, or those never having true stamens and pistils, but propagated by spores of various kinds.
Cryptogamist
n.
• One skilled in cryptogamic botany.
Cryptogram
n.
• A cipher writing. Same as Cryptograph.
Cryptograph
n.
• Cipher; something written in cipher.
Cryptographal
a.
• Pertaining to cryptography; cryptographical.
Cryptographer
n.
• One who writes in cipher, or secret characters.
Cryptographist
n.
• Same as Cryptographer.
Cryptography
n.
• The act or art of writing in secret characters; also, secret characters, or cipher.
Cryptologu
n.
• Secret or enigmatical language.
Cryptonym
n.
• A secret name; a name by which a person is known only to the initiated.
Cryptopine
n.
(Chem.) A colorless crystalline alkaloid obtained in small quantities from opium.
Crypturi
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of flying, dromognathous birds, including the tinamous of South America.
Crystal
n.
(Chem. & Min.) The regular form which a substance tends to assume in solidifying, through the inherent power of cohesive attraction. It is bounded by plane surfaces, symmetrically arranged, and each species of crystal has fixed axial ratios.
• The material of quartz, in crystallization transparent or nearly so, and either colorless or slightly tinged with gray, or the like; — called also rock crystal. Ornamental vessels are made of it. Cf. Smoky quartz, Pebble; also Brazilian pebble, under Brazilian.
• A species of glass, more perfect in its composition and manufacture than common glass, and often cut into ornamental forms.
• The glass over the dial of a watch case.
• Anything resembling crystal, as clear water, etc.
a.
• Consisting of, or like, crystal; clear; transparent; lucid; pellucid; crystalline.
Crystalline
a.
• Consisting, or made, of crystal.
• Formed by crystallization; like crystal in texture.
• Imperfectly crystallized; as, granite is only crystalline, while quartz crystal is perfectlly crystallized.
• Fig.: Resembling crystal; pure; transparent; pellucid.
n.
• A crystalline substance.
Crystallite
n.
(Min.) A minute mineral form like those common in glassy volcanic rocks and some slags, not having a definite crystalline outline and not referable to any mineral species, but marking the first step in the crystallization process. According to their form crystallites are called trichites, belonites, globulites, etc.
Crystallizable
a.
• Capable of being crystallized; that may be formed into crystals.
Crystallization
n.
(Chem. & Min.) The act or process by which a substance in solidifying assumes the form and sructure of a crystal, or becomes crystallized.
• The body formed by crystallizing; as, silver on precipitation forms arborescent crystallizations.
Crystallize
v. t.
• To cause to form crystals, or to assume the crystalline form.
v. i.
• To be converted into a crystal; to take on a crystalline form, through the action of crystallogenic or cohesive attraction.
Crystallogeny
n.
• The science which pertains to the production of crystals.
Crystallographer
n.
• One who describes crystals, or the manner of their formation; one versed in crystallography.
Crystallographically
adv.
• In the manner of crystallography.
Crystallography
n.
• The doctrine or science of crystallization, teaching the system of forms among crystals, their structure, and their methods of formation.
• A discourse or treatise on crystallization.
Crystalloid
a.
• Crystal-like; transparent like crystal.
n.
(Chem.) A body which, in solution, diffuses readily through animal membranes, and generally is capable of being crystallized; — opposed to colloid.
(Bot.) One of the microscopic particles resembling crystals, consisting of protein matter, which occur in certain plant cells; — called also protein crystal.
Crystallomancy
n.
• Divination by means of a crystal or other transparent body, especially a beryl.
Crystallometry
n.
• The art of measuring crystals.
Crystallurgy
n.
• Crystallizaton.
Ctenocyst
n.
(Zool.) An organ of the Ctenophora, supposed to be sensory.
Ctenoid
a.
(Zool.) Having a comblike margin, as a ctenoid scale
• Pertaining to the Ctenoidei.
n.
• A ctenoidean.
Ctenoidean
a.
(Zool.) Relating to the Ctenoidei.
n.
• One of the Ctenoidei.
Ctenoidei
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of fishes, established by Agassiz, characterized by having scales with a pectinated margin, as in the perch. The group is now generally regarded as artificial.
Ctenophora
n. pl.
(Zool.) A class of Coelenterata, commonly ellipsoidal in shape, swimming by means of eight longitudinal rows of paddles. The separate paddles somewhat resemble combs.
Ctenophore
n.
(Zool.) One of the Ctenophora.
Ctenostomata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of Bryozoa, usually having a circle of bristles below the tentacles.
Cub
n.
• A young animal, esp. the young of the bear.
• Jocosely or in contempt, a boy or girl, esp. an awkward, rude, illmannered boy.
v. t. & i.
• To bring forth; — said of animals, or in contempt, of persons.
n.
• A stall for cattle.
• A cupboard.
v. t.
• To shut up or confine.
Cuban
a.
• Of or pertaining to Cuba or its inhabitants.
n.
• A native or an inhabitant of Cuba.
Cubation
n.
• The act of lying down; a reclining.
Cubatory
a.
• Lying down; recumbent.
Cubature
n.
• The process of determining the solid or cubic contents of a body.
Cubdrawn
a.
• Sucked by cubs.
Cube
n.
(Geom.) A regular solid body, with six equal square sides.
(Math.) The product obtained by taking a number or quantity three times as a factor; as, 4x4=16, and 16x4=64, the cube of 4.
v. t.
• To raise to the third power; to obtain the cube of.
Cubeb
n.
• The small, spicy berry of a species of pepper (Piper Cubeba; in med., Cubeba officinalis), native in Java and Borneo, but now cultivated in various tropical countries. The dried unripe fruit is much used in medicine as a stimulant and purgative.
Cubebic
a.
• Pertaining to, or derived from, cubebs; as, cubebic acid (a soft olive-green resin extracted from cubebs).
Cubhood
n.
• The state of being a cub.
Cubic
n.
(Geom.) A curve of the third degree.
Cubically
adv.
• In a cubical method.
Cubicalness
n.
• The quality of being cubical.
Cubicle
n.
• A loding room; esp., a sleeping place partitioned off from a large dormitory.
Cubicular
a.
• Belonging to a chamber or bedroom.
Cubiform
a.
• Of the form of a cube.
Cubile
n.
• The lowest course of stones in a building.
Cubilose
n.
• A mucilagenous secretion of certain birds found as the characteristic ingredient of edible bird's-nests.
Cubit
n.
(Anat.) The forearm; the ulna, a bone of the arm extending from elbow to wrist.
• A measure of length, being the distance from the elbow to the extremity of the middle finger.
Cubital
a.
• Of or pertaining to the cubit or ulna; as, the cubital nerve; the cubital artery; the cubital muscle.
• Of the length of a cubit.
n.
• A sleeve covering the arm from the elbow to the hand.
Cubited
a.
• Having the measure of a cubit.
Cubless
a.
• Having no cubs.
Cuboid
a.
(Anat.) Cube-shaped, or nearly so; as, the cuboid bone of the foot.
n.
(Anat.) The bone of the tarsus, which, in man and most mammals, supports the metatarsals of the fourth and fifth toes.
Cuboidal
a.
(Anat.) Cuboid.
Cuckold
n.
• A man whose wife is unfaithful; the husband of an adulteress.
(Zool.) A West Indian plectognath fish (Ostracion triqueter).
• The cowfish.
v. t.
• To make a cuckold of, as a husband, by seducing his wife, or by her becoming an adulteress.
Cuckoldize
v. t.
• To cuckold.
Cuckoldly
a.
• Having the qualities of a cuckold; mean-spirited; sneaking.
Cuckoldom
n.
• The state of a cuckold; cuckolds, collectively.
Cuckoldry
n.
• The state of being a cuckold; the practice of making cuckolds.
Cuckoo
n.
(Zool.) A bird belonging to Cuculus, Coccyzus, and several allied genera, of many species.
Cuckoobud
n.
(Bot.) A species of Ranunculus (R. bulbosus); — called also butterflower, buttercup, kingcup, goldcup.
Cuckooflower
n.
(Bot.) A species of Cardamine (C. pratensis), or lady's smock. Its leaves are used in salads. Also, the ragged robin (Lychnis Flos-cuculi).
Cuckoopint
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the genus Arum (A. maculatum); the European wake-robin.
Cucquean
n.
• A woman whose husband is unfaithful to her.
Cucujo
n.
(Zool.) The fire beetle of Mexico and the West Indies.
Cuculoid
a.
(Zool.) Like or belonging to the cuckoos (Cuculidae).
Cucumber
n.
(Bot.) A creeping plant, and its fruit, of several species of the genus Cucumis, esp. Cucumis sativus, the unripe fruit of which is eaten either fresh or picked. Also, similar plants or fruits of several other genera.
Cucumiform
a.
• Having the form of a cucumber; having the form of a cylinder tapered and rounded at the ends, and either straight or curved.
Cucumis
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants including the cucumber, melon, and same kinds of gourds.
Cucurbitaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a family of plants of which the cucumber, melon, and gourd are common examples.
Cucurbitive
a.
• Having the shape of a gourd seed; — said of certain small worms.
Cud
n
• That portion of food which is brought up into the mouth by ruminating animals from their first stomach, to be cheved a second time.
• A portion of tobacco held in the mouth and chewed; a quid.
• The first stomach of ruminating beasts.
Cudbear
n
• A powder of a violet red color, difficult to moisten with water, used for making violet or purple dye. It is prepared from certain species of lichen, especially Lecanora tartarea.
(Bot.) A lichen (Lecanora tartarea), from which the powder is obtained.
Cudden
n.
• A clown; a low rustic; a dolt.
(Zool.) The coalfish.
Cuddle
v. i.
• To ie close or snug; to crouch; to nestle.
v. t.
• To embrace closely; to foundle.
n.
• A close embrace.
Cuddy
n.
• An ass; esp., one driven by a huckster or greengrocer.
• Hence: A blockhead; a lout.
(Mech.) A lever mounted on a tripod for lifting stones, leveling up railroad ties, etc.
n.
(Naut.) A small cabin: also, the galley or kitchen of a vessel.
n.
(Zool) The coalfish (Pollachius carbonarius).
Cudgel
n.
• A staff used in cudgel play, shorter than the quarterstaff, and wielded with one hand; hence, any heavy stick used as a weapon.
v. t.
• To beat with a cudgel.
Cudgeler
n.
• One who beats with a cudgel.
Cudweed
n
(Bot.) A small composite plant with cottony or silky stem and leaves, primarily a species of Gnaphalium, but the name is now given to many plants of different genera, as Filago, Antennaria, etc.; cottonweed.
Cue
n.
• The tail; the end of a thing; especially, a tail-like twist of hair worn at the back of the head; a queue.
• The last words of a play actor's speech, serving as an intimation for the next succeeding player to speak; any word or words which serve to remind a player to speak or to do something; a catchword.
• A hint or intimation.
• The part one has to perform in, or as in, a play.
• Humor; temper of mind.
• A straight tapering rod used to impel the balls in playing billiards.
v. t.
• To form into a cue; to braid; to twist.
n.
• A small portion of bread or beer; the quantity bought with a farthing or half farthing.
Cuerpo
n.
• The body.
Cuff
v. t.
• To strike; esp., to smite with the palm or flat of the hand; to slap.
• To buffet.
v. i.
• To fight; to scuffle; to box.
n.
• A blow; esp.,, a blow with the open hand; a box; a slap.
n.
• The fold at the end of a sleeve; the part of a sleeve turned back from the hand.
• Any ornamental appendage at the wrist, whether attached to the sleeve of the garment or separate;especially, in modern times, such an appendage of starched linen, or a substitute for it of paper, or the like.
Cuffy
n.
• A name for a negro.
Cufic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the older characters of the Arabic language.
Cuinage
n.
• The stamping of pigs of tin, by the proper officer, with the arms of the duchy of Cornwall.
Cuirass
n.
• A piece of defensive armor, covering the body from the neck to the girdle
• The breastplate taken by itself.
(Zool) An armor of bony plates, somewhat resembling a cuirass.
Cuirassed
a.
• Wearing a cuirass.
(Zool) Having a covering of bony plates, resembling a cuirass;- said of certain fishes.
Cuirassier
n.
• A soldier armed with a cuirass.
Cuish
n.
• Defensive armor for the thighs.
Cuisine
n.
• The kitchen or cooking department.
• Manner or style of cooking.
Culasse
n.
• The lower faceted portion of a brilliant-cut diamond.
Culdee
n.
• One of a class of anchorites who lived in various parts of Scotland, Ireland, and Wales.
Culex
n.
(Zool.) A genus of dipterous insects, including the gnat and mosquito.
Culiciform
a.
(Zool.) Gnat-shaped.
Culinarily
adv.
• In the manner of a kitchen; in connection with a kitchen or cooking.
Culinary
a.
• Relating to the kitchen, or to the art of cookery; used in kitchens; as, a culinary vessel; the culinary art.
Cull
v. t.
• To separate, select, or pick out; to choose and gather or collect; as, to cuil flowers.
n.
• A cully; a dupe; a gull.
Cullender
n.
• A strainer.
Culler
n.
• One who piks or chooses; esp., an inspector who select wares suitable for market.
Cullet
n.
• Broken glass for remelting.
n.
• A small central plane in the back of a cut gem.
Cullibility
n.
• Gullibility.
Cullible
a.
• Easily deceived; gullible.
Culling
n
• The act of one who culls.
• Anything separated or selected from a mass.
Cullion
n.
• A mean wretch; a base fellow; a poltroon; a scullion.
Cullionly
a.
• Mean; base.
Cullis
n.
• A strong broth of meat, strained and made clear for invalids; also, a savory jelly.
n.
(Arch.) A gutter in a roof; a channel or groove.
Culls
n. pl.
• Refuse timber, from which the best part has been culled out.
• Any refuse stuff, as rolls not properly baked.
Cully
n.
• A person easily deceived, tricked, or imposed on; a mean dupe; a gull.
v. t.
• To trick, cheat, or impose on; to deceive.
Cullyism
n.
• The state of being a cully.
Culm
n.
(Min.) Mineral coal that is not bituminous; anthracite, especially when found in small masses.
• The waste of the Pennsylvania anthracite mines, consisting of fine coal, dust, etc., and used as fuel.
Culmen
n.
• Top; summit; acme.
(Zool.) The dorsal ridge of a bird's bill.
Culmiferous
a.
• Having jointed stems or culms.
a.
(Min.) Containing, or abounding in, culm or glance coal.
Culminal
a.
• Pertaining to a culmen.
Culminant
a.
• Being vertical, or at the highest point of altitude; hence, predominant.
Culminate
v. i.
• To reach its highest point of altitude; to come to the meridian; to be vertical or directly overhead.
• To reach the highest point, as of rank, size, power, numbers, etc.
a.
• Growing upward, as distinguished from a laterral growth; — applied to the growth of corals.
Culmination
n.
• The attainment of the highest point of altitude reached by a heavently body; passage across the meridian; transit.
• Attainment or arrival at the highest pitch of glory, power, etc.
Culpa
n.
(Law) Negligence or fault, as distinguishable from dolus (deceit, fraud), which implies intent, culpa being imputable to defect of intellect, dolus to defect of heart.
Culpability
n.
• The state of being culpable.
Culpable
a.
• Deserving censure; worthy of blame; faulty; immoral; criminal.
• Guilty; as, clpable of a crime.
Culpatory
a.
• Expressing blame; censuring; reprehensory; inculpating.
Culpe
n.
• Blameworthiness.
Culpon
n.
• A shered; a fragment; a strip of wood.
Culprit
n.
• One accused of, or araigned for, a crime, as before a judge.
• One quilty of a fault; a criminal.
Culrage
n.
(Bot.) Smartweed (Polygonum Hydropiper).
Cult
n .
• Attentive care; homage; worship.
• A system of religious belief and worship.
Cultch
n.
• Empty oyster shells and other substances laid down on oyster grounds to furnish points for the attachment of the spawn of the oyster.
Culter
n.
• A colter.
Cultirostral
a.
(Zool.) Having a bill shaped like the colter of a plow, or like a knife, as the heron, stork, etc.
Cultirostres
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of wading birds including the stork, heron, crane, etc.
Cultivable
a.
• Capable of being cultivated or tilled.
Cultivatable
a.
• Cultivable.
Cultivate
v. t.
• To bestow attention, care, and labor upon, with a view to valuable returns; to till; to fertilize; as, to cultivate soil.
• To direct special attention to; to devote time and thought to; to foster; to cherish.
• To seek the society of; to court intimacy with.
• To improve by labor, care, or study; to impart culture to; to civilize; to refine.
• To raise or produce by tillage; to care for while growing; as, to cultivate corn or grass.
Cultivation
n.
• The art or act of cultivating; improvement for agricultural purposes or by agricultural processes; tillage; production by tillage.
• Bestowal of time or attention for self-improvement or for the benefit of others; fostering care.
• The state of being cultivated; advancement in physical, intellectual, or moral condition; refinement; culture.
Cultivator
n.
• One who cultivates; as, a cultivator of the soil; a cultivator of literature.
• An agricultural implement used in the tillage of growing crops, to loosen the surface of the earth and kill the weeds; esp., a triangular frame set with small shares, drawn by a horse and by handles.
Cultriform
a.
(Bot. & Zool.) Shaped like a pruning knife; cultrate.
Cultrivorous
a.
• Devouring knives; swallowing, or pretending to swallow, knives; — applied to persons who have swallowed, or have seemed to swallow, knives with impunity.
Culturable
a.
• Capable of, or fit for, being cultivated; capable or becoming cultured.
Cultural
a.
• Of or pertaining to culture.
Culture
n.
• The act or practice of cultivating, or of preparing the earth for seed and raising crops by tillage; as, the culture of the soil.
• The act of, or any labor or means employed for, training, disciplining, or refining the moral and intellectual nature of man; as. the culture of the mind.
• The state of being cultivated; result of cultivation; physical improvement; enlightenment and discipline acquired by mental and moral training; civilization; refinement in manners and taste.
v. t.
• To cultivate; to educate.
Cultured
a.
• Under culture; cultivated.
• Characterized by mental and moral training; disciplined; refined; well-educated.
Cultureless
a.
• Having no culture.
Culturist
n.
• A cultivator.
• One who is an advocate of culture.
Cultus
n. sing. & pl
• Established or accepted religious rites or usages of worship; state of religious development. Cf.Cult, 2.
Culver
n.
• A dove.
n.
• A culverin.
Culverhouse
n.
• A dovecote.
Culverin
n.
• A long cannon of the 16th century, usually an 18-pounder with serpent-shaped handles.
Culverkey
n.
• A bunch of the keys or samaras of the ash tree.
• An English meadow plant, perhaps the columbine or the bluebell squill (Scilla nutans).
Culvert
n.
• A transverse drain or waterway of masonry under a road, railroad, canal, etc.; a small bridge.
Culvertail
n.
(Carp.) Dovetail.
Culvertailed
a.
• United or fastened by a dovetailed joint.
Cumacea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of marine Crustacea, mostly of small size.
Cumbent
a.
• Lying down; recumbent.
Cumber
v. t.
• To rest upon as a troublesome or useless weight or load; to be burdensome or oppressive to; to hinder or embarrass in attaining an object, to obstruct or occupy uselessly; to embarrass; to trouble.
n.
• Trouble; embarrassment; distress.
Cumbersome
a.
• Burdensome or hindering, as a weight or drag; embarrassing; vexatious; cumbrous.
• Not easily managed; as, a cumbersome contrivance or machine.
Cumbrance
n.
• Encumbrance.
Cumbrian
a.
• Pertaining to Cumberland, England, or to a system of rocks found there.
Cumbrous
a.
• Rendering action or motion difficult or toilsome; serving to obstruct or hinder; burdensome; clogging.
• Giving trouble; vexatious.
Cumene
n.
(Chem.) A colorless oily hydrocarbon, C6H5.C3H7, obtained by the distillation of cuminic acid; — called also cumol.
Cumidine
n.
(Chem.) A strong, liquid, organic base, C3H7.C6H4.NH2, homologous with aniline.
Cumin
n.
(Bot.) A dwarf umbelliferous plant, somewhat resembling fennel (Cuminum Cyminum), cultivated for its seeds, which have a bitterish, warm taste, with an aromatic flavor, and are used like those of anise and caraway.
Cuminic
a.
• Pertaining to, or derived from, cumin, or from oil of caraway; as, cuminic acid.
Cuminil
n .
• A substance, analogous to benzil, obtained from oil of caraway.
Cuminol
n.
• A liquid, C3H7.C6H4.CHO, obtained from oil of caraway; — called also cuminic aldehyde.
Cummin
n.
• Same as Cumin.
Cumshaw
n.
• A present or bonus; — originally applied to that paid on ships which entered the port of Canton.
v. t.
• To give or make a present to.
Cumulate
v. t.
• To gather or throw into a heap; to heap together; to accumulate.
Cumulation
n.
• The act of heaping together; a heap.
Cumulatist
n.
• One who accumulates; one who collects.
Cumulative
a.
• Composed of parts in a heap; forming a mass; agregated.
• Augmenting, gaining, or giving force, by successive additions; as, a cumulative argument, i. e., one whose force increases as the statement proceeds.
(Law) Tending to prove the same point to which other evidence has been offered; — said of evidence.
• Given by same testator to the same legatee; — said of a legacy.
Cumulose
a.
• Full of heaps.
Cumulostratus
n.
(Meteor.) A form of cloud.
Cumulus
n.
(Meteor.) One of the four principal forms of clouds. SeeCloud.
Cun
v. t.
• To con (a ship).
v. t.
• To know.
Cunabula
n. pl.
• The earliest abode; original dwelling place; originals; as, the cunabula of the human race.
(Bibliography) The extant copies of the first or earliest printed books, or of such as were printed in the 15th century.
Cunctation
n.
• Delay; procrastination.
Cunctative
a.
• Slow; tardy; dilatory; causing delay.
Cunctipotent
a.
• All-powerful; omnipotent.
Cund
v. t.
• To con (a ship).
Cundurango
n.
(Med.) The bark of a South American vine (Gonolobus Condurango) of the Milkweed family. It has been supposed, but erroneously, to be a cure for cancer.
Cuneal
• Relating to a wedge; wedge-shaped.
Cuneatic
a.
• Cuneiform.
Cunette
n.
(Fort.) A drain trench, in a ditch or moat; — called also cuvette.
Cunner
n.
(Zool.) A small edible fish of the Atlantic coast (Ctenolabrus adspersus); — called also chogset, burgall, blue perch, and bait stealer.
• A small shellfish; the limpet or patella.
Cunning
a.
• Knowing; skillfull; dexterous.
• Wrought with, or exibiting, skill or ingenuity; ingenious; curious; as, cunning work.
• Crafty; sly; artful; designid; deceitful.
• Pretty or pleasing; as, a cunning little boy
n.
• Knowledge; art; skill; dexterity.
• The faculty or act of using stratagem to accomplish a purpose; fraudulent skill or dexterity; deceit; craft.
Cunningly
adv.
• In a cunning manner; with cunning.
Cunningman
n.
• A fortune teller; one who pretends to reveal mysteries.
Cunningness
n.
• Quality of being cunning; craft.
Cunotator
n.
• One who delays or lingers.
Cup
n.
• A small vessel, used commonly to drink from; as, a tin cup, a silver cup, a wine cup; especially, in modern times, the pottery or porcelain vessel, commonly with a handle, used with a saucer in drinking tea, coffee, and the like.
• The contents of such a vessel; a cupful.
• Repeated potations; social or exessive indulgence in intoxicating drinks; revelry.
• That which is to be received or indured; that which is allotted to one; a portion.
• Anything shaped like a cup; as, the cup of an acorn, or of a flower.
(Med.) A cupping glass or other vessel or instrument used to produce the vacuum in cupping.
v. t.
• To supply with cups of wine.
(Surg.) To apply a cupping apparatus to; to subject to the operation of cupping.
(Mech.) To make concave or in the form of a cup; as, to cup the end of a screw.
Cupbearer
n.
• One whose office it is to fill and hand the cups at an enterainment.
(Antiq.) One of the attendants of a prince or noble, permanently charged with the performance of this office for his master.
Cupboard
n.
• A board or shelf for cups and dishes.
• A small closet in a room, with shelves to receive cups, dishes, food, etc.; hence, any small closet.
v. t.
• To collect, as into a cupboard; to hoard.
Cupel
n.
• A shallow porus cup, used in refining precious metals, commonly made of bone ashes (phosphate of lime).
v. t.
• To refine by means of a cupel.
Cupellation
n.
• The act or process of refining gold or silver, etc., in a cupel.
Cupful
n.
• As much as a cup will hold.
Cupid
n .
(Rom. Myth.) The god of love, son of Venus; usually represented as a naked, winged boy with bow and arrow.
Cupidity
n.
• A passionate desire; love.
• Eager or inordinate desire, especially for wealth; greed of gain; avarice; covetousness
Cupola
n.
(Arch.) A roof having a rounded form, hemispherical or nearly so; also, a celing having the same form. When on a large scale it is usually called dome.
• A small structure standing on the top of a dome; a lantern.
• A furnace for melting iron or other metals in large quantity, — used chiefly in foundries and steel works.
• A revoling shot-proof turret for heavy ordnance.
(Anat.) The top of the spire of the cochlea of the ear.
Cupper
n.
• One who performs the operation of cupping.
Cupping
n.
(Med.) The operation of drawing blood to or from the surface of the person by forming a partial vacuum over the spot. Also, sometimes, a similar operation for drawing pus from an abscess.
Cupreous
a.
• Consisting of copper or resembling copper; coppery.
Cupric
a
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, copper; containing copper; — said of those compounds of copper in which this element is present in its lowest proportion.
Cupriferous
a.
• Containing copper; as, cupriferous silver.
Cuprite
n.
(Min.) The red oxide of copper; red copper; an important ore of copper, occurring massive and in isometric crystals.
Cuproid
n.
(Crystalloq.) A solid related to a tetrahedron, and contained under twelve equal triangles.
Cuprous
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, copper; containing copper; — said of those compounds of copper in which this element is present in its highest proportion.
Cuprum
n.
(Chem.) Copper.
Cupulate
a.
• Having or bearing cupeles; cupuliferous.
Cupule
n.
(Bot.) A cuplet or little cup, as the acorn; the husk or bur of the filbert, chestnut, etc.
(Zool.) A sucker or acetabulum.
Cupuliferous
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or resembling, the family of plants ot which the oak and the chestnut are examples, — trees bearing a smooth, solid nut inclosed in some kind of cup or bur; bearing, or furnished with, a cupule.
Cur
n.
• A mongrel or inferior dog.
• A worthless, snarling fellow; — used in contempt.
Curability
n.
• The state of being curable; curableness.
Curable
a.
• Capable of being cured; admitting remedy.
Curacy
n.
• The office or employment of a curate.
Curarine
n.
(Chem.) A deadly alkaloid extracted from the curare poison and from the Strychnos toxifera. It is obtained in crystalline colorless salts.
Curarize
v. t.
• To poison with curare.
Curassow
n.
(Zool.) A large gallinaceous bird of the American genera Crax, Ourax, etc., of the family Cracidae.
Curat
n.
• A cuirass or breastplate.
Curate
n.
• One who has the cure souls; originally, any clergyman, but now usually limited to one who assist a rector or vicar
Curateship
n.
• A curacy.
Curation
n.
• Cure; healing.
Curative
a.
• Relating to, or employed in, the cure of diseases; tending to cure.
Curator
n.
• One who has the care and superintendence of anything, as of a museum; a custodian; a keeper.
• One appointed to act as guardian of the estate of a person not legally competent to manage it, or of an absentee; a trustee; a guardian.
Curatorship
n.
• The office of a curator.
Curatrix
n.
• A woman who cures.
• A woman who is a guardian or custodian.
Curb
v. t.
• To bend or curve
• To guide and manage, or restrain, as with a curb; to bend to one's will; to subject; to subdue; to restrain; to confine; to keep in check.
• To furnish wich a curb, as a well; also, to restrain by a curb, as a bank of earth.
v. i.
• To bend; to crouch; to cringe.
n.
• That which curbs, restrains, or subdues; a check or hindbrance; esp., a chain or strap attached to the upper part of the branches of a bit, and capable of being drawn tightly against the lower jaw of the horse.
(Arch.) An assemblage of three or more pieces of timber, or a metal member, forming a frame around an opening, and serving to maintain the integrity of that opening; also, a ring of stone serving a similar purpose, as at the eye of a dome.
• A frame or wall round the mouth of a well; also, a frame within a well to prevent the earth caving in.
• A curbstone.
(Far.) A swelling on the back part of the hind leg of a horse, just behind the lowest part of the hock joint, generally causing lameness.
Curbless
a.
• Having no curb or restraint.
Curbstone
n.
• A stone et along a margin as a and protection, as along the edge of a sidewalk next the roadway; an edge stone.
Curculio
n.
(Zool.) One of a large group of beetles (Rhynchophora) of many genera; — called also weevils, snout beetles, billbeetles, and billbugs. Many of the species are very destructive, as the plum curculio, the corn, grain, and rice weevils, etc.
Curculionidous
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the Curculionideae, or weevil tribe.
Curcuma
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants of the order Scitamineae, including the turmeric plant (Curcuma longa).
Curcumin
n.
(Chem.) The coloring principle of turmeric, or curcuma root, extracted as an orange yellow crystalline substance, C14H14O4, with a green fluorescence.
Curd
n.
• The coagulated or thickened part of milk, as distingushed from the whey, or watery part. It is eaten as food, especially when made into cheese.
• The coagulated part of any liquid.
• The edible flower head of certain brassicaceous plants, as the broccoli and cauliflower.
v. t.
• To cause to coagulate or thicken; to cause to congeal; to curdle.
v. i.
• To become coagulated or thickened; to separate into curds and whey
Curdiness
n.
• The state of being curdy.
Curdle
v. i.
• To change into curd; to coagulate; as, rennet causes milk to curdle.
• To thicken; to congeal.
v. t.
• To change into curd; to cause to coagulate.
• To congeal or thicken.
Curdless
a.
• Destitute of curd.
Curdy
a.
• Like curd; full of curd; coagulated.
Cure
n.
• Care, heed, or attention. 2. Spiritual charge; care of soul; the office of a parish priest or of a curate; hence, that which is committed to the charge of a parish priest or of a curate; a curacy; as, to resign a cure; to obtain a cure.
• Medical or hygienic care; remedial treatment of disease; a method of medical treatment; as, to use the water cure.
• Act of healing or state of being healed; restoration to health from disease, or to soundness after injury.
• Means of the removal of disease or evil; that which heals; a remedy; a restorative.
v. t.
• To heal; to restore to health, soundness, or sanity; to make well; — said of a patient.
• To subdue or remove by remedial means; to remedy; to remove; to heal; — said of a malady.
• To set free from (something injurious or blameworthy), as from a bad habit.
• To prepare for preservation or permanent keeping; to preserve, as by drying, salting, etc.; as, to cure beef or fish; to cure hay.
v. i.
• To pay heed; to care; to give attention.
• To restore health; to effect a cure.
• To become healed.
Cureall
n.
• A remedy for all diseases, o for all ills; a panacea.
Cureless
a.
• Incapable of cure; incurable.
Curer
n.
• One who cures; a healer; a physician.
• One who prepares beef, fish, etc., for preservation by drying, salting, smoking, etc.
Curette
n.
(Med.) A scoop or ring with either a blunt or a cutting edge, for removing substances from the walls of a cavity, as from the eye, ear, or womb.
Curfew
n.
• The ringing of an evening bell, originally a signal to the inhabitants to cover fires, extinguish lights, and retire to rest, — instituted by William the Conqueror; also, the bell itself.
• A utensil for covering the fire.
Curia
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) One of the thirty parts into which the Roman people were divided by Romulus.
• The place of assembly of one of these divisions.
• The place where the meetings of the senate were held; the senate house.
(Middle Ages) The court of a sovereign or of a feudal lord; also; his residence or his household.
(Law) Any court of justice.
Curialism
n.
• The wiew or doctrins of the ultramontane party in the Latin Church.
Curialist
n.
• One who belongs to the ultramontane party in the Latin Church.
Curialistic
a.
• Pertaining to a court.
• Relating or belonging to the ultramonate party in the Latin Church.
Curiality
n.
• The privileges, prerogatives, or retinue of a court.
Curiet
n.
• A cuirass.
Curing
• p. a. & vb. n. of Cure.
Curio
n.
• Any curiosity or article of virtu.
Curiologic
a.
• Pertaining to a rude kind of hieroglyphics, in which a thing is represented by its picture instead of by a symbol.
Curiosity
n.
• The state or quality or being curious; nicety; accuracy; exactness; elaboration.
• Disposition to inquire, investigate, or seek after knowledge; a desire to gratify the mind with new information or objects of interest; inquisitiveness.
• That which is curious, or fitted to excite or reward attention.
Curioso
n.
• A virtuoso.
Curious
a.
• Difficult to please or satisfy; solicitous to be correct; careful; scrupulous; nice; exact.
• Exhibiting care or nicety; artfully constructed; elaborate; wrought with elegance or skill.
• Careful or anxious to learn; eager for knowledge; given to research or inquiry; habitually inquisitive; prying; — sometimes with after or of.
• Exciting attention or inquiry; awakening surprise; inviting and rewarding inquisitiveness; not simple or plain; strange; rare.
Curiously
adv.
• In a curious manner.
Curiousness
n.
• Carefulness; painstaking.
• The state of being curious; exactness of workmanship; ingenuity of contrivance.
• Inquisitiveness; curiosity.
Curl
v. t.
• To twist or form into ringlets; to crisp, as the hair.
• To twist or make onto coils, as a serpent's body.
• To deck with, or as with, curls; to ornament.
• To raise in waves or undulations; to ripple.
(Hat Making) To shape (the brim) into a curve.
v. i.
• To contract or bend into curis or ringlets, as hair; to grow in curls or spirals, as a vine; to be crinkled or contorted; to have a curly appearance; as, leaves lie curled on the ground.
• To move in curves, spirals, or undulations; to contract in curving outlines; to bend in a curved form; to make a curl or curls.
• To play at the game called curling.
n.
• A ringlet, especially of hair; anything of a spiral or winding form.
• An undulating or waving line or streak in any substance, as wood, glass, etc.; flexure; sinuosity.
• A disease in potatoes, in which the leaves, at their first appearance, seem curled and shrunken.
Curled
a.
• Having curls; curly; sinuous; wavy; as, curled maple (maple having fibers which take a sinnuous course).
Curledness
n.
• State of being curled; curliness.
Curler
n.
• One who, or that which, curls.
• A player at the game called curling.
Curlew
n.
(Zool.) A wading bird of the genus Numenius, remarkable for its long, slender, curved bill.
Curliness
n.
• State of being curly.
Curling
n.
• The act or state of that which curls; as, the curling of smoke when it rises; the curling of a ringlet; also, the act or process of one who curls something, as hair, or the brim of hats.
• A scottish game in which heavy weights of stone or iron are propelled by hand over the ice towards a mark.
Curlingly
adv.
• With a curl, or curls.
Curly
a.
• Curling or tending to curl; having curls; full of ripples; crinkled.
Curlycue
n.
• Some thing curled or spiral,, as a flourish made with a pen on paper, or with skates on the ice; a trick; a frolicsome caper.
Curmudgeon
n.
• An avaricious, grasping fellow; a miser; a niggard; a churl.
Curmudgeonly
a.
• Like a curmudgeon; niggardly; churlish; as, a curmudgeonly fellow.
Curmurring
n.
• Murmuring; grumbling; — sometimes applied to the rumbling produced by a slight attack of the gripes.
Curr
v. i.
• To coo.
Currant
n.
• A small kind of seedless raisin, imported from the Levant, chiefly from Zante and Cephalonia; — used in cookery.
• The acid fruit or berry of the Ribes rubrum or common red currant, or of its variety, the white currant.
(Bot.) A shrub or bush of several species of the genus Ribes (a genus also including the gooseberry); esp., the Ribes rubrum.
Currency
n.
• A continued or uninterrupted course or flow like that of a sream; as, the currency of time.
• The state or quality of being current; general acceptance or reception; a passing from person to person, or from hand to hand; circulation; as, a report has had a long or general currency; the currency of bank notes.
• That which is in circulation, or is given and taken as having or representing value; as, the currency of a country; a specie currency; esp., government or bank notes circulating as a substitute for metallic money.
• Fluency; readiness of utterance.
• Current value; general estimation; the rate at which anything is generally valued.
Current
a.
• Running or moving rapidly.
• Now passing, as time; as, the current month.
• Passing from person to person, or from hand to hand; circulating through the community; generally received; common; as, a current coin; a current report; current history.
• Commonly estimated or acknowledged.
• Fitted for general acceptance or circulation; authentic; passable.
n.
• A flowing or passing; onward motion. Hence: A body of fluid moving continuously in a certain direction; a stream; esp., the swiftest part of it; as, a current of water or of air; that which resembles a stream in motion; as, a current of electricity.
• General course; ordinary procedure; progressive and connected movement; as, the current of time, of events, of opinion, etc.
Currently
adv.
• In a current manner; generally; commonly; as, it is currently believed.
Currentness
n.
• The quality of being current; currency; circulation; general reception.
• Easiness of pronunciation; fluency.
Curricle
n.
• A small or short course.
• A two-wheeled chaise drawn by two horses abreast.
Curriculum
n.
• A race course; a place for running.
• A course; particularly, a specified fixed course of study, as in a university.
Curried
p.a.
• Dressed by currying; cleaned; prepared.
• Prepared with curry; as, curried rice, fowl, etc.
Currier
n.
• One who curries and dresses leather, after it is tanned.
Currish
a.
• Having the qualities, or exhibiting the characteristics, of a cur; snarling; quarrelsome; snappish; churlish; hence, also malicious; malignant; brutal.
Curry
v. t.
• To dress or prepare for use by a process of scraping, cleansing, beating, smoothing, and coloring; — said of leather.
• To dress the hair or coat of (a horse, ox, or the like) with a currycomb and brush; to comb, as a horse, in order to make clean.
• To beat or bruise; to drub; — said of persons.
n.
(Cookery) A kind of sauce much used in India, containing garlic, pepper, ginger, and other strong spices.
• A stew of fowl, fish, or game, cooked with curry.
v. t.
• To flavor or cook with curry.
Currycomb
n.
• A kind of card or comb having rows of metallic teeth or serrated ridges, used in curryng a horse.
v. t.
• To comb with a currycomb.
Curse
v. t.
• To call upon divine or supernatural power to send injury upon; to imprecate evil upon; to execrate.
• To bring great evil upon; to be the cause of serious harm or unhappiness to; to furnish with that which will be a cause of deep trouble; to afflict or injure grievously; to harass or torment.
v. i.
• To utter imprecations or curses; to affirm or deny with imprecations; to swear.
n.
• An invocation of, or prayer for, harm or injury; malediction.
• Evil pronounced or invoked upon another, solemnly, or in passion; subjection to, or sentence of, divine condemnation.
• The cause of great harm, evil, or misfortune; that which brings evil or severe affliction; torment.
Cursed
a.
• Deserving a curse; execrable; hateful; detestable; abominable.
Cursedly
adv.
• In a cursed manner; miserably; in a manner to be detested; enormously.
Cursedness
n.
• The state of being under a curse or of being doomed to execration or to evil.
• Wickedness; sin; cursing.
• Shrewishness.
Curser
n.
• One who curses.
Curship
n.
• The state of being a cur; one who is currish.
Cursitating
a.
• Moving about slightly.
Cursitor
n.
• A courier or runner.
(Eng.Law) An officer in the Court of Chancery, whose business is to make out original writs.
Cursive
a.
• Running; flowing.
n.
• A character used in cursive writing.
• A manuscript, especially of the New Testament, written in small, connected characters or in a running hand; — opposed to uncial.
Cursor
n.
• Any part of a mathematical instrument that moves or slides backward and forward upon another part.
Cursorary
a.
• Cursory; hasty.
Cursores
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of running birds including the ostrich, emu, and allies; the Ratitaae.
• A group of running spiders; the wolf spiders.
Cursorial
a.
(Zool.) Adapted to running or walking, and not to prehension; as, the limbs of the horse are cursorial.
• Of or pertaining to the Cursores.
Cursorily
adv.
• In a running or hasty manner; carelessly.
Cursoriness
n.
• The quality of being cursory; superficial performance; as, cursoriness of view.
Cursory
a.
• Running about; not stationary.
• Characterized by haste; hastily or superficially performed; slight; superficial; careless.
Curst
• imp. & p.p. of Curse.
a.
• Froward; malignant; mischievous; malicious; snarling.
Curstfully
adv.
• Peevishly; vexatiously; detestably.
Curt
a.
• Characterized by exessive brevity; short; rudely concise; as, curt limits; a curt answer.
Curtail
v. t.
• To cut off the end or tail, or any part, of; to shorten; to abridge; to diminish; to reduce.
n.
• The scroll termination of any architectural member, as of a step, etc.
Curtailer
n.
• One who curtails.
Curtailment
n.
• The act or result of curtailing or cutting off.
Curtain
n.
• A hanging screen intended to darken or conceal, and admitting of being drawn back or up, and reclosed at pleasure; esp., drapery of cloth or lace hanging round a bed or at a window; in theaters, and like places, a movable screen for concealing the stage.
(Fort.) That part of the rampart and parapet which is between two bastions or two gates.
(Arch.) That part of a wall of a building which is between two pavilions, towers, etc.
• A flag; an ensign; — in contempt.
v. t.
• To inclose as with curtains; to furnish with curtains.
Curtal
a.
• Curt; brief; laconic.
n.
• A horse with a docked tail; hence, anything cut short.
Curtana
n.
• The pointless sword carried before English monarchs at their coronation, and emblematically considered as the sword of mercy; — also called the sword of Edward the Confessor.
Curtate
a.
(Astron.) Shortened or reduced; — said of the distance of a planet from the sun or earth, as measured in the plane of the ecliptic, or the distance from the sun or earth to that point where a perpendicular, let fall from the planet upon the plane of the ecliptic, meets the ecliptic.
Curtation
n.
(Astron.) The interval by which the curtate distance of a planet is less than the true distance.
Curtein
n.
• Same as Curtana.
Curtes
a.
• Courteous.
Curtesy
n.
(Law) the life estate which a husband has in the lands of his deceased wife, which by the common law takes effect where he has had issue by her, born alive, and capable of inheriting the lands.
Curtilage
n.
(Law) A yard, courtyard, or piece of ground, included within the fence surrounding a dwelling house.
Curtly
adv.
• In a curt manner.
Curtness
n.
• The quality of bing curt.
Curtsness
n.
• Peevishness; malignity; frowardness; crabbedness; surliness.
Curtsy
n.
• Same as Courtesy, an act of respect.
Curule
a.
• Of or pertaining to a charoit.
(Rom. Antiq.) Of or pertaining to a kind of chair appropriated to Roman magistrates and dignitaries; pertaining to, having, or conferring, the right to sit in the curule chair; hence, official.
Cururo
n.
(Zool.) A Chilian burrowing rodent of the genus Spalacopus.
Curvation
n.
• The act of bending or crooking.
Curvative
a.
(Bot.) Having the margins only a little curved; — said of leaves.
Curvature
n.
• The act of curving, or the state of being bent or curved; a curving or bending, normal or abnormal, as of a line or surface from a rectilinear direction; a bend; a curve.
(Math.) The amount of degree of bending of a mathematical curve, or the tendency at any point to depart from a tangent drawn to the curve at that point.
Curve
a.
• Bent without angles; crooked; curved; as, a curve line; a curve surface.
n.
• A bending without angles; that wcich is bent; a flexure; as, a curve in a railway or canal.
(Geom.) A line described according to some low, and having no finite portion of it a straight line.
v. t.
• To bend; to crook; as, to curve a line; to curve a pipe; to cause to swerve from a straight course; as, to curve a ball in pitching it.
v. i.
• To bend or turn gradually from a given direction; as, the road curves to the right.
Curvedness
n.
• The state of being curved.
Curvet
n.
(Man.) A particular leap of a horse, when he raises both his fore legs at once, equally advanced, and, as his fore legs are falling, raises his hind legs, so that all his legs are in the air at once.
• A prank; a frolic.
v. i.
• To make a curvet; to leap; to bound. 'Oft and high he did curvet." Drayton. 2. To leap and frisk; to frolic.
v. t.
• To cause to curvet.
Curvicaudate
a.
(Zool.) Having a curved or crooked tail.
Curvicostate
a.
(Bot.) Having bent ribs.
Curvidentate
a.
• Having curved teeth.
Curviform
a.
• Having a curved form.
Curvilinead
n.
(Geom.) An instrument for drawing curved lines.
Curvilinearity
n.
• The state of being curvilinear or of being bounded by curved lines.
Curvilinearly
adv.
• In a curvilinear manner.
Curvinerved
a.
(Bot.) Having the ribs or the veins of the leaves curved; — called also curvinervate and curve-veined.
Curvirostral
a.
(Zool.) Having a crooked beak, as the crossbill.
Curvirostres
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of passerine birds, including the creepers and nuthatches.
Curviserial
a.
(Bot.) Distributed in a curved line, as leaves along a stem.
Curvity
n.
• The state of being curved; a bending in a regular form; crookedness.
Curvograph
n.
(Geom.) An arcograph.
Cushat
n.
(Zool.) The ringdove or wood pigeon.
Cushewbird
n.
(Zool) The galeated curassow.
Cushion
n.
• A case or bag stuffed with some soft and elastic material, and used to sit or recline upon; a soft pillow or pad.
• Anything resembling a cushion in properties or use
• a pad on which gilders cut gold leaf
• a mass of steam in the end of the cylinder of a steam engine to receive the impact of the piston
• the elastic edge of a billiard table.
• A riotous kind of dance, formerly common at weddings; — called also cushion dance.
v. t.
• To seat or place on, or as on a cushion.
• To furnish with cushions; as, to cushion a chaise.
• To conceal or cover up, as under a cushion.
Cushionet
n.
• A little cushion.
Cushionless
a.
• Hot furnished with a cushion.
Cushiony
a.
• Like a cushion; soft; pliable.
Cushite
n.
• A descendant of Cush, the son of Ham and grandson of Noah.
Cusk
n.
(Zool.) A large, edible, marine fish (Brosmius brosme), allied to the cod, common on the northern coasts of Europe and America; — called also tusk and torsk.
Cuskin
n.
• A kind of drinking cup.
Cusp
n.
(Arch.) A triangular protection from the intrados of an arch, or from an inner curve of tracery.
(Astrol.) The beginning or first entrance of any house in the calculations of nativities, etc.
(Astron) The point or horn of the crescent moon or other crescent-shaped luminary.
(Math.) A multiple point of a curve at which two or more branches of the curve have a common tangent.
(Anat.) A prominence or point, especially on the crown of a tooth.
(Bot.) A sharp and rigid point.
v. t.
• To furnish with a cusp or cusps.
Cuspated
a.
• Ending in a point.
Cuspid
n.
(Anat.) One of the canine teeth; — so called from having but one point or cusp on the crown.
Cuspidal
a.
• Ending in a point.
Cuspidate
v. t.
• To make pointed or sharp.
Cuspidor
n.
• Any ornamental vessel used as a spittoon; hence, to avoid the common term, a spittoon of any sort.
Cuspis
n.
• A point; a sharp end.
Cussuetudinary
n.
• A manual or ritual of customary devotional exercises.
Custard
n.
• A mixture of milk and eggs, sweetened, and baked or boiled.
Custodial
a.
• Relating to custody or guardianship.
Custodian
n.
• One who has care or custody, as of some public building; a keeper or superintendent.
Custodianship
n.
• Office or duty of a custodian.
Custodier
n.
• A custodian.
Custody
n.
• A keeping or guarding; care, watch, inspection, for keeping, preservation, or security.
• Judicial or penal safe-keeping.
• State of being guarded and watched to prevent escape; restraint of liberty; confinement; imprisonment.
Custom
n.
• Frequent repetition of the same act; way of acting common to many; ordinary manner; habitual practice; usage; method of doing or living.
• Habitual buying of goods; practice of frequenting, as a shop, manufactory, etc., for making purchases or giving orders; business support.
(Law) Long-established practice, considered as unwritten law, and resting for authority on long consent; usage.
• Familiar aquaintance; familiarity.
v. t.
• To make familiar; to accustom.
• To supply with customers.
v. i.
• To have a custom.
n.
• 1 the customary toll,tax, or tribute.
• Duties or tolls imposed by law on commodities, imported or exported.
v. t.
• To pay the customs of.
Customable
a.
• Customary.
• Subject to the payment of customs; dutiable.
Customableness
n.
• Quality of being customable; conformity to custom.
Customably
adv.
• Usually.
Customarily
adv.
• In a customary manner; habitually.
Customariness
n.
• Quality of being customary.
Customary
a.
• Agreeing with, or established by, custom; established by common usage; conventional; habitual.
(Law) Holding or held by custom; as, customary tenants; customary service or estate.
n.
• A book containing laws and usages, or customs; as, the Customary of the Normans.
Customer
n.
• One who collect customs; a toll gatherer.
• One who regularly or repeatedly makes purchases of a trader; a purchaser; a buyer.
• A person with whom a business house has dealings; as, the customers of a bank.
• A peculiar person; — in an indefinite sense; as, a queer customer; an ugly customer.
• A lewd woman.
Customhouse
n.
• The building where customs and duties are paid, and where vessels are entered or cleared.
Custos
n.
• A keeper; a custodian; a superintendent.
Cut
v. t.
• To sparate the parts of with, or as with, a sharp instrument; to make an incision in; to gash; to sever; to divide.
• To sever and cause to fall for the purpose of gathering; to hew; to mow or reap.
• To sever and remove by cutting; to cut off; to dock; as, to cut the hair; to cut the nails.
• To castrate or geld; as, to cut a horse.
• To form or shape by cutting; to make by incision, hewing, etc.; to carve; to hew out.
• To wound or hurt deeply the snsibilities of; to pierce; to lacerate; as, sarcasm cuts to the quick.
• To intersect; to cross; as, one line cuts another at right angles.
• To refuse to recognize; to ignorre; as, to cut a person in the street; to cut one's acquaintance.
• To absent one's self from; as, to cut an appointment, a recitation. etc.
v. i.
• To do the work of an edged tool; to serve in dividing or gashing; as, a knife cuts well.
• To admit of incision or severance; to yield to a cutting instrument.
• To perform the operation of dividing, severing, incising, intersecting, etc.; to use a cutting instrument.
• To make a stroke with a whip.
• To interfere, as a horse.
• To move or make off quickly.
• To divide a pack of cards into two portion to decide the deal or trump, or to schange the order of the cards to be dealt.
n.
• An opening made with an edged instrument; a cleft; a gash; a slash; a wound made by cutting; as, a sword cut.
• A stroke or blow or cutting motion with an edged instrument; a stroke or blow with a whip.
• That which wounds the feelings, as a harsh remark or criticism, or a sarcasm; personal discourtesy, as neglecting to recognize an acquaintance when meeting him; a slight.
• A notch, passage, or channel made by cutting or digging; a furrow; a groove; as, a cut for a railroad.
• The surface left by a cut; as, a smooth or clear cut.
• A portion severed or cut off; a division; as, a cut of beef; a cut of timber.
• An engraved block or plate; the impression from such an engraving; as, a book illustrated with fine cuts.
• The act of dividing a pack cards.
• The right to divide; as, whose cut is it?
• Manner in which a thing is cut or formed; shape; style; fashion; as, the cut of a garment.
• A common work horse; a gelding.
• The failure of a college officer or student to be present at any appointed exercise.
• A skein of yarn.
a.
• Gashed or divided, as by a cutting instrument.
• Formed or shaped as by cuttting; carved.
• Overcome by liquor; tipsy.
Cutaneous
a.
• Of pertaining to the skin; existing on, or affecting, the skin; as, a cutaneous disease; cutaneous absorption; cutaneous respiration.
Cutaway
a.
• Having a part cut off or away; having the corners rounded or cut away.
Cutchery
n.
• A hindoo hall of justice.
Cute
a.
• Clever; sharp; shrewd; ingenious; cunning.
Cuteness
n.
• Acuteness; cunning.
Cutgrass
• A grass with leaves having edges furnished with very minute hooked prickles, which form a cutting edge; one or more species of Leersia.
Cuticle
n.
(Anat.) The scarfskin or epidermis.
(Bot.) The outermost skin or pellicle of a plant, found especially in leaves and young stems.
• A thin skin formed on the surface of a liquid.
Cuticular
a.
• Pertaining to the cuticle, or external coat of the skin; epidermal.
Cutin
n.
(Bot.) The substance which, added to the material of a cell wall, makes it waterproof, as in cork.
Cutinization
n.
(Bot.) The conversion of cell walls into a material which repels water, as in cork.
Cutinize
v. t. & i.
• To change into cutin.
Cutlass
n.
• A short, heavy, curving sword, used in the navy.
Cutler
n.
• One who makes or deals in cutlery, or knives and other cutting instruments.
Cutlery
n.
• The business of a cutler.
• Edged or cutting instruments, collectively.
Cutlet
n.
• A piece of meat, especially of veal or mutton, cut for broiling.
Cutling
n.
• The art of making edged tools or cutlery.
Cutose
n.
(Chem.) A variety of cellulose, occuring as a fine transparent membrane covering the aerial organs of plants, and forming an essential ingredient of cork; by oxidation it passes to suberic acid.
Cutpurse
n.
• One who cuts purses for the sake of stealing them or their contents (an act common when men wore purses fastened by a string to their girdles); one who steals from the person; a pickpocket
Cutter
n.
• One who cuts; as, a stone cutter; a die cutter; esp., one who cuts out garments.
• That which cuts; a machine or part of a machine, or a tool or instrument used for cutting, as that part of a mower which severs the stalk, or as a paper cutter.
• A fore tooth; an incisor.
(Naut.) A boat used by ships of war.
• A fast sailing vessel with one mast, rigged in most essentials like a sloop. A cutter is narrower end deeper than a sloop of the same length, and depends for stability on a deep keel, often heavily weighted with lead.
• A small armed vessel, usually a steamer, in the revenue marine service; — also called revenue cutter.
• A small, light one-horse sleigh.
• An officer in the exchequer who notes by cutting on the tallies the sums paid.
• A ruffian; a bravo; a destroyer.
• A kind of soft yellow brick, used for facework; — so called from the facility with which it can be cut.
Cutthroat
n.
• One who cuts throats; a murderer; an assassin.
a.
• Murderous; cruel; barbarous.
Cutting
n.
• The act or process of making an incision, or of severing, felling, shaping, etc.
• Something cut, cut off, or cut out, as a twig or ion cut off from a stoock for the purpose of grafting or of rooting as an independent plant; something cut out of a newspaper; an excavation cut through a hill or elsewhere to make a way for a railroad, canal, etc.; a cut.
a.
• Adapted to cut; as, a cutting tool.
• Chilling; penetratinn; sharp; as, a cutting wind.
• Severe; sarcastic; biting; as, a cutting reply.
Cuttingly
adv.
• In a cutting manner.
Cuttle
n.
• A knife.
Cutty
n.
• A short spoon.
• A short tobacco pipe.
• A light or unchaste woman.
Cuttystoo
n.
• A low stool
• A seat in old Scottish churches, where offenders were made to sit, for public rebuke by the minister.
Cutwal
n.
• The chief police officer of a large city.
Cutwater
n.
(Naut.) The fore part of a ship's prow, which cuts the water.
• A starling or other structure attached to the pier of a birdge, with an angle or edge directed up stream, in order better to resist the action of water, ice, etc.; the sharpened upper end of the pier itself.
(Zool.) A sea bird of the Atlantic (Rhynchops nigra); — called also black skimmer, scissorsbill, and razorbill.
Cutwork
n.
(Fine Arts) An ancient term for embroidery, esp. applied to the earliest form of lace, or to that early embroidery on linen and the like, from which the manufacture of lace was developed.
Cutworm
n.
(Zool.) A caterpillar which at night eats off young plants of cabbage, corn, etc., usually at the ground. Some kinds ascend fruit trees and eat off the flower buds. During the day, they conceal themselves in the earth. The common cutworms are the larvae of various species of Agrotis and related genera of noctuid moths.
Cuvette
n.
• A pot, bucket, or basin, in which molten plate glass is carried from the melting pot to the casting table.
(Fort.) A cunette.
(Spectrometry)(Analytical chemistry) A small vessel with at least two flat and transparent sides, used to hold a liquid sample to be analysed in the light path of a spectrometer.
Cyamelide
n.
(Chem.) A white amorphous substance, regarded as a polymeric modification of isocyanic acid.
Cyamellone
n.
(Chem) A complex derivative of cyanogen, regarded as an acid, and known chiefly in its salts; — called also hydromellonic acid.
Cyanate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of cyanic acid.
Cyanean
a.
• Having an azure color.
Cyanic
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, cyanogen.
• Of or pertaining to a blue color.
Cyanide
n.
(Chem.) A compound formed by the union of cyanogen with an element or radical.
Cyanin
n.
(Chem.) The blue coloring matter of flowers; — called also anthokyan and anthocyanin.
Cyanine
n.
(Chem.) One of a series of artificial blue or red dyes obtained from quinoline and lepidine and used in calico printing.
Cyanite
n.
(Min.) A mineral occuring in thin-bladed crystals and crystalline aggregates, of a sky-blue color. It is a silicate of aluminium.
Cyanogen
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, inflammable, poisonous gas, C2N2, with a peach-blossom odor, so called from its tendency to form blue compounds; obtained by heating ammonium oxalate, mercuric cyanide, etc. It is obtained in combination, forming an alkaline cyanide when nitrogen or a nitrogenous compound is strongly ignited with carbon and soda or potash. It conducts itself like a member of the halogen group of elements, and shows a tendency to form complex compounds. The name is also applied to the univalent radical, CN (the half molecule of cyanogen proper), which was one of the first compound radicals recognized.
Cyanometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring degress of blueness.
Cyanopathy
n.
(Med.) A disease in which the body is colored blue in its surface, arising usually from a malformation of the heart, which causes an imperfect arterialization of the blood; blue jaundice.
Cyanophyll
n.
(Bot.) A blue coloring matter supposed by some to be one of the component parts ofchlorophyll.
Cyanosed
a.
• Rendered blue, as the surface of the body, from cyanosis or deficient aration of the blood.
Cyanosis
n.
(Med.) A condition in which, from insufficient aration of the blood, the surface of the body becomes blue.
Cyanosite
n.
(Min.) Native sulphate of copper. Cf. Blue vitriol, under Blue.
Cyanotic
a.
(Med.) Relating to cyanosis; affected with cyanosis; as, a cyanotic patient; having the hue caused by cyanosis; as, a cyanitic skin.
Cyanotype
n.
• A photographic picture obtained by the use of a cyanide.
Cyanurate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of cyanuric acid.
Cyanuret
n.
(Chem.) A cyanide.
Cyanuric
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or derived from, cyanic and uric acids.
Cyathiform
a.
• In the form of a cup, a little widened at the top.
Cyatholith
n.
(Biol.) A kind of coccolith, which in shape resembles a minute cup widened at the top, and varies in size from
Cyathophylloid
a.
(Palen.) Like, or pertaining to, the family Cyathophyllidae.
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil coral of the family Cyathophyllidae; sometimes extended to fossil corals of other related families belonging to the group Rugosa; — also called cup corals. Thay are found in paleozoic rocks.
Cycad
n.
(Bot.) Any plant of the natural order Cycadeceae, as the sago palm, etc.
Cycadaceous
a.
(Bot.) Pertaining to, or resembling, an order of plants like the palms, but having exogenous wood. The sago palm is an example.
Cycas
n.
(Bot.) A genus of trees, intermediate in character between the palms and the pines. The pith of the trunk of some species furnishes a valuable kind of sago.
Cyclamen
n.
(Bot.) A genus of plants of the Primrose family, having depressed rounded corms, and pretty nodding flowers with the petals so reflexed as to point upwards, whence it is called rabbit's ears. It is also called sow bread, because hogs are said to eat the corms.
Cyclamin
n.
• A white amorphous substance, regarded as a glucoside, extracted from the corm of Cyclamen Europaeum.
Cyclas
n.
• A long gown or surcoat (cut off in front), worn in the Middle Ages. It was sometimes embroidered or interwoven with gold. Also, a rich stuff from which the gown was made.
Cycle
n.
• An imaginary circle or orbit in the heavens; one of the celestial spheres.
• An interval of time in which a certain succession of events or phenomena is completed, and then returns again and again, uniformly and continually in the same order; a periodical space of time marked by the recurrence of something peculiar; as, the cucle of the seasons, or of the year.
• An age; a long period of time.
• An orderly list for a given time; a calendar.
• The circle of subjects connected with the exploits of the hero or heroes of some particular period which have severed as a popular theme for poetry, as the legend aof Arthur and the knights of the Round Table, and that of Charlemagne and his paladins.
(Bot.) One entire round in a circle or a spire; as, a cycle or set of leaves.
• A bicycle or tricycle, or other light velocipede.
v. i.
• To pass through a cycle of changes; to recur in cycles.
• To ride a bicycle, tricycle, or other form of cycle.
Cyclide
n.
(Geom.) A surface of the fourth degree, having certain special relations to spherical surfaces. The tore or anchor ring is one of the cyclides.
Cycling
n.
• The act, art, or practice, of riding a cycle, esp. a bicycle or tricycle.
Cyclist
n.
• A cycler.
Cyclobranchiate
a.
(Zool) Having the gills around the margin of the body, as certain limpets.
Cycloganoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Cycloganoidei.
n.
(Zool.) One of the Cycloganoidei.
Cycloganoidei
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of ganoid fishes, having cycloid scales. The bowfin (Amia calva) is a living example.
Cycloid
n.
(Geom.) A curve generated by a point in the plane of a circle when the circle is rolled along a straight line, keeping always in the same plane.
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Cycloidei.
n.
(Zool.) One of the Cycloidei.
Cycloidal
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, a cycloid; as, the cycloidal space is the space contained between a cycloid and its base.
Cycloidei
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of fishes, formerly proposed by Agassiz, for those with thin, smooth scales, destitute of marginal spines, as the herring and salmon. The group is now regarded as artificial.
Cycloidian
a. & n.
(Zool.) Same as 2d and 3d Cycloid.
Cyclometer
n.
• A contrivance for recording the revolutions of a wheel, as of a bicycle.
Cyclometry
n.
(Geom.) The art of measuring circles.
Cyclone
n.
(Meteor.) A violent storm, often of vast extent, characterized by high winds rotating about a calm center of low atmospheric pressure. This center moves onward, often with a velocity of twenty or thirty miles an hour.
Cyclonic
a.
• Pertaining to a cyclone.
Cyclopean
a.
• Pertaining to the Cyclops; characteristic of the Cyclops; huge; gigantic; vast and rough; massive; as, Cyclopean labors; Cyclopean architecture.
Cyclopedic
a.
• Belonging to the circle of the sciences, or to a cyclopedia; of the nature of a cyclopedia; hence, of great range, extent, or amount; as, a man of cyclopedic knowledge.
Cyclopedist
n.
• A maker of, or writer for, a cyclopedia.
Cyclopic
a.
• Pertaining to the Cyclops; Cyclopean.
Cyclops
n. sing. & pl.
(Gr. Myth.) One of a race of giants, sons of Neptune and Amphitrite, having but one eye, and that in the middle of the forehead. They were fabled to inhabit Sicily, and to assist in the workshops of Vulcan, under Mt. Etna.
(Zool.) A genus of minute Entomostraca, found both in fresh and salt water.
• A portable forge, used by tinkers, etc.
Cyclorama
n.
• A pictorial view which is extended circularly, so that the spectator is surrounded by the objects represented as by things in nature. The realistic effect is increased by putting, in the space between the spectator and the picture, things adapted to the scene represented, and in some places only parts of these objects, the completion of them being carried out pictorially.
Cycloscope
n.
• A machine for measuring at any moment velocity of rotation, as of a wheel of a steam engine.
Cyclosis
n.
(Bot.) The circulation or movement of protoplasmic granules within a living vegetable cell.
Cyclostoma
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Bryozoa, in which the cells have circular apertures.
Cyclostomata
• ,
Cyclostomi
n. pl.
(Zool.) A glass of fishes having a suckerlike mouth, without jaws, as the lamprey; the Marsipobranchii.
Cyclostylar
a.
• Relating to a structure composed of a circular range of columns, without a core or building within.
Cyclostyle
n.
• A contrivance for producing manifold copies of writing or drawing. The writing or drawing is done with a style carrying a small wheel at the end which makes minute punctures in the paper, thus converting it into a stencil. Copies are transferred with an inked roller.
Cydonin
n.
(Chem.) A peculiar mucilaginous substance extracted from the seeds of the quince (Cydonia vulgaris), and regarded as a variety of amylose.
Cygnet
n.
(Zool.) A young swan.
Cygnus
n.
(Astron.) A constellation of the northern hemisphere east of, or following, Lyra; the Swan.
Cylinder
n.
(Geom.) A solid body which may be generated by the rotation of a parallelogram round one its sides; or a body of rollerlike form, of which the longitudinal section is oblong, and the cross section is circular.
• The space inclosed by any cylindrical surface. The space may be limited or unlimited in length.
• Any hollow body of cylindrical form
• The chamber of a steam engine in which the piston is moved by the force of steam.
• The barrel of an air or other pump.
(Print.) The revolving platen or bed which produces the impression or carries the type in a cylinder press.
• The bore of a gun; the turning chambered breech of a revolver.
• The revolving square prism carryng the cards in a Jacquard loom.
Cylindraceous
a.
• Cylindrical, or approaching a cylindrical form.
Cylindrically
adv.
• In the manner or shape of a cylinder; so as to be cylindrical.
Cylindricity
n
• The quality or condition of being cylindrical.
Cylindriform
a.
• Having the form of a cylinder.
Cylindroid
n.
• A solid body resembling a right cylinder, but having the bases or ends elliptical.
(Geom.) A certain surface of the third degree, described by a moving straight line; — used to illustrate the motions of a rigid body and also the forces acting on the body.
Cylindrometric
a.
• Belonging to a scale used in measuring cylinders.
Cyma
n.
(Arch.) A member or molding of the cornice, the profile of which is wavelike in form.
(Bot.) A cyme.
Cymar
n.
• A sight covering; a scarf.
Cymatium
n.
(Arch.) A capping or crowning molding in classic architecture.
Cymbal
n.
• A musical instrument used by the ancients. It is supposed to have been similar to the modern kettle drum, though perhaps smaller.
• A musical instrument of brass, shaped like a circular dish or a flat plate, with a handle at the back; — used in pairs to produce a sharp ringing sound by clashing them together.
• A musical instrument used by gypsies and others, made of steel wire, in a triangular form, on which are movable rings.
Cymbalist
n.
• A performer upon cymbals.
Cymbiform
a.
• Shaped like a boat; (Bot.) elongated and having the upper surface decidedly concave, as the glumes of many grasses.
Cymbium
n.
(Zool.) A genus of marine univalve shells; the gondola.
Cyme
n.
(Bot.) A flattish or convex flower cluster, of the centrifugal or determinate type, differing from a corymb chiefly in the order of the opening of the blossoms.
Cymene
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, liquid, combustible hydrocarbon, CH3.C6H4.C3H7, of pleasant odor, obtained from oil of cumin, oil of caraway, carvacrol, camphor, etc.; — called also paracymene, and formerly camphogen.
Cymidine
n.
(Chem.) A liquid organic base, C10H13.NH2, derived from cymene.
Cymiferous
a.
• Producing cymes.
Cymogene
n.
(Chem.) A highly volatile liquid, condensed by cold and pressure from the first products of the distillation of petroleum; — used for producing low temperatures.
Cymoid
a.
(Bot.) Having the form of a cyme.
Cymophanous
a.
• Having a wavy, floating light; opalescent; chatoyant.
Cymric
a.
• Welsh.
n.
• The Welsh language.
Cymry
n.
• A collective term for the Welsh race; — so called by themselves .
Cymule
n.
(Bot.) A small cyme, or one of very few flowers.
Cynanche
n.
(Med.) Any disease of the tonsils, throat, or windpipe, attended with inflammation, swelling, and difficulty of breathing and swallowing.
Cynanthropy
n.
(Med.) A kind of madness in which men fancy themselves changed into dogs, and imitate the voice and habits of that animal.
Cynarctomachy
n.
• Bear baiting with a dog.
Cynarrhodium
n.
(Bot.) A fruit like that of the rose, consisting of a cup formed of the calyx tube and receptacle, and containing achenes.
Cynegetics
n.
• The art of hunting with dogs.
Cynic
n.
(Gr. Philos) One of a sect or school of philosophers founded by Antisthenes, and of whom Diogenes was a disciple. The first Cynics were noted for austere lives and their scorn for social customs and current philosophical opinions. Hence the term Cynic symbolized, in the popular judgment, moroseness, and contempt for the views of others.
• One who holds views resembling those of the Cynics; a snarler; a misanthrope; particularly, a person who believes that human conduct is directed, either consciously or unconsciously, wholly by self-interest or self-indulgence, and that appearances to the contrary are superficial and untrustworthy.
Cynically
adv.
• In a cynical manner.
Cynicalness
n.
• The quality of being cynical.
Cynicism
n.
• The doctrine of the Cynics; the quality of being cynical; the mental state, opnions, or conduct, of a cynic; morose and contemptuous views and opinions.
Cynoidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Carnivora, including the dogs, wolves, and foxes.
Cynorexia
n.
(Med.) A voracious appetite, like that of a starved dog.
Cynosural
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cynosure.
Cynosure
n.
• The constellation of the Lesser Bear, to which, as containing the polar star, the eyes of mariners and travelers were often directed.
• That which serves to direct.
• Anything to which attention is strongly turned; a center of attraction.
Cyperaceous
a.
(Bot.) Of, pertaining to, or resembling, a large family of plants of which the sedge is the type.
Cyperus
n.
(Bot.) A large genus of plants belonging to the Sedge family, and including the species called galingale, several bulrushes, and the Egyptian papyrus.
Cyphonautes
n.
(Zool.) The free-swimming, bivalve larva of certain Bryozoa.
Cyphonism
n.
• A punishment sometimes used by the ancients, consisting in the besmearing of the criminal with honey, and exposing him to insects. It is still in use among some Oriental nations.
Cypraea
n.
(Zool.) A genus of mollusks, including the cowries.
Cypres
n.
(Law) A rule for construing written instruments so as to conform as nearly to the intention of the parties as is consistent with law.
Cypress
n.
(Bot) A coniferous tree of the genus Cupressus. The species are mostly evergreen, and have wood remarkable for its durability.
Cyprian
a.
• Belonging to Cyprus.
• Of, pertaining, or conducing to, lewdness.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Cyprus, especially of ancient Cyprus; a Cypriot.
• A lewd woman; a harlot.
Cyprine
a.
• Of or pertaining to the cypress.
a.
(Zool.) Cyprinoid.
Cyprinodont
n.
(Zool.) One of the Cyprinodontidae, a family of fishes including the killifishes or minnows.
Cyprinoid
a.
(Zool.) Like the carp (Cyprinus).
n.
• One of the Cyprinidae, or Carp family, as the goldfish, barbel, etc.
Cypriot
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Cyprus.
Cypripedium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of orchidaceous plants including the lady's slipper.
Cypris
n.
(Zool.) A genus of small, bivalve, freshwater Crustacea, belonging to the Ostracoda; also, a member of this genus.
Cyprus
n.
• A thin, transparent stuff, the same as, or corresponding to, crape. It was either white or black, the latter being most common, and used for mourning.
Cypruslawn
n.
• Same as Cyprus.
Cypsela
n.
(Bot.) A one-seeded, one-called, indehiscent fruit; an achene with the calyx tube adherent.
Cypseliform
a.
(Zool.) Like or belonging to the swifts (Cypselidae.)
Cyrenaic
a.
• Pertaining to Cyrenaica, an ancient country of northern Africa, and to Cyrene, its principal city; also, to a school of philosophy founded by Aristippus, a native of Cyrene.
n.
• A native of Cyrenaica; also, a disciple of the school of Aristippus.
Cyrenian
a.
• Pertaining to Cyrene, in Africa; Cyrenaic.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Cyrene.
• One of a school of philosophers, established at Cyrene by Aristippus, a disciple of Socrates. Their doctrines were nearly the same as those of the Epicureans.
Cyriologic
a.
• Relating to capital letters.
Cyrtostyle
n.
(Arch.) A circular projecting portion.
Cyst
n.
(Med.) A pouch or sac without opening, usually membranous and containing morbid matter, which is accidentally developed in one of the natural cavaties or in the substance of an organ.
• In old authors, the urinary bladder, or the gall bladder.
(Bot.) One of the bladders or air vessels of certain algae, as of the great kelp of the Pacific, and common rockweeds (Fuci) of our shores.
(Zool.) A small capsule or sac of the kind in which many immature entozoans exit in the tissues of living animals; also, a similar form in Rotifera, etc.
• A form assumed by Protozoa inwhich they become saclike and quiescent. It generally precedes the production of germs.
Cysted
a.
• Inclosed in a cyst.
Cystic
a.
• Having the form of, or living in, a cyst; as, the cystic entozoa.
• Containing cysts; cystose; as, cystic sarcoma.
(Anat.) Pertaining to, or contained in, a cyst; esp., pertaining to, or contained in, either the urinary bladder or the gall bladder.
Cysticule
n.
(Anat.) An appendage of the vestibular ear sac of fishes.
Cystid
n.
(Zool.) One of the Cystidea.
Cystidea
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of Crinoidea, mostly fossils of the Paleozoic rocks. They were usually roundish or egg-shaped, and often unsymmetrical; some were sessile, others had short stems.
Cystidean
n.
(Zool.) One of the Cystidea.
Cystine
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A white crystalline substance, C3H7NSO2, containing sulphur, occuring as a constituent of certain rare urinary calculi, and occasionally found as a sediment in urine.
Cystis
n.
• A cyst.
Cystitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the bladder.
Cystocarp
n.
(Bot.) A minute vesicle in a red seaweed, which contains the reproductive spores.
Cystocele
n.
(Med.) Hernia in which the urinary bladder protrudes; vesical hernia.
Cystoidea
n.
• Same as Cystidea.
Cystolith
n.
(Bot.) A concretion of mineral matter within a leaf or other part of a plant.
(Med.) A urinary calculus.
Cystolithic
a.
(Med.) Relating to stone in the bladder.
Cystoplast
n.
(Biol.) A nucleated cell having an envelope or cell wall, as a red blood corpuscle or an epithelial cell; a cell concerned in growth.
Cystose
a.
• Containing, or resembling, a cyst or cysts; cystic; bladdery.
Cystotome
n.
(Surg.) A knife or instrument used in cystotomy.
Cystotomy
n.
• The act or practice of opening cysts; esp., the operation of cutting into the bladder, as for the extraction of a calculus.
Cytherean
a.
• Pertaining to the goddess Venus.
Cytoblast
n.
(Biol.) The nucleus of a cell; the germinal or active spot of a cellule, through or in which cell development takes place.
Cytococcus
n.
(Biol.) The nucleus of the cytula or parent cell.
Cytode
n.
(Biol.) A nonnucleated mass of protoplasm, the supposed simplest form of independent life differing from the amoeba, in which nuclei are present.
Cytogenesis
n.
(Biol.) Development of cells in animal and vegetable organisms.
Cytogenous
a.
(Anat.) Producing cells; — applied esp. to lymphatic, or adenoid, tissue.
Cytogeny
n .
(Biol.) Cell production or development; cytogenesis.
Cytoid
a.
(Physiol.) Cell-like; — applied to the corpuscles of lymph, blood, chyle, etc.
Cytoplasm
n.
(Biol.) The substance of the body of a cell, as distinguished from the karyoplasma, or substance of the nucleus.
Cytty
a.
• Short; as, a cutty knife; a cutty sark.
Cytula
n.
(Biol.) The fertilized egg cell or parent cell, from the development of which the child or other organism is formed.
Czar
n.
• A king; a chief; the title of the emperor of Russia.
Czarevna
n.
• The title of the wife of the czarowitz.
Czarina
n.
• The title of the empress of Russia.
Czarinian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the czar or the czarina; czarish.
Czarish
a.
• Of or pertaining to the czar.
Czarowitz
n.
• The title of the eldest son of the czar of Russia.
Czech
n.
• One of the Czechs.
• The language of the Czechs (often called Bohemian), the harshest and richest of the Slavic languages.
Czechic
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Czechs.
Czechs
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) The most westerly branch of the great Slavic family of nations, numbering now more than 6,000,000, and found principally in Bohemia and Moravia.

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