Dictionary Of The English Language "Chi"
Entries are from pre-1900 editions of Webster's Unabridged Dictionary.
"Find..." will scroll to entry. Click entry's headword to hear it.
Chian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Chios, an island in the Agean Sea.
Chiaroscurist
n.
• A painter who cares for and studies light and shade rather than color.
Chiasmus
n.
(Rhet.) An inversion of the order of words or phrases, when repeated or subsequently referred to in a sentence
Chiastolite
n.
(Min.) A variety of andalusite; — called also macle. The tesselated apperance of a cross section is due to the symmetrical arrangement of impurities in the crystal.
Chic
n.
• Good form; style.
Chica
n.
• A red coloring matter. extracted from the Bignonia Chica, used by some tribes of South American Indians to stain the skin.
• A fermented liquor or beer made in South American from a decoction of maize.
• A popular Moorish, Spanish, and South American dance, said to be the original of the fandango, etc.
Chicane
n.
• The use of artful subterfuge, designed to draw away attention from the merits of a case or question; — specifically applied to legal proceedings; trickery; chicanery; caviling; sophistry.
v. i.
• To use shifts, cavils, or artifices.
Chicaner
n.
• One who uses chicanery.
Chicanery
n.
• Mean or unfair artifice to perplex a cause and obscure the truth; stratagem; sharp practice; sophistry.
Chich
n.
(Bot.) The chick-pea.
Chichevache
n.
• A fabulous cow of enormous size, whose food was patient wives, and which was therefore in very lean condition.
Chick
v. i.
• To sprout, as seed in the ground; to vegetate. Chalmers.
n.
• A chicken.
• A child or young person; — a term of endearment.
Chickabiddy
n.
• A chicken; a fowl; also, a trivial term of endearment for a child.
Chickadee
n.
(Zool.) A small bird, the blackcap titmouse (Parus atricapillus), of North America; — named from its note.
Chickaree
n.
(Zool.) The American red squirrel (Sciurus Hudsonius); — so called from its cry.
Chickasaws
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A trible of North American Indians (Southern Appalachian) allied to the Choctaws. They formerly occupied the northern part of Alabama and Mississippi, but now live in the Indian Territory.
Chicken
n.
• A young bird or fowl, esp. a young barnyard fowl.
• A young person; a child; esp. a young woman; a maiden.
Chickling
n.
• A small chick or chicken.
Chickweed
n.
(Bot.) The name of several caryophyllaseous weeds, especially Stellaria media, the seeds and flower buds of which are a favorite food of small birds.
Chicky
n.
• A chicken; — used as a diminutive or pet name, especially in calling fowls.
Chicory
n.
(Bot.) A branching perennial plant (Cichorium Intybus) with bright blue flowers, growing wild in Europe, Asia, and America; also cultivated for its roots and as a salad plant; succory; wild endive.
• The root, which is roasted for mixing with coffe.
Chide
v. t.
• To rebuke; to reprove; to scold; to find fault with.
• Fig.: To be noise about; to chafe against.
v. i.
• To utter words of disapprobation and displeasure; to find fault; to contend angrily.
• To make a clamorous noise; to chafe.
n.
• A continuous noise or murmur.
Chider
n.
• One who chides or quarrels.
Chideress
n.
• She who chides.
Chidester
n.
• A female scold.
Chidingly
adv.
• In a chiding or reproving manner.
Chief
n.
• The head or leader of any body of men; a commander, as of an army; a head man, as of a tribe, clan, or family; a person in authority who directs the work of others; the pricipal actio or agent.
• The principal part; the most valuable portion.
(Her.) The upper third part of the field. It is supposed to be composed of the dexter, sinister, and middle chiefs.
a.
• Highest in office or rank; principal; head.
• Principal or most eminent in any quality or action; most distinguished; having most influence; taking the lead; most important; as, the chief topic of conversation; the chief interest of man.
• Very intimate, near, or close.
Chiefage
n.
• A tribute by the head; a capitation tax.
Chiefest
a.
• First or foremost; chief; principal.
Chiefless
a.
• Without a chief or leader.
Chiefly
adv.
• In the first place; principally; preeminently; above; especially.
• For the most part; mostly.
Chiefrie
n.
• A small rent paid to the lord paramount.
Chieftain
n.
• A captain, leader, or commander; a chief; the head of a troop, army, or clan.
Chierte
n.
• Love; tender regard.
Chievance
n.
• An unlawful bargain; traffic in which money is exported as discount.
Chignon
n.
• A knot, boss, or mass of hair, natural or artificial, worn by a woman at the back of the head.
Chikara
n.
(Zool.) The Ingoat antelope (Tragops Bennettii) Of India.
• The Indian four-horned antelope (Tetraceros quadricornis).
Chilblain
n.
• A blain, sore, or inflammatory swelling, produced by exposure of the feet or hands to cold, and attended by itching, pain, and sometimes ulceration.
v. t.
• To produce chilblains upon.
Child
n.
• A son or a daughter; a male or female descendant, in the first degree; the immediate progeny of human parents; — in law, legitimate offspring. Used also of animals and plants.
• A descendant, however remote; — used esp. in the plural; as, the children of Israel; the children of Edom.
• One who, by character of practice, shows signs of relationship to, or of the influence of, another; one closely connected with a place, occupation, character, etc.; as, a child of God; a child of the devil; a child of disobedience; a child of toil; a child of the people.
• A noble youth.
• A young person of either sex. esp. one between infancy and youth; hence, one who exhibits the characteristics of a very young person, as innocence, obedience, trustfulness, limited understanding, etc.
• A female infant.
v. i.
• To give birth; to produce young.
Childbearing
n.
• The act of producing or bringing forth children; parturition.
Childbed
n.
• The state of a woman bringing forth a child, or being in labor; parturition.
Childbirth
n.
• The act of bringing forth a child; travail; labor.
Childcrowing
n.
(Med.) The crowing noise made by children affected with spasm of the laryngeal muscles; false croup.
Childe
n.
• A cognomen formerly prefixed to his name by the oldest son, until he succeeded to his ancestral titles, or was knighted; as, Childe Roland.
Childed
a.
• Furnished with a child.
Childhood
n.
• The state of being a child; the time in which persons are children; the condition or time from infancy to puberty.
• Children, taken collectively.
• The commencement; the first period.
Childing
a.
• Bearing Children; productive; fruitful.
Childish
a.
• Of, pertaining to, befitting, or resembling, a child.
• Peurile; trifling; weak.
Childishly
adv.
• In the manner of a child; in a trifling way; in a weak or foolish manner.
Childishness
n.
• The state or quality of being childish; simplicity; harmlessness; weakness of intellect.
Childlessness
n.
• The state of being childless.
Childlike
a.
• Resembling a child, or that which belongs to children; becoming a child; meek; submissive; dutiful.
Childly
a.
• Having tthe character of a child; belonging, or appropriate, to a child.
adv.
• Like a child.
Childness
n.
• The manner characteristic of a child.
Children
n.
• pl. of Child.
Childship
n.
• The state or relation of being a child.
Chili
n.
• A kind of red pepper.
Chiliad
n.
• A thousand; the aggregate of a thousand things; especially, a period of a thousand years.
Chiliagon
n.
• A plane figure of a thousand angles and sides.
Chiliahedron
n.
• A figure bounded by a thousand plane surfaces
Chilian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Chili.
n.
• A native or citizen of Chili.
Chiliarchy
n.
• A body consisting of a thousand men.
Chiliasm
n.
• The millennium.
• The doctrine of the personal reign of Christ on earth during the millennium.
Chiliast
n.
• One who believes in the second coming of Christ to reign on earth a thousand years; a milllenarian.
Chiliastic
a.
• Millenarian.
Chill
n.
• A moderate but disagreeable degree of cold; a disagreeable sensation of coolness, accompanied with shivering.
(Med.) A sensation of cold with convulsive shaking of the body, pinched face, pale skin, and blue lips, caused by undue cooling of the body or by nervous excitement, or forming the precursor of some constitutional disturbance, as of a fever.
• A check to enthusiasm or warmth of feeling; discouragement; as, a chill comes over an assemblly.
• An iron mold or portion of a mold, serving to cool rapidly, and so to harden, the surface of molten iron brought in contact with it.
• The hardened part of a casting, as the tread of a car wheel.
a.
• Moderately cold; tending to cause shivering; chilly; raw.
• Affected by cold.
• Characterized by coolness of manner, feeling, etc.; lacking enthusiasm or warmth; formal; distant; as, a chill reception.
• Discouraging; depressing; dispiriting.
v. t.
• To strike with a chill; to make chilly; to cause to shiver; to affect with cold.
• To check enthusiasm or warmth of feeling of; to depress; to discourage.
(Metal.) To produce, by sudden cooling, a change of crystallization at or near the surface of, so as to increase the hardness; said of cast iron.
v. i.
(Metal.) To become surface-hardened by sudden cooling while solidifying; as, some kinds of cast iron chill to a greater depth than others.
Chilled
a.
• Hardened on the surface or edge by chilling; as, chilled iron; a chilled wheel.
(Paint.) Having that cloudiness or dimness of surface that is called "blooming."
Chilli
n.
• See Chili.
Chilliness
n.
• A state or sensation of being chilly; a disagreeable sensation of coldness.
• A moderate degree of coldness; disagreeable coldness or rawness; as, the chilliness of the air.
• Formality; lack of warmth.
Chilling
a.
• Making chilly or cold; depressing; discouraging; cold; distant; as, a chilling breeze; a chilling manner.
Chillness
n.
• Coolness; coldness; a chill.
Chilly
a.
• Moderately cold; cold and raw or damp so as to cause shivering; causing or feeling a disagreeable sensation of cold, or a shivering.
Chilognath
n.
(Zool.) A myriapod of the order Chilognatha.
Chilognatha
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the two principal orders of myriapods. They have numerous segments, each bearing two pairs of small, slender legs, which are attached ventrallly, near together.
Chiloma
n.
(Zool.) The tumid upper lip of certain mammals, as of a camel.
Chilopod
n.
(Zool.) A myriapod of the order Chilopoda.
Chilopoda
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the orders of myriapods, including the centipeds. They have a single pair of elongated legs attached laterally to each segment; well developed jaws; and a pair of thoracic legs converted into poison fangs. They are insectivorous, very active, and some species grow to the length of a foot.
Chilostomatous
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Chilostoma.
Chimaera
n.
(Zool.) A cartilaginous fish of several species, belonging to the order Holocephali. The teeth are few and large. The head is furnished with appendages, and the tail terminates in a point.
Chimaeroid
a.
(Zool.) Related to, or like, the chimaera.
Chimango
(Zool.) A south American carrion buzzard (Milvago chimango).
Chimb
n.
• The edge of a cask, etc; a chine.
v. i.
• Chime.
Chime
n.
• The harmonious sound of bells, or of musical instruments.
• A set of bells musically tuned to each other; specif., in the pl., the music performed on such a set of bells by hand, or produced by mechanism to accompany the striking of the hours or their divisions.
• Pleasing correspondence of proportion, relation, or sound.
v. i.
• To sound in harmonious accord, as bells.
• To be in harmony; to agree; to sut; to harmonize; to correspond; to fall in with.
• To join in a conversation; to express assent; — followed by in or in with.
• To make a rude correspondence of sounds; to jingle, as in rhyming.
v. i.
• To cause to sound in harmony; to play a tune, as upon a set of bells; to move or strike in harmony.
• To utter harmoniously; to recite rhythmically.
Chimer
n.
• One who chimes.
Chimera
n.
(Myth.) A monster represented as vomiting flames, and as having the head of a lion, the body of a goat, and the tail of a dragon.
• A vain, foolish, or incongruous fancy, or creature of the imagination; as, the chimera of an author.
Chimere
n.
• The upper robe worn by a bishop, to which lawn sleeves are usually attached.
Chimeric
a.
• Chimerical.
Chimerical
a.
• Merely imaginary; fanciful; fantastic; wildly or vainly conceived; having, or capable of having, no existence except in thought; as, chimerical projects.
Chimerically
adv.
• Wildy; vainly; fancifully.
Chiminage
n.
(Old Law) A toll for passage through a forest.
Chimney
n.
• A fireplace or hearth.
• That part of a building which contains the smoke flues; esp. an upright tube or flue of brick or stone, in most cases extending through or above the roof of the building. Often used instead of chimney shaft.
• A tube usually of glass, placed around a flame, as of a lamp, to create a draft, and promote combustion.
(Min.) A body of ore, usually of elongated form, extending downward in a vein.
Chimpanzee
n.
(Zool.) An african ape (Anthropithecus troglodytes or Troglodytes niger) which approaches more nearly to man, in most respects, than any other ape. When full grown, it is from three to four feet high.
Chin
n.
• The lower extremity of the face below the mouth; the point of the under jaw.
(Zool.) The exterior or under surface embraced between the branches of the lower jaw bone, in birds.
China
n.
• A country in Eastern Asia.
• China ware, which is the modern popular term for porcelain.
Chinaman
n.
• A native of China; a Chinese.
Chinch
n.
(Zool.) The bedbug (Cimex lectularius).
(Zool.) A bug (Blissus leucopterus), which, in the United States, is very destructive to grass, wheat, and other grains; — also called chiniz, chinch bug, chink bug. It resembles the bedbug in its disgusting odor.
Chincha
n.
(Zool.) A south American rodent of the genus Lagotis.
Chinche
a.
• Parsimonious; niggardly.
Chincherie
n.
• Penuriousness.
Chinchilla
n.
(Zool.) A small rodent (Chinchilla lanigera), of the size of a large squirrel, remarkable for its fine fur, which is very soft and of a pearly gray color. It is a native of Peru and Chili.
• The fur of the chinchilla.
• A heavy, longnapped, tufted woolen cloth.
Chine
n.
• A chink or cleft; a narrow and deep ravine; as, Shanklin Chine
n.
• The backbone or spine of an animal; the back.
• A piece of the backbone of an animal, with the adjoining parts, cut for cooking.
• The edge or rim of a cask, etc., formed by the projecting ends of the staves; the chamfered end of a stave.
v. t.
• To cut through the backbone of; to cut into chine pieces.
• Too chamfer the ends of a stave and form the chine..
Chined
a.
• Pertaining to, or having, a chine, or backbone; — used in composition.
• Broken in the back.
Chinese
a.
• Of or pertaining to China; peculiar to China.
n. sing. & pl.
• A native or natives of China, or one of that yellow race with oblique eyelids who live principally in China.
• The language of China, which is monosyllabic.
Chink
n.
• A small cleft, rent, or fissure, of greater length than breadth; a gap or crack; as, the chinks of wall.
v. i.
• To crack; to open.
v. t.
• To cause to open in cracks or fissures.
• To fill up the chinks of; as, to chink a wall.
n.
• A short, sharp sound, as of metal struck with a slight degree of violence.
• Money; cash.
v. t.
• To cause to make a sharp metallic sound, as coins, small pieces of metal, etc., by bringing them into collision with each other.
v. i.
• To make a slight, sharp, metallic sound, as by the collision of little pieces of money, or other small sonorous bodies.
Chinky
a.
• Full of chinks or fissures; gaping; opening in narrow clefts.
Chinned
a.
• Having a chin; — used chiefly in compounds; as, short-chinned.
Chinook
n.
(Ethnol.) One of a tribe of North American Indians now living in the state of Washington, noted for the custom of flattening their skulls. Chinooks also called Flathead Indians.
• A warm westerly wind from the country of the Chinooks, sometimes experienced on the slope of the Rocky Mountains, in Montana and the adjacent territory.
• A jargon of words from various languages (the largest proportion of which is from that of the Chinooks) generally understood by all the Indian tribes of the northwestern territories of the United States.
Chinquapin
n.
(Bot.) A branching, nut-bearing tree or shrub (Castanea pumila) of North America, from six to twenty feet high, allied to the chestnut. Also, its small, sweet, edible nat.
Chinse
v. t. & i.
(Naut.) To thrust oakum into (seams or chinks) with a chisel , the point of a knife, or a chinsing iron; to calk slightly.
Chintz
n.
• Cotton cloth, printed with flowers and other devices, in a number of different colors, and often glazed.
Chioppine
n.
• Same as Chopine, n.
Chip
v. t.
• To cut small pieces from; to diminsh or reduce to shape, by cutting away a little at a time; to hew.
• To break or crack, or crack off a portion of, as of an eggshell in hatching, or a piece of crockery.
• To bet, as with chips in the game of poker.
v. i.
• To break or fly off in small pieces.
n.
• A piece of wood, stone, or other substance, separated by an ax, chisel, or cutting instrument.
• A fragment or piece broken off; a small piece.
• Wood or Cuban palm leaf split into slips, or straw plaited in a special manner, for making hats or bonnets.
• Anything dried up, withered, or without flavor; — used contemptuously.
• One of the counters used in poker and other games.
(Naut.) The triangular piece of wood attached to the log line.
Chipmunk
n.
(Zool.) A squirrel-like animal of the genus Tamias, sometimes called the striped squirrel, chipping squirrel, ground squirrel, hackee. The common species of the United States is the Tamias striatus.
Chipper
v. i.
• To chirp or chirrup.
a.
• Lively; cheerful; talkative.
Chippeways
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A tribe of Indians formerly inhabiting the northern and weastern shores of Lake Superior; — called also Objibways.
Chipping
n.
• A chip; a piece separated by a cutting or graving instrument; a fragment.
• The act or process of cutting or breaking off small pieces, as in dressing iron with a chisel, or reducing a timber or block of stone to shape.
• The breaking off in small pieces of the edges of potter's ware, porcelain, etc.
Chippy
a.
• Abounding in, or resembling, chips; dry and tasteless.
n.
(Zool.) A small American sparrow (Spizella socialis), very common near dwelling; — also called chipping bird and chipping sparrow, from its simple note.
Chips
n.
(Naut.) A ship's carpenter.
Chiragra
n.
(Med.) Gout in the hand.
Chiragrical
a.
• Having the gout in the hand, or subject to that disease.
Chiretta
n.
• A plant (Agathotes Chirayta) found in Northern India, having medicinal properties to the gentian, and esteemed as a tonic and febrifuge.
Chirk
v. i.
• To shriek; to gnash; to utter harsh or shrill cries.
• To chirp like a bird.
v. t.
• To cheer; to enliven; as, to chirk one up.
a.
• Lively; cheerful; in good spirits.
Chirm
v. i.
• To chirp or to make a mournful cry, as a bird.
Chirognomy
n.
• The art of judging character by the shape and apperance of the hand.
Chirograph
n.
(Old. Law) A writing which, reguiring a counterpart, was engrossed twice on the same piece of parchment, with a space between, in which was written the word chirographum, through which the parchment was cut, and one part given to each party. It answered to what is now called a charter party.
• The last part of a fine of land, commonly called the foot of the fine.
Chirographer
n.
• One who practice the art or business of writing or engrossing.
Chirographist
n.
• A chirographer; a writer or engrosser.
• One who tells fortunes by examining the hand.
Chirography
n.
• The art of writing or engrossing; handwriting; as, skilled in chirography.
• The art of telling fortunes by examining the hand.
Chirogymnast
n.
• A mechanocal contrivance for exercesing the fingers of a pianist.
Chirological
a.
• Relating to chirology.
Chirologist
n.
• One who communicates thoughts by signs made with the hands and fingers.
Chirology
n.
• The art or practice of using the manual alphabet or of communicating thoughts by sings made by the hands and fingers; a substitute for spoken or written language in intercourse with the deaf and dumb.
Chiromancer
n.
• One who practices chiromancy.
Chiromancy
n.
• The art or practice of foretelling events, or of telling the fortunes or the disposition of persons by inspecting the hand; palmistry.
Chiromonic
a.
• Relating to chironomy.
Chironomy
n.
• The art of moving the hands in oratory or in pantomime; gesture
Chiroplast
n.
(Mus.) An instrument to guid the hands and fingers of pupils in playing on the piano, etc.
Chiropodist
n.
• One who treats diseases of the hands and feet; especially, one who removes corns and bunions.
Chiropody
n.
• The art of treating diseases of the hands and feet.
Chirosophist
n.
• A fortune teller.
Chirp
v. i.
• To make a shop, sharp, cheerful, as of small birds or crickets.
n.
• A short, sharp note, as of a bird or insect.
Chirper
n.
• One who chirps, or is cheerful.
Chirping
a.
• Cheering; enlivening.
Chirpingly
adv.
• In a chirping manner.
Chirre
v. i.
• To coo, as a pigeon.
Chirrup
v. t.
• To quicken or animate by chirping; to cherup.
v. i.
• To chirp.
n.
• The act of chirping; a chirp.
Chirrupy
a.
• Cheerful; joyous; chatty.
Chirurgeon
n.
• A surgeon.
Chirurgeonly
adv.
• Surgically.
Chirurgery
n.
• Surgery.
Chisel
n.
• A tool with a cutting edge on one end of a metal blade, used in dressing, shaping, or working in timber, stone, metal, etc.; — usually driven by a mallet or hammer.
v. t.
• To cut, pare, gouge, or engrave with a chisel; as, to chisel a block of marble into a statue.
• To cut close, as in a bargain; to cheat.
Chisleu
n.
• The ninth month of the Jewish ecclesiastical year, answering to a part of November with a part of December.
Chisley
a.
• Having a large admixture of small pebbles or gravel; — said of a soil.
Chit
n.
• The embryo or the growing bud of a plant; a shoot; a sprout; as, the chits of Indian corn or of potatoes.
• A child or babe; as, a forward chit; also, a young, small, or insignificant person or animal.
• An excrescence on the body, as a wart.
• A small tool used in cleaving laths.
v. i.
• To shoot out; to sprout.
3d sing.
• Chideth.
Chitchat
n.
• Familiar or trifling talk; prattle.
Chitin
n.
(Chem.) A white amorphous horny substance forming the harder part of the outer integument of insects, crustacea, and various other invertebrates; entomolin.
Chitinization
n.
• The process of becoming chitinous.
Chitinous
a.
• Having the nature of chitin; consisting of, or containing, chitin.
Chiton
n.
• An under garment among the ancient Greeks, nearly representing the modern shirt.
(Zool.) One of a group of gastropod mollusks, with a shell composed of eight movable dorsal plates.
Chitter
v. i.
• To chirp in a tremulous manner, as a bird.
• To shiver or chatter with cold.
Chitterling
n.
• The frill to the breast of a shirt, which when ironed out resembled the small entrails.
Chitterlings
n. pl.
(Cookery) The smaller intestines of swine, etc., fried for food.
Chittra
n.
(Zool.) The axis deer of India.
Chitty
a.
• Full of chits or sprouts.
• Childish; like a babe.
Chivachie
n.
• A cavalry raid; hence, a military expedition.
Chivalric
a.
• Relating to chivalry; knightly; chivalrous.
Chivalrous
a.
• Pertaining to chivalry or knight-errantry; warlike; heroic; gallant; high-spirited; high-minded; magnanimous.
Chivalrously
adv.
• In a chivalrous manner; gallantly; magnanimously.
Chivalry
n.
• A body or order of cavaliers or knights serving on horseback; illustrious warriors, collectively; cavalry.
• The dignity or system of knighthood; the spirit, usages, or manners of knighthood; the practice of knight-errantry.
• The qualifications or character of knights, as valor, dexterity in arms, courtesy, etc.
(Eng. Law) A tenure of lands by knight's service; that is, by the condition of a knight's performing service on horseback, or of performing some noble or military service to his lord.
• Exploit.
Chive
n.
(Bot.) A filament of a stamen.
n.
(Bot.) A perennial plant (Allium Schoenoprasum), allied to the onion. The young leaves are used in omelets, etc.
Chivy
v. t.
• To goad, drive, hunt, throw, or pitch.
Chlamydate
a.
(Zool.) Having a mantle; — applied to certain gastropods.
Chlamyphore
n.
(Zool.) A small South American edentate (Chlamyphorus truncatus, and C. retusus) allied to the armadillo. It is covered with a leathery shell or coat of mail, like a cloak, attached along the spine.
Chlamys
n.
• A loose and flowing outer garment, worn by the ancient Greeks; a kind of cloak.
Chloasma
n.
(Med.) A cutaneous affection characterized by yellow or yellowish brown pigmented spots.
Chloral
n.
(Chem.) A colorless oily liquid, CCl3.CHO, of a pungent odor and harsh taste, obtained by the action of chlorine upon ordinary or ethyl alcohol.
(Med.) Chloral hydrate.
Chloralamide
n.
(Chem.) A compound of chloral and formic amide used to produce sleep.
Chloralism
n.
(Med.) A morbid condition of the system resulting from excessive use of chloral.
Chloralum
n.
• An impure aqueous solution of chloride of aluminium, used as an antiseptic and disinfectant.
Chloranil
n.
(Chem.) A yellow crystalline substance, C6Cl4.O2, regarded as a derivative of quinone, obtained by the action of chlorine on certain benzene derivatives, as aniline.
Chlorate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of chloric acid; as, chlorate of potassium.
Chlorhydric
a.
(Chem.) Same as Hydrochloric.
Chlorhydrin
n.
(Chem.) One of a class of compounds formed from certain polybasic alcohols (and especially glycerin) by the substitution of chlorine for one or more hydroxyl groups.
Chloric
a.
• Pertaining to, or obtained from, chlorine; — said of those compounds of chlorine in which this element has a valence of five, or the next to its highest; as, chloric acid, HClO3.
Chloridate
v.t.
• To treat or prepare with a chloride, as a plate with chloride of silver, for the purposes of photography.
Chloride
n.
(Chem.) A binary compound of chlorine with another element or radical; as, chloride of sodium (common salt).
Chloridic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a chloride; containing a chloride.
Chlorinate
v. t.
(Chem.) To treat, or cause to combine, with chlorine.
Chlorination
n.
• The act or process of subjecting anything to the action of chlorine; especially, a process for the extraction of gold by exposure of the auriferous material to chlorine gas.
Chlorine
n.
(Chem.) One of the elementary substances, commonly isolated as a greenish yellow gas, two and one half times as heavy as air, of an intensely disagreeable suffocating odor, and exceedingly poisonous. It is abundant in nature, the most important compound being common salt. It is powerful oxidizing, bleaching, and disinfecting agent. Symbol Cl. Atomic weight, 35.4.
Chloriodic
a.
• Compounded of chlorine and iodine; containing chlorine and iodine.
Chloriodine
n.
• A compound of chlorine and iodine.
Chlorite
n.
(Min.) The name of a group of minerals, usually of a green color and micaceous to granular in structure. They are hydrous silicates of alumina, iron, and magnesia.
n.
(Chem.) Any salt of chlorous acid; as, chlorite of sodium.
Chloritic
a.
• Pertaining to, or containing, chlorite; as, chloritic sand.
Chlormethane
n.
(Chem.) A colorless gas, CH3Cl, of a sweet odor, easily condensed to a liquid; — called also methyl chloride.
Chlorocruorin
n.
(Physiol.) A green substance, supposed to be the cause of the green color of the blood in some species of worms.
Chlorodyne
n.
(Med.) A patent anodyne medicine, containing opium, chloroform, Indian hemp, etc.
Chloroform
n.
(Chem.) A colorless volatile liquid, CHCl3, having an ethereal odor and a sweetish taste, formed by treating alcohol with chlorine and an alkali. It is a powerful solvent of wax, resin, etc., and is extensively used to produce anaesthesia in surgical operations; also externally, to alleviate pain.
v. t.
• To treat with chloroform, or to place under its influence.
Chloroleucite
n.
(Bot.) Same as Chloroplastid.
Chlorometer
n.
• An instrument to test the decoloring or bleaching power of chloride of lime.
Chlorometry
n.
• The process of testing the bleaching power of any combination of chlorine.
Chloropal
n.
(Min.) A massive mineral, greenish in color, and opal-like in appearance. It is essentially a hydrous silicate of iron.
Chloropeptic
a.
(Physiol. Chem.) Of or pertaining to an acid more generally called pepsin-hydrochloric acid.
Chlorophane
n.
(Min.) A variety of fluor spar, which, when heated, gives a beautiful emerald green light.
(Physiol.) The yellowish green pigment in the inner segment of the cones of the retina.
Chlorophyll
n.
(Bot.) Literally, leaf green; a green granular matter formed in the cells of the leaves (and other parts exposed to light) of plants, to which they owe their green color, and through which all ordinary assimilation of plant food takes place. Similar chlorophyll granules have been found in the tissues of the lower animals.
Chloroplastid
n.
(Bot.) A granule of chlorophyll; — also called chloroleucite.
Chlorosis
n.
(Med.) The green sickness; an anaemic disease of young women, characterized by a greenish or grayish yellow hue of the skin, weakness, palpitation, etc.
(Bot.) A disease in plants, causing the flowers to turn green or the leaves to lose their normal green color.
Chlorotic
a.
• Pertaining to, or affected by, chlorosis.
Chlorous
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or derived from, chlorine; — said of those compounds of chlorine in which this element has a valence of three, the next lower than in chloric compounds; as, chlorous acid, HClO2.
(Chem. Physics) Pertaining to, or resembling, the electro-negative character of chlorine; hence, electro-negative; — opposed to basylous or zincous.
Chlorpicrin
n.
(Chem.) A heavy, colorless liquid, CCl3.NO2, of a strong pungent odor, obtained by subjecting picric acid to the action of chlorine.
Chloruret
n.
(Chem.) A chloride.
Choanoid
a.
(Anat.) Funnel-shaped; — applied particularly to a hollow muscle attached to the ball of the eye in many reptiles and mammals.
Chocard
n.
(Zool.) The chough.
Chock
v. t.
• To stop or fasten, as with a wedge, or block; to scotch; as, to chock a wheel or cask.
v. i.
• To fill up, as a cavity.
n.
• A wedge, or block made to fit in any space which it is desired to fill, esp. something to steady a cask or other body, or prevent it from moving, by fitting into the space around or beneath it.
(Naut.) A heavy casting of metal, usually fixed near the gunwale. It has two short horn-shaped arms curving inward, between which ropes or hawsers may pass for towing, mooring, etc.
adv.
(Naut.) Entirely; quite; as, chock home; chock aft.
v. t.
• To encounter.
n.
• An encounter.
Chockablock
a.
(Naut.) Hoisted as high as the tackle will admit; brought close together, as the two blocks of a tackle in hoisting.
Chocolate
n.
• A paste or cake composed of the roasted seeds of the Theobroma Cacao ground and mixed with other ingredients, usually sugar, and cinnamon or vanilla.
• The beverage made by dissolving a portion of the paste or cake in boiling water or milk.
Choctaws
n. pl.
• ; sing. Choctaw. (Ethnol.) A tribe of North American Indians (Southern Appalachian), in early times noted for their pursuit of agriculture, and for living at peace with the white settlers. They are now one of the civilized tribes of the Indian Territory.
Choice
n.
• Act of choosing; the voluntary act of selecting or separating from two or more things that which is preferred; the determination of the mind in preferring one thing to another; election.
• The power or opportunity of choosing; option.
• Care in selecting; judgment or skill in distinguishing what is to be preferred, and in giving a preference; discrimination.
• A sufficient number to choose among.
• The thing or person chosen; that which is approved and selected in preference to others; selection.
• The best part; that which is preferable.
a.
• Worthly of being chosen or preferred; select; superior; precious; valuable.
• Preserving or using with care, as valuable; frugal; — used with of; as, to be choice of time, or of money.
• Selected with care, and due attention to preference; deliberately chosen.
Choiceful
a.
• Making choices; fickle.
Choicely
adv.
• With care in choosing; with nice regard to preference.
• In a preferable or excellent manner; excellently; eminently.
Choiceness
n.
• The quality of being of particular value or worth; nicely; excellence.
Choir
n.
• A band or organized company of singers, especially in church service.
• That part of a church appropriated to the singers.
(Arch.) The chancel.
Choke
v. t.
• To render unable to breathe by filling, pressing upon, or squeezing the windpipe; to stifle; to suffocate; to strangle.
• To obstruct by filling up or clogging any passage; to block up.
• To hinder or check, as growth, expansion, progress, etc.; to stifle.
• To affect with a sense of strangulation by passion or strong feeling.
• To make a choke, as in a cartridge, or in the bore of the barrel of a shotgun.
v. i.
• To have the windpipe stopped; to have a spasm of the throat, caused by stoppage or irritation of the windpipe; to be strangled.
• To be checked, as if by choking; to stick.
n.
• A stoppage or irritation of the windpipe, producing the feeling of strangulation.
(Gun.) The tied end of a cartridge.
• A constriction in the bore of a shotgun, case of a rocket, etc.
Chokeberry
n.
(Bot.) The small apple-shaped or pear-shaped fruit of an American shrub (Pyrus arbutifolia) growing in damp thickets; also, the shrub.
Chokecherry
n.
(Bot.) The astringent fruit of a species of wild cherry (Prunus Virginiana); also, the bush or tree which bears such fruit.
Chokedar
n.
• A watchman; an officer of customs or police.
Choker
n.
• One who, or that which, chokes.
• A stiff wide cravat; a stock.
Choking
a.
• That chokes; producing the feeling of strangulation.
• Indistinct in utterance, as the voice of a person affected with strong emotion.
Cholaemaa
n.
(Med.) A disease characterized by severe nervous symptoms, dependent upon the presence of the constituents of the bile in the blood.
Cholagogue
a.
(Med.) Promoting the discharge of bile from the system.
n.
• An agent which promotes the discharge of bile from the system.
Cholate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of cholic acid; as, sodium cholate.
Cholecystis
n.
(Anat.) The gall bladder.
Cholecystotomy
n.
(Surg.) The operation of making an opening in the gall bladder, as for the removal of a gallstone.
Choledology
n.
(Med.) A treatise on the bile and bilary organs.
Choleic
a.
(Physiol. Chem.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, bile; as, choleic acid.
Choler
n.
• The bile; — formerly supposed to be the seat and cause of irascibility.
• Irritation of the passions; anger; wrath.
Cholera
n.
(Med.) One of several diseases affecting the digestive and intestinal tract and more or less dangerous to life, esp. the one commonly called Asiatic cholera.
Choleraic
a.
• Relating to, or resulting from, or resembling, cholera.
Choleric
a.
• Abounding with, or producing choler, or bile.
• Easily irritated; irascible; inclined to anger.
• Angry; indicating anger; excited by anger.
Cholericly
adv.
• In a choleric manner; angrily.
Choleriform
a.
• Resembling cholera.
Cholerine
n.
(Med.) The precursory symptoms of cholera.
• The first stage of epidemic cholera.
• A mild form of cholera.
Choleroid
a.
• Choleriform.
Cholesteric
a.
• Pertaining to cholesterin, or obtained from it; as, cholesteric acid.
Cholesterin
n.
(Chem.) A white, fatty, crystalline substance, tasteless and odorless, found in animal and plant products and tissue, and especially in nerve tissue, in the bile, and in gallstones.
Choltry
n.
• A Hindoo caravansary.
Chomp
v. i.
• To chew loudly and greedily; to champ.
Chondrification
n.
(Physiol.) Formation of, or conversion into, cartilage.
Chondrify
v. t. & i.
• To convert, or be converted, into cartilage.
Chondrigen
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) The chemical basis of cartilage, converted by long boiling in water into a gelatinous body called chondrin.
Chondrigenous
a.
(Physiol.) Affording chondrin.
Chondrin
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A colorless, amorphous, nitrogenous substance, tasteless and odorless, formed from cartilaginous tissue by long-continued action of boiling water. It is similar to gelatin, and is a large ingredient of commercial gelatin.
Chondrite
n.
(Min.) A meteoric stone characterized by the presence of chondrules.
Chondritic
a.
(Min.) Granular; pertaining to, or having the granular structure characteristic of, the class of meteorites called chondrites.
Chondritis
n.
(Med.) An inflammation of cartilage.
Chondrodite
n.
(Min.) A fluosilicate of magnesia and iron, yellow to red in color, often occurring in granular form in a crystalline limestone.
Chondroganoidea
n.
(Zool.) An order of ganoid fishes, including the sturgeons; — so called on account of their cartilaginous skeleton.
Chondrogen
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) Same as Chondrigen.
Chondrogenesis
n.
(Physiol.) The development of cartilage.
Chondroid
a.
• Resembling cartilage.
Chondrology
n.
(Anat.) The science which treats of cartilages.
Chondroma
n.
• A cartilaginous tumor or growth.
Chondrometer
n.
• A steelyard for weighting grain.
Chondropterygian
a.
• Having a cartilaginous skeleton.
n.
• One of the Chondropterygii.
Chondropterygii
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of fishes, characterized by cartilaginous fins and skeleton. It includes both ganoids (sturgeons, etc.) and selachians (sharks), but is now often restricted to the latter.
Chondrostei
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of fishes, including the sturgeons; — so named because the skeleton is cartilaginous.
Chondrotomy
n.
(Anat.) The dissection of cartilages.
Chondrule
n.
(Min.) A peculiar rounded granule of some mineral, usually enstatite or chrysolite, found imdedded more or less aboundantly in the mass of many meteoric stones, which are hence called chondrites.
Choose
v. t.
• To make choice of; to select; to take by way of preference from two or more objects offered; to elect; as, to choose the least of two evils.
• To wish; to desire; to prefer.
v. i.
• To make a selection; to decide.
• To do otherwise.
Chooser
n.
• One who chooses; one who has the power or right of choosing; an elector.
Chop
v. t.
• To cut by striking repeatedly with a sharp instrument; to cut into pieces; to mince; — often with up.
• To sever or separate by one more blows of a sharp instrument; to divide; — usually with off or down.
• To seize or devour greedily; — with up.
v. i.
• To make a quick strike, or repeated strokes, with an ax or other sharp instrument.
• To do something suddenly with an unexpected motion; to catch or attempt to seize.
• To interrupt; — with in or out.
v. t.
• To barter or truck.
• To exchange; substitute one thing for another.
v. i.
• To purchase by way of truck.
(Naut.) To vary or shift suddenly; as, the wind chops about.
• To wrangle; to altercate; to bandy words.
n.
• A change; a vicissitude.
v. t. & i.
• To crack.
n.
• The act of chopping; a stroke.
• A piece chopped off; a slice or small piece, especially of meat; as, a mutton chop.
• A crack or cleft.
n.
• A jaw of an animal; — commonly in the pl.
• A movable jaw or cheek, as of a wooden vise.
• The land at each side of the mouth of a river, harbor, or channel; as, East Chop or West Chop.
n.
• Quality; brand; as, silk of the first chop.
• A permit or clearance.
Chopboat
n.
• A licensed lighter employed in the transportation of goods to and from vessels.
Chopchurch
n.
(Old Eng. Law) An exchanger or an exchange of benefices.
Chopfallen
a.
• Having the lower chop or jaw depressed; hence, crestfallen; dejected; dispirited;downcast.
Chophouse
n.
• A house where chops, etc., are sold; an eating house.
n.
• A customhouse where transit duties are levied.
Chopin
n.
• A liquid measure formerly used in France and Great Britain, varying from half a pint to a wine quart.
Chopine
n.
• A clog, or patten, having a very thick sole, or in some cases raised upon a stilt to a height of a foot or more.
Chopness
n.
• A kind of spade.
Chopper
n.
• One who, or that which, chops.
Chopping
a.
• Stout or plump; large.
a.
• Shifting or changing suddenly, as the wind; also, having tumbling waves dashing against each other; as, a chopping sea.
n.
• Act of cutting by strokes.
Choppy
a.
• Full of cracks.
• Rough, with short, tumultuous waves; as, a choppy sea.
Chops
n. pl.
• The jaws; also, the fleshy parts about the mouth.
• The sides or capes at the mouth of a river, channel, harbor, or bay; as, the chops of the English Channel.
Chopstrick
n.
• One of two small sticks of wood, ivory, etc., used by the Chinese and Japanese to convey food to the mouth.
Choragic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a choragus.
Choragus
n.
(Gr. Antiq.) A chorus leader; esp. one who provided at his own expense and under his own supervision one of the choruses for the musical contents at Athens.
Choral
a.
• Of or pertaining to a choir or chorus; singing, sung, or adapted to be sung, in chorus or harmony.
n.
(Mus.) A hymn tune; a simple sacred tune, sung in unison by the congregation; as, the Lutheran chorals.
Choralist
n.
• A singer or composer of chorals.
Chorally
adv.
• In the manner of a chorus; adapted to be sung by a choir; in harmony.
Chord
n.
• The string of a musical instrument.
(Mus.) A combination of tones simultaneously performed, producing more or less perfect harmony, as, the common chord.
(Geom.) A right line uniting the extremities of the arc of a circle or curve.
(Anat.) A cord.
(Engin.) The upper or lower part of a truss, usually horizontal, resisting compression or tension.
v. t.
• To provide with musical chords or strings; to string; to tune.
v. i.
(Mus.) To accord; to harmonize together; as, this note chords with that.
Chorda
n.
(Anat.) A cord.
Chordal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a chord.
Chordata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A comprehensive division of animals including all Vertebrata together with the Tunicata, or all those having a dorsal nervous cord.
Chordee
n.
(Med.) A painful erection of the penis, usually with downward curvature, occurring in gonorrhea.
Chore
n.
• A small job; in the pl., the regular or daily light work of a household or farm, either within or without doors.
v. i.
• To do chores.
n.
• A choir or chorus.
Chorea
n.
(Med.) St. Vitus's dance; a disease attended with convulsive twitchings and other involuntary movements of the muscles or limbs.
Choregraphy
n.
• The art of representing dancing by signs, as music is represented by notes.
Choreic
a.
• Of the nature of, or pertaining to, chorea; convulsive.
Chorepiscopal
a.
• Pertaining to a chorepiscopus or his change or authority.
Chorepiscopus
n.
(Eccl.) A "country" or suffragan bishop, appointed in the ancient church by a diocesan bishop to exercise episcopal jurisdiction in a rural district.
Choriamb
n.
• Same as Choriambus.
Choriambic
a.
• Pertaining to a choriamb.
n.
• A choriamb.
Choriambus
n.
(Anc. Pros.) A foot consisting of four syllables, of which the first and last are long, and the other short (- \'de \'de -); that is, a choreus, or trochee, and an iambus united.
Choric
a.
• Of or pertaining to a chorus.
Chorion
n.
(Anat.) The outer membrane which invests the fetus in the womb; also, the similar membrane investing many ova at certain stages of development.
• The true skin, or cutis.
(Bot.) The outer membrane of seeds of plants.
Chorisis
n.
(Bot.) The separation of a leaf or floral organ into two more parts.
Chorist
n.
• A singer in a choir; a chorister.
Chorister
n.
• One of a choir; a singer in a chorus.
• One who leads a choir in church music.
Choristic
a.
• Choric; choral.
Chorograph
n.
• An instrument for constructing triangles in marine surveying, etc.
Chorographer
n.
• One who describes or makes a map of a district or region.
• A geographical antiquary; one who investigates the locality of ancient places.
Chorographical
a.
• Pertaining to chorography.
Chorography
n.
• the mapping or description of a region or district.
Choroid
a.
(Anat.) resembling the chorion; as, the choroid plexuses of the ventricles of the brain, and the choroid coat of the eyeball.
n.
• The choroid coat of the eye.
Choroidal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the choroid coat.
Chorology
n.
(Biol.) The science which treats of the laws of distribution of living organisms over the earth's surface as to latitude, altitude, locality, etc.
Chorometry
n.
• The art of surveying a region or district.
Chorus
n.
(Antiq.) A band of singers and dancers.
(Gr. Drama) A company of persons supposed to behold what passed in the acts of a tragedy, and to sing the sentiments which the events suggested in couplets or verses between the acts; also, that which was thus sung by the chorus.
• An interpreter in a dumb show or play.
(Mus.) A company of singers singing in concert.
(Mus.) A composition of two or more parts, each of which is intended to be sung by a number of voices.
(Mus.) Parts of a song or hymn recurring at intervals, as at the end of stanzas; also, a company of singers who join with the singer or choir in singer or choir in singing such parts.
• The simultaneous of a company in any noisy demonstration; as, a Chorus of shouts and catcalls.
v. i.
• To sing in chorus; to exclaim simultaneously.
Chose
n.
(Law) A thing; personal property.
• imp. & p. p. of Choose.
Chosen
p. p.
• Selected from a number; picked out; choice.
n.
• One who, or that which is the object of choice or special favor.
Chouan
n.
• One of the royalist insurgents in western France (Brittany, etc.), during and after the French revolution.
Chough
n.
(Zool.) A bird of the Crow family (Fregilus graculus) of Europe. It is of a black color, with a long, slender, curved bill and red legs; — also called chauk, chauk-daw, chocard, Cornish chough, red-legged crow. The name is also applied to several allied birds, as the Alpine chough.
Chouicha
n.
(Zool.) The salmon of the Columbia River or California.
Chouka
n.
(Zool.) The Indian four-horned antelope; the chikara.
Chouse
v. t.
• To cheat, trick, defraud; — followed by of, or out of; as, to chouse one out of his money.
n.
• One who is easily cheated; a tool; a simpleton; a gull.
• A trick; sham; imposition.
• A swindler.
Chout
n.
• An assessment equal to a fourth part of the revenue.
Chowchow
a.
• Consisting of several kinds mingled together; mixed; as, chowchow sweetmeats (preserved fruits put together).
n.
(Com.) A kind of mixed pickles.
Chowder
n.
(Cookery) A dish made of fresh fish or clams, biscuit, onions, etc., stewed together.
• A seller of fish.
v. t.
• To make a chowder of.
Chowry
n.
• A whisk to keep off files, used in the East Indies.
Chowter
v. t.
• To grumble or mutter like a froward child.
Chrematistics
n.
• The science of wealth; the science, or a branch of the science, of political economy.
Chreotechnics
n.
• The science of the useful arts, esp. agriculture, manufactures, and commerce.
Chrestomathic
a.
• Teaching what is useful.
Chrestomathy
n.
• A selection of passages, with notes, etc., to be used in acquiring a language; as, a Hebrew chrestomathy.
Chrism
n.
(Gr. & R. C. Churchs) Olive oil mixed with balm and spices, consecrated by the bishop on Maundy Thursday, and used in the administration of baptism, confirmation, ordination, etc.
• The same as Chrisom.
Chrismal
a.
• Of or pertaining to or used in chrism.
Chrismation
n.
• The act of applying the chrism, or consecrated oil.
Chrismatory
n.
• A cruet or vessel in which chrism is kept.
Chrisom
n.
• A white cloth, anointed with chrism, or a white mantle thrown over a child when baptized or christened.
• A child which died within a month after its baptism; — so called from the chrisom cloth which was used as a shroud for it.
Christ
n.
• The Anointed; an appellation given to Jesus, the Savior. It is synonymous with the Hebrew Messiah.
Christcross
n.
• The mark of the cross, as cut, painted, written, or stamped on certain objects, — sometimes as the sign of 12 o'clock on a dial.
• The beginning and the ending.
Christen
v. t.
• To baptize and give a Christian name to.
• To give a name; to denominate.
• To Christianize.
• To use for the first time.
Christendom
n.
• The profession of faith in Christ by baptism; hence, the Christian religion, or the adoption of it.
• The name received at baptism; or, more generally, any name or appelation.
• That portion of the world in which Christianity prevails, or which is governed under Christian institutions, in distinction from heathen or Mohammedan lands.
• The whole body of Christians.
Christian
n.
• One who believes, or professes or is assumed to believe, in Jesus Christ, and the truth as taught by Him; especially, one whose inward and outward life is conformed to the doctrines of Christ.
• One born in a Christian country or of Christian parents, and who has not definitely becomes an adherent of an opposing system.
(Eccl.) One of a Christian denomination which rejects human creeds as bases of fellowship, and sectarian names. They are congregational in church government, and baptize by immersion. They are also called Disciples of Christ, and Campbellites.
• One of a sect (called Christian Connection) of open-communion immersionists. The Bible is their only authoritative rule of faith and practice.
a.
• Pertaining to Christ or his religion; as, Christian people.
• Pertaining to the church; ecclesiastical; as, a Christian court.
• Characteristic of Christian people; civilized; kind; kindly; gentle; beneficent.
Christianism
n.
• The Christian religion.
• The Christian world; Christendom.
Christianite
n.
(Min.) Same as Anorthite.
Christianity
n.
• The religion of Christians; the system of doctrines and precepts taught by Christ.
• Practical conformity of one's inward and outward life to the spirit of the Christian religion
• The body of Christian believers.
Christianization
n.
• The act or process of converting or being converted to a true Christianity.
Christianize
v. t.
• To make Christian; to convert to Christianity; as, to Christianize pagans.
• To imbue with or adapt to Christian principles.
v. i.
• To adopt the character or belief of a Christian; to become Christian.
Christianlike
a.
• Becoming to a Christian.
Christianly
adv.
• In a manner becoming the principles of the Christian religion.
a.
• Christianlike.
Christianness
n.
• Consonance with the doctrines of Christianity.
Christless
a.
• Without faith in Christ; unchristian.
Christlike
a.
• Resembling Christ in character, actions, etc.
Christly
a.
• Christlike.
Christmas
n.
• An annual church festival (December 25) and in some States a legal holiday, in memory of the birth of Christ, often celebrated by a particular church service, and also by special gifts, greetings, and hospitality.
Christmastide
n.
• The season of Christmas.
Christocentric
a.
• Making Christ the center, about whom all things are grouped, as in religion or history; tending toward Christ, as the central object of thought or emotion.
Christology
n.
• A treatise on Christ; that department of theology which treats of the personality, attributes, or life of Christ.
Christophany
n.
• An appearance of Christ, as to his disciples after the crucifixion.
Chromascope
n.
• An instrument for showing the optical effects of color.
Chromate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of chromic acid.
Chromatic
a.
• Relating to color, or to colors.
(Mus.) Proceeding by the smaller intervals (half steps or semitones) of the scale, instead of the regular intervals of the diatonic scale.
Chromatical
a.
• Chromatic.
Chromatically
adv.
• In a chromatic manner.
Chromatics
n.
• The science of colors; that part of optics which treats of the properties of colors.
Chromatin
n.
(Biol.) Tissue which is capable of being stained by dyes.
Chromatism
n.
(Optics) The state of being colored, as in the case of images formed by a lens.
(Bot.) An abnormal coloring of plants.
Chromatogenous
a.
• Producing color.
Chromatography
n.
• A treatise on colors
Chromatology
n.
• A treatise on colors.
Chromatophore
n.
(Zool.) A contractile cell or vesicle containing liquid pigment and capable of changing its form or size, thus causing changes of color in the translucent skin of such animals as possess them. They are highly developed and numerous in the cephalopods.
(Bot.) One of the granules of protoplasm, which in mass give color to the part of the plant containing them.
Chromatoscope
n.
(Astron.) A reflecting telescope, part of which is made to rotate eccentrically, so as to produce a ringlike image of a star, instead of a point; — used in studying the scintillation of the stars.
Chromatosphere
n.
• A chromosphere.
Chromatrope
n.
(Physics) An instrument for exhibiting certain chromatic effects of light (depending upon the persistence of vision and mixture of colors) by means of rapidly rotating disks variously colored.
• A device in a magic lantern or stereopticon to produce kaleidoscopic effects.
Chromatype
n.
(Photog.) A colored photographic picture taken upon paper made sensitive with potassium bichromate or some other salt of chromium.
• The process by which such picture is made.
Chrome
n.
• Same as Chromium.
Chromic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, chromium; — said of the compounds of chromium in which it has its higher valence.
Chromid
n.
(Zool.) One of the Chromidae, a family of fresh-water fishes abundant in the tropical parts of America and Africa. Some are valuable food fishes, as the bulti of the Nile.
Chromidrosis
n.
(Med.) Secretion of abnormally colored perspiration.
Chromism
n.
• Same as Chromatism.
Chromite
n.
(Min.) A black submetallic mineral consisting of oxide of chromium and iron; — called also chromic iron.
(Chem.) A compound or salt of chromous hydroxide regarded as an acid.
Chromium
n.
(Chem.) A comparatively rare element occurring most abundantly in the mineral chromite. Atomic weight 52.5. Symbol Cr. When isolated it is a hard, brittle, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty. Its chief commercial importance is for its compounds, as potassium chromate, lead chromate, etc., which are brilliantly colored and are used dyeing and calico printing. Called also chrome.
Chromo
n.
• A chromolithograph.
Chromoblast
n.
• An embryonic cell which develops into a pigment cell.
Chromogen
(Biol.) Vegetable coloring matter other than green; chromule.
(Chem.) Any colored compound, supposed to contain one or more chromophores.
Chromogenic
a.
(Biol.) Containing, or capable of forming, chromogen; as, chromogenic bacteria.
Chromograph
n.
• An apparatus by which a number of copies of written matter, maps, plans, etc., can be made; — called also hectograph.
Chromoleucite
n.
(Bot.) A chromoplastid.
Chromolithograph
n.
• A picture printed in tints and colors by repeated impressions from a series of stones prepared by the lithographic process.
Chromolithographer
n.
• One who is engaged in chromolithography.
Chromolithographic
a.
• Pertaining to, or made by, chromolithography.
Chromolithohraphy
n.
• Lithography adapted to printing in inks of various colors.
Chromophane
n.
(Physiol.) A general name for the several coloring matters, red, green, yellow, etc., present in the inner segments in the cones of the retina, held in solution by fats, and slowly decolorized by light; distinct from the photochemical pigments of the rods of the retina.
Chromophore
n.
(Chem.) Any chemical group or residue (as NO; N; or O) which imparts some decided color to the compound of which it is an ingredient.
Chromophotography
n.
• The art of producing photographs in colors.
Chromophotolithograph
n.
• A photolithograph printed in colors.
Chromoplastid
n.
(Bot.) A protoplasmic granule of some other color than green; — also called chromoleucite.
Chromosome
n.
(Biol.) One of the minute bodies into which the chromatin of the nucleus is resolved during mitotic cell division; the idant of Weismann.
Chromosphere
n.
(Astron.) An atmosphere of rare matter, composed principally of incandescent hydrogen gas, surrounding the sun and enveloping the photosphere. Portions of the chromosphere are here and there thrown up into enormous tongues of flame.
Chromospheric
a.
• Of or pertaining to the chromosphere.
Chromotype
n.
• A sheet printed in colors by any process, as a chromolithograph.
• A photographic picture in the natural colors.
Chromous
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or derived from, chromium, when this element has a valence lower than that in chromic compounds.
Chromule
n.
(Bot.) A general name for coloring matter of plants other than chlorophyll, especially that of petals.
Chronic
a.
• Relating to time; according to time.
• Continuing for a long time; lingering; habitual.
Chronical
a.
• Chronic.
Chronicle
n.
• An historical register or account of facts or events disposed in the order of time.
• A narrative of events; a history; a record.
• The two canonical books of the Old Testament in which immediately follow 2 Kings.
v. t.
• To record in a history or chronicle; to record; to register.
Chronicler
n.
• A writer of a chronicle; a recorder of events in the order of time; an historian.
Chronique
n.
• A chronicle.
Chronogram
n.
• An inscription in which certain numeral letters, made to appear specially conspicuous, on being added together, express a particular date or epoch, as in the motto of a medal struck by Gustavus Adolphus in 1632: ChrIstVs DVX; ergo trIVMphVs. - the capitals of which give, when added as numerals, the sum 1632.
• The record or inscription made by a chronograph.
Chronogrammatist
n.
• A writer of chronograms.
Chronograph
n.
• An instrument for measuring or recording intervals of time, upon a revolving drum or strip of paper moved by clockwork. The action of the stylus or pen is controlled by electricity.
• Same as Chronogram, 1.
• A chronoscope.
Chronographer
n.
• One who writes a chronography; a chronologer.
Chronographic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a chronograph.
Chronography
n.
• A description or record of past time; history.
Chronologer
n.
• Same as Chronologist.
Chronology
n.
• The science which treats of measuring time by regular divisions or periods, and which assigns to events or transactions their proper dates.
Chronometer
n.
• An instrument for measuring time; a timekeeper.
• A portable timekeeper, with a heavy compensation balance, and usually beating half seconds; — intended to keep time with great accuracy for use an astronomical observations, in determining longitude, etc.
(Mus.) A metronome.
Chronometry
n.
• The art of measuring time; the measuring of time by periods or divisions.
Chronopher
n.
• An instrument signaling the correct time to distant points by electricity.
Chronoscope
n.
• An instrument for measuring minute intervals of time; used in determining the velocity of projectiles, the duration of short-lived luminous phenomena, etc.
Chrysalid
a.
• Pertaining to a chrysalis; resembling a chrysalis.
Chrysalis
n.
(Zool.) The pupa state of certain insects, esp. of butterflies, from which the perfect insect emerges.
Chrysaniline
n.
(Chem.) A yellow substance obtained as a by-product in the manufacture of rosaniline. It dyes silk a fine golden-yellow color.
Chrysanthemum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of composite plants, mostly perennial, and of many species including the many varieties of garden chrysanthemums (annual and perennial), and also the feverfew and the oxeye daisy.
Chrysarobin
n.
(Chem.) A bitter, yellow substance forming the essential constituent of Goa powder, and yielding chrysophanic acid proper; hence formerly called also chrysphanic acid.
Chrysaurin
n.
• An orange-colored dyestuff, of artificial production.
Chryselephantine
a.
• Composed of, or adorned with, gold and ivory.
Chrysene
n.
(Chem.) One of the higher aromatic hydrocarbons of coal tar, allied to napthalene and anthracene. It is a white crystalline substance, C18H12, of strong blue fluorescence, but generally colored yellow by impurities.
Chrysoberyl
n.
(Min.) A mineral, found in crystals, of a yellow to green or brown color, and consisting of aluminia and glucina. It is very hard, and is often used as a gem.
Chrysochlore
n.
(Zool.) A South African mole of the genus Chrysochloris; the golden mole, the fur of which reflects brilliant metallic hues of green and gold.
Chrysocolla
n.
(Min.) A hydrous silicate of copper, occurring massive, of a blue or greenish blue color.
Chrysogen
n.
(Chem.) A yellow crystalline substance extracted from crude anthracene.
Chrysography
n.
• The art of writing in letters of gold.
• A writing executed in letters of gold.
Chrysoidine
n.
(Chem.) An artificial, yellow, crystalline dye, C6H5N2.C6H3(NH2)2. Also, one of a group of dyestuffs resembling chrysoidine proper.
Chrysolite
n.
(Min.) A mineral, composed of silica, magnesia, and iron, of a yellow to green color. It is common in certain volcanic rocks; — called also olivine and peridot. Sometimes used as a gem. The name was also early used for yellow varieties of tourmaline and topaz.
Chrysology
n.
• That branch of political economy which relates to the production of wealth.
Chrysopa
n.
(Zool.) A genus of neuropterous insects.
Chrysophane
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside extracted from rhubarb as a bitter, yellow, crystalline powder, and yielding chrysophanic acid on decomposition.
Chrysophanic
a.
• Pertaining to, or derived from, or resembling, chrysophane.
Chrysoprase
n.
(Min.) An apple-green variety of chalcedony, colored by nickel. It has a dull flinty luster, and is sometimes used in jewelry.
Chrysosperm
n.
• The seed of gold; a means of creating gold.
Chrysotype
n.
• A photographic picture taken upon paper prepared by the use of a sensitive salt of iron and developed by the application of chloride of gold.
• 2process, invented by Sir J.Herschel.
Chthonic
a.
• Pertaining to the earth; earthy; as, chthonic religions.
Chub
n.
(Zool.) A species to fresh-water fish of the Cyprinidae or Carp family. The common European species is Leuciscus cephalus; the cheven. In America the name is applied to various fishes of the same family, of the genera Semotilus, Squalius, Ceratichthys, etc., and locally to several very different fishes, as the tautog, black bass, etc.
Chubbed
a.
• Chubby.
Chubbedness
n.
• The state of being chubby.
Chubby
a.
• Like a chub; plump, short, and thick.
Chuck
v. i.
• To make a noise resembling that of a hen when she calls her chickens; to cluck.
• To chuckle; to laugh.
v. t.
• To call, as a hen her chickens.
n.
• The chuck or call of a hen.
• A sudden, small noise.
• A word of endearment; — corrupted from chick.
v. t.
• To strike gently; to give a gentle blow to.
• To toss or throw smartly out of the hand; to pitch.
(Mech.) To place in a chuck, or hold by means of a chuck, as in turning; to bore or turn (a hole) in a revolving piece held in a chuck.
n.
• A slight blow or pat under the chin.
• A short throw; a toss.
(Mach.) A contrivance or machine fixed to the mandrel of a lathe, for holding a tool or the material to be operated upon.
n.
• A small pebble; — called also chuckstone and chuckiestone.
• A game played with chucks, in which one or more are tossed up and caught; jackstones.
n.
• A piece of the backbone of an animal, from between the neck and the collar bone, with the adjoining parts, cut for cooking; as, a chuck steak; a chuck roast.
Chuckle
v. t.
• To call, as a hen her chickens; to cluck.
• To fondle; to cocker.
n.
• A short, suppressed laugh; the expression of satisfaction, exultation, or derision.
v. i.
• To laugh in a suppressed or broken manner, as expressing inward satisfaction, exultation, or derision.
Chucklehead
n.
• A person with a large head; a numskull; a dunce.
Chuckleheaded
a.
• Having a large head; thickheaded; dull; stupid.
Chud
v. t.
• To champ; to bite.
Chuet
n.
• Minced meat.
Chufa
n.
(Bot.) A sedgelike plant (Cyperus esculentus) producing edible tubers, native about the Mediterranean, now cultivated in many regions; the earth almond.
Chuff
n.
• A coarse or stupid fellow.
a.
• Stupid; churlish.
Chuffily
adv.
• Clownishly; surlily.
Chuffiness
n.
• The quality of being chuffy.
Chuffy
a.
• Fat or puffed out in the cheeks.
• Rough; clownish; surly.
Chulan
n.
(Bot.) The fragrant flowers of the Chloranthus inconspicuus, used in China for perfuming tea.
Chum
n.
• A roommate, especially in a college or university; an old and intimate friend.
v. i.
• To occupy a chamber with another; as, to chum together at college.
n.
• Chopped pieces of fish used as bait.
Chump
n.
• A short, thick, heavy piece of wood.
Chunam
n.
• Quicklime; also, plaster or mortar.
Chunk
n.
• A short, thick piece of anything.
Chunky
a.
• Short and thick.
Church
n.
• A building set apart for Christian worship.
• A Jewish or heathen temple.
• A formally organized body of Christian believers worshiping together.
• A body of Christian believers, holding the same creed, observing the same rites, and acknowledging the same ecclesiastical authority; a denomination; as, the Roman Catholic church; the Presbyterian church.
• The collective body of Christians.
• Any body of worshipers; as, the Jewish church; the church of Brahm.
• The aggregate of religious influences in a community; ecclesiastical influence, authority, etc.; as, to array the power of the church against some moral evil.
v. t.
• To bless according to a prescribed form, or to unite with in publicly returning thanks in church, as after deliverance from the dangers of childbirth; as, the churching of women.
Churchdom
n.
• The institution, government, or authority of a church.
Churchgoer
n.
• One who attends church.
Churchgoing
a.
• Habitually attending church.
• Summoning to church.
Churchism
n.
• Strict adherence to the forms or principles of some church organization; sectarianism.
Churchless
a.
• Without a church.
Churchlike
a.
• Befitting a church or a churchman; becoming to a clergyman.
Churchliness
n.
• Regard for the church.
Churchly
a.
• Pertaining to, or suitable for, the church; ecclesiastical.
Churchman
n.
• An ecclesiastic or clergyman.
• An Episcopalian, or a member of the Established Church of England.
• One was is attached to, or attends, church.
Churchmanly
a.
• Pertaining to, or becoming, a churchman.
Churchmanship
n.
• The state or quality of being a churchman; attachment to the church.
Churchship
n.
• State of being a church.
Churchwarden
n.
• One of the officers (usually two) in an Episcopal church, whose duties vary in different dioceses, but always include the provision of what is necessary for the communion service.
• A clay tobacco pipe, with a long tube.
Churchwardenship
n.
• The office of a churchwarden.
Churchy
a.
• Relating to a church; unduly fond of church forms.
Churchyard
n.
• The ground adjoining a church, in which the dead are buried; a cemetery.
Churl
n.
• A rustic; a countryman or laborer.
• A rough, surly, ill-bred man; a boor.
• A selfish miser; an illiberal person; a niggard.
a.
• Churlish; rough; selfish.
Churlish
a.
• Like a churl; rude; cross-grained; ungracious; surly; illiberal; niggardly.
• Wanting pliancy; unmanageable; unyielding; not easily wrought; as, a churlish soil; the churlish and intractable nature of some minerals.
Churlishly
adv.
• In a churlish manner.
Churlishness
n.
• Rudeness of manners or temper; lack of kindness or courtesy.
Churly
a.
• Rude; churlish; violent.
Churn
n.
• A vessel in which milk or cream is stirred, beaten, or otherwise agitated (as by a plunging or revolving dasher) in order to separete the oily globules from the other parts, and obtain butter.
v. t.
• To stir, beat, or agitate, as milk or cream in a churn, in order to make butter.
• To shake or agitate with violence.
v. i.
• To perform the operation of churning.
Churning
n.
• The act of one who churns.
• The quantity of butter made at one operation.
Churrus
n.
• A powerfully narcotic and intoxicating gum resin which exudes from the flower heads, seeds, etc., of Indian hemp.
Churrworm
n.
(Zool.) An insect that turns about nimbly; the mole cricket; — called also fan cricket.
Chute
n.
• A framework, trough, or tube, upon or through which objects are made to slide from a higher to a lower level, or through which water passes to a wheel.
Chylaceous
a.
(Physiol.) Possessed of the properties of chyle; consisting of chyle.
Chylaqueous
a.
(Zool.) Consisting of chyle much diluted with water; — said of a liquid which forms the circulating fluid of some inferior animals.
Chyle
n.
(Physiol.) A milky fluid containing the fatty matter of the food in a state of emulsion, or fine mechanical division; formed from chyme by the action of the intestinal juices. It is absorbed by the lacteals, and conveyed into the blood by the thoracic duct.
Chylifaction
n.
(Physiol.) The act or process by which chyle is formed from food in animal bodies; chylification, — a digestive process.
Chylifactive
a.
(Physiol.) Producing, or converting into, chyle; having the power to form chyle.
Chyliferous
a.
• [Chyle + -ferous: cf. F. chylifere.] (Physiol.) Transmitting or conveying chyle; as, chyliferous vessels.
Chylific
a.
• Chylifactive.
Chylification
n.
(Physiol.) The formation of chyle.
Chylificatory
a.
• Chylifactive.
Chylify
v. t. & i.
(Physiol.) To make chyle of; to be converted into chyle.
Chylopoetic
a.
(Physiol.) Concerned in the formation of chyle; as, the chylopoetic organs.
Chylous
a.
(Physiol.) Consisting of, or similar to, chyle.
Chyluria
n.
(Med.) A morbid condition in which the urine contains chyle or fatty matter, giving it a milky appearance.
Chyme
n.
(Physiol.) The pulpy mass of semi-digested food in the small intestines just after its passage from the stomach. It is separated in the intestines into chyle and excrement.
Chymiferous
a.
(Physiol.) Bearing or containing chyme.
Chymification
n.
(Physiol.) The conversion of food into chyme by the digestive action of gastric juice.
Chymify
v. t.
(Physiol.) To form into chyme.
Chymous
a.
• Of or pertaining to chyme.
Chyometer
n.
(Chem.) An instrument for measuring liquids. It consists of a piston moving in a tube in which is contained the liquid, the quantity expelled being indicated by the graduation upon the piston rod.
Cibarious
a.
• Pertaining to food; edible.
Cibation
n.
• The act of taking food.
(Alchemy) The process or operation of feeding the contents of the crucilbe with fresh material.
Cibol
n.
• A perennial alliaceous plant (Allium fistulosum), sometimes called Welsh onion. Its fistular leaves areused in cookery.
Ciborium
n.
(Arch.) A canopy usually standing free and supported on four columns, covering the high altar, or, very rarely, a secondary altar.
(R. C. Ch.) The coffer or case in which the host is kept; the pyx.
Cicada
n.
(Zool.) Any species of the genus Cicada. They are large hemipterous insects, with nearly transparent wings. The male makes a shrill sound by pecular organs in the under side of the abdomen, consisting of a pair of stretched membranes, acted upon by powerful muscles. A noted American species (C. septendecim) is called the seventeen year locust. Another common species is the dogday cicada.
Cicala
n.
• A cicada.
Cicatrice
n.
• A cicatrix.
Cicatricial
a.
(Med.) Relating to, or having the character of, a cicatrix.
Cicatricle
n.
(Biol.) The germinating point in the embryo of a seed; the point in the yolk of an egg at which development begins.
Cicatrisive
a.
• Tending to promote the formation of a cicatrix; good for healing of a wound.
Cicatrix
n.
(Med.) The pellicle which forms over a wound or breach of continuity and completes the process of healing in the latter, and which subsequently contracts and becomes white, forming the scar.
Cicatrizant
n.
(Med.) A medicine or application that promotes the healing of a sore or wound, or the formation of a cicatrix.
Cicatrization
n.
(Med.) The process of forming a cicatrix, or the state of being cicatrized.
Cicatrize
v. t.
(Med.) To heal or induce the formation of a cicatrix in, as in wounded or ulcerated flesh.
v. i.
(Med.) To heal; to have a new skin.
Cicatrose
a.
• Full of scars.
Cicely
n.
(Bot.) Any one of several umbelliferous plants, of the genera Myrrhis, Osmorrhiza, etc.
Cicero
n.
(Print.) Pica type; — so called by French printers.
Cicerone
n.
• One who shows strangers the curiosities of a place; a guide.
Ciceronian
a.
• Resembling Cicero in style or action; eloquent.
Ciceronianism
n.
• Imitation of, or resemblance to, the style or action Cicero; a Ciceronian phrase or expression.
Cichoraceous
a.
• Belonging to, or resembling, a suborder of composite plants of which the chicory (Cichorium) is the type.
Cicisbeism
n.
• The state or conduct of a cicisbeo.
Cicisbeo
n.
• A professed admirer of a married woman; a dangler about women.
• A knot of silk or ribbon attached to a fan, walking stick, etc.
Ciclatoun
n.
• A costly cloth, of uncertain material, used in the Middle Ages.
Cicurate
v. t.
• To tame.
Cicuration
n.
• The act of taming.
Cicuta
n.
(Bot.) a genus of poisonous umbelliferous plants, of which the water hemlock or cowbane is best known.
Cicutoxin
n.
(Chem.) The active principle of the water hemlock (Cicuta) extracted as a poisonous gummy substance.
Cid
n.
• Chief or commander; in Spanish literature, a title of Ruy Diaz, Count of Bivar, a champion of Christianity and of the old Spanish royalty, in the 11th century.
• An epic poem, which celebrates the exploits of the Spanish national hero, Ruy Diaz.
Cider
n.
• The expressed juice of apples. It is used as a beverage, for making vinegar, and for other purposes.
Ciderist
n.
• A maker of cider.
Ciderkin
n.
• A kind of weak cider made by steeping the refuse pomace in water.
Cierge
n.
• A wax candle used in religous rites.
Cigar
n.
• A small roll of tobacco, used for smoking.
Cigarette
n.
• A little cigar; a little fine tobacco rolled in paper for smoking.
Cilia
n. pl.
(Anat.) The eyelashes.
(Biol.) Small, generally microscopic, vibrating appendages lining certain organs, as the air passages of the higher animals, and in the lower animals often covering also the whole or a part of the exterior. They are also found on some vegetable organisms. In the Infusoria, and many larval forms, they are locomotive organs.
(Bot.) Hairlike processes, commonly marginal and forming a fringe like the eyelash.
(Zool.) Small, vibratory, swimming organs, somewhat resembling true cilia, as those of Ctenophora.
Ciliary
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the cilia, or eyelashes. Also applied to special parts of the eye itself; as, the ciliary processes of the choroid coat; the ciliary muscle, etc.
(Biol.) Pertaining to or connected with the cilia in animal or vegetable organisms; as, ciliary motion.
Ciliata
n. pl.
(Zool.) One of the orders of Infusoria, characterized by having cilia. In some species the cilia cover the body generally, in others they form a band around the mouth.
Cilice
n.
• A kind of haircloth undergarment.
Cilician
a.
• Of or pertaining to Cilicia in Asia Minor.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Cilicia.
Cilicious
a.
• Made, or consisting, of hair.
Ciliograde
a.
(Zool.) Moving by means of cilia, or cilialike organs; as, the ciliograde Medusae.
Cillosis
n.
(Med.) A spasmodic trembling of the upper eyelid.
Cima
n.
(Arch.) A kind of molding.
Cimbal
n.
• A kind of confectionery or cake.
Cimbia
n.
(Arch.) A fillet or band placed around the shaft of a column as if to strengthen it.
Cimbrian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Cimbri.
n.
• One of the Cimbri.
Cimbric
a.
• Pertaining to the Cimbri, an ancient tribe inhabiting Northern Germany.
n.
• The language of the Cimbri.
Cimeliarch
n.
• A superintendent or keeper of a church's valuables; a churchwarden.
Cimex
n.
(Zool.) A genus of hemipterous insects of which the bedbug is the best known example.
Cimiss
n.
(Zool.) The bedbug.
Cimmerian
a.
• Pertaining to the Cimmerii, a fabulous people, said to have lived, in very ancient times, in profound and perpetual darkness.
• Without any light; intensely dark.
Cimolite
n.
(Min.) A soft, earthy, clayey mineral, of whitish or grayish color.
Cinch
n.
• A strong saddle girth, as of canvas.
• A tight grip.
Cinchona
n.
(Bot.) A genus of trees growing naturally on the Andes in Peru and adjacent countries, but now cultivated in the East Indies, producing a medicinal bark of great value.
(Med.) The bark of any species of cinchona containing three per cent. or more of bitter febrifuge alkaloids; Peruvian bark; Jesuits' bark.
Cinchonaceous
a.
• Allied or pertaining to cinchona, or to the plants that produce it.
Cinchonic
a.
• Belonging to, or obtained from, cinchona.
Cinchonidine
n.
(Chem.) One of the quinine group of alkaloids, found especially in red cinchona bark. It is a white crystalline substance, C19H22N2O, with a bitter taste and qualities similar to, but weaker than, quinine; — sometimes called also cinchonidia.
Cinchonine
n.
(Chem.) One of the quinine group of alkaloids isomeric with and resembling cinchonidine; — called also cinchonia.
Cinchonism
n.
(Med.) A condition produced by the excessive or long-continued use of quinine, and marked by deafness, roaring in the ears, vertigo, etc.
Cinchonize
v. t.
• To produce cinchonism in; to poison with quinine or with cinchona.
Cincture
n.
• A belt, a girdle, or something worn round the body, — as by an ecclesiastic for confining the alb.
• That which encompasses or incloses; an inclosure.
(Arch.) The fillet, listel, or band next to the apophyge at the extremity of the shaft of a column.
Cinctured
n.
• Having or wearing a cincture or gridle.
Cinder
n.
• Partly burned or vitrified coal, or other combustible, in which fire is extinct.
• A hot coal without flame; an ember.
• A scale thrown off in forging metal.
• The slag of a furnace, or scoriaceous lava from a volcano.
Cindery
a.
• Resembling, or composed of, cinders; full of cinders.
Cinefaction
n.
• Cineration; reduction to ashes.
Cineraceous
a.
• Like ashes; ash-colored; cinerous.
Cineraria
n.
(Bot.) A Linnaean genus of free-flowering composite plants, mostly from South Africa. Several species are cultivated for ornament.
Cinerary
a.
• Pertaining to ashes; containing ashes.
Cineration
n.
• The reducing of anything to ashes by combustion; cinefaction.
Cinereous
a.
• Like ashes; ash-colored; grayish.
Cinerescent
a.
• Somewhat cinereous; of a color somewhat resembling that of wood ashes.
Cineritious
a.
• Like ashes; having the color of ashes, — as the cortical substance of the brain.
Cinerulent
a.
• Full of ashes.
Cingalese
n. sing. & pl.
• A native or natives of Ceylon descended from its primitive inhabitants; also (sing.), the language of the Cingalese.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Cingalese.
Cingulum
n.
(Zool.) A distinct girdle or band of color; a raised spiral line as seen on certain univalve shells.
• The clitellus of earthworms.
• The base of the crown of a tooth.
Cinnabar
n.
(Min.) Red sulphide of mercury, occurring in brilliant red crystals, and also in red or brown amorphous masses. It is used in medicine.
• The artificial red sulphide of mercury used as a pigment; vermilion.
Cinnabarine
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, cinnabar; consisting of cinnabar, or containing it; as, cinnabarine sand.
Cinnamene
n.
(Chem.) Styrene (which was formerly called cinnamene because obtained from cinnamic acid).
Cinnamic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or obtained from, cinnamon.
Cinnamon
n.
• The inner bark of the shoots of Cinnamomum Zeylanicum, a tree growing in Ceylon. It is aromatic, of a moderately pungent taste, and is one of the best cordial, carminative, and restorative spices.
• Cassia.
Cinnamone
n.
• A yellow crystalline substance, (C6H5.C2H2)2CO, the ketone of cinnamic acid.
Cinnamyl
n.
(Chem.) The hypothetical radical, (C6H5.C2H2)2C, of cinnamic compounds.
Cinnoline
n.
• A nitrogenous organic base, C8H6N2, analogous to quinoline, obtained from certain complex diazo compounds.
Cinque
n.
• Five; the number five in dice or cards.
Cinquecento
n. & a.
• The sixteenth century, when applied to Italian art or literature; as, the sculpture of the Cinquecento; Cinquecento style.
Cinquefoil
n.
(Bot.) The name of several different species of the genus Potentilla; — also called five-finger, because of the resemblance of its leaves to the fingers of the hand.
(Arch.) An ornamental foliation having five points or cups, used in windows, panels, etc.
Cinura
n. pl.
(Zool.) The group of Thysanura which includes Lepisma and allied forms; the bristletails.
Cipher
n.
(Arith.) A character [0] which, standing by itself, expresses nothing, but when placed at the right hand of a whole number, increases its value tenfold.
• One who, or that which, has no weight or influence.
• A character in general, as a figure or letter.
• A combination or interweaving of letters, as the initials of a name; a device; a monogram; as, a painter's cipher, an engraver's cipher, etc. The cut represents the initials N. W.
• A private alphabet, system of characters, or other mode of writing, contrived for the safe transmission of secrets; also, a writing in such characters.
a.
• Of the nature of a cipher; of no weight or influence.
v. i.
• To use figures in a mathematical process; to do sums in arithmetic.
v. t.
• To write in occult characters.
• To get by ciphering; as, to cipher out the answer.
• To decipher.
• To designate by characters.
Cipherer
n.
• One who ciphers.
Cipherhood
n.
• Nothingness.
Cipolin
n.
(Min.) A whitish marble, from Rome, containiing pale greenish zones. It consists of calcium carbonate, with zones and cloudings of talc.
Cippus
n.
• A small, low pillar, square or round, commonly having an inscription, used by the ancients for various purposes, as for indicating the distances of places, for a landmark, for sepulchral inscriptions, etc.
Circ
n.
• An amphitheatrical circle for sports; a circus.
Circar
n.
• A district, or part of a province.
Circassian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Circassia, in Asia.
n.
• A native or inhabitant of Circassia.
Circean
a.
• Having the characteristics of Circe, daughter of Sol and Perseis, a mythological enchantress, who first charmed her victims and then changed them to the forms of beasts; pleasing, but noxious; as, a Circean draught.
Circinal
a.
(Bot.) Circinate.
Circinate
a.
(Bot.) Rolled together downward, the tip occupying the center; — a term used in reference to foliation or leafing, as in ferns.
v. t.
• To make a circle around; to encompass.
Circination
n.
• An orbicular motion.
• A circle; a concentric layer.
Circle
n.
• A plane figure, bounded by a single curve line called its circumference, every part of which is equally distant from a point within it, called the center.
• The line that bounds sush a figure; a circumference; a ring.
(Astron.) An instrument of observation, the graduated limb of which consists of an entire circle.
• A round body; a sphere; an orb.
• Compass; circuit; inclosure.
• A company assembled, or conceived to assemble, about a central point of interest, or bound by a common tie; a class or division of society; a coterie; a set.
• A circular group of persons; a ring.
• A series ending where it begins, and repeating itself.
(Logic) A form of argument in which two or more unproved statements are used to prove each other; inconclusive reasoning.
• Indirect form of words; circumlocution.
• A territorial division or district.
v. t.
• To move around; to revolve around.
• To encompass, as by a circle; to surround; to inclose; to encircle.
v. i.
• To move circularly; to form a circle; to circulate.
Circled
a.
• Having the form of a circle; round.
Circler
n.
• A mean or inferior poet, perhaps from his habit of wandering around as a stroller; an itinerant poet. Also, a name given to the cyclic poets.
Circlet
n.
• A little circle; esp., an ornament for the person, having the form of a circle; that which encircles, as a ring, a bracelet, or a headband.
• A round body; an orb.
• A circular piece of wood put under a dish at table.
Circuit
n.
• The act of moving or revolving around, or as in a circle or orbit; a revolution; as, the periodical circuit of the earth round the sun.
• The circumference of, or distance round, any space; the measure of a line round an area.
• That which encircles anything, as a ring or crown.
• The space inclosed within a circle, or within limits.
• A regular or appointed journeying from place to place in the exercise of one's calling, as of a judge, or a preacher.
(Law) A certain division of a state or country, established by law for a judge or judges to visit, for the administration of justice. Bouvier. (b) (Methodist Church) A district in which an itinerant preacher labors.
• Circumlocution.
v. i.
• To move in a circle; to go round; to circulate.
v. t.
• To travel around.
Circuiteer
n.
• A circuiter.
Circuiter
n.
• One who travels a circuit, as a circuit judge.
Circuition
n.
• The act of going round; circumlocution.
Circuitous
a.
• Going round in a circuit; roundabout; indirect; as, a circuitous road; a circuitous manner of accompalishing an end.
Circuity
n.
• A going round in a circle; a course not direct; a roundabout way of proceeding.
Circulable
a.
• That may be circulated.
Circular
a.
• In the form of, or bounded by, a circle; round.
• repeating itself; ending in itself; reverting to the point of beginning; hence, illogical; inconclusive; as, circular reasoning.
• Adhering to a fixed circle of legends; cyclic; hence, mean; inferior.
• Addressed to a circle, or to a number of persons having a common interest; circulated, or intended for circulation; as, a circular letter.
• Perfect; complete.
n.
• A circular letter, or paper, usually printed, copies of which are addressed or given to various persons; as, a business circular.
• A sleeveless cloak, cut in circular form.
Circularity
n.
• The quality or state of being circular; a circular form.
Circularly
adv.
• In a circular manner.
Circulary
a.
• Circular; illogical.
Circulate
v. i.
• To move in a circle or circuitously; to move round and return to the same point; as, the blood circulates in the body.
• To pass from place to place, from person to person, or from hand to hand; to be diffused; as, money circulates; a story circulates.
v. t.
• To cause to pass from place to place, or from person to person; to spread; as, to circulate a report; to circulate bills of credit.
Circulation
n.
• The act of moving in a circle, or in a course which brings the moving body to the place where its motion began.
• The act of passing from place to place or person to person; free diffusion; transmission.
• Currency; circulating coin; notes, bills, etc., current for coin.
• The extent to which anything circulates or is circulated; the measure of diffusion; as, the circulation of a newspaper.
(Physiol.) The movement of the blood in the blood-vascular system, by which it is brought into close relations with almost every living elementary constituent. Also, the movement of the sap in the vessels and tissues of plants.
Circulative
a.
• Promoting circulation; circulating.
Circulator
n.
• One who, or that which, circulates.
Circulatorious
a.
• Travelling from house to house or from town to town; itinerant.
Circulatory
a.
• Circular; as, a circulatory letter.
• Circulating, or going round.
(Anat.) Subserving the purposes of circulation; as, circulatory organs; of or pertaining to the organs of circulation; as, circulatory diseases.
n.
• A chemical vessel consisting of two portions unequally exposed to the heat of the fire, and with connecting pipes or passages, through which the fluid rises from the overheated portion, and descends from the relatively colder, maintaining a circulation.
Circulet
n.
• A circlet.
Circuline
a.
• Proceeding in a circle; circular.
Circumagitate
v. t.
• To agitate on all sides.
Circumambage
n.
• A roundabout or indirect course; indirectness.
Circumambiency
n.
• The act of surrounding or encompassing.
Circumambient
a.
• Surrounding; inclosing or being on all sides; encompassing.
Circumambulate
v. t.
• To walk round about.
Circumbendibus
n.
• A roundabout or indirect way.
Circumcenter
n.
(Geom.) The center of a circle that circumscribes a triangle.
Circumcise
v. t.
• To cut off the prepuce of foreskin of, in the case of males, and the internal labia of, in the case of females.
(Script.) To purify spiritually.
Circumciser
n.
• One who performs circumcision.
Circumcision
n.
• The act of cutting off the prepuce or foreskin of males, or the internal labia of females.
(Script.) The Jews, as a circumcised people.
• Rejection of the sins of the flesh; spiritual purification, and acceptance of the Christian faith.
Circumclusion
n.
• Act of inclosing on all sides.
Circumcursation
n.
• The act of running about; also, rambling language.
Circumdenudation
n.
(Geol.) Denudation around or in the neighborhood of an object.
Circumduce
v. t.
(Scots Law) To declare elapsed, as the time allowed for introducing evidence.
Circumduct
v. t.
• To lead about; to lead astray.
(Law) To contravene; to nullify; as, to circumduct acts of judicature.
Circumduction
n.
• A leading about; circumlocution.
• An annulling; cancellation.
(Phisiol.) The rotation of a limb round an imaginary axis, so as to describe a concial surface.
Circumesophagal
a.
(Anat.) Surrounding the esophagus; — in Zool. said of the nerve commissures and ganglia of arthropods and mollusks.
Circumesophageal
a.
(Anat.) Circumesophagal.
Circumfer
v. t.
• To bear or carry round.
Circumference
n.
• The line that goes round or encompasses a circular figure; a periphery.
• A circle; anything circular.
• The external surface of a sphere, or of any orbicular body.
v. t.
• To include in a circular space; to bound.
Circumferential
a.
• Pertaining to the circumference; encompassing; encircling; circuitous.
Circumferentially
adv.
• So as to surround or encircle.
Circumferentor
n.
• A surveying instrument, for taking horizontal angles and bearings; a surveyor's compass. It consists of a compass whose needle plays over a circle graduated to 360°, and of a horizontal brass bar at the ends of which are standards with narrow slits for sighting, supported on a tripod by a ball and socket joint.
• A graduated wheel for measuring tires; a tire circle.
Circumflant
a.
• Blowing around.
Circumflect
v. t.
• To bend around.
• To mark with the circumflex accent, as a vowel.
Circumflex
n.
• A wave of the voice embracing both a rise and fall or a fall and a rise on the same a syllable.
• A character, or accent, denoting in Greek a rise and of the voice on the same long syllable, marked thus [~ or ]; and in Latin and some other languages, denoting a long and contracted syllable, marked [ or ^].
v. t.
• To mark or pronounce with a circumflex.
a.
• Moving or turning round; circuitous.
(Anat.) Curved circularly; — applied to several arteries of the hip and thigh, to arteries, veins, and a nerve of the shoulder, and to other parts.
Circumflexion
n.
• The act of bending, or causing to assume a curved form.
• A winding about; a turning; a circuity; a fold.
Circumfluence
n.
• A flowing round on all sides; an inclosing with a fluid.
Circumfulgent
a.
• Shining around or about.
Circumfuse
v. t.
• To pour round; to spread round.
Circumfusile
a.
• Capable of being poured or spread round.
Circumfusion
n.
• The act of pouring or spreading round; the state of being spread round.
Circumgestation
n.
• The act or process of carrying about.
Circumgyrate
v. t. & i.
• To roll or turn round; to cause to perform a rotary or circular motion.
Circumgyration
n.
• The act of turning, rolling, or whirling round.
Circumgyratory
a.
• Moving in a circle; turning round.
Circumgyre
v. i.
• To circumgyrate.
Circumincession
n.
(Theol.) The reciprocal existence in each other of the three persons of the Trinity.
Circumjacence
n.
• Condition of being circumjacent, or of bordering ou every side.
Circumjacent
a.
• Lying round; borderong on every side.
Circumjovial
n.
• One of the moons or satellites of the planet Jupiter.
Circumlittoral
a.
• Adjointing the shore.
Circumlocution
n.
• The use of many words to express an idea that might be expressed by few; indirect or roundabout language; a periphrese.
Circumlocutional
a.
• Relating to, or consisting of, circumlocutions; periphrastic; circuitous.
Circumlocutory
a.
• Characterised by circumlocution; periphrastic.
Circummeridian
a.
• About, or near, the meridian.
Circummure
v. t.
• To encompass with a wall.
Circumnavigable
a.
• Capable of being sailed round.
Circumnavigate
v. t.
• To sail completely round.
Circumnavigation
n.
• The act of circumnavigating, or sailing round.
Circumnavigator
n.
• One who sails round.
Circumnutate
v. i.
• To pass through the stages of circumnutation.
Circumnutation
n.
(Bot.) The successive bowing or bending in different directions of the growing tip of the stems of many plants, especially seen in climbing plants.
Circumpolar
a.
• About the pole; — applied to stars that revolve around the pole without setting; as, circumpolar stars.
Circumposition
n.
• The act of placing in a circle, or round about, or the state of being so placed.
Circumrotate
v. t. & i.
• To rotate about.
Circumrotation
n.
• The act of rolling or revolving round, as a wheel; circumvolution; the state of being whirled round.
Circumscissile
a.
(Bot.) Dehiscing or opening by a transverse fissure extending around (a capsule or pod).
Circumscribable
a.
• Capable of being circumscribed.
Circumscribe
v. t.
• to write or engare around.
• To inclose within a certain limit; to hem in; to surround; to bound; to confine; to restrain.
(Geom.) To draw a line around si as to touch at certain points without cutting.
Circumscriber
n.
• One who, or that which, circumscribes.
Circumscriptible
a.
• Capable of being circumscribed or limited by bounds.
Circumscription
n.
• An inscription written around anything.
• The exterior line which determines the form or magnitude of a body; outline; periphery.
• The act of limiting, or the state of being limited, by conditions or restraints; bound; confinement; limit.
Circumscriptive
a.
• Circumscribing or tending to circumscribe; marcing the limits or form of.
Circumscriptively
adv.
• In a limited manner.
Circumscriptly
adv.
• In a literal, limited, or narrow manner.
Circumspect
a.
• Attentive to all the circustances of a case or the probable consequences of an action; cautious; prudent; wary.
Circumspection
n.
• Attention to all the facts and circumstances of a case; caution; watchfulness.
Circumspective
a.
• Looking around everi way; cautious; careful of consequences; watchful of danger.
Circumspectively
adv.
• Circumspectly.
Circumspectly
adv.
• In a circumspect manner; cautiously; warily.
Circumspectness
n.
• Vigilance un guarding against evil from every quarter; caution.
Circumstance
n.
• That which attends, or relates to, or in some way affects, a fact or event; an attendant thing or state of things.
• An event; a fact; a particular incident.
• Circumlocution; detail.
• Condition in regard to worldly estate; state of property; situation; surroundings.
v. t.
• To place in a particular situation; to suppy relative incidents.
Circumstanced
p. a.
• Placed in a particular position or condition; situated.
• Governed by events or circumstances.
Circumstant
a.
• Standing or placed around; surrounding.
Circumstantiable
a.
• Capable of being circumstantiated.
Circumstantial
a.
• Consisting in, or pertaining to, circumstances or particular incidents.
• Incidental; relating to, but not essential.
• Abounding with circumstances; detailing or exhibiting all the circumstances; minute; particular.
n.
• Something incidental to the main subject, but of less importance; opposed to an essential; — generally in the plural; as, the circumstantials of religion.
Circumstantiality
n.
• The state, characteristic, or quality of being circumstantial; particularity or minuteness of detail.
Circumstantially
adv.
• In respect to circumstances; not essentially; accidentally.
• In every circumstance or particular; minutely.
Circumstantiate
v. t.
• To place in particular circumstances; to invest with particular accidents or adjuncts.
• To prove or confirm by circumstances; to entr into details concerning.
Circumterraneous
a.
• Being or dwelling around the earth.
Circumundulate
v. t.
• To flow round, as waves.
Circumvallate
v. t.
• To surround with a rampart or wall.
a.
• Surrounded with a wall; inclosed with a rampart.
(Anat.) Surrounded by a ridle or elevation; as, the circumvallate papillae, near the base of the tongue.
Circumvallation
n.
(Mil.) The act of surrounding with a wall or rampart.
• A line of field works made around a besieged place and the besieging army, to protect the camp of the besiegers against the attack of an enemy from without.
Circumvection
n.
• The act of carrying anything around, or the state of being so carried.
Circumvent
v. t.
• To gain advantage over by arts, stratagem, or deception; to decieve; to delude; to get around.
Circumvention
n.
• The act of prevailing over another by arts, address, or fraud; deception; fraud; imposture; delusion.
Circumventive
a.
• Tending to circumvent; deceiving by artifices; deluding.
Circumventor
n.
• One who circumvents; one who gains his purpose by cunning.
Circumvest
v. t.
• To cover round, as woth a garment; to invest.
Circumvolant
a.
• Flying around.
Circumvolation
n.
• The act of flying round.
Circumvolution
n.
• The act of rolling round; the state of being rolled.
• A thing rolled round another.
• A roundabout procedure; a circumlocution.
Circumvolve
v. t.
• To roll round; to cause to revolve; to put into a circular motion.
v. i.
• To roll round; to revolve.
Circus
n.
(Roman Antiq.) A level oblong space surrounded on three sides by seats of wood, earth, or stone, rising in tiers one above another, and divided lengthwise through the middle by a barrier around which the track or course was laid out. It was used for chariot races, games, and public shows.
• A circular inclosure for the exhibition of feats of horsemanship, acrobatic displays, etc. Also, the company of performers, with their equipage.
• Circuit; space; inclosure.
Cirque
n.
• A circle; a circus; a circular erection or arrangement of objects.
• A kind of circular valley in the side of a mountain, walled around by precipices of great height.
Cirrate
a.
(Zool.) Having cirri along the margin of a part or organ.
Cirrhose
a.
• Same as Cirrose.
Cirrhosis
n.
(Med.) A disease of the liver in which it usually becomes smaller in size and more dense and fibrous in consistence; hence sometimes applied to similar changes in other organs, caused by increase in the fibrous framework and decrease in the proper substance of the organ.
Cirrhotic
a.
• Pertaining to, caused by, or affected with, cirrhosis; as, cirrhotic degeneration; a cirrhotic liver.
Cirrhus
n.
• Same as Cirrus.
Cirri
n. pl.
• pl. of Cirrus.
Cirriferous
a.
• Bearing cirri, as many plants and animals.
Cirriform
a.
(Biol.) Formed like a cirrus or tendril; — said of appendages of both animals and plants.
Cirrigerous
a.
(Biol.) Having curled locks of hair; supporting cirri, or hairlike appendages.
Cirrigrade
a.
(Biol.) Moving or moved by cirri, or hairlike appendages.
Cirriped
n.
(Zool.) One of the Cirripedia.
Cirripedia
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of Crustacea including the barnacles. When adult, they have a calcareous shell composed of several pieces. From the opening of the shell the animal throws out a group of curved legs, looking like a delicate curl, whence the name of the group.
Cirrobranchiata
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of Mollusca having slender, cirriform appendages near the mouth; the Scaphopoda.
Cirrose
a.
(Bot.) Bearing a tendril or tendrils; as, a cirrose leaf.
• Resembling a tendril or cirrus.
Cirrostomi
n. pl.
(Zool.) The lowest group of vertebrates; — so called from the cirri around the mouth; the Leptocardia.
Cirrous
a.
(Bot.) Cirrose.
(Zool.) Tufted; — said of certain feathers of birds.
Cirrus
n.
(Bot.) A tendril or clasper.
(Zool.) A soft tactile appendage of the mantle of many Mollusca, and of the parapodia of Annelida. Those near the head of annelids are Tentacular cirri; those of the last segment are caudal cirri.
• The jointed, leglike organs of Cirripedia.
(Zool.) The external male organ of trematodes and some other worms, and of certain Mollusca.
Cirsocele
n.
(Med.) The varicose dilatation of the spermatic vein.
Cirsoid
a.
(Med.) Varicose.
Cirsotomy
n.
(Surg.) Any operation for the removal of varices by incision.
Cisalpine
a.
• On the hither side of the Alps with reference to Rome, that is, on the south side of the Alps; — opposed to transalpine.
Cisatlantic
a.
• On this side of the Atlantic Ocean; — used of the eastern or the western side, according to the standpoint of the writer.
Cisco
n.
(Zool.) The Lake herring (Coregonus Artedi), valuable food fish of the Great Lakes of North America. The name is also applied to C. Hoyi, a related species of Lake Michigan.
Ciselure
n.
• The process of chasing on metals; also, the work thus chased.
Cisleithan
a.
• On the Austrian side of the river Leitha; Austrian.
Cismontane
a.
• On this side of the mountains.
Cispadane
a.
• On the hither side of the river Po with reference to Rome; that is, on the south side.
Cissoid
n.
(Geom.) A curve invented by Diocles, for the purpose of solving two celebrated problems of the higher geometry; viz., to trisect a plane angle, and to construct two geometrical means between two given straight lines.
Cist
n.
(Antiq.) A box or chest. Specifically: (a) A bronze receptacle, round or oval, frequently decorated with engravings on the sides and cover, and with feet, handles, etc., of decorative castings. (b) A cinerary urn.
Cisted
a.
• Inclosed in a cyst.
Cistercian
n.
(Eccl.) A monk of the prolific branch of the Benedictine Order, established in 1098 at Citeaux, in France, by Robert, abbot of Molesme. For two hundred years the Cistercians followed the rule of St. Benedict in all its rigor.
a.
• Of or pertaining to the Cistercians.
Cistern
n.
• An artificial reservoir or tank for holding water, beer, or other liquids.
• A natural reservoir; a hollow place containing water.
Cit
n.
• A citizen; an inhabitant of a city; a pert townsman; — used contemptuously. "Insulted as a cit".
Citable
a.
• Capable of being cited.
Citadel
n.
• A fortress in or near a fortified city, commanding the city and fortifications, and intended as a final point of defense.
Cital
n.
• Summons to appear, as before a judge.
• Citation; quotation
Citation
n.
• An official summons or notice given to a person to appear; the paper containing such summons or notice.
• The act of citing a passage from a book, or from another person, in his own words; also, the passage or words quoted; quotation.
• Enumeration; mention; as, a citation of facts.
(Law) A reference to decided cases, or books of authority, to prove a point in law.
Citator
n.
• One who cites.
Citatory
a.
• Having the power or form of a citation; as, letters citatory.
Cite
v. t.
• To call upon officially or authoritatively to appear, as before a court; to summon.
• To urge; to enjoin.
• To quote; to repeat, as a passage from a book, or the words of another.
• To refer to or specify, as for support, proof, illustration, or confirmation.
• To bespeak; to indicate.
(Law) To notify of a proceeding in court.
Citer
n.
• One who cites.
Citess
n.
• A city woman
Cithara
n.
(Mus.) An ancient instrument resembling the harp.
Citharistic
a.
• Pertaining, or adapted, to the cithara.
Citicism
n.
• The manners of a cit or citizen.
Citied
a.
• Belonging to, or resembling, a city.
• Containing, or covered with, cities.
Citified
a.
• Aping, or having, the manners of a city.
Citigradae
n. pl.
(Zool.) A suborder of Arachnoidea, including the European tarantula and the wolf spiders (Lycosidae) and their allies, which capture their prey by rapidly running and jumping.
Citigrade
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to the Citigradae.
n.
• One of the Citigradae.
Citiner
n.
• One who is born or bred in a city; a citizen.
Citizen
n.
• One who enjoys the freedom and privileges of a city; a freeman of a city, as distinguished from a foreigner, or one not entitled to its franchises.
• An inhabitant of a city; a townsman.
• A person, native or naturalized, of either sex, who owes allegiance to a government, and is entitled to reciprocal protection from it.
• One who is domiciled in a country, and who is a citizen, though neither native nor naturalized, in such a sense that he takes his legal status from such country.
a.
• Having the condition or qualities of a citizen, or of citizens; as, a citizen soldiery.
• Of or pertaining to the inhabitants of a city; characteristic of citizens; effeminate; luxurious.
Citizeness
n.
• A female citizen.
Citizenship
n.
• The state of being a citizen; the status of a citizen.
Citole
n.
(Mus.) A musical instrument; a kind of dulcimer.
Citraconic
a.
• Pertaining to, derived from, or having certain characteristics of, citric and aconitic acids.
Citrate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of citric acid.
Citric
a.
(Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, the citron or lemon; as, citric acid.
Citrination
n.
• The process by which anything becomes of the color of a lemon; esp., in alchemy, the state of perfection in the philosopher's stone indicated by its assuming a deep yellow color.
Citrine
a.
• Like a citron or lemon; of a lemon color; greenish yellow.
n.
• A yellow, pellucid variety of quartz.
Citron
n.
(Bot) A fruit resembling a lemon, but larger, and pleasantly aromatic. The thick rind, when candied, is the citron of commerce.
• A citron tree.
• A citron melon.
Citrus
n.
(Bot.) A genus of trees including the orange, lemon, citron, etc., originally natives of southern Asia.
Cittern
n.
(Mus.) An instrument shaped like a lute, but strung with wire and played with a quill or plectrum.
City
n.
• A large town.
• A corporate town; in the United States, a town or collective body of inhabitants, incorporated and governed by a mayor and aldermen or a city council consisting of a board of aldermen and a common council; in Great Britain, a town corporate, which is or has been the seat of a bishop, or the capital of his see.
• The collective body of citizens, or inhabitants of a city.
a.
• Of or pertaining to a city.
Cive
n.
(Bot.) Same as Chive.
Civet
n.
• A substance, of the consistence of butter or honey, taken from glands in the anal pouch of the civet (Viverra civetta). It is of clear yellowish or brownish color, of a strong, musky odor, offensive when undiluted, but agreeble when a small portion is mixed with another substance. It is used as a perfume.
(Zool) The animal that produces civet (Viverra civetta); — called also civet cat. It is carnivorous, from two to three feet long, and of a brownish gray color, with transverse black bands and spots on the body and tail. It is a native of northern Africa and of Asia. The name is also applied to other species.
v. t.
• To scent or perfume with civet.
Civic
a.
• Relating to, or derived from, a city or citizen; relating to man as a member of society, or to civil affairs.
Civicism
n.
• The principle of civil government.
Civics
n.
• The science of civil government.
Civil
a.
• Pertaining to a city or state, or to a citizen in his relations to his fellow citizens or to the state; within the city or state.
• Subject to government; reduced to order; civilized; not barbarous; — said of the community.
• Performing the duties of a citizen; obedient to government; — said of an individual.
• Having the manners of one dwelling in a city, as opposed to those of savages or rustics; polite; courteous; complaisant; affable.
• Pertaining to civic life and affairs, in distinction from military, ecclesiastical, or official state.
• Relating to rights and remedies sought by action or suit distinct from criminal proceedings.
Civilian
n.
• One skilled in the civil law.
• A student of the civil law at a university or college.
• One whose pursuits are those of civil life, not military or clerical.
Civilist
n.
• A civilian.
Civilizable
a.
• Capable of being civilized.
Civilization
n.
• The act of civilizing, or the state of being civilized; national culture; refinement.
(Law) Rendering a criminal process civil.
Civilize
v. t.
• To reclaim from a savage state; to instruct in the rules and customs of civilization; to educate; to refine.
• To admit as suitable to a civilized state.
Civilized
a.
• Reclaimed from savage life and manners; instructed in arts, learning, and civil manners; refined; cultivated.
Civilizer
n.
• One who, or that which, civilizes or tends to civilize.
Civillty
n.
• The state of society in which the relations and duties of a citizen are recognized and obeyed; a state of civilization.
• A civil office, or a civil process
• Courtesy; politeness; kind attention; good breeding; a polite act or expression.
Civily
adv.
• In a civil manner; as regards civil rights and privileges; politely; courteously; in a well bred manner.
Civism
n.
• State of citizenship.
Cizar
v. i.
• To clip with scissors.
Cizars
n. pl.
• Scissors.
Cize
n.
• Bulk; largeness.
Clabber
n.
• Milk curdled so as to become thick.
v. i.
• To become clabber; to lopper.
Clachan
n.
• A small village containing a church.
Clack
v. i.
• To make a sudden, sharp noise, or a succesion of such noises, as by striking an object, or by collision of parts; to rattle; to click.
• To utter words rapidly and continually, or with abruptness; to let the tongue run.
v. t.
• To cause to make a sudden, sharp noise, or succession of noises; to click.
• To utter rapidly and inconsiderately.
n.
• A sharp, abrupt noise, or succession of noises, made by striking an object.
• Anything that causes a clacking noise, as the clapper of a mill, or a clack valve.
• Continual or importunate talk; prattle; prating.
Clacker
n.
• One who clacks; that which clacks; especially, the clapper of a mill.
• A claqueur.
Clad
v.t
• To clothe.
• imp. & p. p. of Clothe.
Cladocera
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of the Entomostraca.
Cladophyll
n.
(Bot.) A special branch, resembling a leaf, as in the apparent foliage of the broom (Ruscus) and of the common cultivated smilax (Myrsiphillum).
Claggy
a.
• Adhesive; — said of a roof in a mine to which coal clings.
Claim
v..
• To ask for, or seek to obtain, by virtue of authority, right, or supposed right; to challenge as a right; to demand as due.
• To proclaim.
• To call or name.
• To assert; to maintain.
v. i.
• To be entitled to anything; to deduce a right or title; to have a claim.
n.
• A demand of a right or supposed right; a calling on another for something due or supposed to be due; an assertion of a right or fact.
• A right to claim or demand something; a title to any debt, privilege, or other thing in possession of another; also, a title to anything which another should give or concede to, or confer on, the claimant.
• The thing claimed or demanded; that (as land) to which any one intends to establish a right; as a settler's claim; a miner's claim.
• A laoud call.
Claimable
a.
• Capable of being claimed.
Claimant
n.
• One who claims; one who asserts a right or title; a claimer.
Claimer
n.
• One who claims; a claimant.
Claimless
a.
• Having no claim.
Clairvoyance
n.
• A power, attributed to some persons while in a mesmeric state, of discering objects not perceptible by the senses in their normal condition.
Clairvoyant
a.
• Pertaining to clairvoyance; discerning objects while in a mesmeric state which are not present to the senses.
n.
• One who is able, when in a mesmeric state, to discern objects not present to the senses.
Clam
n.
(Zool.) A bivalve mollusk of many kinds, especially those that are edible; as, the long clam (Mya arenaria), the quahog or round clam (Venus mercenaria), the sea clam or hen clam (Spisula solidissima), and other species of the United States. The name is said to have been given originally to the Tridacna gigas, a huge East Indian bivalve.
(Ship Carp.) Strong pinchers or forceps.
(Mech.) A kind of vise, usually of wood.
v. t.
• To clog, as with glutinous or viscous matter.
v. i.
• To be moist or glutinous; to stick; to adhere.
n.
• Claminess; moisture.
n.
• A crash or clangor made by ringing all the bells of a chime at once.
v. t. & i.
• To produce, in bell ringing, a clam or clangor; to cause to clang.
Clamant
a.
• Crying earnestly, beseeching clamorousky.
Clamation
n.
• The act of crying out.
Clamatores
n. pl.
(Zool.) A division of passerine birds in which the vocal muscles are but little developed, so that they lack the power of singing.
Clamatorial
a.
(Zool.) Like or pertaining to the Clamatores.
Clambake
n.
• The backing or steaming of clams on heated stones, between layers of seaweed; hence, a picnic party, gathered on such an occasion.
Clamber
v. i.
• To climb with difficulty, or with hands and feet; — also used figuratively.
n.
• The act of clambering.
v. t.
• To ascend by climbing with difficulty.
Clamjamphrie
n.
• Low, worthless people; the rabble.
Clammily
adv.
• In a clammy manner.
Clamminess
n.
• State of being clammy or viscous.
Clammy
a.
• Having the quality of being viscous or adhesive; soft and sticky; glutinous; damp and adhesive, as if covered with a cold perspiration.
Clamor
n.
• A great outcry or vociferation; loud and continued shouting or exclamation.
• Any loud and continued noise.
• A continued expression of dissatisfaction or discontent; a popular outcry.
v. t.
• To salute loudly.
• To stun with noise.
• To utter loudly or repeatedly; to shout.
v. i.
• To utter loud sounds or outcries; to vociferate; to complain; to make importunate demands.
Clamorer
n.
• One who clamors.
Clamorous
a.
• Speaking and repeating loud words; full of clamor; calling or demanding loudly or urgently; vociferous; noisy; bawling; loud; turbulent.
Clamp
n.
• Something rigid that holds fast or binds things together; a piece of wood or metal, used to hold two or more pieces together.
• An instrument with a screw or screws by which work is held in its place or two parts are temporarily held together.
(Joinery) A piece of wood placed across another, or inserted into another, to bind or strengthen.
• One of a pair of movable pieces of lead, or other soft material, to cover the jaws of a vise and enable it to grasp without bruising.
(Shipbuilding) A thick plank on the inner part of a ship's side, used to sustuan the ends of beams.
• A mass of bricks heaped up to be burned; or of ore for roasting, or of coal coking.
• A mollusk.
v. t.
• To fasten with a clamp or clamps; to apply a clamp to; to place in a clamp.
• To cover, as vegetables, with earth.
n.
• A heavy footstep; a tramp.
v. i.
• To tread heavily or clumsily; to clump.
Clamper
n.
• An instrument of iron, with sharp prongs, attached to a boot or shoe to enable the wearer to walk securely upon ice; a creeper.
Clan
n.
• A tribe or collection of families, united under a chieftain, regarded as having the same common ancestor, and bearing the same surname; as, the clan of Macdonald.
• A clique; a sect, society, or body of persons; esp., a body of persons united by some common interest or pursuit; — sometimes used contemptuously.
Clancular
a.
• Conducted with secrecy; clandestine; concealed.
Clancularly
adv.
• privately; secretly.
Clandestine
a.
• Conducted with secrecy; withdrawn from public notice, usually for an evil purpose; kept secret; hidden; private; underhand; as, a clandestine marriage.
Clandestinity
n.
• Privacy or secrecy.
Clang
v. t.
• To strike together so as to produce a ringing metallic sound.
v. i.
• To give out a clang; to resound.
Clanging
n.
• A loud, ringing sound, like that made by metallic substances when clanged or struck together.
(Mus.) Qualyty of tone.
Clangor
n.
• A sharp, harsh, ringing sound.
Clangorous
a.
• Making a clangor; having a ringing, metallic sound.
Clangous
a.
• Making a clang, or a ringing metallic sound.
Clanjamfrie
n.
• Same as Clamjamphrie.
Clank
n.
• A sharp, brief, ringing sound, made by a collision of metallic or other sonorous bodies; — usually expressing a duller or less resounding sound than clang, and a deeper and stronger sound than clink.
v. t.
• To cause to sound with a clank; as, the prisoners clank their chains.
v. i.
• To sound with a clank.
Clankless
a.
• Without a clank.
Clannish
a.
• Of or pertaining to a clan; closely united, like a clan; disposed to associate only with one's clan or clique; actuated by the traditions, prejudices, habits, etc., of a clan.
Clanship
n.
• A state of being united togheter as in a clan; an association under a chieftain.
Clansman
n.
Clap
v. t.
• To strike; to slap; to strike, or strike together, with a quick motion, so, as to make a sharp noise; as, to clap one's hands; a clapping of wings.
• To thrust, drive, put, or close, in a hasty or abrupt manner; — often followed by to, into, on, or upon.
• To manifest approbation of, by striking the hands together; to applaud; as, to clap a performance.
• To express contempt or derision.
v. i.
• To knock, as at a door.
• To strike the hands together in applause.
• To come together suddenly with noise.
• To enter with alacrity and briskness; — with to or
• To talk noisily; to chatter loudly.
n.
• A loud noise made by sudden collision; a bang.
• A burst of sound; a sudden explosion.
• A single, sudden act or motion; a stroke; a blow.
• A striking of hands to express approbation.
• Noisy talk; chatter.
(Falconry) The nether part of the beak of a hawk.
n.
• Gonorrhea.
Clapboard
n.
• A narrow board, thicker at one edge than at the other; — used for weatherboarding the outside of houses.
• A stave for a cask.
v. t.
• To cover with clapboards; as, to clapboard the sides of a house.
Clape
n.
(Zool.) A bird; the flicker.
Clapper
n.
• A person who claps.
• That which strikes or claps, as the tongue of a bell, or the piece of wood that strikes a mill hopper, etc.
n.
• A rabbit burrow.
Clapperclaw
v. t.
• To fight and scratch.
• To abuse with the tongue; to revile; to scold.
Claps
v. t.
• Variant of Clasp
Claptrap
n.
• A contrivance for clapping in theaters.
• A trick or device to gain applause; humbug.
a.
• Contrived for the purpose of making a show, or gaining applause; deceptive; unreal.
Claque
n.
• A collection of persons employed to applaud at a theatrical exhibition.
Claqueur
n.
• One of the claque employed to applaud at a theater.
Clare
n.
• A nun of the order of St.Clare.
Clarence
n.
• A close four-wheeled carriage, with one seat inside, and a seat for the driver.
Clarendon
n.
• A style of type having a narrow and heave face. It is made in all sizes.
Claret
n.
• The name firat given in England to the red wines of Mdoc, in France, and afterwards extended to all the red Bordeaux wines. The name is also given to similar wines made in the United States.
Claribella
n.
(Mus.) A soft, sweet stop, or set of open wood pipes in an organ.
Clarichord
n.
• A musical instrument, formerly in use, in form of a spinet; — called also manichord and clavichord.
Clarification
n.
• The act or process of making clear or transparent, by freeing visible impurities; as, the clarification of wine.
• The act of freeing from obscurities.
Clarifier
n.
• That which clarifies.
• A vessel in which the process of clarification is conducted; as, the clarifier in sugar works.
Clarify
v. t.
• To make clear or bright by freeing from feculent matter; to defecate; to fine; — said of liquids, as wine or sirup.
• To make clear; to free from obscurities; to brighten or illuminate.
• To glorify.
v. i.
• To grow or become clear or transparent; to become free from feculent impurities, as wine or other liquid under clarification.
• To grow clear or bright; to clear up.
Clarigate
v. i.
• To declare war with certain ceremonies.
Clarinet
n.
(Mus.) A wind instrument, blown by a single reed, of richer and fuller tone than the oboe, which has a double reed. It is the leading instrument in a military band.
Clarino
n.
(Mus.) A reed stop in an organ.
Clarion
n.
• A kind of trumpet, whose note is clear and shrill.
Clarisonus
a.
• Having a clear sound.
Claritude
n.
• Clearness; splendor.
Clarity
n.
• Clearness; brightness; splendor.
Clarre
n.
• Wine with a mixture of honey and species.
Clart
v. t.
• To daub, smear, or spread, as with mud, etc.
Clarty
a.
• Sticky and foul; muddy; filthy; dirty.
Clary
v. i.
• To make a loud or shrill noise.
n.
(Bot.) A plant (Salvia sclarea) of the Sage family, used in flavoring soups.
Clash
v. i.
• To make a noise by striking against something; to dash noisily together.
• To meet in opposition; to act in a contrary direction; to come onto collision; to interfere.
v. t.
• To strike noisily against or together.
n.
• A loud noise resulting from collision; a noisy collision of bodies; a collision.
• Opposition; contradiction; as between differing or contending interests, views, purposes, etc.
Clashingly
adv.
• With clashing.
Clasp
v. t.
• To shut or fasten together with, or as with, a clasp; to shut or fasten (a clasp, or that which fastens with a clasp).
• To inclose and hold in the hand or with the arms; to grasp; to embrace.
• To surround and cling to; to entwine about.
n.
• An adjustable catch, bent plate, or hook, for holding together two objects or the parts of anything, as the ends of a belt, the covers of a book, etc.
• A close embrace; a throwing of the arms around; a grasping, as with the hand.
Clasper
n.
• One who, or that which, clasps, as a tendril.
(Zool.) One of a pair of organs used by the male for grasping the female among many of the Crustacea.
• One of a pair of male copulatory organs, developed on the anterior side of the ventral fins of sharks and other elasmobranchs.
Claspered
a.
• Furnished with tendrils.
Class
n.
• A group of individuals ranked together as possessing common characteristics; as, the different classes of society; the educated class; the lower classes.
• A number of students in a school or college, of the same standing, or pursuing the same studies.
• A comprehensive division of animate or inanimate objects, grouped together on account of their common characteristics, in any classification in natural science, and subdivided into orders, families, tribes, gemera, etc.
• A set; a kind or description, species or variety.
(Methodist Church) One of the sections into which a church or congregation is divided, and which is under the supervision of a class leader.
v. t.
• To arrange in classes; to classify or refer to some class; as, to class words or passages.
• To divide into classes, as students; to form into, or place in, a class or classes.
v. i.
• To grouped or classed.
Classible
a.
• Capable of being classed.
Classic
n.
• A work of acknowledged excellence and authrity, or its author; — originally used of Greek and Latin works or authors, but now applied to authors and works of a like character in any language.
• One learned in the literature of Greece and Rome, or a student of classical literature.
Classicalism
n.
• A classical idiom, style, or expression; a classicism.
• Adherence to what are supposed or assumed to be the classical canons of art.
Classicalist
n.
• One who adheres to what he thinks the classical canons of art.
Classically
adv.
• In a classical manner; according to the manner of classical authors.
• In the manner of classes; according to a regular order of classes or sets.
Classicism
n.
• A classic idiom or expression; a classicalism.
Classicist
n.
• One learned in the classics; an advocate for the classics.
Classifiable
a.
• Capable of being classified.
Classific
a.
• Characterizing a class or classes; relating to classification.
Classification
n.
• The act of forming into a class or classes; a distibution into groups, as classes, orders, families, etc., according to some common relations or affinities.
Classificatory
a.
• Pertaining to classification; admitting of classification.
Classifier
n.
• One who classifies.
Classify
v. t.
• To distribute into classes; to arrange according to a system; to arrnge in sets according to some method founded on common properties or characters.
Classis
n.
• A class or order; sort; kind.
(Eccl.) An ecclesiastical body or judicatry in certain churches, as the Reformed Dutch. It is intermediate between the consistory and the synod, and corresponds to the presbutery in the Presbuterian church.
Classman
n.
• A member of a class; a classmate.
• A candidate for graduation in arts who is placed in an honor class, as opposed to a passman, who is not classified.
Classmate
n.
• One who is in the same class with another, as at school or college.
Clastic
a.
• Pertaining to what may be taken apart; as, clastic anatomy (of models).
(Min.) Fragmental; made up of brok fragments; as, sandstone is a clastic rock.
Clathrate
a.
(Bot.) Shaped like a lattice; cancellate.
(Zool.) Having the surface marked with raised lines resembling a lattice, as many shells.
Clatter
v. i.
• To make a rattling sound by striking hard bodies together; to make a succession of abrupt, rattling sounds.
• To talk fast and noisily; to rattle with the tongue.
v. t.
• To make a rattling noise with.
n.
• A rattling noise, esp. that made by the collision of hard bodies; also, any loud, abrupt sound; a repetition of abrupt sounds.
• Commotion; disturbance. "Those mighty feats which made such a clatter in story."
• Rapid, noisy talk; babble; chatter.
Clatterer
n.
• One who clatters.
Clatteringly
adv.
• With clattering.
Claudent
a.
• Shutting; confining; drawing together; as, a claudent muscle.
Claudicant
a.
• Limping.
Claudication
n.
• A halting or limping.
Clause
n.
• A separate portion of a written paper, paragraph, or sentence; an article, stipulation, or proviso, in a legal document.
(Gram.) A subordinate portion or a subdivision of a sentence containing a subject and its predicate.
n.
Claustral
a.
• Cloistral.
Claustrum
n.
(Anat.) A thin lamina of gray matter in each cerebral hemiphere of the brain of man.
Clausular
a.
• Consisting of, or having, clauses.
Clausure
n.
• The act of shutting up or confining; confinement.
Clave
• imp. of Cleave.
Clavecin
n.
• The harpsichord.
Clavellated
a.
(Old Chem.) Said of potash, probably in reference to its having been obtained from billets of wood by burning.
Claver
n.
• Frivolous or nonsensical talk; prattle; chattering.
Clavichord
n.
(Mus.) A keyed stringed instrument, now superseded by the pianoforte.
Clavicle
n.
(Anat.) The collar bone, which is joined at one end to the scapula, or shoulder blade, and at the other to the sternum, or breastbone. In man each clavicle is shaped like the letter , and is situated just above the first rib on either side of the neck. In birds the two clavicles are united ventrally, forming the merrythought, or wishbone.
Clavicorn
a.
(Zool.) Having club-shaped antennae.
n.
• One of the Clavicornes.
Clavicornes
n. pl.
(Zool.) A group of beetles having club-shaped antennae.
Clavicular
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the clavicle.
Clavier
n.
(Mus.) The keyboard of an organ, pianoforte, or harmonium.
Claviform
a.
(Bot.) Club-shaped; clavate.
Claviger
n.
• One who carries the keys of any place.
n.
• One who carries a club; a club bearer.
Clavigerous
a.
• Bearing a club or a key.
Clavis
n.
• A key; a glossary.
Clavus
n.
• A callous growth, esp. one the foot; a corn.
Clavy
n.
(Arch.) A mantelpiece.
Claw
n.
• A sharp, hooked nail, as of a beast or bird.
• The whole foot of an animal armed with hooked nails; the pinchers of a lobster, crab, etc.
• Anything resembling the claw of an animal, as the curved and forked end of a hammer for drawing nails.
(Bot.) A slender appendage or process, formed like a claw, as the base of petals of the pink.
v. t.
• To pull, tear, or scratch with, or as with, claws or nails.
• To relieve from some uneasy sensation, as by scratching; to tickle; hence, to flatter; to court.
• To rail at; to scold.
v. i.
• To scrape, scratch, or dig with a claw, or with the hand as a claw.
Clawback
n.
• A flatterer or sycophant.
a.
• Flattering; sycophantic.
v. t.
• To flatter.
Clawed
a.
• Furnished with claws.
Clawless
a.
• Destitute of claws.
Clay
n.
• A soft earth, which is plastuc, or may be molded with the hands, consisting of hydrous silicate of alumunium. It is the result of the wearing down and decomposition, in part, of rocks containing aluminous minerals, as granite. Lime, magnesia, oxide of iron, and other ingredients, are often present as impurities.
(Poetry & Script.) Earth in general, as representing the elementary particles of the human body; hence, the human body as formed from such particles.
v. t.
• To cover or manure with clay.
• To clarify by filtering through clay, as sugar.
Clayes
n. pl.
(Fort.) Wattles, or hurdles, made with stakes interwoven with osiers, to cover lodgments.
Clayey
a.
• Consisting of clay; abounding with clay; partaking of clay; like clay.
Clayish
a.
• Partaking of the nature of clay, or containing particles of it.
Claymore
n.
• A large two-handed sword used formerly by the Scottish Highlanders.
Claytonia
n.
(Bot.) An American genus of perennial herbs with delicate blossoms; — sometimes called spring beauty.
Cleading
n.
• A jacket or outer covering of wood, etc., to prevent radiation of heat, as from the boiler, cylinder. etc., of a steam engine.
• The planking or boarding of a shaft, cofferdam, etc.
Clean
a.
• Free from dirt or filth; as, clean clothes.
• Free from that which is useless or injurious; without defects; as, clean land; clean timber.
• Free from awkwardness; not bungling; adroit; dexterous; as, aclean trick; a clean leap over a fence.
• Free from errors and vulgarisms; as, a clean style.
• Free from restraint or neglect; complete; entire.
• Free from moral defilement; sinless; pure.
(Script.) Free from ceremonial defilement.
• Free from that which is corrupting to the morals; pure in tone; healthy.
• Well-proportioned; shapely; as, clean limbs.
adv.
• Without limitation or remainder; quite; perfectly; wholly; entirely.
• Without miscarriage; not bunglingly; dexterously.
v. t.
• To render clean; to free from whatever is foul, offensive, or extraneous; to purify; to cleanse.
Cleaner
n.
• One who, or that which, cleans.
Cleaning
n.
• The act of making clean.
• The afterbirth of cows, ewes, etc.
Cleanlily
adv.
• In a cleanly manner.
Cleanliness
n.
• State of being cleanly; neatness of person or dress.
Cleanly
a.
• Habitually clean; pure; innocent.
• Cleansing; fitted to remove moisture; dirt, etc.
• Adroit; skillful; dexterous; artful.
adv.
• In a clean manner; neatly.
• Innocently; without stain.
• Adroitly; dexterously.
Cleanness
n.
• The state or quality of being clean.
• Purity of life or language; freedom from licentious courses.
Cleansable
a.
• Capable of being cleansed.
Cleanse
v. t.
• To render clean; to free from fith, pollution, infection, guilt, etc.; to clean.
Cleanser
n.
• One who, or that which, cleanses; a detergent.
Clear
a.
• Free from opaqueness; transparent; bright; light; luminous; unclouded.
• Free from ambiquity or indistinctness; lucid; perspicuous; plain; evident; manifest; indubitable.
• Able to perceive clearly; keen; acute; penetrating; discriminating; as, a clear intellect; a clear head.
• Not clouded with passion; serene; cheerful.
• Easily or distinctly heard; audible; canorous.
• Without mixture; entirely pure; as, clear sand.
• Without defect or blemish, such as freckles or knots; as, a clear complexion; clear lumber.
• Free from guilt or stain; unblemished.
• Without diminution; in full; net; as, clear profit.
• Free from impediment or obstruction; unobstructed; as, a clear view; to keep clear of debt.
• Free from embarrassment; detention, etc.
n.
(Carp.) Full extent; distance between extreme limits; especially; the distance between the nearest surfaces of two bodies, or the space between walls; as, a room ten feet square in the clear.
adv.
• In a clear manner; plainly.
• Without limitation; wholly; quite; entirely; as, to cut a piece clear off.
v. t.
• To render bright, transparent, or undimmed; to free from clouds.
• To free from impurities; to clarify; to cleanse.
• To free from obscurity or ambiguity; to relive of perplexity; to make perspicuous.
• To render more quick or acute, as the understanding; to make perspicacious.
• To free from impediment or incumbrance, from defilement, or from anything injurious, useless, or offensive; as, to clear land of trees or brushwood, or from stones; to clear the sight or the voice; to clear one's self from debt; — often used with of, off, away, or out.
• To free from the imputation of guilt; to justify, vindicate, or acquit; — often used with from before the thing imputed.
• To leap or pass by, or over, without touching or fallure; as, to clear a hedge; to clear a reef.
• To gain without deduction; to net.
v. i.
• To become free from clouds or fog; to become fair; — often fallowed by up, off, or away.
• To disengage one's self frpm incumbrances, distress, or entanglements; to become free.
Clearage
n.
• The act of reforming anything; clearance.
Clearance
n.
• The act of clearing; as, to make a through clearance.
• A certificate that a ship or vessel has been cleared at the customhouse; permission to sail.
• Clear or net profit.
(Mach.) The distance by which one object clears another, as the distance between the piston and cylinder head at the end of a stroke in a steam engine, or the least distance between the point of a cogwell tooth and the bottom of a space between teeth of a wheel with which it engages.
Clearedness
n.
• The quality of being cleared.
Clearer
n.
• One who, or that which, clears.
(Naut.) A tool of which the hemp for lines and twines, used by sailmakers, is finished.
Clearing
n.
• The act or process of making clear.
• A tract of land cleared of wood for cultivation.
• A method adopted by banks and bankers for making an exchange of checks held by each against the others, and settling differences of accounts.
• The gross amount of the balances adjusted in the clearing house.
Clearly
adv.
• In a clear manner.
Clearness
n.
• The quality or state of being clear.
Clearstarch
v. t.
• To stiffen with starch, and then make clear by clapping with the hands; as, to clearstarch muslin.
Clearstarcher
n.
• One who clearstarches.
Clearwing
n.
(Zool.) A lepidop terous insect with partially transparent wings, of the family Ageriadae, of which the currant and peach-tree borers are examples.
Cleat
n.
(Carp.) A strip of wood or iron fastened on transversely to something in order to give strength, prevent warping, hold position, etc.
(Naut.) A device made of wood or metal, having two arms, around which turns may be taken with a line or rope so as to hold securely and yet be readily released. It is bolted by the middle to a deck or mast, etc., or it may be lashed to a rope.
v. t.
• To strengthen with a cleat.
Cleavable
a.
• Capable of cleaving or being divided.
Cleavage
n.
• The act of cleaving or splitting.
(Crystallog.) The quality possessed by many crystallized substances of splitting readily in one or more definite directions, in which the cohesive attraction is a minimum, affording more or less smooth surfaces; the direction of the dividing plane; a fragment obtained by cleaving, as of a diamond.
(Geol.) Division into laminae, like slate, with the lamination not necessarily parallel to the plane of deposition; — usually produced by pressure.
Cleave
v. i.
p. p.
p. pr. & vb. n.
• To adhere closely; to stick; to hold fast; to cling. 2. To unite or be united closely in interest or affection; to adhere with strong attachment.
• To fit; to be adapted; to assimilate.
Cleave
v. t.
• To part or divide by force; to split or rive; to cut.
• To pert or open naturally; to divide.
v. i.
• To part; to open; to crack; to separate; as parts of bodies; as, the ground cleaves by frost.
Cleavelandite
n.
(Min.) A variety of albite, white and lamellar in structure.
Cleaver
n.
• One who cleaves, or that which cleaves; especially, a butcher's instrument for cutting animal bodies into joints or pieces.
Cleavers
n.
(Bot.) A species of Galium (G. Aparine), having a fruit set with hooked bristles, which adhere to whatever they come in contact with; — called also, goose grass, catchweed, etc.
Cleche
a.
(Her.) Charged with another bearing of the same figure, and of the color of the field, so large that only a narrow border of the first bearing remains visible; — said of any heraldic bearing. Compare Voided.
Cledge
n.
(Mining.) The upper stratum of fuller's earth.
Cledgy
a.
• Stiff, stubborn, clayey, or tenacious; as, a cledgy soil.
Clee
n.
• A claw.
n.
(Zool.) The redshank.
Clef
n.
(Mus.) A character used in musical notation to determine the position and pitch of the scale as represented on the staff.
Cleft
imp. & p. p.
• from Cleave.
a.
• Divided; split; partly divided or split.
(Bot.) Incised nearly to the midrob; as, a cleft leaf.
n.
• A space or opening made by splitting; a crack; a crevice; as, the cleft of a rock.
• A piece made by splitting; as, a cleft of wood.
(Far.) A disease in horses; a crack on the band of the pastern.
Cleftgraft
v. t.
• To ingraft by cleaving the stock and inserting a scion.
Cleg
n.
(Zool.) A small breeze or horsefly.
Clem
v. t. & i.
• To starve; to famish.
Clematis
n.
(Bot.) A genus of flowering plants, of many species, mostly climbers, having feathery styles, which greatly enlarge in the fruit; — called also virgin's bower.
Clemence
n.
• Clemency.
Clemency
n.
• Disposition to forgive and spare, as offenders; mildness of temper; gentleness; tenderness; mercy.
• Mildness or softness of the elements; as, the clemency of the season.
Clement
a.
• Mild in temper and disposition; merciful; compassionate.
Clementine
a.
• Of or pertaining to Clement, esp. to St.Clement of Rome and the spurious homilies attributed to him, or to Pope Clement V. and his compilations of canon law.
Clepe
v. t.
• To call, or name.
v. i.
• To make appeal; to cry out.
Clepsine
n.
(Zool.) A genus of freshwater leeches, furnished with a proboscis. They feed upon mollusks and worms.
Clepsydra
n.
• A water clock; a contrivance for measuring time by the graduated flow of a liquid, as of water, through a small aperture.
Clerestory
n.
• Same as Clearstory.
Clergeon
n.
• A chorister boy.
Clergial
a.
• Learned; erudite; clercial.
Clergical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the clergy; clerical; clerkily; learned.
Clergy
n.
• The body of men set apart, by due ordination, to the service of God, in the Christian church, in distinction from the laity; in England, usually restricted to the ministers of the Established Church.
• Learning; also, a learned profession.
• The privilege or benefit of clergy.
Clergyable
a.
• Entitled to, or admitting, the benefit of clergy; as, a clergyable felony.
Clergyman
n.
• An ordained minister; a man regularly authorized to peach the gospel, and administer its ordinances; in England usually restricted to a minister of the Established Church.
Cleric
n.
• A clerk, a clergyman.
a.
• Same as Clerical.
Clerical
a.
• Of or pertaining to the clergy; suitable for the clergy.
• Of or relating to a clerk or copyist, or to writing.
Clericalism
n.
• An excessive devotion to the interests of the sacerdotal order; undue influence of the clergy; sacerdotalism.
Clericity
n.
• The state of being a clergyman.
Clerisy
n.
• The literati, or well educated class.
• The clergy, or their opinions, as opposed to the laity.
Clerk
n.
• A clergyman or ecclesiastic.
• A man who could read; a scholar; a learned person; a man of letters.
• A parish officer, being a layman who leads in reading the responses of the Episcopal church service, and otherwise assists in it.
• One employed to keep records or accounts; a scribe; an accountant; as, the clerk of a court; a town clerk.
• An assistant in a shop or store.
Clerkless
a.
• Unlearned.
Clerklike
a.
• Scholarlike.
Clerkliness
n.
• Scholarship.
Clerkly
a.
• Of or pertaining to a clerk.
adv.
• In a scholarly manner.
Clerkship
n.
• State, quality, or business of a clerk.
Cleromancy
n.
• A divination by throwing dice or casting lots.
Cleronomy
n.
• Inheritance; heritage.
Clever
a.
• Possessing quickness of intellect, skill, dexterity, talent, or adroitness; expert.
• Showing skill or adroitness in the doer or former; as, a clever speech; a clever trick.
• Having fitness, propriety, or suitableness.
• Well-shaped; handsome.
• Good-natured; obliging.
Cleverish
a.
• Somewhat clever.
Cleverly
adv.
• In a clever manner.
Cleverness
n.
• The quality of being clever; skill; dexterity; adroitness.
Clevis
n.
• A piece of metal bent in the form of an oxbow, with the two ends perforated to receive a pin, used on the end of the tongue of a plow, wagen, etc., to attach it to a draft chain, whiffletree, etc.; — called also clavel, clevy.
Clew
v. t.
• To direct; to guide, as by a thread.
(Naut.) To move of draw (a sail or yard) by means of the clew garnets, clew lines, etc.; esp. to draw up the clews of a square sail to the yard.
Cliche
n.
• A stereotype plate or any similar reproduction of ornament, or lettering, in relief.
Click
v. i.
• To make a slight, sharp noise (or a succession of such noises), as by gentle striking; to tick.
v. t.
• To more with the sound of a click.
• To cause to make a clicking noise, as by striking together, or against something.
n.
• A slight sharp noise, such as is made by the cocking of a pistol.
• A kind of articulation used by the natives of Southern Africa, consisting in a sudden withdrawal of the end or some other portion of the tongue from a part of the mouth with which it is in contact, whereby a sharp, clicking sound is produced. The sounds are four in number, and are called cerebral, palatal, dental, and lateral clicks or clucks, the latter being the noise ordinarily used in urging a horse forward.
v. t.
• To snatch.
n.
• A detent, pawl, or ratchet, as that which catches the cogs of a ratchet wheel to prevent backward motion.
• The latch of a door.
Clicker
n.
• One who stands before a shop door to invite people to buy.
(Print.) One who as has charge of the work of a companionship.
Clicket
n.
• The knocker of a door.
• A latch key.
Clicky
a.
• Resembling a click; abounding in clicks.
Clidastes
n.
(Paleon.) A genus of exinct marine reptiles, allied to the Mosasaurus.
Cliency
n.
• State of being a client.
Client
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A citizen who put himself under the protection of a man of distinction and influence, who was called his patron.
• A dependent; one under the protection of another.
(Law) One who consults a legal adviser, or submits his cause to his management.
Clientage
n.
• State of being client.
• A body of clients.
Cliental
a.
• Of or pertaining to a client.
Cliented
a.
• Supplied with clients.
Clientele
n.
• The condition or position of a client; clientship
• The clients or dependents of a nobleman of patron.
• The persons who make habitual use of the services of another person; one's clients, collectively; as, the clientele of a lawyer, doctor, notary, etc.
Clientship
n.
• Condition of a client; state of being under the protection of a patron.
Cliff
n.
• A high, steep rock; a precipice.
Cliffy
a.
• Having cliffs; broken; craggy.
Clift
n.
• A cliff.
n.
• A cleft of crack; a narrow opening.
• The fork of the legs; the crotch.
Clifted
a.
• Broken; fissured.
Climacteric
a.
• Relating to a climacteric; critical.
n.
• A period in human life in which some great change is supposed to take place in the constitution. The critical periods are thought by some to be the years produced by multiplying 7 into the odd numbers 3, 5, 7, and 9; to which others add the 81st year.
• Any critical period.
Climatal
a.
• Climatic.
Climatarchic
a.
• Presiding over, or regulating, climates.
Climate
n.
(Anc. Geog.) One of thirty regions or zones, parallel to the equator, into which the surface of the earth from the equator to the pole was divided, according to the successive increase of the length of the midsummer day.
• The condition of a place in relation to various phenomena of the atmosphere, as temperature, moisture, etc., especially as they affect animal or vegetable life.
v. i.
• To dwell.
Climatic
a.
• Of or pertaining to a climate; depending on, or limited by, a climate.
Climatical
a.
• Climatic.
Climatize
v. t. & i.
• To acclimate or become acclimated.
Climatography
n.
• A description of climates.
Climatological
a.
• Of or pertaining to climatology.
Climatologist
n.
• One versed in, or who studies, climatology.
Climatology
n.
• The science which treats of climates and investigates their phenomena and causes.
Climature
n.
• A climate.
Climax
n.
• Upward movement; steady increase; gradation; ascent.
(Rhet.) A figure of which the parts of a sentence or paragraph are so arranged that each sicceeding one rise above its predecessor in impressiveness.
• The highest point; the greatest degree.
Climb
v. i.
• To ascend or mount laboriously, esp. by use of the hands and feet.
• To ascend as if with effort; to rise to a higher point.
(Bot.) To ascend or creep upward by twining about a support, or by attaching itself by tendrills, rootlets, etc., to a support or upright surface.
v. t.
• To ascend, as by means of the hands and feet, or laboriously or slowly; to mount.
n.
• The act of one who climbs; ascent by climbing.
Climbable
a.
• Capable of being climbed.
Climber
n.
• One who, or that which, climbs
(Bot.) A plant that climbs.
(Zool.) A bird that climbs, as a woodpecker or a parrot.
v. i.
• To climb; to mount with effort; to clamber.
Climbing
• p. pr. & vb. n. of Climb.
Clime
n.
• A climate; a tract or region of the earth.
Clinanthium
n.
(Bot.) The receptacle of the flowers in a composite plant; — also called clinium.
Clinch
v. t.
• To hold firmly; to hold fast by grasping or embracing tightly.
• To set closely together; to close tightly; as, to clinch the teeth or the first.
• The bend or turn over the point of (something that has been driven trough an object), so that it will hold fast; as, to clinch a nail.
• To make conclusive; to confirm; to establish; as, to clinch an argument.
v. i.
• To hold fast; to grasp something firmly; to seize or grasp one another.
n.
• The act or process of holding fast; that which serves to hold fast; a grip; a grasp; a clamp; a holdfast; as, to get a good clinch of an antagonist, or of a weapon; to secure anything by a clinch.
• A pun.
(Naut.) A hitch or bend by which a rope is made fast to the ring of an anchor, or the breeching of a ship's gun to the ringbolts.
Clincher
n.
• One who, or that which, clinches; that which holds fast.
• That which ends a dispute or controversy; a decisive argument.
Cling
v. i.
• To adhere closely; to stick; to hold fast, especially by twining round or embracing; as, the tendril of a vine clings to its support; — usually followed by to or together.
v. t.
• To cause to adhere to, especially by twining round or embraching.
• To make to dry up or wither.
n.
• Adherence; attachment; devotion.
Clingstone
a.
• Having the flesh attached closely to the stone, as in some kinds of peaches.
n.
• A fruit, as a peach, whose flesh adheres to the stone.
Clingy
a.
• Apt to cling; adhesive.
Clinic
n.
• One confined to the bed by sickness.
(Eccl.) One who receives baptism on a sick bed.
(Med.) A school, or a session of a school or class, in which medicine or surgery is taught by the examination and treatment of patients in the presence of the pupils.
Clinically
adv.
• In a clinical manner.
Clinique
n.
(Med.) A clinic.
Clink
v. t.
• To cause to give out a slight, sharp, tinkling, sound, as by striking metallic or other sonorous bodies together.
v. i.
• To give out a slight, sharp, thinkling sound.
• To rhyme. .
n.
• A slight, sharp, tinkling sound, made by the collision of sonorous bodies.
Clinker
n.
• A mass composed of several bricks run together by the action of the fire in the kiln.
• Scoria or vitrified incombustible matter, formed in a grate or furnace where anthracite coal in used; vitrified or burnt matter ejected from a volcano; slag.
• A scale of oxide of iron, formed in forging.
• A kind of brick.
Clinkstone
n.
(Min.) An igneous rock of feldspathic composition, lamellar in structure, and clinking under the hammer.
Clinodiagonal
n.
(Crystallog.) That diagonal or lateral axis in a monoclinic crystal which makes an oblique angle witch the vertical axis.
a.
• Pertaining to, or the direction of, the clinidiagonal.
Clinographic
a.
• Pertaining to that mode of projection in drawing in which the rays of light are supposed to fall obliquely on the plane of projection.
Clinoid
a.
(Anat.) Like a bed; — applied to several processes on the inner side of the sphenoid bone.
Clinometer
n.
(Geol.) An instrument for determining the dip of beds or strata, pr the slope of an embankment or cutting; a kind of plumb level.
Clinometric
a.
• Pertaining to, or ascertained by, the clinometer.
• Pertaining to the oblique crystalline forms, or to solids which have oblique angles between the axes; as, the clinometric systems.
Clinometry
n.
(geol.) That art or operation of measuring the inclination of strata.
Clinopinacoid
n.
(Crystallog.) The plane in crystals of the monoclinic system which is parallel to the vertical and the inclined lateral (clinidiagonal) axes.
Clinorhombic
a.
(Crystallog.) Possessing the qualities of a prism, obliquely inclined to a rhombic base; monoclinic.
Clinquant
a.
• Glittering; dressed in, or overlaid with, tinsel finery.
n.
• Tinse;l; Dutch gold.
Clio
n.
(Class. Myth.) The Muse who presided over history.
Clione
n.
• A genus of naked pteropods. One species (Clione papilonacea), abundant in the Arctic Ocean, constitutes a part of the food of the Greenland whale. It is sometimes incorrectly called Clio.
Clip
v. t.
• To embrace, hence; to encompass.
• To cut off; as with shears or scissors; as, to clip the hair; to clip coin.
• To curtail; to cut short.
v. i.
• To move swiftly; — usually with indefinite it.
n.
• An embrace.
• A cutting; a shearing.
• The product of a single shearing of sheep; a season's crop of wool.
• A clasp or holder for letters, papers, etc.
• An embracing strap for holding parts together; the iron strap, with loop, at the ends of a whiffletree.
(Far.) A projecting flange on the upper edge of a horseshoe, turned up so as to embrace the lower part of the hoof; — called also toe clip and beak.
• A blow or stroke with the hand; as, he hit him a clip.
Clipper
n.
• One who clips; specifically, one who clips off the edges of coin.
• A machine for clipping hair, esp. the hair of horses.
(Naut.) A vessel with a sharp bow, built and rigged for fast sailing.
Clipping
n.
• The act of embracing.
• The act of cutting off, curtailing, or diminishing; the practice of clipping the edges of coins.
• That which is clipped off or out of something; a piece separated by clipping; as, newspaper clippings.
Clique
n.
• A narrow circle of persons associated by common interests or for the accomplishment of a common purpose; — generally used in a bad sense.
v. i.
• To To associate together in a clannish way; to act with others secretly to gain a desired end; to plot; — used with together.
Cliquish
a.
• Of or pertaining to a clique; disposed to from cliques; exclusive in spirit.
Cliquism
n.
• The tendency to associate in cliques; the spirit of cliques.
Clitellus
n.
(Zool.) A thickened glandular portion of the body of the adult earthworm, consisting of several united segments modified for reproductive purposes.
Clitoris
n.
(Anat.) A small organ at the upper part of the vulva, homologous to the penis in the male.
Clivity
n.
• Inclination; ascent or descent; a gradient.
Cloaca
n.
• A sewer; as, the Cloaca Maxima of Rome.
• A privy.
(Anat.) The common chamber into which the intestinal, urinary, and generative canals discharge in birds, reptiles, amphibians, and many fishes.
Cloacal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cloaca.
Cloak
n.
• A loose outer garment, extending from the neck downwards, and commonly without sleeves. It is longer than a cape, and is worn both by men and by women.
• That which conceals; a disguise or pretext; an excuse; a fair pretense; a mask; a cover.
v. t.
• To cover with, or as with, a cloak; hence, to hide or conceal.
Cloakedly
adv.
• In a concealed manner.
Cloaking
n.
• The act of covering with a cloak; the act of concealing anything.
• The material of which of which cloaks are made.
Cloakroom
n.
• A room, attached to any place of public resort, where cloaks, overcoats, etc., may be deposited for a time.
Clock
n.
• A machine for measuring time, indicating the hour and other divisions by means of hands moving on a dial plate. Its works are moved by a weight or a spring, and it is often so constructed as to tell the hour by the stroke of a hammer on a bell. It is not adapted, like the watch, to be carried on the person.
• A watcg, esp. one that strikes.
• The striking of a clock.
• A figure or figured work on the ankle or side of a stocking.
v. t.
• To ornament with figured work, as the side of a stocking.
v. t. & i.
• To call, as a hen.
n.
(Zool.) A large beetle, esp. the European dung beetle (Scarabaeus stercorarius).
Clocklike
a.
• Like a clock or like clockwork; mechanical.
Clockwork
n.
• The machinery of a clock, or machinary resembling that of a clock; machinery which produced regularity of movement.
Clod
n.
• A lump or mass, especially of earth, turf, or clay.
• The ground; the earth; a spot of earth or turf.
• That which is earthy and of little relative value, as the body of man in comparison with the soul.
• A dull, gross, stupid fellow; a dolt
• A pert of the shoulder of a beef creature, or of the neck piece near the shoulder.
v.i
• To collect into clods, or into a thick mass; to coagulate; to clot; as, clodded gore.
v. t.
• To pelt with clods.
• To throw violently; to hurl.
Cloddish
a.
• Resembling clods; gross; low; stupid; boorish.
Cloddy
a.
• Consisting of clods; full of clods.
Clodhopper
n.
• A rude, rustic fellow.
Clodhopping
a.
• Boorish; rude.
Clodpate
n.
• A blockhead; a dolt.
Clodpated
a.
• Stupid; dull; doltish.
Clodpoll
n.
• A stupid fellow; a dolt.
Cloff
n.
• Formerly an allowance of two pounds in every three hundred weight after the tare and tret are subtracted; now used only in a general sense, of small deductions from the original weight.
Clog
n.
• That which hinders or impedes motion; hence, an encumbrance, restraint, or impediment, of any kind.
• A weight, as a log or block of wood, attached to a man or an animal to hinder motion.
• A shoe, or sandal, intended to protect the feet from wet, or to increase the apparent stature, and having, therefore, a very thick sole. Cf. Chopine.
v. t.
• To encumber or load, especially with something that impedes motion; to hamper.
• To obstruct so as to hinder motion in or through; to choke up; as, to clog a tube or a channel.
• To burden; to trammel; to embarrass; to perplex.
v. i.
• To become clogged; to become loaded or encumbered, as with extraneous matter.
• To coalesce or adhere; to unite in a mass.
Clogginess
n.
• The state of being clogged.
Clogging
n.
• Anything which clogs.
Cloggy
a.
• Clogging, or having power to clog.
Cloisonne
a.
• Inlaid between partitions: — said of enamel when the lines which divide the different patches of fields are composed of a kind of metal wire secured to the ground; as distinguished from champleve enamel, in which the ground is engraved or scooped out to receive the enamel.
Cloister
n.
• An inclosed place.
• A covered passage or ambulatory on one side of a court; (pl.) the series of such passages on the different sides of any court, esp. that of a monastery or a college.
• A monastic establishment; a place for retirement from the world for religious duties.
v. t.
• To confine in, or as in, a cloister; to seclude from the world; to immure.
Cloisteral
a.
• Cloistral.
Cloistered
a.
• Dwelling in cloisters; solitary.
• Furnished with cloisters.
Cloisterer
n.
• One belonging to, or living in, a cloister; a recluse.
Cloistral
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or confined in, a cloister; recluse.
Cloistress
n.
• A nun.
Clong
• imp. of Cling.
Clonic
a.
(Med.) Having an irregular, convulsive motion.
Cloom
v. t.
• To close with glutinous matter.
Cloop
n.
• The sound made when a cork is forcibly drawn from a bottle.
Close
v. t.
• To stop, or fill up, as an opening; to shut; as, to close the eyes; to close a door.
• To bring together the parts of; to consolidate; as, to close the ranks of an army; — often used with up.
• To bring to an end or period; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to end; to consummate; as, to close a bargain; to close a course of instruction.
• To come or gather around; to inclose; to encompass; to confine.
v. i.
• To come together; to unite or coalesce, as the parts of a wound, or parts separated.
• To end, terminate, or come to a period; as, the debate closed at six o'clock.
• To grapple; to engange in hand-to-hand fight.
n.
• The manner of shutting; the union of parts; junction.
• Conclusion; cessation; ending; end.
• A grapple in wrestling.
(Mus.) The conclusion of a strain of music; cadence.
• A double bar marking the end.
n.
• An inclosed place; especially, a small field or piece of land surrounded by a wall, hedge, or fence of any kind; — specifically, the precinct of a cathedral or abbey.
• A narrow passage leading from a street to a court, and the houses within.
(Law) The interest which one may have in a piece of ground, even though it is not inclosed.
a.
• Shut fast; closed; tight; as, a close box.
• Narrow; confined; as, a close alley; close quarters.
• Oppressive; without motion or ventilation; causing a feeling of lassitude; — said of the air, weather, etc.
• Strictly confined; carefully quarded; as, a close prisoner.
• Out of the way observation; secluded; secret; hidden.
• Disposed to keep secrets; secretive; reticent.
• Having the parts near each other; dense; solid; compact; as applied to bodies; viscous; tenacious; not volatile, as applied to liquids.
• Concise; to the point; as, close reasoning.
• Adjoining; near; either in space; time, or thought; — often followed by to.
• Short; as, to cut grass or hair close.
• Intimate; familiar; confidential.
• Nearly equal; almost evenly balanced; as, a close vote.
• Difficult to obtain; as, money is close.
• Parsimonious; stingy.
• Adhering strictly to a standard or original; exact; strict; as, a close translation.
• Accurate; careful; precise; also, attentive; undeviating; strict; not wandering; as, a close observer.
(Phon.) Uttered with a relatively contracted opening of the mouth, as certain sounds of e and o in French, Italian, and German; — opposed to open.
adv.
• In a close manner.
• Secretly; darkly.
Closefisted
a.
• Covetous; niggardly.
Closehanded
a.
• Covetous; penurious; stingy; closefisted.
Closehauled
a.
(Naut.) Under way and moving as nearly as possible toward the direction from which the wind blows; — said of a sailing vessel.
Closely
adv.
• In a close manner.
• Secretly; privately.
Closemouthed
a.
• Cautious in speaking; secret; wary; uncommunicative.
Closen
v. t.
• To make close.
Closeness
n.
• The state of being close.
Closer
n.
• One who, or that which, closes; specifically, a boot closer.
• A finisher; that which finishes or terminates.
(Masonry) The last stone in a horizontal course, if of a less size than the others, or a piece of brick finishing a course.
Closereefed
a.
(Naut.) Having all the reefs taken in; — said of a sail.
Closet
n.
• A small room or apartment for retirement; a room for privacy.
• A small apartment, or recess in the side of a room, for household utensils, clothing, etc.
v. t.
• To shut up in, or as in, a closet; to conceal.
• To make into a closet for a secret interview.
Closh
n.
• A disease in the feet of cattle; laminitis.
n.
• The game of ninepins.
Closure
n.
• The act of shutting; a closing; as, the closure of a chink.
• That which closes or shuts; that by which separate parts are fastened or closed.
• That which incloses or confines; an inclosure.
• A conclusion; an end.
(Parliamentary Practice) A method of putting an end to debate and securing an immediate vote upon a measure before a legislative body. It is similar in effect to the previous question. It was first introduced into the British House of Commons in 1882. The French word cloture was originally applied to this proceeding.
Clot
n.
• A concretion or coagulation; esp. a soft, slimy, coagulated mass, as of blood; a coagulum.
v. i.
• To concrete, coagulate, or thicken, as soft or fluid matter by evaporation; to become a cot or clod.
v. t.
• To form into a slimy mass.
Clotbur
n.
• The burdock.
• Same as Cocklebur.
Clote
n.
• The common burdock; the clotbur.
Cloth
n.
• A fabric made of fibrous material (or sometimes of wire, as in wire cloth); commonly, a woven fabric of cotton, woolen, or linen, adapted to be made into garments; specifically, woolen fabrics, as distinguished from all others.
• The dress; raiment.
• The distinctive dress of any profession, especially of the clergy; hence, the clerical profession.
Clothe
v. t.
• To put garments on; to cover with clothing; to dress.
• To provide with clothes; as, to feed and clothe a family; to clothe one's self extravagantly.
• Fig.: To cover or invest, as with a garment; as, to clothe one with authority or power.
v. i.
• To wear clothes.
Clothes
n. pl.
• Covering for the human body; dress; vestments; vesture; — a general term for whatever covering is worn, or is made to be worn, for decency or comfort.
• The covering of a bed; bedclothes.
Clotheshorse
n.
• A frame to hang clothes on.
Clothesline
n.
• A rope or wire on which clothes are hung to dry.
Clothespin
n.
• A forked piece of wood, or a small spring clamp, used for fastening clothes on a line.
Clothespress
n.
• A receptacle for clothes.
Clothier
n.
• One who makes cloths; one who dresses or fulls cloth.
• One who sells cloth or clothes, or who makes and sells clothes.
Clothing
n.
• Garments in general; clothes; dress; raiment; covering.
• The art of process of making cloth.
• A covering of non-conducting material on the outside of a boiler, or steam chamber, to prevent radiation of heat.
Clothred
p. p.
• Clottered. Chaucer.
Clotted
a.
• Composed of clots or clods; having the quality or form of a clot; sticky; slimy; foul.
Clotter
v. i.
• To concrete into lumps; to clot.
Clotty
a.
• Full of clots, or clods.
Clotweed
n.
• Cocklebur.
Cloud
n.
• A collection of visible vapor, or watery particles, susponded in the upper atmosphere.
• A mass or volume of smoke, or flying dust, resembling vapor.
• A dark vein or spot on a lighter material, as in marble; hence, a blemish or defect; as, a cloud upon one's reputation; a cloud on a title.
• That which has a dark, lowering, or threatening aspect; that which temporarily overshadows, obscures, or depresses; as, a cloud of sorrow; a cloud of war; a cloud upon the intellect.
• A great crowd or multitude; a vast collection.
• A large, loosely-knitted scarf, worn by women about the head.
v. t.
• To overspread or hide with a cloud or clouds; as, the sky is clouded.
• To darken or obscure, as if by hiding or enveloping with a cloud; hence, to render gloomy or sullen.
• To blacken; to sully; to stain; to tarnish; to damage; — esp. used of reputation or character.
• To mark with, or darken in, veins or sports; to variegate with colors; as, to cloud yarn.
v. i.
• To grow cloudy; to become obscure with clouds; — often used with up.
Cloudberry
n.
(Bot.) A species of raspberry (Rubus Chamaemerous) growing in the northern regions, and bearing edible, amber-colored fruit.
Cloudily
adv.
• In a cloudy manner; darkly; obscurely.
Cloudiness
n.
• The state of being cloudy.
Clouding
n.
• A mottled appearance given to ribbons and silks in the process of dyeing.
• A diversity of colors in yarn, recurring at regular intervals.
Cloudland
n.
• Dreamland.
Cloudless
a.
• Without a cloud; clear; bright.
Cloudlet
n.
• A little cloud.
Cloudy
a.
• Overcast or obscured with clouds; clouded; as, a cloudy sky.
• Consisting of a cloud or clouds.
• Indicating gloom, anxiety, sullenness, or ill-nature; not open or cheerful.
• Confused; indistinct; obscure; dark.
• Lacking clearness, brightness, or luster.
• Marked with veins or sports of dark or various hues, as marble.
Clough
n.
• A cleft in a hill; a ravine; a narrow valley.
• A sluice used in returning water to a channel after depositing its sediment on the flooded land.
n.
(Com.) An allowance in weighing.
Clout
n.
• A cloth; a piece of cloth or leather; a patch; a rag.
• A swadding cloth.
• A piece; a fragment.
• The center of the butt at which archers shoot; — probably once a piece of white cloth or a nail head.
• An iron plate on an axletree or other wood to keep it from wearing; a washer.
• A blow with the hand.
v. t.
• To cover with cloth, leather, or other material; to bandage; patch, or mend, with a clout.
• To join or patch clumsily.
• To quard with an iron plate, as an axletree.
• To give a blow to; to strike.
• To stud with nails, as a timber, or a boot sole.
Clouterly
a.
• Clumsy; awkward.
Clove
• imp. of Cleave. Cleft.
n.
• A cleft; a gap; a ravine; — rarely used except as part of a proper name; as, Kaaterskill Clove; Stone Clove.
n.
• A very pungent aromatic spice, the unexpanded flower bud of the clove tree (Eugenia, or Caryophullus, aromatica), a native of the Molucca Isles.
n.
(Bot.) One of the small bulbs developed in the axils of the scales of a large bulb, as in the case of garlic.
• A weight. A clove of cheese is about eight pounds, of wool, about seven pounds.
Cloven
p. p. & a.
• from Cleave, v. t.
Clover
n.
(Bot.) A plant of differend species of the genus Trifolium; as the common red clover, T. pratense, the white, T. repens, and the hare's foot, T. arvense.
Clovered
a.
• Covered with growing clover.
Clown
n.
• A man of coarse nature and manners; an awkward fellow; an illbred person; a boor.
• One who works upon the soil; a rustic; a churl.
• The fool or buffoon in a play, circus, etc.
v. i.
• To act as a clown; — with it
Clownage
n.
• Behavior or manners of a clown; clownery.
Clownery
n.
• Clownishness.
Clownish
a.
• Of or resembling a clown, or characteristic of a clown; ungainly; awkward.
Clownishness
n.
• The manners of a clown; coarseness or rudeness of behavior.
Cloy
v. t.
• To fill or choke up; to stop up; to clog.
• To glut, or satisfy, as the appetite; to satiate; to fill to loathing; to surfeit.
• To penetrate or pierce; to wound.
• To spike, as a cannon.
• To stroke with a claw.
Cloyless
a.
• That does not cloy.
Cloyment
n.
• Satiety.
Club
n.
• A heavy staff of wood, usually tapering, and wielded the hand; a weapon; a cudgel.
• Any card of the suit of cards having a figure like the trefoil or clover leaf. (pl.) The suit of cards having such figure.
• An association of persons for the promotion of some common object, as literature, science, politics, good fellowship, etc.; esp. an association supported by equal assessments or contributions of the members.
• A joint charge of expense, or any person's share of it; a contribution to a common fund.
v. t.
• To beat with a club.
(Mil.) To throw, or allow to fall, into confusion.
• To unite, or contribute, for the accomplishment of a common end; as, to club exertions.
• To raise, or defray, by a proportional assesment; as, to club the expense.
v. i.
• To form a club; to combine for the promotion of some common object; to unite.
• To pay on equal or proportionate share of a common charge or expense; to pay for something by contribution.
(Naut.) To drift in a current with an anchor out.
Clubbable
a.
• Suitable for membership in a club; sociable.
Clubbed
a.
• Shaped like a club; grasped like, or used as, a club.
Clubber
n.
• One who clubs.
• A member of a club.
Clubbish
a.
• Rude; clownish.
• Disposed to club together; as, a clubbish set.
Clubbist
n.
• A member of a club; a frequenter of clubs.
Clubfist
n.
• A large, heavy fist.
• A coarse, brutal fellow.
Clubfisted
a.
• Having a large fist.
Clubfoot
n.
(Med.) A short, variously distorted foot; also, the deformity, usually congenital, which such a foot exhibits; talipes.
Clubfooted
a.
• Having a clubfoot.
Clubhand
n.
(Med.) A short, distorted hand; also, the deformity of having such a hand.
Clubhaul
v. t.
(Naut.) To put on the other tack by dropping the lee anchor as soon as the wind is out of the sails (which brings the vessel's head to the wind), and by cutting the cable as soon as she pays off on the other tack. Clubhauling is attempted only in an exigency.
Clubhouse
n.
• A house occupied by a club.
Clubroom
n.
• The apartment in which a club meets.
Cluck
v. i.
• To make the noise, or utter the call, of a brooding hen.
v. t.
• To call together, or call to follow, as a hen does her chickens.
n.
• The call of a hen to her chickens.
• A click.
Clucking
n.
• The noise or call of a brooding hen.
Clue
n.
• A ball of thread; a thread or other means of guidance. Same as Clew.
Clum
interj.
• Silence; hush.
Clumber
n.
(Zool.) A kind of field spaniel, with short legs and stout body, which, unlike other spaniels, hunts silently.
Clump
n.
• An unshaped piece or mass of wood or other substance.
• A cluster; a group; a thicket.
• The compressed clay of coal strata.
v. t.
• To arrange in a clump or clumps; to cluster; to group.
v. i.
• To tread clumsily; to clamp.
Clumper
v. t.
• To form into clumps or masses.
Clumps
n.
• A game in which questions are asked for the purpose of enabling the questioners to discover a word or thing previously selected by two persons who answer the questions; — so called because the players take sides in two "clumps" or groups, the "clump" which guesses the word winning the game.
Clumpy
a.
• Composed of clumps; massive; shapeless.
Clumsily
adv.
• In a clumsy manner; awkwardly; as, to walk clumsily.
Clumsiness
n.
• The quality of being clusy.
Clumsy
a.
• Stiff or benumbed, as with cold.
• Without skill or grace; wanting dexterity, nimbleness, or readiness; stiff; awkward, as if benumbed; unwieldy; unhandy; hence; ill-made, misshapen, or inappropriate; as, a clumsy person; a clumsy workman; clumsy fingers; a clumsy gesture; a clumsy excuse.
Clunch
n.
• .
(Mining) Indurated clay.
• One of the hard beds of the lower chalk.
Clung
• imp. & p. p. of Cling.
a.
• Wasted away; shrunken.
Cluniac
n.
(Eccl. Hist.) A monk of the reformed branch of the Benedictine Order, founded in 912 at Cluny (or Clugny) in France. — Also used as a.
Cluniacensian
a.
• Cluniac.
Clupeoid
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the Herring family.
Cluster
n.
• A number of things of the same kind growing together; a bunch.
• A number of similar things collected together or lying contiguous; a group; as, a cluster of islands.
• A number of individuals grouped together or collected in one place; a crowd; a mob.
v. i.
• To grow in clusters or assemble in groups; to gather or unite in a cluster or clusters.
v. t.
• To collect into a cluster or clusters; to gather into a bunch or close body.
Clusteringly
adv.
• In clusters.
Clustery
a.
• Growing in, or full of, clusters; like clusters.
Clutch
n.
• A gripe or clinching with, or as with, the fingers or claws; seizure; grasp.
• The hands, claws, or talons, in the act of grasping firmly; — often figuratively, for power, rapacity, or cruelty; as, to fall into the clutches of an adversary.
(Mach.) A device which is used for coupling shafting, etc., so as to transmit motion, and which may be disengaged at pleasure.
• Any device for gripping an object, as at the end of a chain or tackle.
(Zool.) The nest complement of eggs of a bird.
v. t.
• To seize, clasp, or gripe with the hand, hands, or claws; — often figuratively; as, to clutch power.
• To close tightly; to clinch.
v. i.
• To reach (at something) as if to grasp; to catch or snatch; — often followed by at.
Clutter
n.
• A confused collection; hence, confusion; disorder; as, the room is in a clutter.
• Clatter; confused noise.
v. t.
• To crowd together in disorder; to fill or cover with things in disorder; to throw into disorder; to disarrange; as, to clutter a room.
v. i.
• To make a confused noise; to bustle.
v. t.
• To clot or coagulate, as blood.
Clypeastroid
a.
(Zool.) Like or related to the genus Clupeaster; — applied to a group of flattened sea urchins, with a rosette of pores on the upper side.
Clypeate
a.
(Bot.) Shaped like a round buckler or shield; scutate.
(Zool.) Furnished with a shield, or a protective plate or shell.
Clypeiform
a.
• Shield-shaped; clypeate.
Clypeus
n.
(Zool.) The frontal plate of the head of an insect.
Clysmian
a.
• Connected with, or related to, the deluge, or to a cataclysm; as, clysmian changes.
Clysmic
a.
• Washing; cleansing.
Clyster
n.
(Med.) A liquid injected into the lower intestines by means of a syringe; an injection; an enema.
Cnemial
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the shin bone.
Cnida
n.
(Zool.) One of the peculiar stinging, cells found in Coelenterata; a nematocyst; a lasso cell.
Cnidaria
n.
(Zool.) A comprehensive group equivalent to the true Coelenterata, i.e., exclusive of the sponges. They are so named from presence of stinging cells (cnidae) in the tissues.
Cnidoblast
n.
(Zool.) One of the cells which, in the Coelenterata, develop into cnidae.
Cnidocil
n.
(Zool.) The fine filiform process of a cnidoblast.
Coacervate
a.
• Raised into a pile; collected into a crowd; heaped.
v. t.
• To heap up; to pile.
Coacervation
n.
• A heaping together.
Coach
n.
• A large, closed, four-wheeled carriage, having doors in the sides, and generally a front and back seat inside, each for two persons, and an elevated outside seat in front for the driver.
• A special tutor who assists in preparing a student for examination; a trainer; esp. one who trains a boat's crew for a race.
(Naut.) A cabin on the after part of the quarterdeck, usually occupied by the captain.
(Railroad) A first-class passenger car, as distinguished from a drawing-room car, sleeping car, etc. It is sometimes loosely applied to any passenger car.
v. t.
• To convey in a coach.
• To prepare for public examination by private instruction; to train by special instruction.
v. i.
• To drive or to ride in a coach; — sometimes used with
Coachbox
• The seat of a coachman.
Coachdog
(Zool.) One of a breed of dogs trained to accompany carriages; the Dalmatian dog.
Coachee
n.
• A coachman
Coachfellow
n.
• One of a pair of horses employed to draw a coach; hence , a comrade.
Coachman
n.
• A man whose business is to drive a coach or carriage.
(Zool.) A tropical fish of the Atlantic ocean (Dutes auriga); — called also charioteer. The name refers to a long, lashlike spine of the dorsal fin.
Coachmanship
n.
• Skill in driving a coach.
Coact
v. t.
• To force; to compel; to drive.
v. i.
• To act together; to work in concert; to unite.
Coaction
n.
• Force; compulsion, either in restraining or impelling.
Coactive
a.
• Serving to compel or constrain; compulsory; restrictive.
• Acting in concurrence; united in action.
Coactively
adv.
• In a coactive manner.
Coactivity
n.
• Unity of action.
Coadaptation
n.
• Mutual adaption.
Coadapted
a.
• Adapted one to another; as, coadapted pulp and tooth.
Coadjument
n.
• Mutual help; cooperation.
Coadjust
v. t.
• To adjust by mutual adaptations.
Coadjustment
n.
• Mutual adjustment.
Coadjutant
a.
• Mutually assisting or operating; helping.
n.
• An assistant.
Coadjuting
a.
• Mutually assisting.
Coadjutive
a.
• Rendering mutual aid; coadjutant.
Coadjutor
n.
• One who aids another; an assistant; a coworker.
(R. C. Ch.) The assistant of a bishop or of a priest holding a benefice.
Coadjutorship
n.
• The state or office of a coadjutor; joint assistance.
Coadjuvancy
n.
• Joint help; cooperation.
Coadjuvant
a.
• Cooperating.
n.
(Med.) An adjuvant.
Coadunate
a.
(Bot.) United at the base, as contiguous lobes of a leaf.
Coadunation
n.
• Union, as in one body or mass; unity.
Coadunition
n.
• Coadunation.
Coadventure
n.
• An adventure in which two or more persons are partakers.
v. i.
• To share in a venture.
Coadventurer
n.
• A fellow adventurer.
Coafforest
v. t.
• To convert into, or add to, a forest.
Coagency
n.
• Agency in common; joint agency or agent.
Coagent
n.
• An associate in an act; a coworker.
Coagment
v. t.
• To join together.
Coagmentation
n.
• The act of joining, or the state of being joined, together; union.
Coagulability
n.
• The quality of being coagulable; capacity of being coagulated.
Coagulable
a.
• Capable of being coagulated.
Coagulant
n.
• That which produces coagulation.
Coagulate
a.
• Coagulated.
v. t.
• To cause (a liquid) to change into a curdlike or semisolid state, not by evaporation but by some kind of chemical reaction; to curdle; as, rennet coagulates milk; heat coagulates the white of an egg.
v. i.
• To undergo coagulation.
Coagulated
a.
• Changed into, or contained in, a coagulum or a curdlike mass; curdled.
Coagulation
n.
• The change from a liquid to a thickened, curdlike, insoluble state, not by evaporation, but by some kind of chemical reaction; as, the spontaneous coagulation of freshly drawn blood; the coagulation of milk by rennet, or acid, and the coagulation of egg albumin by heat. Coagulation is generally the change of an albuminous body into an insoluble modification.
• The substance or body formed by coagulation.
Coagulative
a.
• Having the power to cause coagulation; as, a coagulative agent.
Coagulator
n.
• That which causes coagulation.
Coagulatory
a.
• Serving to coagulate; produced by coagulation; as, coagulatory effects.
Coagulum
n.
• The thick, curdy precipitate formed by the coagulation of albuminous matter; any mass of coagulated matter, as a clot of bloot.
Coaita
n.
(Zool.) The native name of certain South American monkeys of the genus Ateles, esp. A. paniscus. The black-faced coaita is Ateles ater.
Coak
n.
(Carp.) A kind of tenon connecting the face of a scarfed timber with the face of another timber, or a dowel or pin of hard wood or iron uniting timbers.
• A metallic bushing or strengthening piece in the center of a wooden block sheve.
v. t.
(Carp.) To unite, as timbers, by means of tenons or dowels in the edges or face.
Coal
n.
• A thoroughly charred, and extinguished or still ignited, fragment from wood or other combustible substance; charcoal.
(Min.) A black, or brownish black, solid, combustible substance, dug from beds or veins in the earth to be used for fuel, and consisting, like charcoal, mainly of carbon, but more compact, and often affording, when heated, a large amount of volatile matter.
v. t.
• To burn to charcoal; to char.
• To mark or delineate with charcoal.
• To supply with coal; as, to coal a steamer.
v. i.
• To take in coal; as, the steaer coaled at Southampton.
Coalesce
v. i.
• To grow together; to unite by growth into one body; as, the parts separated by a wound coalesce.
• To unite in one body or product; to combine into one body or community; as, vapors coalesce.
Coalescence
n.
• The act or state of growing together, as similar parts; the act of uniting by natural affinity or attraction; the state of being united; union; concretion.
Coalescent
a.
• Growing together; cohering, as in the organic cohesion of similar parts; uniting.
Coalfish
n.
(Zool.) The pollock; — called also, coalsey, colemie, colmey, coal whiting, etc.
• The beshow or candlefish of Alaska.
• The cobia.
Coalgoose
n.
(Zool.) The cormorant; — so called from its black color.
Coalite
v. i.
• To unite or coalesce.
v. t.
• To cause to unite or coalesce.
Coalition
n.
• The act of coalescing; union into a body or mass, as of separate bodies or parts; as, a coalition of atoms.
• A combination, for temporary purposes, of persons, parties, or states, having different interests.
Coalitioner
n.
• A coalitionist.
Coalitionist
n.
• One who joins or promotes a coalition; one who advocates coalition.
Coalmouse
n.
(Zool.) A small species of titmouse, with a black head; the coletit.
Coalpit
n.
• A pit where coal is dug.
• A place where charcoal is made.
Coaly
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, coal; containing coal; of the nature of coal.
Coamings
n. pl.
(Naut.) Raised pieces of wood of iron around a hatchway, skylight, or other opening in the deck, to prevent water from running bellow; esp. the fore-and-aft pieces of a hatchway frame as distinguished from the transverse head ledges.
Coannex
v. t.
• To annex with something else.
Coaptation
n.
• The adaptation or adjustment of parts to each other, as of a broken bone or dislocated joint.
Coarctate
a.
(Zool.) Pressed together; closely connected; — applied to insects having the abdomen separated from the thorax only by a constriction.
Coarctation
n.
• Confinement to a narrow space.
• Pressure; that which presses.
(Med.) A stricture or narrowing, as of a canal, cavity, or orifice.
Coarse
a.
• Large in bulk, or composed of large parts or particles; of inferior quality or appearance; not fine in material or close in texture; gross; thick; rough; — opposed to fine; as, coarse sand; coarse thread; coarse cloth; coarse bread.
• Not refined; rough; rude; unpolished; gross; indelicate; as, coarse manners; coarse language.
Coarsely
adv.
• In a coarse manner; roughly; rudely; inelegantly; uncivilly; meanly.
Coarsen
v. t.
• To make coarse or vulgar; as, to coarsen one's character.
Coarseness
n.
• The quality or state of being coarse; roughness; melegance; vulgarity; grossness; as, coarseness of food, texture, manners, or language.
Coarticulation
n.
(Anat.) The unoin or articulation of bones to form a joint.
Coast
n.
• The side of a thing.
• The exterior line, limit, or border of a country; frontier border.
• The seashore, or land near it.(Zool.)
v. i.
• To draw or keep near; to approach.
• To sail by or near the shore.
• To sail from port to port in the same country.
• To slide down hill; to slide on a sled, upon snow or ice.
v. t.
• To draw near to; to approach; to keep near, or by the side of.
• To sail by or near; to follow the coast line of.
• To conduct along a coast or river bank.
Coastal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cast.
Coaster
n.
• A vessel employed in sailing along a coast, or engaged in the coasting trade.
• One who sails near the shore.
Coasting
a.
• Sailing along or near a coast, or running between ports along a coast.
n.
• A sailing along a coast, or from port to port; a carrying on a coasting trade.
• Sliding down hill; sliding on a sled upon snow or ice.
Coat
n.
• An outer garment fitting the upper part of the body; especially, such a garment worn by men.
• A petticoat.
• The habit or vesture of an order of men, indicating the order or office; cloth.
• An external covering like a garment, as fur, skin, wool, husk, or bark; as, the horses coats were sleek.
• A layer of any substance covering another; a cover; a tegument; as, the coats of the eye; the coats of an onion; a coat of tar or varnish.
• Same as Coat of arms.
• A coat card.
v. t.
• To cover with a coat or outer garment.
• To cover with a layer of any substance; as, to coat a jar with tin foil; to coat a ceiling.
Coatee
n.
• A coat with short flaps.
Coati
n.
(Zool.) A mammal of tropical America of the genus Nasua, allied to the raccoon, but with a longer body, tail, and nose.
Coating
n.
• A coat or covering; a layer of any substance, as a cover or protection; as, the coating of a retort or vial.
• Cloth for coats; as, an assortment of coatings.
Coatless
a.
• Not wearing a coat; also, not possessing a coat.
Coax
v. t.
• To persuade by gentle, insinuating courtesy, flattering, or fondling; to wheedle; to soothe.
n.
• A simpleton; a dupe.
Coaxation
n.
• The act of croaking.
Coaxer
n.
• One who coaxes.
Coaxingly
adv.
• In a coaxing manner; by coaxing.
Cob
n.
• The top or head of anything.
• A leader or chief; a conspicuous person, esp. a rich covetous person.
• The axis on which the kernels of maize or indian corn grow.
(Zool.) A spider; perhaps from its shape; it being round like a head.
(Zool.) A young herring.
(Zool.) A fish; — also called miller's thumb.
• A short-legged and stout horse, esp. one used for the saddle.
(Zool.) A sea mew or gull; esp., the black-backed gull (Larus marinus).
• A lump or piece of anything, usually of a somewhat large size, as of coal, or stone.
• A cobnut; as, Kentish cobs.
• Clay mixed with straw.
• A punishment consisting of blows inflicted on the buttocks with a strap or a flat piece of wood.
• A Spanish coin formerly current in Ireland, worth abiut 4s. 6d.
v. t.
• To strike
(Mining) To break into small pieces, as ore, so as to sort out its better portions.
(Naut.) To punish by striking on the buttocks with a strap, a flat piece of wood, or the like.
Cobaea
n.
• A genus of climbing plants, native of Mexico and South America. C. scandens is a consrvatory climber with large bell-shaped flowers.
Cobalt
n.
(Chem.) A tough, lustrous, reddish white metal of the iron group, not easily fusible, and somewhat magnetic. Atomic weight 59.1. Symbol Co.
• A commercial name of a crude arsenic used as fly poison.
Cobaltic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, cobalt; — said especially of those compounds in which cobalt has higher valence; as, cobaltic oxide.
Cobaltiferous
a.
(Min.) Containing cobalt.
Cobaltous
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, derived from, or containing, cobalt; — said esp. of cobalt compounds in which the metal has its lower valence.
Cobbing
a.
• Haughty; purse-proud.
Cobble
n.
• A fishing boat.
n.
• A cobblestone.
• Cob coal.
v. t.
• To make or mend coarsely; to patch; to botch; as, to cobble shoes.
• To make clumsily.
• To pave with cobblestones.
Cobbler
n.
• A mender of shoes.
• A clumsy workman.
• A beverage.
Cobblestone
n.
• A large pebble; a rounded stone not too large to be handled; a small boulder; — used for paving streets and for other purposes.
Cobby
a.
• Headstrong; obstinate.
• Stout; hearty; lively.
Cobelligerent
a.
• Carryng on war in conjunction with another power.
n.
• A nation or state that carries on war in connection with another.
Cobia
n.
(Zool.) An oceanic fish of large size (Elacate canada); the crabeater; — called also bonito, cubbyyew, coalfish, and sergeant fish.
Cobiron
n.
• An andiron with a knob at the top.
Cobishop
n.
• A joint or coadjutant bishop.
Coble
n.
• A flat-floored fishing boat with a lug sail, and a drop rudder extending from two to four feet below the keel. It was originally used on the stormy coast of Yorkshire, England.
Cobnut
n.
(Com.) A large roundish variety of the cultivated hazelnut.
• A game played by children with nuts.
Cobourg
n.
• A thin worsted fabric for women's dresses.
Cobra
n.
• The cobra de capello.
Cobstone
n.
• Cobblestone.
Cobswan
n.
• A large swan.
Cobwall
n.
• A wall made of clay mixed with straw.
Cobweb
n.
• The network spread by a spider to catch its prey.
• A snare of insidious meshes designed to catch the ignorant and unwary.
• That which is thin and unsubstantial, or flimsy and worthless; rubbish.
(Zool.) The European spotted flycatcher.
Cobwebbed
a.
• Abounding in cobwebs.
Cobwebby
a.
• Abounding in cobwebs, or any fine web; resembling a cobweb.
Cobwork
a.
• Built of logs, etc., laid horizontally, with the ends dovetailed together at the corners, as in a log house; in marine work, often surrounding a central space filled with stones; as, a cobwork dock or breakwater.
Coca
n.
• The dried leaf of a South American shrub (Erythroxylon Coca). In med., called Erythroxylon.
Cocagne
n.
• An imaginary country of idleness and luxury.
• The land of cockneys; cockneydom; — a term applied to London and its suburbs.
Cocaine
n.
(Chem.) A powerful alkaloid, C17H21NO4, obtained from the leaves of coca. It is a bitter, white, crystalline substance, and is remarkable for producing local insensibility to pain.
Cocciferous
a.
• Bearing or producing berries; bacciferous; as, cocciferrous trees or plants.
Coccinella
n.
(Zool.) A genus of small beetles of many species. They and their larvae feed on aphids or plant lice, and hence are of great benefit to man. Also called ladybirds and ladybugs.
Coccobacterium
n.
(Biol.) One of the round variety of bacteria, a vegetable organism, generally less than a thousandth of a millimeter in diameter.
Coccolite
n.
(Min.) A granular variety of pyroxene, green or white in color.
Coccolith
n.
(Biol.) One of a kind of minute, calcareous bodies, probably vegetable, often abundant in deep-sea mud.
Coccosphere
n.
(Biol.) A small, rounded, marine organism, capable of braking up into coccoliths.
Coccosteus
n.
(Paleon.) An extinct genus of Devonian ganoid fishes, having the broad plates about the head studded with berrylike tubercles.
Coccus
n.
(Bot.) One of the separable carpels of a dry fruit.
(Zool.) A genus of hemipterous insects, including scale insects, and the cochineal insect (Coccus cacti).
(Biol.) A form of bacteria, shaped like a globule.
Coccygeal
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the coccyx; as, the coccygeal vertebrae.
Coccygeous
a.
• Coccygeal.
Coccyx
n.
(Anat.) The end of the vertebral column beyond the sacrum in man and tailless monkeys. It is composed of several vertebrae more or less consolidated.
Cochineal
• A dyestuff consisting of the dried bodies of females of the Coccus cacti, an insect native in Mexico, Central America, etc., and found on several species of cactus, esp. Opuntia cochinellifera.
Cochlea
n.
(Anat.) An appendage of the labyrinth of the internal ear, which is elongated and coiled into a spiral in mammals.
Cochlear
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the cochlea.
Cochleare
n.
• A spoon.
(Med) A spoonful.
Cochleary
a.
• Same as Cochleate.
Cock
n.
• The male of birds, particulary of gallinaceous or domestic fowls.
• A vane in the shape of a cock; a weathercock.
• A chief man; a leader or master.
• The crow of a cock, esp. the first crow in the morning; cockcrow.
• A faucet or valve.
• The style of gnomon of a dial.
• The indicator of a balance.
• The bridge piece which affords a bearing for the pivot of a balance in a clock or watch.
v. t.
• To set erect; to turn up.
• To shape, as a hat, by turning up the brim.
• To set on one side in a pert or jaunty manner.
• To turn (the eye) obliquely and partially close its lid, as an expression of derision or insinuation.
v. i.
• To strut; to swagger; to look big, pert, or menacing.
n.
• The act of cocking; also, the turn so given; as, a cock of the eyes; to give a hat a saucy cock.
n.
• The notch of an arrow or crossbow.
• The hammer in the lock of a firearm.
v. t.
• To draw the hammer of (a firearm) fully back and set it for firing.
v. i.
• To draw back the hammer of a firearm, and set it for firing.
n.
• A small concial pile of hay.
v. t.
• To put into cocks or heaps, as hay.
n.
• A small boat.
n.
• A corruption or disguise of the word God, used in oaths.
Cockade
n.
• A badge, usually in the form of a rosette, or knot, and generally worn upon the hat; — used as an indication of military or naval service, or party allegiance, and in England as a part of the livery to indicate that the wearer is the servant of a military or naval officer.
Cockaded
a.
• Wearing a cockade.
Cockal
n.
• A game played with sheep's bones instead of dice
• The bone used in playing the game; — called also huckle bone.
Cockaleekie
n.
• A favorite soup in Scotland, made from a capon highly seasoned, and boiled with leeks and prunes.
Cockamaroo
n.
• The Russian variety of bagatelle.
Cockateel
n.
(Zool.) An Australian parrot (Calopsitta Novae-Hollandiae); — so called from its note.
Cockatoo
n.
(Zool.) A bird of the Parrot family, of the subfamily Cacatuinae, having a short, strong, and much curved beak, and the head ornamented with a crest, which can be raised or depressed at will. There are several genera and many species; as the broad-crested (Plictolophus, or Cacatua, cristatus), the sulphur-crested (P. galeritus), etc. The palm or great black cockatoo of Australia is Microglossus aterrimus. Cock"a*trice (?; 277), n. Page 273 1. A fabulous serpent whose breath and look were said to be fatal.
(Her.) A representation of this serpent. It has the head, wings, and legs of a bird, and tail of a serpent.
(Script.) A venomous serpent which which cannot now be identified.
• Any venomous or deadly thing.
Cockbill
v. t.
(Naut.) To tilt up one end of so as to make almost vertical; as, to cockbill the yards as a sign of mourning.
Cockboat
n.
• A small boat, esp. one used on rivers or near the shore.
Cockchafer
n.
(Zool.) A beetle of the genus Melolontha (esp. M. vulgaris) and allied genera; — called also May bug, chafer, or dorbeetle.
Cocker
v. t.
• Th treat with too great tenderness; to fondle; to indulge; to pamper.
n.
• One given to cockfighting.
(Zool.) A small dog of the spaniel kind, used for starting up woodcocks, etc.
n.
• A rustic high shoe or half-boots.
Cockerel
n.
• A young cock.
Cocket
a.
• Pert; saucy.
n.
(Eng. Law) A customhouse seal; a certified document given to a shopper as a warrant that his goods have been duly enstered and have paid duty.
• An office in a customhouse where goods intended for export are entered.
• A measure for bread.
Cockeye
n.
• A squinting eye.
n.
(Mach.) The socket in the ball of a millstone, which sits on the cockhead.
Cockfight
n.
• A match or contest of gamecocks.
Cockfighting
n.
• The act or practice of pitting gamecocks to fight.
a.
• Addicted to cockfighting.
Cockhead
n.
(Mach.) The rounded or pointed top of a grinding mill spindle, forming a pivot on which the stone is balanced.
Cockhorse
n.
• A child's rocking-horse.
• A high or tall horse.
a.
• Lifted up, as one is on a tall horse.
• Lofty in feeling; exultant; pround; upstart.
Cockieleekie
n.
• Same as Cockaleekie.
Cocking
n.
• Cockfighting.
Cockle
n.
(Zool.) A bivalve mollusk, with radiating ribs, of the genus Cardium, especially C. edule, used in Europe for food; — sometimes applied to similar shells of other genera.
• A cockleshell.
• The mineral black tourmaline or schorl; — so called by the Cornish miners.
• The fire chamber of a furnace.
• A hop-drying kiln; an oast.
• The dome of a heating furnace.
v. t.
• To cause to contract into wrinkles or ridges, as some kinds of cloth after a wetting.
n.
(Bot.) A plant or weed that grows among grain; the corn rose (Luchnis Githage).
• The Lotium, or darnel.
Cocklebur
n.
(Bot.) A coarse, composite weed, having a rough or prickly fruit; one of several species of the genus Xanthium; — called also clotbur.
Cockled
a.
• Inclosed in a shell.
a.
• Wrinkled; puckered.
Cockler
n.
• One who takes and sells cockles.
Cockleshell
n.
• One of the shells or valves of a cockle.
• A light boat.
Cockloft
n.
• An upper loft; a garret; the highest room in a building.
Cockmaster
n.
• One who breeds gamecocks.
Cockmatch
n.
• A cockfight.
Cockney
n.
• An effeminate person; a spoilt child.
• A native or resident of the city of London; — used contemptuosly.
a.
• Of or relating to, or like, cockneys.
Cockneydom
n.
• The region or home of cockneys; cockneys, collectively.
Cockneyfi
v. t.
• To form with the manners or character of a cockney.
Cockneyish
a.
• Characteristic of, or resembling, cockneys.
Cockneyism
n.
• The charasteristics, manners, or dialect, of a cockney.
Cockpit
n.
• A pit, or inclosed area, for cockfights.
• The Privy Council room at Westminster; — so called because built on the site of the cockpit of Whitehall palace.
(Naut.) That part of a war vessel appropriated to the wounded during an engagement.
• In yachts and other small vessels, a space lower than the rest of the deck, which affords easy access to the cabin.
Cockroach
n.
(Zool.) An orthopterus insect of the genus Blatta, and allied genera.
Cockscomb
n.
(Bot.) A plant (Celosia cristata), of many varieties, cultivated for its broad, fantastic spikes of brilliant flowers; — sometimes called garden cockscomb. Also the Pedicularis, or lousewort, the Rhinanthus Crista-galli, and the Onobrychis Crista-galli.
Cockshead
n.
(Bot.) A leguminous herb (Onobrychis Caput-galli), having small spiny-crested pods.
Cockshut
n.
• A kind of net to catch woodcock.
Cockshy
n.
• A game in which trinkets are set upon sticks, to be thrown at by the players; — so called from an ancient popular sport which consisted in "shying" or throwing cudgels at live cocks.
• An object at which stones are flung.
Cockspur
n.
(Bot.) A variety of Crataegus, or hawthorn (C. Crus-galli), having long, straight thorns; — called also Cockspur thorn.
Cocksure
a.
• Perfectly safe.
• Quite certain.
Cockswain
n.
• The steersman of a boat; a petty officer who has charge of a boat and its crew.
Cocktail
n.
• A beverage made of brandy, whisky, or gin, iced, flavored, and sweetened.
(Stock Breeding) A horse, not of pure breed, but having only one eighth or one sixteenth impure blood in his veins.
• A mean, half-hearted fellow; a coward.
(Zool.) A species of rove beetle; — so called from its habit of elevating the tail.
Cockup
n.
(Zool.) A large, highly esteemed, edible fish of India (Lates calcarifer); — also called begti.
Cockweed
n.
(Bot.) Peppergrass.
Cocky
a.
• Pert.
Cocleariform
a.
• Spoon-shaped.
Cocoa
n.
• A preparation made from the seeds of the chocolate tree, and used in making, a beverage; also the beverage made from cocoa or cocoa shells.
Cocoanut
n.
• The large, hard-shelled nut of the cocoa palm. It yields an agreeable milky liquid and a white meat or albumen much used as food and in making oil.
Cocoon
n.
• An oblong case in which the silkworn lies in its chrysalis state. It is formed of threads of silk spun by the worm just before leaving the larval state. From these the silk of commerce is prepared.
(Zool.) The case constructed by any insect to contain its larva or pupa.
• The case of silk made by spiders to protect their eggs.
• The egg cases of mucus, etc., made by leeches and other worms.
Cocoonery
n.
• A building or apartment for silkworms, when feeding and forming cocoons.
Coctible
a.
• Capable of being cooked.
Coctile
a.
• Made by baking, or exposing to heat, as a brick.
Coction
n.
• Act of boiling.
(Med.) Digestion.
• The change which the humorists believed morbific matter undergoes before elimination.
Cod
n.
• A husk; a pod; as, a peascod.
• A small bag or pouch.
• The scortum.
• A pillow or cushion. Halliwell.
n.
(Zool.) An important edible fish (Gadus morrhua), Taken in immense numbers on the northern coasts of Europe and America. It is especially abundant and large on the Grand Bank of Newfoundland. It is salted and dried in large quantities.
Coda
n.
(Mus.) A few measures added beyond the natural termination of a composition.
Codder
n.
• A gatherer of cods or peas.
Codding
a.
• Lustful.
Coddle
v. t.
• To parboil, or soften by boiling.
• To treat with excessive tenderness; to pamper.
Coddymoddy
n.
(Zool.) A gull in the plumage of its first year.
Code
n.
• A body of law, sanctioned by legislation, in which the rules of law to be specifically applied by the courts are set forth in systematic form; a compilation of laws by public authority; a digest.
• Any system of rules or regulations relating to one subject; as, the medical code, a system of rules for the regulation of the professional conduct of physicians; the naval code, a system of rules for making communications at sea means of signals.
Codefendant
n.
• A joint defendant.
Codeine
n.
(Chem.) One of the opium alkaloids; a white crystalline substance, C18H21NO3, similar to and regarded as a derivative of morphine, but much feebler in its action; — called also codeia.
Codetta
n.
(Mus.) A short passage connecting two sections, but not forming part of either; a short coda.
Codex
n.
• A book; a manuscript.
• A collection or digest of laws; a code.
• An ancient manuscript of the Sacred Scriptures, or any part of them, particularly the New Testament.
• A collection of canons.
Codfish
n.
(Zool.) A kind of fish. Same as Cod.
Codger
n.
• A miser or mean person.
• A singular or odd person; — a familiar, humorous, or depreciatory appellation.
Codical
a.
• Ralating to a codex, or a code.
Codicil
n.
(Law) A clause added to a will.
Codicillary
a.
• Of the nature of a codicil.
Codification
n.
• The act or process of codifying or reducing laws to a code.
Codifier
n.
• One who codifies.
Codify
v. t.
• To reduce to a code, as laws.
Codilla
n.
(Com.) The coarse tow of flax and hemp.
Codille
n.
• A term at omber, signifying that the game is won.
Codist
n.
• A codifier; a maker of codes.
Codling
n.
(Zool.) A young cod; also, a hake.
Codpiece
n.
• A part of male dress in front of the breeches, formerly made very conspicuous.
Coeducation
n.
• An educating together, as of persons of different sexes or races.
Coefficacy
n.
• Joint efficacy.
Coefficiency
n.
• Joint efficiency; cooperation.
Coefficient
a.
• Cooperating; acting together to produce an effect.
n.
• That which unites in action with something else to produce the same effect.
(Math.) A number or letter put before a letter or quantity, known or unknown, to show how many times the latter is to be taken; as, 6x; bx; here 6 and b are coefficients of x.
(Physics) A number, commonly used in computation as a factor, expressing the amount of some change or effect under certain fixed conditions as to temperature, length, volume, etc.; as, the coefficient of expansion; the coefficient of friction.
Coehorn
n.
(Mil.) A small bronze mortar mounted on a wooden block with handles, and light enough to be carried short distances by two men.
Coelacanth
a.
(Zool.) Having hollow spines, as some ganoid fishes.
Coelenterate
a.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Coelentra.
n.
• One of the Coelentera.
Coelia
n.
(Anat.) A cavity.
Coelodont
a.
(Zool.) Having hollow teeth; — said of a group lizards.
n.
• One of a group of lizards having hollow teeth.
Coelospermous
a.
(Bot.) Hollow-seeded; having the ventral face of the seedlike carpels incurved at the ends, as in coriander seed.
Coemption
n.
• The act of buying the whole quantity of any commodity.
Coendoo
n.
(Zool.) The Brazilian porcupine (Cercolades, or Sphingurus, prehensiles), remarkable for its prehensile tail.
Coenesthesis
n.
(Physiol.) Common sensation or general sensibility, as distinguished from the special sensations which are located in, or ascribed to, separate organs, as the eye and ear. It is supposed to depend on the ganglionic system.
Coenoecium
n.
(Zool.) The common tissue which unites the various zooids of a bryozoan.
Coenogamy
n.
• The state of a community which permits promiscuous sexual intercourse among its members; — as in certain primitive tribes or communistic societies.
Coenosarc
n.
(Zool.) The common soft tissue which unites the polyps of a compound hydroid.
Coenurus
n.
(Zool.) The larval stage of a tapeworm (Taenia coenurus) which forms bladderlike sacs in the brain of sheep, causing the fatal disease known as water brain, vertigo, staggers or gid.
Coequal
a.
• Being on an equality in rank or power.
n.
• One who is on an equality with another.
Coequality
n.
• The state of being on an equality, as in rank or power.
Coequally
adv.
• With coequality.
Coerce
v. t.
• To restrain by force, especially by law or authority; to repress; to curb.
• To compel or constrain to any action; as, to coerce a man to vote for a certain candidate.
• To compel or enforce; as, to coerce obedience.
Coercible
a.
• Capable of being coerced.
Coercion
n.
• The act or process of coercing.
(Law) The application to another of either physical or moral force. When the force is physical, and cannot be resisted, then the act produced by it is a nullity, so far as concerns the party coerced. When the force is moral, then the act, though voidable, is imputable to the party doing it, unless he be so paralyzed by terror as to act convulsively. At the same time coercion is not negatived by the fact of submission under force. "Coactus volui" (I consented under compulsion) is the condition of mind which, when there is volition forced by coercion, annuls the result of such coercion.
Coercitive
a.
• Coercive.
Coercive
a.
• Serving or intended to coerce; having power to constrain.
Coerulignone
n.
(Chem.) A bluish violet, crystalline substance obtained in the purification of crude wood vinegar. It is regarded as a complex quinone derivative of diphenyl; — called also cedriret.
Coessential
a.
• Partaking of the same essence.
Coessentiality
n.
• Participation of the same essence.
Coestablishment
n.
• Joint establishment.
Coestate
n.
• Joint estate.
Coetanean
n.
• A personcoetaneous with another; a contemporary.
Coetaneous
a.
• Of the same age; beginning to exist at the same time; contemporaneous.
Coeternal
a.
• Equally eternal. —
Coeternity
n.
• Existence from eternity equally with another eternal being; equal eternity.
Coeval
a.
• Of the same age; existing during the same period of time, especially time long and remote; — usually followed by with.
n.
• One of the same age; a contemporary.
Coevous
a.
• Coeaval
Coexecutor
n.
• A joint executor.
Coexecutrix
n.
• A joint executrix.
Coexist
v. i.
• To exist at the same time; — sometimes followed by with.
Coexistence
n.
• Existence at the same time with another; — contemporary existence.
Coexistent
a.
• Existing at the same time with another.
n.
• That which coexists with another.
Coexisting
a.
• Coexistent.
Coextend
v. t.
• To extend through the same space or time with another; to extend to the same degree.
Coextension
n.
• The act of extending equally, or the state of being equally extended.
Coextensive
a.
• Equally extensive; having extent; as, consciousness and knowledge are coextensive.
Coffee
n.
• The "beans" or "berries" (pyrenes) obtained from the drupes of a small evergreen tree of the genus Coffea, growing in Abyssinia, Arabia, Persia, and other warm regions of Asia and Africa, and also in tropical America.
• The coffee tree.
• The beverage made from the roasted and ground berry.
Coffeehouse
n.
• A house of entertainment, where guests are supplied with coffee and other refreshments, and where men meet for conversation.
Coffeeman
n.
• One who keeps a coffeehouse.
Coffeepot
n.
• A covered pot im which coffee is prepared, r is brought upon the table for drinking.
Coffeeroom
n.
• A public room where coffee and other refreshments may be obtained.
Coffer
n.
• A casket, chest, or trunk; especially, one used for keeping money or other valuables.
• Fig.: Treasure or funds; — usually in the plural.
(Arch.) A panel deeply recessed in the ceiling of a vault, dome, or portico; a caisson.
(Fort.) A trench dug in the botton of a dry moat, and extending across it, to enable the besieged to defend it by a raking fire.
• The chamber of a canal lock; also, a caisson or a cofferdam.
v. t.
• To put into a coffer.
(Mining.) To secure from leaking, as a chaft, by ramming clay behind the masonry or timbering.
• To form with or in a coffer or coffers; to turnish with a coffer or coffers.
Cofferdam
n.
• A water-tight inclosure, as of piles packed with clay, from which the water is pumped to expose the bottom (of a river, etc.) and permit the laying of foundations, building of piers, etc.
Cofferer
n.
• One who keeps treasures in a coffer.
Cofferwork
n.
(Masonry) Rubblework faced with stone.
Coffin
n.
• The case in which a dead human body is inclosed for burial.
• A basket.
• A casing or crust, or a mold, of pastry, as for a pie.
• A conical paper bag, used by grocers.
(Far.) The hollow crust or hoof of a horse's foot, below the coronet, in which is the coffin bone.
v. t.
• To inclose in, or as in, a coffin.
Coffinless
a.
• Having no coffin.
Coffle
n.
• A gang of negro slaves being driven to market.
Cog
v. t.
• To seduce, or draw away, by adulation, artifice, or falsehood; to wheedle; to cozen; to cheat.
• To obtrude or thrust in, by falsehood or deception; as, to cog in a word; to palm off.
v. i.
• To deceive; to cheat; to play false; to lie; to wheedle; to cajole.
n.
• A trick or deception; a falsehood.
n.
(Mech.) A tooth, cam, or catch for imparting or receiving motion, as on a gear wheel, or a lifter or wiper on a shaft; originally, a separate piece of wood set in a mortise in the face of a wheel.
(Carp.) A kind of tenon on the end of a joist, received into a notch in a bearing timber, and resting flush with its upper surface.
• A tenon in a scarf joint; a coak.
(Mining.) One of the rough pillars of stone or coal left to support the roof of a mine.
v. t.
• To furnish with a cog or cogs.
n.
• A small fishing boat.
Cogency
n.
• The quality of being cogent; power of compelling conviction; conclusiveness; force.
Cogenial
a.
• Congenial.
Cogent
a.
• Compelling, in a physical sense; powerful.
• Having the power to compel conviction or move the will; constraining; conclusive; forcible; powerful; not easily reasisted.
Cogently
adv.
• In a cogent manner; forcibly; convincigly; conclusively.
Cogger
n.
• A flatterer or deceiver; a sharper.
Coggery
n.
• Trick; deception.
Coggle
n.
• A small fishing boat.
n.
• A cobblestone.
Cogitability
n.
• The quality of being cogitable; conceivableness.
Cogitable
a.
• Capable of being brought before the mind as a throught or idea; conceivable; thinkable.
Cogitabund
a.
• Full of thought; thoughtful.
Cogitate
v. i.
• To engage in continuous thought; to think.
v. t.
• To think over; to plan.
Cogitation
n.
• The act of thinking; thought; meditation; contemplation.
Cogitative
a.
• Possessing, or pertaining to, the power of thinking or meditating.
• Given to thought or contemplation.
Cogman
n.
• A dealer in cogware or coarse cloth.
Cognac
n.
• A kind of French brandy, so called from the town of Cognac.
Cognate
a.
• Allied by blood; kindred by birth; specifically (Law), related on the mother's side.
• Of the same or a similar nature; of the same family; proceeding from the same stock or root; allied; kindred; as, a cognate language.
n.
(Law) One who is related to another on the female side.
• One of a number of things allied in origin or nature; as, certain letters are cognates.
Cognateness
n.
• The state of being cognate.
Cognati
n. pl.
(Law) Relatives by the mother's side.
Cognation
n.
• Relationship by blood; descent from the same original; kindred.
• Participation of the same nature.
(Law) That tie of consanguinity which exists between persons descended from the same mother; — used in distinction from agnation.
Cognatus
n.
(Law) A person cinnected through cognation.
Cognition
n.
• The act of knowing; knowledge; perception.
• That which is known.
Cognitive
a.
• Knowing, or apprehending by the understanding; as, cognitive power.
Cognizable
a.
• Capable of being known or apprehended; as, cognizable causes.
• Fitted to be a subject of judicial investigation; capable of being judicially heard and determined.
Cognizably
adv.
• In a cognizable manner.
Cognizance
n.
• Apprehension by the understanding; perception; observation.
• Recollection; recognition.
(Law) Jurisdiction, or the power given by law to hear and decide controversies.
• The hearing a matter judicially.
• An acknowledgment of a fine of lands and tenements or confession of a thing done.
• A form of defense in the action of replevin, by which the defendant insists that the goods were lawfully taken, as a distress, by defendant, acting as servant for another.
• The distinguishing mark worn by an armed knight, usually upon the helmet, and by his retainers and followers: Hence, in general, a badge worn by a retainer or dependent, to indicate the person or party to which he belonged; a token by which a thing may be known.
Cognizant
a.
• Having cognizance or knowledge. (of).
Cognize
v. t.
• To know or perceive; to recognize.
Cognizee
n.
(Law) One to whom a fine of land was ackowledged.
Cognizor
n.
(Law) One who ackowledged the right of the plaintiff or cognizee in a fine; the defendant.
Cognomen
n.
• The last of the three names of a person among the ancient Romans, denoting his house or family.
(Eng. Law) A surname.
Cognominal
a.
• Of or pertaining to a cognomen; of the nature of a surname.
n.
• One bearing the same name; a namesake.
Cognomination
n.
• A cognomen or surname.
Cognoscence
n.
• Cognizance.
Cognoscente
n.
• A conoisseur.
Cognoscibility
n.
• The quality of being cognoscible.
Cognoscible
a.
• Capable of being known.
• Liable to judicial investigation.
Cognoscitive
a.
• Having the power of knowing.
Cognovit
n.
(Law) An instrument in writting whereby a defendant in an action acknowledges a plaintiff's demand to be just.
Coguardian
n.
• A joint guardian.
Cogue
n.
• A small wooden vessel; a pail.
Cogware
n.
• A coarse, narrow cloth, like frieze, used by the lower classes in the sixteenth century.
Cogwheel
n.
• A wheel with cogs or teeth; a gear wheel.
Cohabit
v. i.
• To inhabit or reside in company, or in the same place or country.
• To dwell or live together as husband and wife.
Cohabitant
n.
• One who dwells with another, or in the same place or country.
Cohabitation
n.
• The act or state of dwelling together, or in the same place with another.
(Law) The living together of a man and woman in supposed sexual relationship.
Cohabiter
n.
• A cohabitant.
Coheir
n.
• A joint heir; one of two or more heirs; one of several entitled to an inheritance.
Coheiress
n.
• A female heir who inherits with other heiresses; a joint heiress.
Coheirship
n.
• The state of being a coheir.
Coherald
n.
• A joint herald.
Cohere
v. i.
• To stick together; to cleave; to be united; to hold fast, as parts of the same mass.
• To be united or connected together in subordination to one purpose; to follow naturally and logically, as the parts of a discourse, or as arguments in a train of reasoning; to be logically consistent.
• To suit; to agree; to fit.
Coherent
a.
• Sticking together; cleaving; as the parts of bodies; solid or fluid.
• Composed of mutually dependent parts; making a logical whole; consistent; as, a coherent plan, argument, or discourse.
• Logically consistent; — applied to persons; as, a coherent thinker.
• Suitable or suited; adapted; accordant.
Coherently
adv.
• In a coherent manner.
Cohesibility
n.
• The state of being cohesible.
Cohesible
a.
• Capable of cohesion.
Cohesion
n.
• The act or state of sticking together; close union.
(Physics) That from of attraction by which the particles of a body are united throughout the mass, whether like or unlike; — distinguished from adhesion, which unites bodies by their adjacent surfaces.
• Logical agreement and dependence; as, the cohesion of ideas.
Cohesive
a.
• Holding the particles of a homogeneous body together; as, cohesive attraction; producing cohesion; as, a cohesive force.
• Cohering, or sticking together, as in a mass; capable of cohering; tending to cohere; as, cohesive clay.
Cohibit
v. t.
• To restrain.
Cohibition
n.
• Hindrance; restraint.
Cohobate
v. t.
(Anc. Chem.) To repeat the distillation of, pouring the liquor back upon the matter remaining in the vessel.
Cohobation
n.
(Anc. Chem.) The process of cohobating.
Cohort
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A body of about five or six hundred soldiers; the tenth part of a legion.
• Any band or body of warriors.
(Bot.) A natural group of orders of plants, less comprehensive than a class.
Cohosh
n.
(Bot.) A perennial American herb (Caulophyllum thalictroides), whose roostock is used in medicine; — also called pappoose root. The name is sometimes also given to the Cimicifuga racemosa, and to two species of Actaea, plants of the Crowfoot family.
Coif
n.
• A cap. Specifically: (a) A close-fitting cap covering the sides of the head, like a small hood without a cape. (b) An official headdress, such as that worn by certain judges in England.
v. t.
• To cover or dress with, or as with, a coif.
Coifed
a.
• Wearing a coif.
Coiffure
n.
• A headdress, or manner of dressing the hair.
Coigne
n.
• A quoin.
Coil
v.t.
• To wind cylindrically or spirally; as, to coil a rope when not in use; the snake coiled itself before springing.
• To encircle and hold with, or as with, coils.
v. i.
• To wind itself cylindrically or spirally; to form a coil; to wind; — often with about or around.
n.
• A ring, series of rings, or spiral, into which a rope, or other like thing, is wound.
• Fig.: Entanglement; toil; mesh; perplexity.
• A series of connected pipes in rows or layers, as in a steam heating apparatus.
n.
• A noise, tumult, bustle, or confusion.
Coilon
n.
• A testicle.
Coin
n.
• A quoin; a corner or external angle; a wegde.
• A piece of metal on which certain characters are stamped by government authority, making it legally current as money; — much used in a collective sense.
• That which serves for payment or recompense.
v. t.
• To make of a definite fineness, and convert into coins, as a mass of metal; to mint; to manufacture; as, to coin silver dollars; to coin a medal.
• To make or fabricate; to invent; to originate; as, to coin a word.
• To acquire rapidly, as money; to make.
v. i.
• To manufacture counterfeit money.
Coinage
n.
• The act or process of converting metal into money.
• Coins; the aggregate coin of a time or place.
• The cost or expense of coining money.
• The act or process of fabricating or inventing; formation; fabrication; that which is fabricated or forged.
Coincibency
n.
• Coincidence.
Coincide
v. i.
• To occupy the same place in space, as two equal triangles, when placed one on the other.
• To occur at the same time; to be contemporaneous; as, the fall of Granada coincided with the discovery of America.
• To correspond exactly; to agree; to concur; as, our aims coincide.
Coincidence
n.
• The condition of occupying the same place in space; as, the coincidence of circles, surfaces, etc.
• The condition or fact of happening at the same time; as, the coincidence of the deaths of John Adams and Thomas Jefferson.
• Exact correspondence in nature, character, result, circumstances, etc.; concurrence; agreement.
Coincident
a.
• Having coincidence; occupying the same place; contemporaneous; concurrent; — followed by with.
n.
• One of two or more coincident events; a coincidence.
Coincidental
a.
• Coincident.
Coincidently
adv.
• With coincidence.
Coincider
n.
• One who coincides with another in an opinion.
Coindication
n.
• One of several signs or sumptoms indicating the same fact; as, a coindication of disease.
Coiner
n.
• One who makes or stamps coin; a maker of money; — usually, a maker of counterfeit money.
• An inventor or maker, as of words.
Coinhabitant
n.
• One who dwells with another, or with others.
Coinhere
v. i.
• To inhere or exist together, as in one substance.
Coinheritance
n.
• Joint inheritance.
Coinheritor
n.
• A coheir.
Coinitial
a.
(Math.) Having a common beginning.
Coinquinate
v. t.
• Topollute.
Coinquination
n.
• Defilement.
Coinstantaneous
a.
• Happening at the same instant.
Cointense
a.
• Equal in intensity or degree; as, the relations between 6 and 12, and 8 and 16, are cointense.
Cointension
n.
• The condition of being of equal in intensity; — applied to relations; as, 3 : 6 and 6 : 12 are relations of cointension.
Coir
n.
• A material for cordage, matting, etc., consisting of the prepared fiber of the outer husk of the cocoanut.
• Cordage or cables, made of this material.
Coistril
n.
• An inferior groom or lad employed by an esquire to carry the knight's arms and other necessaries.
• A mean, paltry fellow; a coward.
Coit
n.
• A quoit.
v. t.
• To throw, as a stone.
Coition
n.
• A coming together; sexual intercourse; copulation.
Cojoin
v. t.
• To join; to conjoin.
Cojuror
n.
• One who swears to another's credibility.
Coke
n.
• Mineral coal charred, or depriver of its bitumen, sulphur, or other volatile matter by roasting in a kiln or oven, or by distillation, as in gas works. It is lagerly used where smokeless fire is required.
v. t.
• To convert into coke.
Cokenay
n.
• A cockney.
Cokernut
n.
(Com.) The cocoanut.
Cokes
n.
• A simpleton; a gull; a dupe.
Cokewold
n.
• Cuckold.
Col
• - (). A prefix signifying with, together.
n.
• A short ridge connecting two higher elevations or mountains; the pass over such a ridge.
Colaborer
n.
• One who labors with another; an associate in labor.
Colander
n.
• A utensil with a bottom perforated with little holes for straining liquids, mashed vegetable pulp, etc.; a strainer of wickerwork, perfprated metal, or the like.
Colation
n.
• The act or process of straining or filtering.
Colatitude
n.
• The complement of the latitude, or the difference between any latitude and ninety degrees.
Colature
n.
• The process of straining; the matter strained; a strainer.
Colbertine
n.
• A kind of lace.
Colchicine
n.
(Chem.) A powerful vegetable alkaloid, C17H19NO5, extracted from the Colchicum autumnale, or meadow saffron, as a white or yellowish amorphous powder, with a harsh, bitter taste; — called also colchicia.
Colchicum
n.
(Bot.) A genus of bulbous-rooted plants found in many parts of Europe, including the meadow saffron.
Colcothar
n.
(Chem.) Polishing rouge; a reddish brown oxide of iron, used in polishing glass, and also as a pigment; — called also crocus Martis.
Cold
a.
• Deprived of heat, or having a low temperature; not warm or hot; gelid; frigid.
• Lacking the sensation of warmth; suffering from the absence of heat; chilly; shivering; as, to be cold.
• Not pungent or acrid.
• Wanting in ardor, intensity, warmth, zeal, or passion; spiritless; unconcerned; reserved.
• Unwelcome; disagreeable; unsatisfactory.
• Wanting in power to excite; dull; uninteresting.
• Affecting the sense of smell (as of hunting dogs) but feebly; having lost its odor; as, a cold scent.
• Not sensitive; not acute.
• Distant; — said, in the game of hunting for some object, of a seeker remote from the thing concealed.
(Paint.) Having a bluish effect. Cf. Warm, 8.
n.
• The relative absence of heat or warmth.
• The sensation produced by the escape of heat; chilliness or chillness.
(Med.) A morbid state of the animal system produced by exposure to cold or dampness; a catarrh.
v. i.
• To become cold.
Coldfinch
n.
(Zool.) A British wagtail.
Coldish
a.
• Somewhat cold; cool; chilly.
Coldly
adv.
• In a cold manner; without warmth, animation, or feeling; with indifference; calmly.
Coldness
n.
• The state or quality of being cold.
Cole
n.
(Bot.) A plant of the Brassica or Cabbage genus; esp. that form of B. oleracea called rape and coleseed.
Colemanite
n.
(Min.) A hydrous borate of lime occurring in transparent colorless or white crystals, also massive, in Southern California.
Coleopter
n.
(Zool.) One of the Coleoptera.
Coleoptera
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of insects having the anterior pair of wings (elytra) hard and horny, and serving as coverings for the posterior pair, which are membranous, and folded transversely under the others when not in use. The mouth parts form two pairs of jaws (mandibles and maxillae) adapted for chewing. Most of the Coleoptera are known as beetles and weevils.
Coleopteran
n.
(Zool.) One of the order of Coleoptera.
Coleopterist
n.
• One versed in the study of the Coleoptera.
Coleorhiza
n.
• A sheath in the embryo of grasses, inclosing the caulicle.
Coleperch
n.
(Zool.) A kind of small black perch.
Colera
n.
• Bile; choler.
Coleridgian
a.
• Pertaining to Samuel Taylor Coleridge, or to his poetry or metaphysics.
Coleseed
n.
• The common rape or cole.
Coleslaw
n.
• A salad made of sliced cabbage.
Coleus
n.
(Bot.) A plant of several species of the Mint family, cultivated for its bright-colored or variegated leaves.
Colewort
n.
• A variety of cabbage in which the leaves never form a compact head.
• Any white cabbage before the head has become firm.
Colfox
n.
• A crafty fox.
Colic
n.
(Med.) A severe paroxysmal pain in the abdomen, due to spasm, obstruction, or distention of some one of the hollow viscera.
a.
• Of or pertaining to colic; affecting the bowels.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the colon; as, the colic arteries.
Colical
a.
• Of, pertaining to, or of the nature of, colic.
Colicky
a.
• Pertaining to, or troubled with, colic; as, a colicky disorder.
Colicroot
n.
• A bitter American herb of the Bloodwort family, with the leaves all radical, and the small yellow or white flowers in a long spike (Aletris farinosa and A. aurea). Called sometimes star grass, blackroot, blazing star, and unicorn root.
Colin
n.
(Zool.) The American quail or bobwhite. The name is also applied to other related species.
Coliseum
n.
• The amphitheater of Vespasian at Rome, the largest in the world.
Colitis
n.
(Med.) An inflammation of the large intestine, esp. of its mucous membrane; colonitis.
Coll
v. t.
• To embrace.
Collaboration
n.
• The act ofworking together; united labor.
Collaborator
n.
• An associate in labor, especially in literary or scientific labor.
Collagen
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) The chemical basis of ordinary connective tissue, as of tendons or sinews and of bone. On being boiled in water it becomes gelatin or glue.
Collagenous
a.
(Physiol.) Containing or resembling collagen.
Collapse
v. i.
• To fall together suddenly, as the sides of a hollow vessel; to close by falling or shrinking together; to have the sides or parts of (a thing) fall in together, or be crushed in together; as, a flue in the boiler of a steam engine sometimes collapses.
• To fail suddenly and completely, like something hollow when subject to too much pressure; to undergo a collapse; as, Maximilian's government collapsed soon after the French army left Mexico; many financial projects collapse after attaining some success and importance.
n.
• A falling together suddenly, as of the sides of a hollow vessel.
• A sudden and complete failure; an utter failure of any kind; a breakdown.
(Med.) Extreme depression or sudden failing o all the vital powers, as the result of disease, injury, or nervous disturbance.
Collapsion
n.
• Collapse.
Collar
n.
• Something worn round the neck, whether for use, ornament, restraint, or identification; as, the collar of a coat; a lady's collar; the collar of a dog.
(Arch.) A ring or cinture.
• A collar beam.
(Bot.) The neck or line of junction between the root of a plant and its stem.
• An ornament worn round the neck by knights, having on it devises to designate their rank or order.
(Zool.) A ringlike part of a mollusk in connection with esophagus.
• A colored ring round the neck of a bird or mammal.
(Mech.) A ring or round flange upon, surrounding, or against an object, and used for rastraining motion within given limits, or for holding something to its place, or for hibing an opening around an object; as, a collar on a shaft, used to prevent endwise motion of the shaft; a collar surrounding a stovepipe at the place where it enters a wall. The flanges of a piston and the gland of a stuffing box are sometimes called collars.
(Naut.) An eye formed in the bight or bend of a shroud or stay to go over the masthead; also, a rope to which certain parts of rigging, as dead-eyes, are secured.
(Mining) A curb, or a horizontal timbering, around the mouth of a shaft.
v. t.
• To seize by the collar.
• To put a collar on.
Collards
n.
• Young cabbage, used as "greens"; esp. a kind cultivated for that purpose; colewort.
Collared
a.
• Wearing a collar.
(Her.) Wearing a collar; — said of a man or beast used as a bearing when a collar is represented as worn around the neck or loins.
• Rolled up and bound close with a string; as, collared beef.
Collatable
a.
• Capable of being collated.
Collate
v. t.
• To compare critically, as books or manuscripts, in order to note the points of agreement or disagreement.
• To gather and place in order, as the sheets of a book for binding.
(Eccl.) To present and institute in a benefice, when the person presenting is both the patron and the ordinary; — followed by to.
• To bestow or confer.
v. i.
(Ecl.) To place in a benefice, when the person placing is both the patron and the ordinary.
Collateral
a.
• Coming from, being on, or directed toward, the side; as, collateral pressure.
• Acting in an indirect way.
• Related to, but not strictly a part of, the main thing or matter under consideration; hence, subordinate; not chief or principal; as, collateral interest; collateral issues.
• Tending toward the same conclusion or result as something else; additional; as, collateral evidence.
(Genealogy) Descending from the same stock or ancestor, but not in the same line or branch or one from the other; — opposed to lineal.
n.
• A collateral relative.
• Collateral security; that which is pledged or deposited as collateral security.
Collaterally
adv.
• Side by side; by the side.
• In an indirect or subordinate manner; indirectly.
• In collateral relation; not lineally.
Collateralness
n.
• The state of being collateral.
Collation
n.
• The act of collating or comparing; a comparison of one copy er thing (as of a book, or manuscript) with another of a like kind; comparison, in general.
(Print.) The gathering and examination of sheets preparatory to binding.
• The act of conferring or bestowing.
• A conference.
(Eccl. Law) The presentation of a clergyman to a benefice by a bishop, who has it in his own gift.
(Law) The act of comparing the copy of any paper with its original to ascertain its conformity.
• The report of the act made by the proper officers.
(Scots Law) The right which an heir has of throwing the whole heritable and movable estates of the deceased into one mass, and sharing it equaly with others who are of the same degree of kindred.
(Eccles.) A collection of the Lives of the Fathers or other devout work read daily in monasteries.
• A light repast or luncheon; as, a cold collation; — first applied to the refreshment on fast days that accompanied the reading of the collation in monasteries.
v. i.
• To partake of a collation.
Collationer
n.
(Print.) One who examines the sheets of a book that has just been printed, to ascertain whether they are correctly printed, paged, etc.
Collatitious
a.
• Brought together; contributed; done by contributions.
Collative
a.
• Passing or held by collation; — said of livings of which the bishop and the patron are the same person.
Collator
n.
• One who collates manuscripts, books, etc.
(Eccl. Law) One who collates to a benefice.
• One who confers any benefit.
Collaud
v. t.
• To join in praising.
Colleague
n.
• A partner or associate in some civil or ecclesiastical office or employment. It is never used of partners in trade or manufactures.
v.t & i.
• To unite or associate with another or with others.
Colleagueship
n.
• Partnership in office.
Collect
v. t.
• To gather into one body or place; to assemble or bring together; to obtain by gathering.
• To demand and obtain payment of, as an account, or other indebtedness; as, to collect taxes.
• To infer from observed facts; to conclude from premises.
v. i.
• To assemble together; as, the people collected in a crowd; to accumulate; as, snow collects in banks.
• To infer; to conclude.
n.
• A short, comprehensive prayer, adapted to a particular day, occasion, or condition, and forming part of a liturgy.
Collectanea
n. pl.
• Passages selected from various authors, usually for purposes of instruction; miscellany; anthology.
Collected
a.
• Gathered together.
• Self-possessed; calm; composed.
Collectedly
adv.
• Composedly; coolly.
Collectedness
n.
• A collected state of the mind; self-possession.
Collectible
a.
• Capable of being collected.
Collection
n.
• The act or process of collecting or of gathering; as, the collection of specimens.
• That which is collected; as: (a) A gathering or assemblage of objects or of persons.
• A gathering of money for charitable or other purposes, as by passing a contribution box for freewill offerings.
• That which is obtained in payment of demands. (d) An accumulation of any substance. "Collections of moisture." Whewell.
• The act of inferring or concluding from premises or observed facts; also, that which is inferred.
• The jurisdiction of a collector of excise.
Collectional
a.
• Of or pertaining to collecting.
Collective
a.
• Formed by gathering or collecting; gathered into a mass, sum, or body; congregated or aggregated; as, the collective body of a nation.
• Deducing consequences; reasoning; inferring.
(Gram.) Expressing a collection or aggregate of individuals, by a singular form; as, a collective name or noun, like assembly, army, juri, etc.
• Tending to collect; forming a collection.
• Having plurality of origin or authority; as, in diplomacy, a note signed by the representatives of several governments is called a collective note.
n.
(Gram.) A collective noun or name.
Collectively
adv.
• In a mass, or body; in a collected state; in the aggregate; unitedly.
Collectiveness
n.
• A state of union; mass.
Collectivism
n.
(Polit. Econ.) The doctrine that land and capital should be owned by society collectively or as a whole; communism.
Collectivist
n.
• An advocate of collectivism.
a.
• Relating to, or characteristic of, collectivism.
Collector
n.
• One who collects things which are separate; esp., one who makes a business or practice of collecting works of art, objects in natural history, etc.; as, a collector of coins.
• A compiler of books; one who collects scattered passages and puts them together in one book.
(Com.) An officer appointed and commissioned to collect and receive customs, duties, taxes, or toll.
• One authorized to collect debts.
• A bachelor of arts in Oxford, formerly appointed to superintend some scholastic proceedings in Lent.
Collectorate
n.
• The district of a collector of customs; a collectorship.
Collectorship
n.
• The office of a collector of customs or of taxes.
Collegatary
n.
(Law) A joint legatee.
College
n.
• A collection, body, or society of persons engaged in common pursuits, or having common duties and interests, and sometimes, by charter, peculiar rights and privileges; as, a college of heralds; a college of electors; a college of bishops.
• A society of scholars or friends of learning, incorporated for study or instruction, esp. in the higher branches of knowledge; as, the colleges of Oxford and Cambridge Universities, and many American colleges.
• A building, or number of buildings, used by a college.
• Fig.: A community.
Collegial
n.
• Collegiate.
Collegian
n.
• A member of a college, particularly of a literary institution so called; a student in a college.
Collegiate
a.
• Of or pertaining to a college; as, collegiate studies; a collegiate society.
n.
• A member of a college.
Collembola
n. pl.
(Zool.) The division of Thysanura which includes Podura, and allied forms.
Collenchyma
n.
(Bot.) A tissue of vegetable cells which are thickend at the angles and (usually) elongated.
Collet
n.
• A small collar or neckband.
(Mech.) A small metal ring; a small collar fastened on an arbor; as, the collet on the balance arbor of a watch; a small socket on a stem, for holding a drill.
(Jewelry) The part of a ring containing the bezel in which the stone is set.
• The flat table at the base of a brilliant.
Colleterial
a.
(Zool.) Of or pertaining to the colleterium of insects.
Colleterium
n.
(Zool.) An organ of female insects, containing a cement to unite the ejected ova.
Colletic
a.
• Agglutinant.
n.
• An agglutinant.
Collide
v. i.
• To strike or dash against each other; to come into collision; to clash; as, the vessels collided; their interests collided.
v. t.
• To strike or dash against.
Collidine
n.
(Chem.) One of a class of organic bases, C8H11N, usually pungent oily liquids, belonging to the pyridine series, and obtained from bone oil, coal tar, naphtha, and certain alkaloids.
Collie
n.
(Zool.) The Scotch shepherd dog. There are two breeds, the rough-haired and smooth-haired. It is remarkable for its intelligence, displayed especially in caring for flocks.
Collied
p. & a.
• Darkened.
Collier
n.
• One engaged in the business of digging mineral coal or making charcoal, or in transporting or dealing in coal.
• A vessel employed in the coal trade.
Colliery
n.
• The place where coal is dug; a coal mine, and the buildings, etc., belonging to it.
• The coal trade.
Colligate
v. t.
• To tie or bind together.
(Logic) To bring together by colligation; to sum up in a single proposition.
a.
• Bound together.
Colligation
n.
• A binding together.
(Logic) That process by which a number of isolated facts are brought under one conception, or summed up in a general proposition, as when Kepler discovered that the various observed positions of the planet Mars were points in an ellipse.
Collimate
v. t.
(Physics & Astron.) To render parallel to a certain line or direction; to bring into the same line, as the axes of telescopes, etc.; to render parallel, as rays of light.
Collimation
n.
• The act of collimating; the adjustment of the line of the sights, as the axial line of the telescope of an instrument, into its proper position relative to the other parts of the instrument.
Collimator
n.
(Astron.) A telescope arranged and used to determine errors of collimation, both vertical and horizontal.
(Optics) A tube having a convex lens at one end and at the other a small opening or slit which is at the principal focus of the lens, used for producing a beam of parallel rays; also, a lens so used.
Collin
n.
• A very pure form of gelatin.
Colline
n.
• A small hill or mount.
Collineation
n.
• The act of aiming at, or directing in a line with, a fixed object.
Colling
n.
• An embrace; dalliance.
Collingly
adv.
• With embraces.
Collingual
a.
• Having, or pertaining to, the same language.
Colliquable
a.
• Liable to melt, grow soft, or become fluid.
Colliquament
n.
• The first rudiments of an embryo in generation.
Colliquate
v. t. & i.
• To change from solid to fluid; to make or become liquid; to melt.
Colliquation
n.
• A melting together; the act of melting; fusion.
(Med.) A processive wasting or melting away of the solid parts of the animal system with copious excretions of liquids by one or more passages.
Colliquative
a.
• Causing rapid waste or exhaustion; melting; as, collequative sweats.
Colliquefaction
n.
• A melting together; the reduction of different bodies into one mass by fusion.
Collish
n.
(Shoemaking) A tool to polish the edge of a sole.
Collision
n.
• The act of striking together; a striking together, as of two hard bodies; a violent meeting, as of railroad trains; a clashing.
• A state of opposition; antagonism; interference.
Collisive
a.
• Colliding; clashing.
Collitigant
a.
• Disputing or wrangling.
n.
• One who litigates or wrangles.
Collocate
a.
• Set; placed. Bacon.
v. t.
• To set or place; to set; to station.
Collocation
n.
• The act of placing; the state of being placed with something else; disposition in place; arrangement.
Collocution
n.
• A speaking or conversing together; conference; mutual discourse.
Collocutor
n.
• One of the speakers in a dialogue.
Collodion
n.
(Chem.) A solution of pyroxylin (soluble gun cotton) in ether containing a varying proportion of alcohol. It is strongly adhesive, and is used by surgeons as a containing for wounds; but its chief application is as a vehicle for the sensitive film in photography.
Collodionize
v. t.
• To prepare or treat with collodion.
Collodiotype
n.
• A picture obtained by the collodion process; a melanotype or ambrotype.
Collogue
v. i.
• To talk or confer secretly and confidentially; to converse, especially with evil intentions; to plot mischief.
Colloid
a.
• Resembling glue or jelly; characterized by a jellylike appearance; gelatinous; as, colloid tumors.
n.
(Physiol. Chem.) A substance (as albumin, gum, gelatin, etc.) which is of a gelatinous rather than a crystalline nature, and which diffuses itself through animal membranes or vegetable parchment more slowly than crystalloids do; — opposed to crystalloid.
(Med.) A gelatinous substance found in colloid degeneration and colloid cancer.
Colloidal
a.
• Pertaining to, or of the nature of, colloids.
Colloidality
n.
• The state or quality of being colloidal.
Collop
n.
• A small slice of meat; a piece of flesh.
• A part or piece of anything; a portion.
Colloped
a.
• Having ridges or bunches of flesh, like collops.
Collophore
n.
(Zool.) A suckerlike organ at the base of the abdomen of insects belonging to the Collembola.
• An adhesive marginal organ of the Lucernariae.
Colloquial
a.
• Pertaining to, or used in, conversation, esp. common and familiar conversation; conversational; hence, unstudied; informal; as, colloquial intercourse; colloquial phrases; a colloquial style.
Colloquialism
n.
• A colloquial expression, not employed in formal discourse or writing.
Colloquialize
v. t.
• To make colloquial and familiar; as, to colloquialize one's style of writing.
Colloquist
n.
• A speaker in a colloquy or dialogue.
Colloquy
n.
• Mutual discourse of two or more persons; conference; conversation.
• In some American colleges, a part in exhibitions, assigned for a certain scholarship rank; a designation of rank in collegiate scholarship.
Colluctancy
n.
• A struggling to resist; a striving against; resistance; opposition of nature.
Colluctation
n.
• A struggling; a contention.
Collude
v. i.
• To have secretly a joint part or share in an action; to play into each other's hands; to conspire; to act in concert.
Colluder
n.
• One who conspires in a fraud.
Collum
n.
(Anat.) A neck or cervix.
(Bot.) Same as Collar.
Collusion
n.
• A secret agreement and cooperation for a fraudulent or deceitful purpose; a playing into each other's hands; deceit; fraud; cunning.
(Law) An agreement between two or more persons to defraud a person of his rights, by the forms of law, or to obtain an object forbidden by law.
Collusive
a.
• Characterized by collusion; done or planned in collusion.
• Acting in collusion.
Collusory
a.
• Collusive.
Collutory
n.
(Med.) A medicated wash for the mouth.
Colly
n.
• The black grime or soot of coal.
v. t.
• To render black or dark, as of with coal smut; to begrime.
n.
• A kind of dog.
Collybist
n.
• A money changer.
Collyrium
n.
(Med.) An application to the eye, usually an eyewater.
Colocolo
n.
(Zool.) A South American wild cat (Felis colocolo), of the size of the ocelot.
Colocynth
n.
(Med.) The light spongy pulp of the fruit of the bitter cucumber (Citrullus, or Cucumis, colocynthis), an Asiatic plant allied to the watermelon; coloquintida. It comes in white balls, is intensely bitter, and a powerful cathartic. Called also bitter apple, bitter cucumber, bitter gourd.
Colocynthin
n.
(Chem.) The active medicinal principle of colocynth; a bitter, yellow, crystalline substance, regarded as a glucoside.
Cologne
n.
• A perfumed liquid, composed of alcohol and certain aromatic oils, used in the toilet; — called also cologne water and eau de cologne.
Colombier
n.
• A large size of paper for drawings.
Colon
n.
(Anat.) That part of the large intestines which extends from the caecum to the rectum.
(Gram.) A point or character, formed thus [:], used to separate parts of a sentence that are complete in themselves and nearly independent, often taking the place of a conjunction.
Colonel
n.
(Mil.) The chief officer of a regiment; an officer ranking next above a lieutenant colonel and next below a brigadier general.
Colonelcy
n.
(Mil.) The office, rank, or commission of a colonel.
Colonelship
n.
• Colonelcy.
Coloner
n.
• A colonist.
Colonial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a colony; as, colonial rights, traffic, wars.
Colonical
a.
• Of or pertaining to husbandmen.
Colonist
n.
• A member or inhabitant of a colony.
Colonization
n.
• Tha act of colonizing, or the state of being colonized; the formation of a colony or colonies.
Colonizationist
n.
• A friend to colonization, esp. to the colonization of Africa by emigrants from the colored population of the United States.
Colonize
v. t.
• To plant or establish a colony or colonies in; to people with colonists; to migrate to and settle in.
v. i.
• To remove to, and settle in, a distant country; to make a colony.
Colonizer
n.
• One who promotes or establishes a colony; a colonist.
Colonnade
n.
(Arch.) A series or range of columns placed at regular intervals with all the adjuncts, as entablature, stylobate, roof, etc.
Colony
n.
• A company of people transplanted from their mother country to a remote province or country, and remaining subject to the jurisdiction of the parent state; as, the British colonies in America.
• The district or country colonized; a settlement.
• A company of persons from the same country sojourning in a foreign city or land; as, the American colony in Paris.
(Nat. Hist.) A number of animals or plants living or growing together, beyond their usual range.
Colophene
n.
(Chem.) A colorless, oily liquid, formerly obtained by distillation of colophony. It is regarded as a polymeric form of terebenthene. Called also diterebene.
Colophon
n.
• An inscription, monogram, or cipher, containing the place and date of publication, printer's name, etc., formerly placed on the last page of a book.
Colophonite
n.
(Min.) A coarsely granular variety of garnet.
Colophony
n.
• Rosin.
Color
n.
• A property depending on the relations of light to the eye, by which individual and specific differences in the hues and tints of objects are apprehended in vision; as, gay colors; sad colors, etc.
• Any hue distinguished from white or black.
• The hue or color characteristic of good health and spirits; ruddy complexion.
• That which is used to give color; a paint; a pigment; as, oil colors or water colors.
• That which covers or hides the real character of anything; semblance; excuse; disguise; appearance.
• Shade or variety of character; kind; species.
• A distinguishing badge, as a flag or similar symbol (usually in the plural); as, the colors or color of a ship or regiment; the colors of a race horse (that is, of the cap and jacket worn by the jockey).
(Law) An apparent right; as where the defendant in trespass gave to the plaintiff an appearance of title, by stating his title specially, thus removing the cause from the jury to the court.
v. t.
• To change or alter the bue or tint of, by dyeing, staining, painting, etc.; to dye; to tinge; to aint; to stain.
• To change or alter, as if by dyeing or painting; to give a false appearance to; usually, to give a specious appearance to; to cause to appear attractive; to make plausible; to palliate or excuse; as, the facts were colored by his prejudices.
• To hide.
v. i.
• To acquire color; to turn red, especially in the face; to blush.
Colorable
a.
• Specious; plausible; having an appearance of right or justice.
Coloradoite
n.
(Min.) Mercury telluride, an iron-black metallic mineral, found in Colorado.
Colorate
a.
• Colored.
Coloration
n.
• The act or art of coloring; the state of being colored.
Colorature
n.
(Mus.) Vocal music colored, as it were, by florid ornaments, runs, or rapid passages.
Colored
a.
• Having color; tinged; dyed; painted; stained.
• Specious; plausible; aborned so as to appear well; as, a highly colored description.
• Of some other color than black or white.
(Ethnol.) Of some other color than white; specifically applied to negroes or persons having negro blood; as, a colored man; the colored people.
(Bot.) Of some other color than green.
Colorific
a.
• Capable of communicating color or tint to other bodies.
Colorimeter
n.
• An instrument for measuring the depth of the color of anything, especially of a liquid, by comparison with a standard liquid.
Coloring
n.
• The act of applying color to; also, that which produces color.
• Change of appearance as by addition of color; appearance; show; disguise; misrepresentation.
Colorist
n.
• One who colors; an artist who excels in the use of colors; one to whom coloring is of prime importance.
Colorless
a.
• Without color; not distinguished by any hue; transparent; as, colorless water.
• Free from any manifestation of partial or peculiar sentiment or feeling; not disclosing likes, dislikes, prejudice, etc.; as, colorless music; a colorless style; definitions should be colorless.
Colorman
n.
• A vender of paints, etc.
Colossal
a.
• Of enormous size; gigantic; huge; as, a colossal statue.
(Sculpture & Painting) Of a size larger than heroic.
Colossean
a.
• Colossal.
Colosseum
n.
• The amphitheater of Vespasian in Rome.
Colossus
n.
• A statue of gigantic size. The name was especially applied to certain famous statues in antiquity, as the Colossus of Nero in Rome, the Colossus of Apollo at Rhodes.
• Any man or beast of gigantic size.
Colostrum
n.
(Med.) The first milk secreted after delivery; biestings.
• A mixture of turpentine and the yolk of an egg, formerly used as an emulsion.
Colotomy
n.
(Surg.) An operation for opening the colon
Colour
n.
• See Color.
Colportage
n.
• The distribution of religious books, tracts, etc., by colporteurs.
Colporter
n.
• Same as Colporteur.
Colporteur
n.
• A hawker; specifically, one who travels about selling and distributing religious tracts and books.
Colstaff
n.
• A staff by means of which a burden is borne by two persons on their shoulders.
Colt
n.
• The young of the equine genus or horse kind of animals; — sometimes distinctively applied to the male, filly being the female. Cf. Foal.
• A young, foolish fellow.
• A short knotted rope formerly used as an instrument of punishment in the navy.
v. i.
• To frisk or frolic like a colt; to act licentiously or wantonly.
v. t.
• To horse; to get with young.
• To befool.
Colter
n.
• A knife or cutter, attached to the beam of a plow to cut the sward, in advance of the plowshare and moldboard.
Coltish
a.
• Like a colt; wanton; frisky.
Coltsfoot
n.
(Bot.) A perennial herb (Tussilago Farfara), whose leaves and rootstock are sometimes employed in medicine.
Coluber
n.
(Zool.) A genus of harmless serpents.
Colubrine
a.
(Zool.) like or related to snakes of the genus Coluber.
• Like a snake; cunning; crafty.
Colugo
n.
(Zool.) A peculiar East Indian mammal (Galleopithecus volans), having along the sides, connecting the fore and hind limbs, a parachutelike membrane, by means of which it is able to make long leaps, like the flying squirrel; — called also flying lemur.
Columbae
n. pl.
(Zool.) An order of birds, including the pigeons.
Columbarium
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A dovecote or pigeon house.
• A sepulchral chamber with niches for holding cinerary urns.
Columbary
n.
• A dovecote; a pigeon house.
Columbate
n.
(Chem.) A salt of columbic acid; a niobate.
Columbella
n.
(Zool.) A genus of univale shells, abundant in tropical seas. Some species, as Columbella mercatoria, were formerly used as shell money.
Columbia
n.
• America; the United States; — a poetical appellation given in honor of Columbus, the discoverer.
Columbiad
n.
(Mil.) A form of seacoast cannon; a long, chambered gun designed for throwing shot or shells with heavy charges of powder, at high angles of elevation.
Columbian
a.
• Of or pertaining to the United States, or to America.
Columbic
a.
(Chem.) Pertaining to, or containing, columbium or niobium; niobic.
a.
• Pertaining to, or derived from, the columbo root.
Columbiferous
a.
• Producing or containing columbium.
Columbin
n.
(Chem.) A white, crystalline, bitter substance.
Columbine
a.
• Of or pertaining to a dove; dovelike; dove-colored.
n.
(Bot.) A plant of several species of the genus Aquilegia; as, A. vulgaris, or the common garden columbine; A. Canadensis, the wild red columbine of North America.
• The mistress or sweetheart of Harlequin in pantomimes.
Columbite
n.
(Min.) A mineral of a black color, submetallic luster, and high specific specific gravity. It is a niobate (or columbate) of iron and manganese, containing tantalate of iron; — first found in New England.
Columbium
n.
(Chem.) A rare element of the vanadium group, first found in a variety of the mineral columbite occurring in Connecticut, probably at Haddam. Atomic weight 94.2. Symbol Cb or Nb. Now more commonly called niobium.
Columella
n.
(Bot.) An axis to which a carpel of a compound pistil may be attached, as in the case of the geranium; or which is left when a pod opens.
• A columnlike axis in the capsule of mosses.
(Anat.) A term applied to various columnlike parts; as, the columnella, or epipterygoid bone, in the skull of many lizards; the columella of the ear, the bony or cartilaginous rod connecting the tympanic membrane with the internal ear.
(Zool.) The upright pillar in the axis of most univalve shells.
• The central pillar or axis of the calicles of certain corals.
Columelliform
a.
• Shaped like a little column, or columella.
Column
n.
(Arch.) A kind of pillar; a cylindrical or polygonal support for a roof, ceiling, statue, etc., somewhat ornamented, and usually composed of base, shaft, and capital.
• Anything resembling, in form or position, a column an architecture; an upright body or mass; a shaft or obelisk; as, a column of air, of water, of mercury, etc. ; the Column Vendome; the spinal column.
(Mil.) A body of troops formed in ranks, one behind the other; — contradistinguished from line.
• A small army.
(Naut.) A number of ships so arranged as to follow one another in single or double file or in squadrons; — in distinction from "line", where they are side by side.
(Print.) A perpendicular set of lines, not extending across the page, and separated from other matter by a rule or blank space; as, a column in a newspaper.
(Arith.) A perpendicular line of figures.
(Bot.) The body formed by the union of the stamens in the Mallow family, or of the stamens and pistil in the orchids.
Columnar
a.
• Formed in columns; having the form of a column or columns; like the shaft of a column.
Columnarity
n.
• The state or quality of being columnar.
Columnated
a.
• Having columns; as, columnated temples.
Columned
a.
• Having columns.
Columniation
n.
• The employment or arrangement of columns in a structure.
Colure
n.
(Astron. & Geog.) One of two great circles intersecting at right angles in the poles of the equator. One of them passes through the equinoctial points, and hence is denominated the equinoctial colure; the other intersects the equator at the distance of 90° from the former, and is called the solstitial colure.
Coly
n.
• Any bird of the genus Colius and allied genera. They inhabit Africa.
Colza
n.
(Bot.) A variety of cabbage (Brassica oleracea), cultivated for its seeds, which yield an oil valued for illuminating and lubricating purposes; summer rape.
Coma
n.
• A state of profound insensibility from which it is difficult or impossible to rouse a person.
n.
(Astron.) The envelope of a comet; a nebulous covering, which surrounds the nucleus or body of a comet.
(Bot.) A tuft or bunch, — as the assemblage of branches forming the head of a tree; or a cluster of brachts when empty and terminating the inflorescence of a plant; or a tuft of long hairs on certain seeds.
Comanches
n. pl.
(Ethnol.) A warlike, savage, and nomadic tribe of the Shoshone family of Indians, inhabiting Mexico and the adjacent parts of the United States; — called also Paducahs. They are noted for plundering and cruelty.
Comart
n.
• A covenant.
Comate
a.
• Encompassed with a coma, or bushy appearance, like hair; hairy.
Comatons
a.
• Comatose.
Comatose
a.
• Relating to, or resembling, coma; drowsy; lethargic; as, comatose sleep; comatose fever.
Comatula
n.
(Zool.) A crinoid of the genus Antedon and related genera. When young they are fixed by a stem. When adult they become detached and cling to seaweeds, etc., by their dorsal cirri; — called also feather stars.
Comatulid
n.
(Zool.) Any crinoid of the genus Antedon or allied genera.
Comb
n.
• An instrument with teeth, for straightening, cleansing, and adjusting the hair, or for keeping it in place.
• An instrument for currying hairy animals, or cleansing and smoothing their coats; a currycomb.
(Manuf. & Mech.) A toothed instrument used for separating and cleansing wool, flax, hair, etc.
• The serrated vibratory doffing knife of a carding machine.
• A former, commonly cone-shaped, used in hat manufacturing for hardening the soft fiber into a bat.
• A tool with teeth, used for chasing screws on work in a lathe; a chaser.
• The notched scale of a wire micrometer.
• The collector of an electrical machine, usually resembling a comb.
(Zool.) The naked fleshy crest or caruncle on the upper part of the bill or hood of a cock or other bird. It is usually red.
• One of a pair of peculiar organs on the base of the abdomen of scorpions.
• The curling crest of a wave.
• The waxen framework forming the walls of the cells in which bees store their honey, eggs, etc.; honeycomb.
• The thumbpiece of the hammer of a gunlock, by which it may be cocked.
v. t.
• To disentangle, cleanse, or adjust, with a comb; to lay smooth and straight with, or as with, a comb; as, to comb hair or wool.
v. i.
(Naut.) To roll over, as the top or crest of a wave; to break with a white foam, as waves.
n.
• A dry measure.
Combat
v. i.
• To struggle or contend, as with an opposing force; to fight.
v. t.
• To fight with; to oppose by force, argument, etc.; to contend against; to resist.
n.
• A fight; a contest of violence; a struggle for supremacy.
(Mil.) An engagement of no great magnitude; or one in which the parties engaged are not armies.
Combatable
a.
• Such as can be, or is liable to be, combated; as, combatable foes, evils, or arguments.
Combatant
a.
• Contending; disposed to contend.
n.
• One who engages in combat.
Combater
n.
• One who combats.
Combative
or
• (), a. Disposed to engage in combat; pugnacious.
Combativeness
n.
• The quality of being combative; propensity to contend or to quarrel.
(Phren.) A cranial development supposed to indicate a combative disposition.
Combattant
a.
(Her.) In the position of fighting; — said of two lions set face to face, each rampant.
Combbroach
n.
• A tooth of a wool comb.
Comber
n.
• One who combs; one whose occupation it is to comb wool, flax, etc. Also, a machine for combing wool, flax, etc.
• A long, curling wave.
v. t.
• To cumber.
n.
• Encumbrance.
n.
(Zool.) The cabrilla. Also, a name applied to a species of wrasse.
Combinable
a.
• Capable of combinding; consistent with.
Combinate
a.
• United; joined; betrothed.
Combination
n.
• The act or process of combining or uniting persons and things.
• The result of combining or uniting; union of persons or things; esp. a union or alliance of persons or states to effect some purpose; — usually in a bad sense.
(Chem.) The act or process of uniting by chemical affinity, by which substances unite with each other in definite proportions by weight to form distinct compounds.
(Math.) The different arrangements of a number of objects, as letters, into groups.
Combine
v. t.
• To unite or join; to link closely together; to bring into harmonious union; to cause or unite so as to form a homogeneous, as by chemical union.
• To bind; to hold by a moral tie.
v. i.
• To form a union; to agree; to coalesce; to confederate.
• To unite by affinity or natural attraction; as, two substances, which will not combine of themselves, may be made to combine by the intervention of a third.
(Card Playing) In the game of casino, to play a card which will take two or more cards whose aggregate number of pips equals those of the card played.
Combined
a.
• United closely; confederated; chemically united.
Combinedly
adv. In combination or cooperation
• ; jointly.
Combiner
n.
• One who, or that which, combines.
Combing
n.
• The act or process of using a comb or a number of combs; as, the combing of one's hair; the combing of wool.
• That which is caught or collected with a comb, as loose, tangled hair.
• Hair arranged to be worn on the head.
Combless
a.
• Without a comb or crest; as, a combless ceck.
Comboloio
n.
• A Mohammedan rosary, consisting of ninety-nine beads.
Combust
a.
• Burnt; consumed.
(Astron.) So near the sun as to be obscured or eclipsed by his light, as the moon or planets when not more than eight degrees and a half from the sun.
Combustibility
n.
• The quality of being combustible.
Combustible
a.
• Capable of taking fire and burning; apt to catch fire; inflammable.
• Eaily kindled or excited; quick; fiery; irascible.
n.
• A substance that may bee set on fire, or which is liable to take fire and burn.
Combustibleness
n.
• Combustibility.
Combustion
n.
• The state of burning.
(Chem.) The combination of a combustible with a supporter of combustion, producing heat, and sometimes both light and heat.
• Violent agitation; confusion; tumult.
Combustious
a.
• Inflammable.
Come
v. i.
• To move hitherward; to draw near; to approach the speaker, or some place or person indicated; — opposed to go.
• To complete a movement toward a place; to arrive.
• To approach or arrive, as if by a journey or form a distance.
• To approach or arrive, as the result of a cause, or of the act of another.
• To arrive in sight; to be manifest; to appear. 6. To get to be, as the result of change or progress; — with a predicate; as, to come united.
v. t.
• To carry through; to succeed in; as, you can't come any tricks here.
n.
• Coming.
Comedian
n.
• An actor or player in comedy.
• A writer of comedy.
Comedienne
n.
• A women who plays in comedy.
Comedietta
n.
• A dramatic sketch; a brief comedy.
Comedo
n.
(Med.) A small nodule or cystic tumor, common on the nose, etc., which on pressure allows the escape of a yellow wormlike mass of retained oily secretion, with a black head (dirt).
Comedown
n.
• A downfall; an humillation.
Comedy
n.
• A dramatic composition, or representation of a bright and amusing character, based upon the foibles of individuals, the manners of society, or the ludicrous events or accidents of life; a play in which mirth predominates and the termination of the plot is happy; — opposed to tragedy.
Comelily
adv.
• In a suitable or becoming manner.
Comeliness
n.
• The quality or state of being comely.
Comely
a.
• Pleasing or agreeable to the sight; well-proportioned; good-looking; handsome.
• Suitable or becoming; proper; agreeable.
adv.
• In a becoming manner.
Comer
n.
• One who comes, or who has come; one who has arrived, and is present.
Comes
n.
(Mus.) The answer to the theme (dux) in a fugue.
Comessation
n.
• A reveling; a rioting.
Comestible
a.
• Suitable to be eaten; eatable; esculent.
n.
• Something suitable to be eaten; — commonly in the plural.
Comet
n.
(Astron.) A member of the solar system which usually moves in an elongated orbit, approaching very near to the sun in its perihelion, and receding to a very great distance from it at its aphelion. A comet commonly consists of three parts: the nucleus, the envelope, or coma, and the tail; but one or more of these parts is frequently wanting.
Cometarium
n.
(Astron.) An instrument, intended to represent the revolution of a comet round the sun.
Cometary
a.
• Pertaining to, or resembling, a comet.
Cometic
a.
• Relating to a comet.
Cometographer
n.
• One who describes or writes about comets.
Cometography
n.
• A description of, or a treatise concerning, comets.
Cometollgy
n.
• The department of astronomy relating to comets.
Comfit
n.
• A dry sweetmeat; any kind of fruit, root, or seed preserved with sugar and dried; a confection.
v. t.
• To preserve dry with sugar.
Comfort
v. t.
• To make strong; to invigorate; to fortify; to corroborate.
• To assist or help; to aid.
• To impart strength and hope to; to encourage; to relieve; to console; to cheer,
n.
• Assistance; relief; support.
• Encouragement; solace; consolation in trouble; also, that which affords consolation.
• A state of quiet enjoyment; freedom from pain, want, or anxiety; also, whatever contributes to such a condition.
• A wadded bedquilt; a comfortable.
(Law) Unlawful support, countenance, or encouragement; as, to give aid and comfort to the enemy.
Comfortable
a.
• Strong; vigorous; valiant.
• Serviceable; helpful.
• Affording or imparting comfort or consolation; able to comfort; cheering; as, a comfortable hope.
• In a condition of comfort; having comforts; not suffering or anxious; hence, contented; cheerful; as, to lead a comfortable life.
• Free, or comparatively free, from pain or distress; — used of a sick person.
n.
• A stuffed or quilted coverlet for a bed; a comforter; a comfort.
Comfortableness
n.
• State of being comfortable or comforting manner.
Comforter
n.
• One who administers comfort or consolation.
(Script.) The Holy Spirit, — reffering to his office of comforting believers.
• A knit woolen tippet, long and narrow.
• A wadded bedquilt; a comfortable.
Comfortless
a.
• Without comfort or comforts; in want or distress; cheerless.
Comfortment
n.
• Act or process of administering comfort.
Comfortress
n.
• A woman who comforts.
Comfrey
n.
(Bot.) A rough, hairy, perennial plant of several species, of the genus Symphytum.
Comic
a.
• Relating to comedy, as distinct from tragedy.
• Causing mirth; ludicrous.
n.
• A comedian.
Comical
a.
• Relating to comedy.
• Exciting mirth; droll; laughable; as, a comical story.
Comicality
n.
• The quality of being comical; something comical.
Comicry
n.
• The power of exciting mirth; comicalness.
Coming
a.
• Approaching; of the future, especially the near future; the next; as, the coming week or year; the coming exhibition.
• Ready to come; complaisant; fond.
n.
• Approach; advent; manifestation; as, the coming of the train.
• Specifically: The Second Advent of Christ.
• Income or revenue.
Comitia
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) A public assembly of the Roman people for electing officers or passing laws.
Comitial
a.
• Relating to the comitia, or popular assembles of the Romans for electing officers and passing laws.
Comity
n.
• Mildness and suavity of manners; courtesy between equals; friendly equals; friendly civility; as, comity of manners; the comity of States.
Comma
n.
• A character or point [,] marking the smallest divisions of a sentence, written or printed.
(Mus.) A small interval (the difference beyween a major and minor half step), seldom used except by tuners.
Command
v. t.
• To order with authority; to lay injunction upon; to direct; to bid; to charge.
• To exercise direct authority over; to have control of; to have at one's disposal; to lead.
• To have within a sphere of control, influence, access, or vision; to dominate by position; to guard; to overlook.
• To have power or influence of the nature of authority over; to obtain as if by ordering; to reeceive as a due; to challenge; to claim; as, justice commands the respect and affections of the people; the best goods command the best price.
• To direct to come; to bestow.
v. i.
• To have or to exercise direct authority; to govern; to sway; to influence; to give an order or orders.
• To have a view, as from a superior position.
n.
• An authoritative order requiring obedience; a mandate; an injunction.
• The possession or exercise of authority.
• Authority; power or right of control; leadership; as, the forces under his command.
• Power to dominate, command, or overlook by means of position; scope of vision; survey.
• Control; power over something; sway; influence; as, to have command over one's temper or voice; the fort has command of the bridge.
• A body of troops, or any naval or military force or post, or the whole territory under the authority or control of a particular officer.
Commandable
a.
• Capable of being commanded.
Commandant
n.
• A commander; the commanding officer of a place, or of a body of men; as, the commandant of a navy-yard.
Commandatory
a.
• Mandatory; as, commandatory authority.
Commander
n.
• A chief; one who has supreme authority; a leader; the chief officer of an army, or of any division of it.
(Navy) An officer who ranks next below a captain, — ranking with a lieutenant colonel in the army.
• The chief officer of a commandery.
• A heavy beetle or wooden mallet, used in paving, in sail lofts, etc.
Commandership
n.
• The office of a commander.
Commandery
n.
• The office or rank of a commander.
• A district or a manor with lands and tenements appertaining thereto, under the control of a member of an order of knights who was called a commander; — called also a preceptory.
• An assembly or lodge of Knights Templars (so called) among the Freemasons.
• A district under the administration of a military commander or governor.
Commanding
a.
• Exercising authority; actually in command; as, a commanding officer.
• Fitted to impress or control; as, a commanding look or presence.
• Exalted; overlooking; having superior strategic advantages; as, a commanding position.
Commandingly
adv.
• In a commanding manner.
Commandment
n.
• An order or injunction given by authority; a command; a charge; a precept; a mandate.
(Script.) One of the ten laws or precepts given by God to the Israelites at Mount Sinai.
• The act of commanding; exercise of authority.
(Law) The offense of commanding or inducing another to violate the law.
Commandress
n.
• A woman invested with authority to command.
Commark
n.
• The frontier of a country; confines.
Commaterial
a.
• Consisting of the same material.
Commatic
a.
• Having short clauses or sentences; brief; concise.
Commatism
n.
• Conciseness in writing.
Commeasurable
a.
• Having the same measure; commensurate; proportional.
Commeasure
v. t.
• To be commensurate with; to equal.
Commemorable
a.
• Worthy to be commemorated.
Commemorate
v. t.
• To call to remembrance by a special act or observance; to celebrate with honor and solemnity; to honor, as a person or event, by some act of respect of affection, intended to preserve the remembrance of the person or event; as, to commemorate the sufferings and dying love of our Savior by the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; to commemorate the Declaration of Independence by the observance of the Fourth of July.
Commemoration
n.
• The act of commemorating; an observance or celebration designed to honor the memory of some person or event.
• Whatever serves the purpose of commemorating; a memorial.
Commemorative
a.
• Tending or intended to commemorate.
Commemorator
n.
• One who commemorates.
Commemoratory
a.
• Serving to commemorate; commomerative.
Commence
v. i.
• To have a beginning or origin; to originate; to start; to begin.
• To begin to be, or to act as.
• To take a degree at a university.
v. t.
• To enter upon; to begin; to perform the first act of.
Commencement
n.
• The first existence of anything; act or fact of commencing; rise; origin; beginnig; start.
• The day when degrees are conferred by colleges and universities upon students and others.
Commend
v. t.
• To commit, intrust, or give in charge for care or preservation.
• To recommend as worthy of confidence or regard; to present as worthy of notice or favorable attention.
• To mention with approbation; to praise; as, to commend a person or an act.
• To mention by way of courtesy, implying remembrance and good will.
n.
• Commendation; praise.
• Compliments; greetings.
Commendable
a.
• Worthy of being commended or praised; laudable; praiseworthy.
Commendam
n.
(Eng. Eccl. Law) A vacant living or benefice commended to a cleric (usually a bishop) who enjoyed the revenue until a pastor was provided. A living so held was said to be held in commendam. The practice was abolished by law in 1836.
Commendatary
n.
• One who holds a living in commendam.
Commendation
n.
• The act of commending; praise; favorable representation in words; recommendation.
• That which is the ground of approbation or praise.
• A message of affection or respect; compliments; greeting.
Commendator
n.
• One who holds a benefice in commendam; a commendatary.
Commendatory
a.
• Serving to commend; containing praise or commendation; commending; praising.
• Holding a benefice in commendam; as, a commendatory bishop.
n.
• A commendation; eulogy.
Commender
n.
• One who commends or praises.
Commensal
n.
• One who eats at the same table.
(Zool.) An animal, not truly parasitic, which lives in with, or on, another, partaking usually of the same food. Both species may be benefited by the association.
a.
• Having the character of a commensal.
Commensalism
n.
• The act of eating together; table fellowship.
Commensality
n.
• Fellowship at table; the act or practice of eating at the same table.
Commensation
n.
• Commensality.
Commensurability
n.
• The quality of being commersurable.
Commensurable
a.
• Having a common measure; capable of being exactly measured by the same number, quantity, or measure.
Commensurably
adv.
• In a commensurable manner; so as to be commensurable.
Commensurate
v. t.
• To reduce to a common measure.
• To proportionate; to adjust.
a.
• Having a common measure; commensurable; reducible to a common measure; as, commensurate quantities.
• Equal in measure or extent; proportionate.
Commensurately
adv.
• In a commensurate manner; so as to be equal or proportionate; adequately.
• With equal measure or extent.
Commensurateness
n.
• The state or quality of being commensurate.
Commensuration
n.
• The act of commensurating; the state of being commensurate.
Comment
v. i.
• To make remarks, observations, or criticism; especially, to write notes on the works of an author, with a view to illustrate his meaning, or to explain particular passages; to write annotations; — often followed by on or upon.
v. t.
• To comment on.
n.
• A remark, observation, or criticism; gossip; discourse; talk.
• A note or observation intended to explain, illustrate, or criticise the meaning of a writing, book, etc.; explanation; annotation; exposition.
Commentary
n.
• A series of comments or annotations; esp., a book of explanations or expositions on the whole or a part of the Scriptures or of some other work.
• A brief account of transactions or events written hastily, as if for a memorandum; — usually in the plural; as, Caesar's Commentaries on the Gallic War.
Commentate
v. t. & i.
• To write comments or notes upon; to make comments.
Commentation
n.
• The act or process of commenting or criticising; exposition.
• The result of the labors of a commentator.
Commentator
n.
• One who writes a commentary or comments; an expositor; an annotator.
Commentatorial
a.
• Pertaining to the making of commentaries.
Commentatorship
n.
• The office or occupation of a commentator.
Commenter
n.
• One who makes or writes comments; a commentator; an annotator.
Commentitious
a.
• Fictitious or imaginary; unreal; as, a commentitious system of religion.
Commerce
n.
• The exchange or buying and selling of commodities; esp. the exchange of merchandise, on a large scale, between different places or communities; extended trade or traffic.
• Social intercourse; the dealings of one person or class in society with another; familiarity.
• Sexual intercourse.
• A round game at cards, in which the cards are subject to exchange, barter, or trade.
v. i.
• To carry on trade; to traffic.
• To hold intercourse; to commune.
Commercial
a.
• Of or pertaining to commerce; carrying on or occupied with commerce or trade; mercantile; as, commercial advantages; commercial relations.
Commercialism
n.
• The commercial spirit or method.
Commercially
adv.
• In a commercial manner.
Commigrate
v. i.
• To migrate together.
Commigration
n.
• Migration together.
Commination
n.
• A threat or threatening; a denunciation of punishment or vengeance.
• An office in the liturgy of the Church of England, used on Ash Wednesday, containing a recital of God's anger and judgments against sinners.
Comminatory
a.
• Threatening or denouncing punishment; as, comminatory terms.
Commingle
v. t. & i.
• To mingle together; to mix in one mass, or intimately; to blend.
Comminute
v. t.
• To reduce to minute particles, or to a fine powder; to pulverize; to triturate; to grind; as, to comminute chalk or bones; to comminute food with the teeth.
Comminution
n.
• The act of reducing to a fine powder or to small particles; pulverization; the state of being comminuted.
(Surg.) Fracture (of a bone) into a number of pieces.
• Gradual diminution by the removal of small particles at a time; a lessening; a wearing away.
Commiserable
a.
• Pitiable.
Commiserate
v. t.
• To feel sorrow, pain, or regret for; to pity.
Commiseration
n.
• The act of commiserating; sorrow for the wants, afflictions, or distresses of another; pity; compassion.
Commiserative
a.
• Feeling or expressing commiseration.
Commiserator
n.
• One who pities.
Commissarial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a commissary.
Commissariat
n.
(Mil.) The organized system by which armies and military posts are supplied with food and daily necessaries.
• The body of officers charged with such service.
Commissary
n.
• One to whom is committed some charge, duty, or office, by a superior power; a commissioner.
(Eccl.) An officer on the bishop, who exercises ecclesiastical jurisdiction in parts of the diocese at a distance from the residence of the bishop.
(Mil.) An officer having charge of a special sevice; as, the commissary of musters.
• An officer whose business is to provide food for a body of troops or a military post; — officially called commissary of subsistence.
Commissaryship
n.
• The office or employment of a commissary.
Commission
n.
• The act of committing, doing, or performing; the act of perpetrating.
• The act of intrusting; a charge; instructions as to how a trust shall be executed.
• The duty or employment intrusted to any person or persons; a trust; a charge.
• A formal written warrant or authority, granting certain powers or privileges and authorizing or commanding the performance of certain duties.
• A certificate conferring military or naval rank and authority; as, a colonel's commission.
• A company of persons joined in the performance of some duty or the execution of some trust; as, the interstate commerce commission.
(Com.) The acting under authority of, or on account of, another.
• The thing to be done as agent for another; as, I have three commissions for the city.
• The brokerage or allowance made to a factor or agent for transacting business for another; as, a commission of ten per cent on sales.
v. t.
• To give a commission to; to furnish with a commission; to empower or authorize; as, to commission persons to perform certain acts; to commission an officer.
• To send out with a charge or commission.
Commissionate
v. t.
• To commission
Commissioner
n.
• A person who has a commission or warrant to perform some office, or execute some bussiness, for the goverment, corporation, or person employing him; as, a commissioner to take affidavits or to adjust claims.
• An officer having charge of some department or bureau of the public service.
Commissionnaire
n.
• An agent or factor; a commission merchant.
• One of a class of attendants, in some European cities, who perform miscellaneous services for travelers.
Commissionship
n.
• The office of commissioner.
Commissive
a.
• Relating to commission; of the nature of, or involving, commission.
Commissural
a.
• Of or pertaining to a commissure.
Commissure
n.
• A joint, seam, or closure; the place where two bodies, or parts of a body, meet and unite; an interstice, cleft, or juncture.
(Anat. & Zool.) The point of union between two parts, as the angles of the lips or eyelids, the mandibles of a bird, etc.
• A collection of fibers connecting parts of the brain or spinal marrow; a chiasma.
(Bot.) The line of junction or cohering face of two carpels, as in the parsnip, caraway, etc.
Commit
v. t.
• To give in trust; to put into charge or keeping; to intrust; to consign; — used with to, unto.
• To put in charge of a jailor; to imprison.
• To do; to perperate, as a crime, sin, or fault.
• To join a contest; to match; — followed by with.
• To pledge or bind; to compromise, expose, or endanger by some decisive act or preliminary step; — often used reflexively; as, to commit one's self to a certain course.
• To confound.
v. i.
• To sin; esp., to be incontinent.
Commitment
n.
• The act of commiting, or putting in charge, keeping, or trust; consigment; esp., the act of commiting to prison.
• A warrant or order for the imprisonment of a person; — more frequently termed a mittimus.
• The act of referring or intrusting to a committee for consideration and report; as, the commitment of a petition or a bill.
• A doing, or preperation, in a bad sense, as of a crime or blunder; commission.
• The act of pledging or engaging; the act of exposing, endangering, or compromising; also, the state of being pledged or engaged.
Committable
a.
• Capable of being committed.
Committal
n.
• The act of commiting, or the state of being committed; commitment.
Committee
n.
• One or more persons elected or appointed, to whom any matter or bussiness is referred, either by a legislative body, or by a court, or by any collective body of men acting together.
n.
(Law) One to whom the charge of the person or estate of another, as of a lunatic, is committed by suitable authority; a guardian.
Committeeman
n.
• A member of a committee.
Committer
n.
• One who commits; one who does or perpetrates.
• A fornicator.
Committible
a.
• Capable of being committed; liable to be committed.
Commix
v. t. & i.
• To mix or mingle together; to blend.
Commixion
n.
• Commixture.
Commixtion
n.
• Commixture; mingling.
Commixture
n.
• The act or process of mixing; the state of being mingled; the blending of ingredients in one mass or compound.
• The mass formed by mingling different things; a compound; a mixture.
Commodate
n.
(Scots Law) A gratuitous loan.
Commode
n.
• A kind of headdress formerly worn by ladies, raising the hair and fore part of the cap to a great height.
• A piece of furniture, so named according to temporary fashion; as: (a) A cheat of drawers or a bureau. (b) A night stand with a compartment for holding a chamber vessel. (c) A kind of close stool. (d) A movable sink for a wash bowl, with closet.
Commodious
a.
• Adapted to its use or purpose, or to wants and necessities; serviceable; spacious and convenient; roomy and comfortable; as, a commodious house.
Commodiously
adv.
• In a commodious manner.
Commodiousness
n.
• State of being commodious; suitableness for its purpose; convience; roominess.
Commodity
n.
• Convenience; accommodation; profit; benefit; advantage; interest; commodiousness.
• That which affords convenience, advantage, or profit, especially in commerce, including everything movable that is bought and sold (except animals), — goods, wares, merchandise, produce of land and manufactures, etc.
• A parcel or quantity of goods.
Commodore
n.
(U. S. Navy) An officer who ranks next above a captain; sometimes, by courtesy, the senior captain of a squadron. The rank of commodore corresponds with that of brigadier general in the army.
(Brititsh Navy) A captain commanding a squadron, or a division of a fleet, or having the temporary rank of rear admiral.
• A title given courtesy to the senior captain of a line of merchant vessels, and also to the chief officer of a yachting or rowing club.
• A familiar for the flagchip, or for the principal vessel of a squadron or fleet.
Common
a.
• Belonging or relating equally, or similary, to more than one; as, you and I have a common interest in the property.
• Belonging to or shared by, affecting or serving, all the members of a class, consired together; general; public; as, propertis common to all plants; the common schools; the Book of Common Prayer.
• Often met with; usual; frequent; customary.
• Not distinguished or exceptional; inconspicuous; ordinary; plebeian; — often in a depreciatory sense.
• Profane; polluted.
• Given to habits of lewdness; prostitute.(Law)(Law)(Law)(Law)(Mus.)(Math.)(Gram.)(Law)(Arith.)(Gram.)(Law)(Law)(Mus.)
n.
• The people; the community.
• An inclosed or uninclosed tract of ground for pleasure, for pasturage, etc., the use of which belongs to the public; or to a number of persons.
(Law) The right of taking a profit in the land of another, in common either with the owner or with other persons; — so called from the community of interest which arises between the claimant of the right and the owner of the soil, or between the claimants and other commoners entitled to the same right.
v. i.
• To converse together; to discourse; to confer.
• To participate.
• To have a joint right with others in common ground.
• To board together; to eat at a table in common.
Commonable
a.
• Held in common.
• Allowed to pasture on public commons.
Commonage
n.
• The right of pasturing on a common; the right of using anything in common with others.
Commonalty
n.
• The common people; those classes and conditions of people who are below the rank of nobility; the commons.
• The majority or bulk of mankind.
Commoner
n.
• One of the common people; one having no rank of nobility.
• A member of the House of Commons.
• One who has a joint right in common ground.
• One sharing with another in anything.
• A student in the university of Oxford, Eng., who is not dependent on any foundation for support, but pays all university charges; — at Cambrige called a pensioner.
• A prostitute.
Commonish
a.
• Somewhat common; commonplace; vulgar.
Commonition
n.
• Advice; warning; instruction.
Commonitive
a.
• Monitory.
Commonitory
a.
• Calling to mind; giving admonition.
Commonly
adv.
• Usually; generally; ordinarily; frequently; for the most part; as, confirmed habits commonly continue trough life.
• In common; familiary.
Commonness
n.
• State or quality of being common or usual; as, the commonness of sunlight.
• Triteness; meanness.
Commonplace
a.
• Common; ordinary; trite; as, a commonplace person, or observation.
n.
• An idea or expression wanting originality or interest; a trite or customary remark; a platitude.
• A memorandum; something to be frequently consulted or referred to.
v. t.
• To enter in a commonplace book, or to reduce to general heads.
v. i.
• To utter commonplaces; to indulge in platitudes.
Commonplaceness
n.
• The quality of being commonplace; commonness.
Commons
n. pl.
• The mass of the people, as distinguished from the titled chasses or nobility; the commonalty; the common people.
• The House of Commons, or lower house of the British Parliament, consisting of representatives elected by the qualified voters of counties, boroughs, and universities.
• Provisions; food; fare, — as that provided at a common table in colleges and universities.
• A club or association for boarding at a common table, as in a college, the members sharing the expenses equally; as, to board in commons.
• A common; public pasture ground.
Commonty
n.
(Scots Law) A common; a piece of land in which two or more persons have a common right.
Commonweal
n.
• Commonwealth.
Commonwealth
n.
• A state; a body politic consisting of a certain number of men, united, by compact or tacit agreement, under one form of government and system of laws.
• The whole body of people in a state; the public.
(Eng. Hist.) Specifically, the form of government established on the death of Charles I., in 1649, which existed under Oliver Cromwell and his son Richard, ending with the abdication of the latter in 1659.
Commorancy
n.
(Law) A dwelling or ordinary residence in a place; habitation.
(Am. Law) Residence temporarily, or for a short time.
Commorant
n.
(Law) Ordinarily residing; inhabiting.
(Am. Law) Inhabiting or occupying temporarily.
n.
• A resident.
Commoration
n.
• The act of staying or residing in a place.
Commorient
a.
• Dying together or at the same time.
Commorse
n.
• Remorse.
Commote
v. t.
• To commove; to disturb; to stir up.
Commotion
n.
• Disturbed or violent motion; agitation.
• A popular tumult; public disturbance; riot.
• Agitation, perturbation, or disorder, of mind; heat; excitement.
Commove
v. t.
• To urge; to persuade; to incite.
• To put in motion; to disturb; to unsettle.
Commpatient
a.
• Suffering or enduring together.
Communal
a.
• Pertaining to a commune.
Communalism
n.
• A French theory of government which holds that commune should be a kind of independent state, and the national government a confederation of such states, having only limited powers. It is advocated by advanced French republicans; but it should not be confounded with communism.
Communalist
n.
• An advocate of communalism.
Communalistic
a.
• Pertaining to communalism.
Commune
v. i.
• To converse together with sympathy and confidence; to interchange sentiments or feelings; to take counsel.
• To receive the communion; to partake of the eucharist or Lord's supper.
n.
• Communion; sympathetic intercourse or conversation between friends.
n.
• The commonalty; the common people.
• A small terrotorial district in France under the government of a mayor and municipal council; also, the inhabitants, or the government, of such a district.
• Absolute municipal self-government.
Communicability
n.
• The quality of being communicable; capability of being imparted.
Communicable
a.
• Capable of being communicated, or imparted; as, a communicable disease; communicable knowledge.
• Communicative; free-speaking.
Communicant
n.
• One who partakes of, or is entitled to partake of, the sacrament of the Lord's supper; a church member.
• One who communicates.
a.
• Communicating.
Communicate
v. t.
• To share in common; to participate in.
• To impart; to convey; as, to communicate a disease or a sensation; to communicate motion by means of a crank.
• To make known; to recount; to give; to impart; as, to communicate information to any one.
• To administer the communion to.
v. i.
• To share or participate; to possess or enjoy in common; to have sympathy.
• To give alms, sympathy, or aid.
• To have intercourse or to be the means of intercourse; as, to communicate with another on business; to be connected; as, a communicating artery.
• To partake of the Lord's supper; to commune.
Communication
n.
• The act or fact of communicating; as, communication of smallpox; communication of a secret.
• Intercourse by words, letters, or messages; interchange of thoughts or opinions, by conference or other means; conference; correspondence.
• Association; company.
• Means of communicating; means of passing from place to place; a connecting passage; connection.
• That which is communicated or imparted; intelligence; news; a verbal or written message.
• Participation in the Lord's supper.
(Rhet.) A trope, by which a speaker assumes that his hearer is a partner in his sentiments, and says we, instead of I or you.
Communicative
a.
• Inclined to communicate; ready to impart to others.
Communicativeness
n.
• The quality of being communicative.
Communicator
n.
• One who communicates.
Communicatory
a.
• Imparting knowledge or information.
Communion
n.
• The act of sharing; community; participation.
• Intercourse between two or more persons; esp., intimate association and intercourse implying sympathy and confidence; interchange of thoughts, purposes, etc.; agreement; fellowship; as, the communion of saints.
• A body of Christians having one common faith and discipline; as, the Presbyterian communion.
• The sacrament of the eucharist; the celebration of the Lord's supper; the act of partaking of the sacrament; as, to go to communion; to partake of the communion.
Communism
n.
• A scheme of equalizing the social conditions of life; specifically, a scheme which contemplates the abolition of inequalities in the possession of property, as by distributing all wealth equally to all, or by holding all wealth in common for the equal use and advantage of all.
Communist
n.
• An advocate for the theory or practice of communism.
• A supporter of the commune of Paris.
Communistic
a.
• Of or pertaining to communism or communists; as, communistic theories.
(Zool.) Living or having their nests in common, as certain birds.
Community
n.
• Common possession or enjoyment; participation; as, a community of goods.
• A body of people having common rights, privileges, or interests, or living in the same place under the same laws and regulations; as, a community of monks. Hence a number of animals living in a common home or with some apparent association of interests.
• Society at large; a commonwealth or state; a body politic; the public, or people in general.
• Common character; likeness.
• Commonness; frequency.
Commutability
n.
• The quality of being commutable.
Commutable
a.
• Capable of being commuted or interchanged.
Commutableness
n.
• The quality of being commutable; interchangeableness.
Commutation
n.
• A passing from one state to another; change; alteration; mutation.
• The act of giving one thing for another; barter; exchange.
(Law) The change of a penalty or punishment by the pardoning power of the State; as, the commutation of a sentence of death to banishment or imprisonment.
• A substitution, as of a less thing for a greater, esp. a substitution of one form of payment for another, or one payment for many, or a specific sum of money for conditional payments or allowances; as, commutation of tithes; commutation of fares; commutation of copyright; commutation of rations.
Commutative
a.
• Relative to exchange; interchangeable; reciprocal.
Commutator
n.
(Elec.) A piece of apparatus used for reversing the direction of an electrical current; an attachment to certain electrical machines, by means of which alternating currents are made to be continuous or to have the same direction.
Commute
v. t.
• To exchange; to put or substitute something else in place of, as a smaller penalty, obligation, or payment, for a greater, or a single thing for an aggregate; hence; to lessen; to diminish; as, to commute a sentence of death to one of imprisonment for life; to commute tithes; to commute charges for fares.
v. i.
• To obtain or bargain for exemption or substitution; to effect a commutation.
• To pay, or arrange to pay, in gross instead of part by part; as, to commute for a year's travel over a route.
Commuter
n.
• One who commutes; especially, one who commutes in traveling.
Commutual
a.
• Mutual; reciprocal; united.
Comose
a.
(Bot.) Bearing a tuft of soft hairs or down, as the seeds of milkweed.
Compact
p. p. & a
• Joined or held together; leagued; confederated.
• Composed or made; — with of.
• Closely or firmly united, as the particles of solid bodies; firm; close; solid; dense.
• Brief; close; pithy; not diffuse; not verbose; as, a compact discourse.
v. t.
• To thrust, drive, or press closely together; to join firmly; to consolidate; to make close; — as the parts which compose a body.
• To unite or connect firmly, as in a system.
n.
• An agreement between parties; a covenant or contract.
Compacted
a.
• Compact; pressed close; concentrated; firmly united.
Compactedly
adv.
• In a compact manner.
Compactedness
n.
• A state of being compact.
Compacter
n.
• One who makes a compact.
Compactible
a.
• That may be compacted.
Compaction
n.
• The act of making compact, or the state of being compact.
Compactly
adv.
• In a compact manner; with close union of parts; densely; tersely.
Compactness
n.
• The state or quality of being compact; close union of parts; density.
Compacture
n.
• Close union or connection of parts; manner of joining; construction.
Compages
n. sing & pl.
• A system or structure of many parts united.
Compaginate
v. t.
• To unite or hold together; as, the side pieces compaginate the frame.
Compagination
n.
• Union of parts; structure.
Companable
a.
• Companionable; sociable.
Companator
n.
(Eccl.) Same as Impanator.
Companiable
a.
• Companionable; sociable.
Companion
n.
• One who accompanies or is in company with another for a longer or shorter period, either from choice or casually; one who is much in the company of, or is associated with, another or others; an associate; a comrade; a consort; a partner.
• A knight of the lowest rank in certain orders; as, a companion of the Bath.
• A fellow; — in contempt.
(Naut.) A skylight on an upper deck with frames and sashes of various shapes, to admit light to a cabin or lower deck.
• A wooden hood or penthouse covering the companion way; a companion hatch.
v. t.
• To be a companion to; to attend on; to accompany.
• To qualify as a companion; to make equal.
Companionable
a.
• Fitted to be a companion; fit for good fellowship; agreeable; sociable.
Companionless
a.
• Without a companion.
Companionship
n.
• Fellowship; association; the act or fact of keeping company with any one.
Company
n.
• The state of being a companion or companions; the act of accompaying; fellowship; companionship; society; friendly intercourse.
• A companion or companions.
• An assemblage or association of persons, either permanent or transient.
• Guests or visitors, in distinction from the members of a family; as, to invite company to dine.
• Society, in general; people assembled for social intercourse.
• An association of persons for the purpose of carrying on some enterprise or business; a corporation; a firm; as, the East India Company; an insurance company; a joint-stock company.
• Partners in a firm whose names are not mentioned in its style or title; — often abbreviated in writing; as, Hottinguer & Co.
(Mil.) A subdivision of a regiment of troops under the command of a captain, numbering in the United States (full strength) 100 men.
(Naut.) The crew of a ship, including the officers; as, a whole ship's company.
• The body of actors employed in a theater or in the production of a play.
v. t.
• To accompany or go with; to be companion to.
v. i.
• To associate.
• To be a gay companion.
• To have sexual commerce.
Comparable
a.
• Capable of being compared; worthy of comparison.
Comparate
n.
(Logic) One of two things compared together.
Comparation
n.
• A making ready; provision.
Comparative
a.
• Of or pertaining to comparison.
• Proceeding from, or by the method of, comparison; as, the comparative anatomy.
• Estimated by comparison; relative; not positive or absolute, as compared with another thing or state.
(Gram.) Expressing a degree greater or less than the positive degree of the quality denoted by an adjective or adverb. The comparative degree is formed from the positive by the use of -er, more, or less; as, brighter, more bright, or less bright.
n.
(Gram.) The comparative degree of adjectives and adverbs; also, the form by which the comparative degree is expressed; as, stronger, wiser, weaker, wore stormy, less windy, are all comparatives.
• An equal; a rival; a compeer.
• One who makes comparisons; one who affects wit.
Comparatively
adv.
• According to estimate made by comparison; relatively; not positively or absolutely.
Comparator
n.
(Physics) An instrument or machine for comparing anything to be measured with a standard measure; — applied especially to a machine for comparing standards of length.
Compare
v. t.
• To examine the character or qualities of, as of two or more persons or things, for the purpose of discovering their resemblances or differences; to bring into comparison; to regard with discriminating attention.
• To represent as similar, for the purpose of illustration; to liken.
(Gram.) To inflect according to the degrees of comparison; to state positive, comparative, and superlative forms of; as, most adjectives of one syllable are compared by affixing "-er" and "-est" to the positive form; as, black, blacker, blackest; those of more than one syllable are usually compared by prefixing "more" and "most", or "less" and "least", to the positive; as, beautiful, more beautiful, most beautiful.
v. i.
• To be like or equal; to admit, or be worthy of, comparison; as, his later work does not compare with his earlier.
• To vie; to assume a likeness or equality.
n.
• Comparison.
• Illustration by comprison; simile.
v. t.
• To get; to procure; to obtain; to acquire
Comparer
n.
• One who compares.
Comparison
n.
• The act of comparing; an examination of two or more objects with the view of discovering the resemblances or differences; relative estimate.
• The state of being compared; a relative estimate; also, a state, quality, or relation, admitting of being compared; as, to bring a thing into comparison with another; there is no comparison between them.
• That to which, or with which, a thing is compared, as being equal or like; illustration; similitude.
(Gram.) The modification, by inflection or otherwise, which the adjective and adverb undergo to denote degrees of quality or quantity; as, little, less, least, are examples of comparison.
(Rhet.) A figure by which one person or thing is compared to another, or the two are considered with regard to some property or quality, which is common to them both; e.g., the lake sparkled like a jewel.
(Phren.) The faculty of the reflective group which is supposed to perceive resemblances and contrasts.(Law)
v. t.
• To compare.
Compart
v. t.
• To divide; to mark out into parts or subdivisions.
Compartition
n.
• The act of dividing into parts or compartments; division; also, a division or compartment.
Compartment
n.
• One of the parts into which an inclosed portion of space is divided, as by partitions, or lines; as, the compartments of a cabinet, a house, or a garden.
(Shipbuilding) One of the sections into which the hold of a ship is divided by water-tight bulkheads.
Compass
n.
• A passing round; circuit; circuitous course.
• An inclosing limit; boundary; circumference; as, within the compass of an encircling wall.
• An inclosed space; an area; extent.
• Extent; reach; sweep; capacity; sphere; as, the compass of his eye; the compass of imagination.
• Moderate bounds, limits of truth; moderation; due limits; — used with within.
(Mus.) The range of notes, or tones, within the capacity of a voice or instument.
• An instrument for determining directions upon the carth's surface by means of a magnetized bar or needle turning freely upon a pivot and pinting in a northerly and southerly direction.
• A pair of compasses.
• A circle; a continent.(Shipbuilding)(Arch.)
v. t.
• To go about or entirely round; to make the circuit of.
• To inclose on all sides; to surround; to encircle; to envior; to invest; to besiege; — used with about, round, around, and round about.
• To curve; to bend into a circular form.
(Law) To purpose; to intend; to imagine; to plot.
Compassable
a.
• Capable of being compassed or accomplished.
Compassed
a.
• Rounded; arched.
Compasses
n.
• An instrument for describing circles, measuring figures, etc., consisting of two, or (rarely) more, pointed branches, or legs, usually joined at the top by a rivet on which they move.
Compassing
a.
(Shipbuilding) Curved; bent; as, compassing timbers.
Compassion
n.
• Literally, suffering with another; a sensation of sorrow excited by the distress or misfortunes of another; pity; commiseration.
v. t.
• To pity.
Compassionable
a.
• Deserving compassion or pity; pitiable.
Compassionate
a.
• Having a temper or disposition to pity; sympathetic; merciful.
• Complaining; inviting pity; pitiable.
v. t.
• To have compassion for; to pity; to commiserate; to sympathize with.
Compassionately
adv.
• In a compassionate manner; mercifully.
Compassionateness
n.
• The quality or state of being compassionate.
Compassless
a.
• Having no compass.
Compaternity
n.
• The relation of a godfather to a person.
Compatibility
n.
• The quality or power of being compatible or congruous; congruity; as, a compatibility of tempers; a compatibility of properties.
Compatible
a.
• Capable of existing in harmony; congruous; suitable; not repugnant; — usually followed by with.
Compatibleness
n.
• Compatibility; consistency; fitness; agreement.
Compatibly
adv.
• In a compatible manner.
Compatriot
n.
• One of the same country, and having like interests and feeling.
a.
• Of the same country; having a common sentiment of patriotism.
Compatriotism
n.
• The condition of being compatriots.
Compear
v. i.
• To appear.
(Law) To appear in court personally or by attorney.
Compeer
• An equal, as in rank, age, prowess, etc.; a companion; a comrade; a mate.
v. t.
• To be equal with; to match.
Compel
v. t.
• To drive or urge with force, or irresistibly; to force; to constrain; to oblige; to necessitate, either by physical or moral force.
• To take by force or violence; to seize; to exact; to extort.
• To force to yield; to overpower; to subjugate.
• To gather or unite in a crowd or company.
• To call forth; to summon.
v. i.
• To make one yield or submit.
Compellable
a.
• Capable of being compelled or constrained.
Compellably
adv.
• By compulsion.
Compellation
n.
• Style of address or salutation; an appellation.
Compellative
n.
(Gram.) The name by which a person is addressed; an appellative.
Compellatory
a.
• Serving to compel; compulsory.
Compeller
n.
• One who compels or constrains.
Compend
n.
• A compendium; an epitome; a summary.
Compendiarious
a.
• Short; compendious.
Compendiate
v. t.
• To sum or collect together.
Compendious
a.
• Containing the substance oe general principles of a subject or work in a narrow compass; abridged; summarized.
Compendiously
dv.
• In a compendious manner.
Compendiousness
n.
• The state or quality of being compendious.
Compendium
n.
• A brief compilation or composition, containing the principal heads, or general principles, of a larger work or system; an abridgment; an epitome; a compend; a condensed summary.
Compensate
v. t.
• To make equal return to; to remunerate; to recompence; to give an equivalent to; to requite suitably; as, to compensate a laborer for his work, or a merchant for his losses.
• To be equivalent in value or effect to; to counterbalance; to make up for; to make amends for.
v. i.
• To make amends; to supply an equivalent; — followed by for; as, nothing can compensate for the loss of reputation.
Compensation
n.
• The act or principle of compensating.
• That which constitutes, or is regarded as, an equivalent; that which makes good the lack or variation of something else; that which compensates for loss or privation; amends; remuneration; recompense.
(Law) The extinction of debts of which two persons are reciprocally debtors by the credits of which they are reciprocally creditors; the payment of a debt by a credit of equal amount; a set-off.
• A recompense or reward for some loss or service.
• An equivalent stipulated for in contracts for the sale of real eatate, in which it is customary to privide that errors in description, etc., shall not avoid, but shall be the subject of compensation.
Compensative
a.
• Affording compensation.
n.
• Compensation.
Compensator
n.
• One who, or that which, compensates; — a name applied to various mechanical devices.
(Naut.) An iron plate or magnet placed near the compass on iron vessels to neutralize the effect of the ship's attraction on the needle.
Compensatory
a.
• Serving for compensation; making amends.
Compense
v. t.
• To compensate.
Comperendinate
v. t.
• To delay.
Compesce
v. t.
• To hold in check; to restrain.
Compete
v. i.
• To contend emulously; to seek or strive for the same thing, position, or reward for which another is striving; to contend in rivalry, as for a prize or in business; as, tradesmen compete with one another.
Competent
a.
• Answering to all requirements; adeqouate; sufficient; suitable; capable; legally qualified; fit.
• Rightfully or properly belonging; incident; — followed by to.
Competently
adv.
• In a competent manner; adequately; suitably.
Competible
a.
• Compatible; suitable; consistent.
Competition
n.
• The act of seeking, or endevearing to gain, what another is endeavoring to gain at the same time; common strife for the same objects; strife for superiority; emulous contest; rivalry, as for approbation, for a prize, or as where two or more persons are engaged in the same business and each seeking patronage; — followed by for before the object sought, and with before the person or thing competed with.
Competitive
a.
• Of or pertaining to competition; producing competition; competitory; as, a competitive examination.
Competitor
n.
• One who seeks what another seeks, or claims what another claims; one who competes; a rival.
• An associate; a confederate.
Competitory
a.
• Acting in competition; competing; rival.
Competitress
n.
• A woman who competes.
Competitrix
n.
• A competitress.
Compilation
n.
• The act or process of compiling or gathering together from various sources.
• That which is compiled; especially, a book or document composed of materials gathering from other books or documents.
Compilator
n.
• Compiler.
Compile
v. t.
• To put together; to construct; to build.
• To contain or comprise.
• To put together in a new form out of materials already existing; esp., to put together or compose out of materials from other books or documents.
• To write; to compose.
Compilement
n.
• Compilation.
Compiler
n.
• One who compiles; esp., one who makes books by compilation.
Compinge
v. t.
• To compress; to shut up.
Complacent
a.
• Self-satisfied; contented; kindly; as, a complacent temper; a complacent smile.
Complacential
a.
• Marked by, or causing, complacence.
Complacently
adv.
• In a complacent manner.
Complain
v. i.
• To give utterance to expression of grief, pain, censure, regret. etc.; to lament; to murmur; to find fault; — commonly used with of. Also, to creak or squeak, as a timber or wheel.
• To make a formal accusation; to make a charge.
v. t.
• To lament; to bewail.
Complainable
a.
• That may be complained of.
Complainant
n.
• One who makes complaint.
(Law) One who commences a legal process by a complaint.
• The party suing in equity, answering to the plaintiff at common law.
Complainer
n.
• One who complains or laments; one who finds fault; a murmurer.
Complaint
n.
• Expression of grief, regret, pain, censure, or resentment; lamentation; murmuring; accusation; fault-finding.
• Cause or subject of complaint or murmuring.
• An ailment or disease of the body.
(Law) A formal allegation or charge against a party made or presented to the appropriate court or officer, as for a wrong done or a crime committed (in the latter case, generally under oath); an information; accusation; the initial bill in proceedings in equity.
Complaintful
a.
• Full of complaint.
Complaisance
n.
• Disposition to please or oblige; obliging compliance with the wishes of others; a deportment indicative of a desire to please; courtesy; civility.
Complaisant
a.
• Desirous to please; courteous; obliging; compliant; as, a complaisant gentleman.
Complanate
a.
• Flattened to a level surface.
v. t.
• To make level.
Complected
a.
• Complexioned.
Complement
n.
• That which fills up or completes; the quantity or number required to fill a thing or make it complete.
• That which is required to supply a deficiency, or to complete a symmetrical whole.
• Full quantity, number, or amount; a complete set; completeness.
(Math.) A second quantity added to a given quantity to make equal to a third given quantity.
• Something added for ornamentation; an accessory.
(Naut.) The whole working force of a vessel.
(Mus.) The interval wanting to complete the octave; — the fourth is the complement of the fifth, the sixth of the third.
• A compliment.
v. t.
• To supply a lack; to supplement.
• To compliment.
Complemental
a.
• Supplying, or tending to supply, a deficiency; fully completing.
• Complimentary; courteous.
Complementary
a.
• Serving to fill out or to complete; as, complementary numbers.
n.
• One skilled in compliments.
Complete
a.
• Filled up; with no part or element lacking; free from deficienty; entire; perfect; consummate.
• Finished; ended; concluded; completed; as, the edifice is complete.
(Bot.) Having all the parts or organs which belong to it or to the typical form; having calyx, corolla, stamens, and pistil.
v. t.
• To bring to a state in which there is no deficiency; to perfect; to consummate; to accomplish; to fulfill; to finish; as, to complete a task, or a poem; to complete a course of education.
Completely
adv.
• In a complete manner; fully.
Completement
n.
• Act of completing or perfecting; completion.
Completeness
n.
• The state of being complete.
Completion
n.
• The act or process of making complete; the getting through to the end; as, the completion of an undertaking, an education, a service.
• State of being complete; fulfillment; accomplishment; realization.
Completive
a.
• Making complete.
Completory
a.
• Serving to fulfill.
n.
(Eccl.) Same as Compline.
Complex
a.
• Composed of two or more parts; composite; not simple; as, a complex being; a complex idea.
• Involving many parts; complicated; intricate.
n.
• Assemblage of related things; colletion; complication.
Complexed
a.
• Complex, complicated.
Complexedness
n.
• The quality or state of being complex or involved; complication.
Complexion
n.
• The state of being complex; complexity.
• A combination; a complex.
• The bodily constitution; the temperament; habitude, or natural disposition; character; nature.
• The color or hue of the skin, esp. of the face.
• The general appearance or aspect; as, the complexion of the sky; the complexion of the news.
Complexional
a.
• Of or pertaining to constitutional complexion.
Complexionally
adv.
• Constitutionally.
Complexionary
a.
• Pertaining to the complexion, or to the care of it.
Complexioned
a.
• Having (such) a complexion; — used in composition; as, a dark-complexioned or a ruddy-complexioned person.
Complexity
n.
• The state of being complex; intricacy; entanglement.
• That which is complex; intricacy; complication.
Complexly
adv.
• In a complex manner; not simply.
Complexness
n.
• The state of being complex; complexity.
Complexus
n.
• A complex; an aggregate of parts; a complication.
Compliable
a.
• Capable of bending or yielding; apt to yield; compliant.
Compliance
n.
• The act of complying; a yielding; as to a desire, demand, or proposal; concession; submission.
• A disposition to yield to others; complaisance.
Compliancy
n.
• Compliance; disposition to yield to others.
Compliant
a.
• Yielding; bending; pliant; submissive.
Compliantly
adv.
• In a compliant manner.
Complicacy
n.
• A state of being complicate or intricate.
Complicant
a.
(Zool.) Overlapping, as the elytra of certain beetles.
Complicate
a.
• Composed of two or more parts united; complex; complicated; involved.
(Bot.) Folded together, or upon itself, with the fold running lengthwise.
v. t.
• To fold or twist together; to combine intricately; to make complex; to combine or associate so as to make intricate or difficult.
Complicately
adv.
• In a complex manner.
Complicateness
n.
• Complexity.
Complication
n.
• The act or process of complicating; the state of being complicated; intricate or confused relation of parts; entaglement; complexity.
(Med.) A disease or diseases, or adventitious circumstances or conditions, coexistent with and modifying a primary disease, but not necessarily connected with it.
Complice
n.
• An accomplice.
Complicity
n.
• The state of being an accomplice; participation in guilt.
Complier
n.
• One who complies, yields, or obeys; one of an easy, yieldy temper.
Compliment
n.
• An expression, by word or act, of approbation, regard, confidence, civility, or admiration; a flattering speech or attention; a ceremonious greeting; as, to send one's compliments to a friend.
v. t.
• To praise, flatter, or gratify, by expressions of approbation, respect, or congratulation; to make or pay a compliment to.
v. i.
• To pass compliments; to use conventional expressions of respect.
Complimental
a.
• Complimentary.
Complimentary
a.
• Expressive of regard or praise; of the nature of, or containing, a compliment; as, a complimentary remark; a complimentary ticket.
Complimentative
a.
• Complimentary.
Complimenter
n.
• One who compliments; one given to complimenting; a flatterer.
Complot
n.
• A plotting together; a confederacy in some evil design; a conspiracy.
v. t. & i.
• To plot or plan together; to conspire; to join in a secret design.
Complotment
n.
• A plotting together.
Complotter
n.
• One joined in a plot.
Complutensian
a.
• Of or pertaining to Complutum (now Alcala de Henares) a city near Madrid; as, the Complutensian Bible.
Compluvium
n.
(Arch.) A space left unroofed over the court of a Roman dwelling, through which the rain fell into the impluvium or cistern.
Comply
v. i.
• To yield assent; to accord; agree, or acquiesce; to adapt one's self; to consent or conform; — usually followed by with.
• To be ceremoniously courteous; to make one's compliments.
v. t.
• To fulfill; to accomplish.
• To infold; to embrace.
Compone
v. t.
• To compose; to settle; to arrange.
Component
a.
• Serving, or helping, to form; composing; constituting; constituent.
n.
• A constituent part; an ingredient.
Comport
v. i.
• To bear or endure; to put up (with); as, to comport with an injury.
• To agree; to accord; to suit; — sometimes followed by with.
v. t.
• To bear; to endure; to brook; to put with.
• To carry; to conduct; — with a reflexive pronoun.
n.
• Manner of acting; behavior; conduct; deportment.
Comportable
a.
• Suitable; consistent.
Comportance
n.
• Behavior; comport.
Comportation
n.
• A bringing together.
Comportment
n.
• Manner of acting; behavior; bearing.
Compose
v. t.
• To form by putting together two or more things or parts; to put together; to make up; to fashion.
• To form the substance of, or part of the substance of; to constitute.
• To construct by mental labor; to design and execute, or put together, in a manner involving the adaptation of forms of expression to ideas, or to the laws of harmony or proportion; as, to compose a sentence, a sermon, a symphony, or a picture.
• To dispose in proper form; to reduce to order; to put in proper state or condition; to adjust; to regulate.
• To free from agitation or disturbance; to tranquilize; to soothe; to calm; to quiet.
(Print.) To arrange (types) in a composing stick in order for printing; to set (type).
v. i.
• To come to terms.
Composed
a.
• Free from agitation; calm; sedate; quiet; tranquil; self-possessed.
Composer
n.
• One who composes; an author. Specifically, an author of a piece of music.
• One who, or that which, quits or calms; one who adjust a difference.
Composing
a.
• Tending to compose or soothe.
• Pertaining to, or used in, composition.
Compositae
n. pl.
(Bot.) A large family of dicotyledonous plants, having their flowers arranged in dense heads of many small florets and their anthers united in a tube. The daisy, dandelion, and asters, are examples.
Composite
a.
• Made up of distinct parts or elements; compounded; as, a composite language.
(Arch.) Belonging to a certain order which is composed of the Ionic order grafted upon the Corinthian. It is called also the Roman or the Italic order, and is one of the five orders recognized by the Italian writers of the sixteenth century.
(Bot.) Belonging to the order Compositae; bearing involucrate heads of many small florets, as the daisy, thistle, and dandelion.
n.
• That which is made up of parts or compounded of several elements; composition; combination; compound.
Composition
n.
• The act or art of composing, or forming a whole or integral, by placing together and uniting different things, parts, or ingredients. In specific uses: (a) The invention or combination of the parts of any literary work or discourse, or of a work of art; as, the composition of a poem or a piece of music.
(Fine Arts) The art or practice of so combining the different parts of a work of art as to produce a harmonious whole; also, a work of art considered as such.
• The act of writing for practice in a language, as English, Latin, German, etc.
(Print.) The setting up of type and arranging it for printing.
• The state of being put together or composed; conjunction; combination; adjustment.
• A mass or body formed by combining two or more substances; as, a chemical composition.
• A literary, musical, or artistic production, especially one showing study and care in arrangement; — often used of an elementary essay or translation done as an educational exercise.
• Consistency; accord; congruity.
• Mutual agreement to terms or conditions for the settlement of a difference or controversy; also, the terms or conditions of settlement; agreement.
(Law) The adjustment of a debt, or avoidance of an obligation, by some form of compensation agreed on between the parties; also, the sum or amount of compensation agreed upon in the adjustment.
• Synthesis as opposed to analysis.(Crystallog.)(Mech.)(Math.)
Compositive
a.
• Having the quality of entering into composition; compounded.
Compositor
n.
• One who composes or sets in order.
(Print.) One who sets type and arranges it for use.
Compositous
a.
(Bot.) Belonging to the Compositae; composite.
Compossible
a.
• Able to exist with another thing; consistent.
Compost
n.
• A mixture; a compound.
(Agric.) A mixture for fertilizing land; esp., a composition of various substances (as muck, mold, lime, and stable manure) thoroughly mingled and decomposed, as in a compost heap.
v. t.
• To manure with compost.
• To mingle, as different fertilizing substances, in a mass where they will decompose and form into a compost.
Composture
n.
• Manure; compost.
Composure
n.
• The act of composing, or that which is composed; a composition.
• Orderly adjustment; disposition.
• Frame; make; temperament.
• A settled state; calmness; sedateness; tranquillity; repose.
• A combination; a union; a bond.
Compotation
n.
• The act of drinking or tippling together.
Compotator
n.
• One who drinks with another.
Compote
n.
• A preparation of fruit in sirup in such a manner as to preserve its form, either whole, halved, or quartered; as, a compote of pears.
Compound
n.
• In the East Indies, an inclosure containing a house, outbuildings, etc.
v. t.
• To form or make by combining different elements, ingredients, or parts; as, to compound a medicine.
• To put together, as elements, ingredients, or parts, in order to form a whole; to combine, mix, or unite.
• To modify or change by combination with some other thing or part; to mingle with something else.
• To compose; to constitute.
• To settle amicably; to adjust by agreement; to compromise; to discharge from obligation upon terms different from those which were stipulated; as, to compound a debt.
v. i.
• To effect a composition; to come to terms of agreement; to agree; to settle by a compromise; — usually followed by with before the person participating, and for before the thing compounded or the consideration.
a.
• Composed of two or more elements, ingredients, parts; produced by the union of several ingredients, parts, or things; composite; as, a compound word.
n.
• That which is compounded or formed by the union or mixture of elements ingredients, or parts; a combination of simples; a compound word; the result of composition.
(Chem.) A union of two or more ingredients in definite proportions by weight, so combined as to form a distinct substance; as, water is a compound of oxygen and hydrogen.
Compoundable
a.
• That may be compounded.
Compounder
n.
• One who, or that which, compounds or mixes; as, a compounder of medicines.
• One who attempts to bring persons or parties to terms of agreement, or to accomplish, ends by compromises.
• One who compounds a debt, obligation, or crime.
• One at a university who pays extraordinary fees for the degree he is to take.
(Eng. Hist.) A Jacobite who favored the restoration of James II, on condition of a general amnesty and of guarantees for the security of the civil and ecclesiastical constitution of the realm.
Comprador
n.
• A kind of steward or agent.
Comprecation
n.
• A praying together.
Comprehend
v. t.
• To contain; to embrace; to include; as, the states comprehended in the Austrian Empire.
• To take in or include by construction or implication; to comprise; to imply.
• To take into the mind; to grasp with the understanding; to apprehend the meaning of; to understand.
Comprehensibility
n.
• The quality or state of being comprehensible; capability of being understood.
Comprehensible
a.
• Capable of being comprehended, included, or comprised.
• Capable of being understood; intelligible; conceivable by the mind.
Comprehensibleness
n.
• The quality of being comprehensible; comprehensibility.
Comprehensibly
adv.
• With great extent of signification; comprehensively.
• Intelligibly; in a manner to be comprehended or understood.
Comprehension
n.
• The act of comprehending, containing, or comprising; inclusion.
• That which is comrehended or inclosed within narrow limits; a summary; an epitome.
• The capacity of the mind to perceive and understand; the power, act, or process of grasping with the intellect; perception; understanding; as, a comprehension of abstract principles.
(Logic) The complement of attributes which make up the notion signified by a general term.
(Rhet.) A figure by which the name of a whole is put for a part, or that of a part for a whole, or a definite number for an indefinite.
Comprehensive
a.
• Including much; comprising many things; having a wide scope or a full view.
• Having the power to comprehend or understand many things.
(Zool.) Possessing peculiarities that are characteristic of several diverse groups.
Comprehensively
adv.
• In a comprehensive manner; with great extent of scope.
Comprehensiveness
n.
• The quality of being comprehensive; extensiveness of scope.
Comprehensor
n.
• One who comprehends; one who has attained to a full knowledge.
Compress
v. t.
• To press or squeeze together; to force into a narrower compass; to reduce the volume of by pressure; to compact; to condense; as, to compress air or water.
• To embrace sexually.
n.
(Surg.) A folded piece of cloth, pledget of lint, etc., used to cover the dressing of wounds, and so placed as, by the aid of a bandage, to make due pressure on any part.
Compressed
a.
• Pressed together; compacted; reduced in volume by pressure.
(Bot.) Flattened lengthwise.
Compressibility
n.
• The quality of being compressible of being compressible; as, the compressibility of elastic fluids.
Compressible
a.
• Capable of being pressed together or forced into a narrower compass, as an elastic or spongy substance.
Compressibleness
n.
• The quality of being compressible; compressibility.
Compression
n.
• The act of compressing, or state of being compressed.
Compressive
a.
• Compressing, or having power or tendency to compress; as, a compressive force.
Compressor
n.
• Anything which serves to compress
(Anat.) A muscle that compresses certain parts.
(Surg.) An instrument for compressing an artery (esp., the femoral artery) or other part.
• An apparatus for confining or flattening between glass plates an object to be examined with the microscope; — called also compressorium.
(Mach.) A machine for compressing gases; especially, an air compressor.
Compressure
n.
• Compression.
Comprint
v. t. & i.
• To print together.
(O. Eng. Law) To print surreptitiously a work belonging to another.
n.
(O. Eng. Law) The surreptitious printing of another's copy or book; a work thus printed.
Comprisal
n.
• The act of comprising or comprehending; a compendium or epitome.
Comprise
v. t.
• To comprehend; to include.
Comprobate
v. i.
• To agree; to concur.
Comprobation
n.
• Joint attestation; proof.
• Approbation.
Compromise
n.
• A mutual agreement to refer matters in dispute to the decision of arbitrators.
• A settlement by arbitration or by mutual consent reached by concession on both sides; a reciprocal abatement of extreme demands or rights, resulting in an agreement.
• A committal to something derogatory or objectionable; a prejudicial concession; a surrender; as, a compromise of character or right.
v. t.
• To bind by mutual agreement; to agree.
• To adjust and settle by mutual concessions; to compound.
• To pledge by some act or declaration; to endanger the life, reputation, etc., of, by some act which can not be recalled; to expose to suspicion.
v. i.
• To agree; to accord.
• To make concession for concilation and peace.
Compromiser
n.
• One who compromises.
Compromissorial
a.
• Relating to compromise.
Compromit
v. t.
• To pledge by some act or declaration; to promise.
• To put to hazard, by some indiscretion; to endanger; to compromise; as, to compromit the honor or the safety of a nation.
Comprovincial
a.
• Belonging to, or associated in, the same province.
n.
• One who belongs to the same province.
Compt
n.
• Account; reckoning; computation.
v. t.
• To compute; to count.
a.
• Neat; spruce.
Compter
n.
• A counter.
Comptible
a.
• Accountable; responsible; sensitive.
Comptly
adv.
• Neatly.
Comptrol
n. & v.
• See Control.
Comptroler
n.
• A controller; a public officer whose duty it is to examine certify accounts.
Compulsative
a.
• Compulsatory.
Compulsatively
adv.
• By compulsion.
Compulsatory
a.
• Operating with force; compelling; forcing; constraininig; resulting from, or enforced by, compulsion.
Compulsion
n.
• The act of compelling, or the state of being compelled; the act of driving or urging by force or by physical or moral constraint; subjection to force.
Compulsive
a.
• Having power to compel; exercising or applying compulsion.
Compulsively
adv.
• By compulsion; by force.
Compulsorily
adv. In a compulsory manner
• ; by force or constraint.
Compulsory
a.
• Having the power of compulsion; constraining.
• Obligatory; enjoined by authority; necessary; due to complusion.
Compunct
a.
• Affected with compunction; conscience-stricken.
Compunction
n.
• A pricking; stimulation.
• A picking of heart; poignant grief proceeding from a sense of guilt or consciousness of causing pain; the sting of conscience.
Compunctionless
a.
• Without compunction.
Compunctious
a.
• Of the nature of compunction; caused by conscience; attended with, or causing, compunction.
Compunctiously
adv.
• With compunction.
Compunctive
a.
• Sensitive in respect of wrongdoing; conscientious.
Compurgation
n.
(Law) The act or practice of justifying or confirming a man's veracity by the oath of others; — called also wager of law.
• Exculpation by testimony to one's veracity or innocence.
Compurgator
n.
• One who bears testimony or swears to the veracity or innocence of another.
Compurgatorial
a.
• Relating to a compurgator or to compurgation.
Computable
a.
• Capable of being computed, numbered, or reckoned.
Computation
n.
• The act or process of computing; calculation; reckoning.
• The result of computation; the amount computed.
Compute
v. t.
• To determine calculation; to reckon; to count.
n.
• Computation.
Computer
n.
• One who computes.
Computist
n.
• A computer.
Comrade
n.
• A mate, companion, or associate.
Comradery
n.
• The spirit of comradeship; comradeship.
Comradeship
n.
• The state of being a comrade; intimate fellowship.
Comrogue
n.
• A fellow rogue.
Comsognathus
n.
(Zool.) A genus of Dinosauria found in the Jurassic formation, and remarkable for having several birdlike features.
Comtism
n.
• Positivism; the positive philosophy.
Comtist
n.
• A disciple of Comte; a positivist.
Con
• - (). A prefix, fr. L. cum, signifying with, together, etc.
adv.
• Against the affirmative side; in opposition; on the negative side; — The antithesis of pro, and usually in connection with it.
v. t.
• To know; to understand; to acknowledge.
• To study in order to know; to peruse; to learn; to commit to memory; to regard studiously.
v. t.
(Naut.) To conduct, or superintend the steering of (a vessel); to watch the course of (a vessel) and direct the helmsman how to steer.
Conacre
v. t.
• To underlet a proportion of, for a single crop; — said of a farm.
n.
• A system of letting a proportion of a farm for a single crop. Also used adjectively; as, the conacre system or principle.
Conarium
n.
(Anat.) The pineal gland.
Conation
n.
(Philos.) The power or act which directs or impels to effort of any kind, whether muscular or psychical.
Conative
a.
• Of or pertaining to conation.
Conatus
n.
• A natural tendency inherent in a body to develop itself; an attempt; an effort.
Concamerate
v. t.
• To arch over; to vault.
• To divide into chambers or cells.
Concameration
n.
• An arch or vault.
• A chamber of a multilocular shell.
Concatenate
v. t.
• To link together; to unite in a series or chain, as things depending on one another.
Concatenation
n.
• A series of links united; a series or order of things depending on each other, as if linked together; a chain, a succession.
Concause
n.
• A joint cause.
Concavation
n.
• The act of making concave.
Concave
a.
• Hollow and curved or rounded; vaulted; — said of the interior of a curved surface or line, as of the curve of the of the inner surface of an eggshell, in opposition to convex; as, a concave mirror; the concave arch of the sky.
• Hollow; void of contents.
n.
• A hollow; an arched vault; a cavity; a recess.
(Mech.) A curved sheath or breasting for a revolving cylinder or roll.
v. t.
• To make hollow or concave.
Concaved
a.
(Her.) Bowed in the form of an arch; — called also arched.
Concaveness
n.
• Hollowness; concavity.
Concavity
n.
• A concave surface, or the space bounded by it; the state of being concave.
Concavous
a.
• Concave.
Conceal
v. t.
• To hide or withdraw from observation; to cover; to cover or keep from sight; to prevent the discovery of; to withhold knowledge of.
Concealable
a.
• Capable of being concealed.
Concealed
a.
• Hidden; kept from sight; secreted.
Concealer
n.
• One who conceals.
Concealment
n.
• The act of concealing; the state of being concealed.
• A place of hiding; a secret place; a retreat frem observation.
• A secret; out of the way knowledge.
(Law) Suppression of such facts and circumstances as in justice ought to be made known.
Concede
v. t.
• To yield or suffer; to surrender; to grant; as. to concede the point in question.
• To grant, as a right or privilege; to make concession of.
• To admit to be true; to acknowledge.
v. i.
• To yield or make concession.
Conceit
n.
• That which is conceived, imagined, or formed in the mind; idea; thought; image; conception.
• Faculty of conceiving ideas; mental faculty; apprehension; as, a man of quick conceit.
• Quickness of apprehension; active imagination; lively fancy.
• A fanciful, odd, or extravagant notion; a quant fancy; an unnatural or affected conception; a witty thought or turn of expression; a fanciful device; a whim; a quip.
• An overweening idea of one's self; vanity.
• Design; pattern.
v. t.
• To conceive; to imagine.
v. i.
• To form an idea; to think.
Conceited
a.
• Endowed with fancy or imagination.
• Entertaining a flattering opinion of one's self; vain.
• Curiously contrived or designed; fanciful.
Conceitedly
adv.
• In an egotistical manner.
• Fancifully; whimsically.
Conceitedness
n.
• The state of being conceited; conceit; vanity.
Conceitless
a.
• Without wit; stupid.
Conceivable
a.
• Capable of being conceived, imagined, or understood.
Conceive
v. t.
• To receive into the womb and begin to breed; to begin the formation of the embryo of.
• To form in the mind; to plan; to devise; to generate; to originate; as, to conceive a purpose, plan, hope.
• To apprehend by reason or imagination; to take into the mind; to know; to imagine; to comprehend; to understand.
v. i.
• To have an embryo or fetus formed in the womb; to breed; to become pregnant.
• To have a conception, idea, or opinion; think; — with of.
Conceiver
n.
• One who conceives.
Concelebrate
v. t.
• To celebrate together.
Concent
n.
• Concert of voices; concord of sounds; harmony; as, a concent of notes.
• Consistency; accordance.
Concentrate
v. t.
• To bring to, or direct toward, a common center; to unite more closely; to gather into one body, mass, or force; to fix; as, to concentrate rays of light into a focus; to concentrate the attention.
• To increase the strength and diminish the bulk of, as of a liquid or an ore; to intensify, by getting rid of useless material; to condense; as, to concentrate acid by evaporation; to concentrate by washing; — opposed to dilute.
v. i.
• To approach or meet in a common center; to consolidate; as, population tends to concentrate in cities.
Concentration
n.
• The act or process of concentrating; the process of becoming concentrated, or the state of being concentrated; concentration.
• The act or process of reducing the volume of a liquid, as by evaporation.
(Metal.) The act or process of removing the dress of ore and of reducing the valuable part to smaller compass, as by currents of air or water.
Concentrative
a.
• Serving or tending to concentrate; characterized by concentration.
Concentrativeness
n.
• The quality of concentrating.
(Phren.) The faculty or propensity which has to do with concentrating the intellectual the intellectual powers.
Concentrator
n.
(Mining) An apparatus for the separation of dry comminuted ore, by exposing it to intermittent puffs of air.
Concentric
n.
• That which has a common center with something else.
Concentrically
adv.
• In a concentric manner.
Concentricity
n.
• The state of being concentric.
Concentual
a.
• Possesing harmony; accordant.
Concept
n.
• An abstract general conception; a notion; a universal.
Conceptacle
n.
• That in which anything is contained; a vessel; a receiver or receptacle.
(Bot.) A pericarp, opening longitudinally on one side and having the seeds loose in it; a follicle; a double follicle or pair of follicles.
• One of the cases containing the spores, etc., of flowerless plants, especially of algae.
Conceptibility
n.
• The quality of being conceivable; conceivableness.
Conceptible
a.
• Capable of being conceived; conceivable.
Conception
n.
• The act of conceiving in the womb; the initiation of an embryonic animal life.
• The state of being conceived; beginning.
• The power or faculty of apprehending of forming an idea in the mind; the power of recalling a past sensation or perception.
• The formation in the mind of an image, idea, or notion, apprehension.
• The image, idea, or notion of any action or thing which is formed in the mind; a concept; a notion; a universal; the product of a rational belief or judgment.
• Idea; purpose; design.
• Conceit; affected sentiment or thought.
Conceptional
a.
• Pertaining to conception.
Conceptionalist
n.
• A conceptualist.
Conceptious
a.
• Apt to conceive; fruitful.
Conceptive
a.
• Capable of conceiving.
Conceptual
a.
• Pertaining to conception.
Conceptualism
n.
(Metaph.) A theory, intermediate between realism and nominalism, that the mind has the power of forming for itself general conceptions of individual or single objects.
Conceptualist
n.
(Metaph.) One who maintains the theory of conceptualism.
Concern
v. t.
• To relate or belong to; to have reference to or connection with; to affect the interest of; to be of importance to.
• To engage by feeling or sentiment; to interest; as, a good prince concerns himself in the happiness of his subjects.
v. i.
• To be of importance.
n.
• That which relates or belongs to one; business; affair.
• That which affects the welfare or happiness; interest; moment.
• Interest in, or care for, any person or thing; regard; solicitude; anxiety.
(Com.) Persons connected in business; a firm and its business; as, a banking concern.
Concerned
a.
• Disturbed; troubled; solicitous; as, to be much concerned for the safety of a friend.
Concernedly
adv.
• In a concerned manner; solicitously; sympathetically.
Concerning
prep.
• Pertaining to; regarding; having relation to; respecting; as regards.
a.
• Important.
n.
• That in which one is concerned or interested; concern; affair; interest.
• Importance; moment; consequence.
• Concern; participation; interposition.
• Emotion of mind; solicitude; anxiety.
Concert
v. t.
• To plan together; to settle or adjust by conference, agreement, or consultation.
• To plan; to devise; to arrange.
v. i.
• To act in harmony or conjunction; to form combined plans.
n.
• Agreement in a design or plan; union formed by mutual communication of opions and viewa; accordance in a scheme; harmony; simultaneous action.
• Musical accordance or harmony; concord.
• A musical entertainment in which several voices or instruments take part.
Concertante
n.
(Mus.) A concert for two or more principal instruments, with orchestral accompaniment. Also adjectively; as, concertante parts.
Concertation
n.
• Strife; contention.
Concertative
a.
• Contentious; quarrelsome.
Concerted
a.
• Mutually contrived or planned; agreed on; as, concerted schemes, signals.
Concertina
n.
• A small musical imstrument on the principle of the accordion. It is a small elastic box, or bellows, having free reeds on the inside, and keys and handles on the outside of each of the two hexagonal heads.
Concertino
n.
(Mus.) A piece for one or more solo instruments with orchestra; — more concise than the concerto.
Concertion
n.
• Act of concerting; adjustment.
Concertmeister
n.
(Mus.) The head violinist or leader of the strings in an orchestra; the sub-leader of the orchestra; concert master.
Concerto
n.
(Mus.) A composition (usually in symphonic form with three movements) in which one instrument (or two or three) stands out in bold relief against the orchestra, or accompaniment, so as to display its qualities or the performer's skill.
Concession
n.
• The act of conceding or yielding; usually implying a demand, claim, or request, and thus distinguished from giving, which is voluntary or spontaneous.
• A thing yielded; an acknowledgment or admission; a boon; a grant; esp. a grant by government of a privilege or right to do something; as, a concession to build a canal.
Concessionist
n.
• One who favors concession.
Concessive
a.
• Implying concession; as, a concessive conjunction.
Concessively
adv.
• By way of concession.
Concessory
a.
• Conceding; permissive.
Concettism
n.
• The use of concetti or affected conceits.
Concetto
n.
• Affected wit; a conceit.
Conch
n.
(Zool.) A name applied to various marine univalve shells; esp. to those of the genus Strombus, which are of large size. S. gigas is the large pink West Indian conch. The large king, queen, and cameo conchs are of the genus Cassis.
• In works of art, the shell used by Tritons as a trumpet.
• One of the white natives of the Bahama Islands or one of their descendants in the Florida Keys; — so called from the commonness of the conch there, or because they use it for food.
• The external ear.
Concha
n.
(Arch.) The plain semidome of an apse; sometimes used for the entire apse.
(Anat.) The external ear; esp. the largest and deepest concavity of the external ear, surrounding the entrance to the auditory canal.
Conchal
a.
(Anat.) Pertaining to the concha, or external ear; as, the conchal cartilage.
Conchifer
n.
(Zool.) One of the Conchifera.
Conchifera
n
(Zool.) That class of Mollusca which includes the bivalve shells; the Lamellibranchiata.
Conchiferous
a.
• Producing or having shells.
Conchiform
a.
• Shaped like one half of a bivalve shell; shell-shaped.
Conchite
n.
(Paleon.) A fossil or petrified conch or shell.
Conchitic
a.
• Composed of shells; containing many shells.
Conchoid
n.
(Geom.) A curve, of the fourth degree, first made use of by the Greek geometer, Nicomedes, who invented it for the purpose of trisecting an angle and duplicating the cube.
Conchoidal
a.
(Min.) Having elevations or depressions in form like one half of a bivalve shell; — applied principally to a surface produced by fracture.
Conchological
a.
(Zool.) Pertaining to, or connected with, conchology.
Conchologist
n.
(Zool.) One who studies, or is versed in, conchology.
Conchology
n.
(Zool.) The science of Mollusca, and of the shells which they form; malacology.
Conchometer
n.
(Zool.) An instrument for measuring shells, or the angle of their spire.
Conchometry
n.
(Zool.) The art of measuring shells or their curves; conchyliometry.
Conchyliometry
n.
• Same as Conchometry.
Conchylious
a.
• Conchylaceous.
Conciator
n.
(Glass Works) The person who weighs and proportions the materials to be made into glass, and who works and tempers them.
Concierge
n.
• One who keeps the entrance to an edifice, public or private; a doorkeeper; a janitor, male or female.
Conciliable
n.
• A small or private assembly, especially of an ecclesiastical nature.
a.
• Capable of being conciliated or reconciled.
Conciliabule
n.
• An obscure ecclesiastical council; a conciliable.
Conciliate
v. t.
• To win ower; to gain from a state of hostility; to gain the good will or favor of; to make friendly; to mollify; to propitiate; to appease.
Conciliation
n.
• The act or process of conciliating; the state of being conciliated.
Conciliative
a.
• Conciliatory.
Conciliator
n.
• One who conciliates.
Conciliatory
a.
• Tending to conciliate; pacific; mollifying; propitiating.
Concinnate
v. t.
• To place fitly together; to adapt; to clear.
Concinnity
n.
• Internal harmony or fitness; mutual adaptation of parts; elegance; — used chiefly of style of discourse.
Concinnous
a.
• Characterized by concinnity; neat; elegant.
Concionate
v. i.
• To preach.
Concionator
n.
• An haranguer of the people; a preacher.
(Old Law) A common councilman.
Concionatory
a.
• Of or pertaining to preaching or public addresses.
Concise
a.
• Expressing much in a few words; condensed; brief and compacted; — used of style in writing or speaking.
Concisely
adv.
• In a concise manner; briefly.
Conciseness
n.
• The quality of being concise.
Concision
n.
• A cutting off; a division; a schism; a faction.
Concitation
n.
• The act of stirring up, exciting, or agitating.
Concite
v. t.
• To excite or stir up.
Conclamation
n.
• An outcry or shout of many together.
Conclave
n.
• The set of apartments within which the cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church are continuously secluded while engaged in choosing a pope.
• The body of cardinals shut up in the conclave for the election of a pope; hence, the body of cardinals.
• A private meeting; a close or secret assembly.
Conclavist
n.
• One of the two ecclesiastics allowed to attend a cardinal in the conclave.
Conclude
v. t.
• To shut up; to inclose.
• To include; to comprehend; to shut up together; to embrace.
• To reach as an end of reasoning; to infer, as from premises; to close, as an argument, by inferring; — sometimes followed by a dependent clause.
• To make a final determination or judgment concerning; to judge; to decide.
• To bring to an end; to close; to finish.
• To bring about as a result; to effect; to make; as, to conclude a bargain.
• To shut off; to restrain; to limit; to estop; to bar; — generally in the passive; as, the defendant is concluded by his own plea; a judgment concludes the introduction of further evidence argument.
v. i.
• To come to a termination; to make an end; to close; to end; to terminate.
• To form a final judgment; to reach a decision.
Concludency
n.
• Deduction from premises; inference; conclusion.
Concludent
a.
• Bringing to a close; decisive; conclusive.
Concluder
n.
• One who concludes.
Concludingly
adv.
• Conclusively.
Conclusible
a.
• Demonstrable; determinable.
Conclusion
n.
• The last part of anything; close; termination; end.
• Final decision; determination; result.
• Any inference or result of reasoning.
(Logic) The inferred proposition of a syllogism; the necessary consequence of the conditions asserted in two related propositions called premises.
• Drawing of inferences.
• An experiment, or something from which a conclusion may be drawn.
(Law) The end or close of a pleading, e.g., the formal ending of an indictment, "against the peace," etc.
• An estoppel or bar by which a person is held to a particular position.
Conclusive
a.
• Belonging to a close or termination; decisive; convincing; putting an end to debate or question; leading to, or involving, a conclusion or decision.
Conclusively
adv.
• In the way of conclusion; decisively; positively.
Conclusiveness
n.
• The quality of being conclusive; decisiveness.
Conclusory
a.
• Conclusive.
Concoct
v. t.
• To digest; to convert into nourishment by the organs of nutrition.
• To purify or refine chemically.
• To prepare from crude materials, as food; to invent or prepare by combining different ingredients; as, to concoct a new dish or beverage.
• To digest in the mind; to devise; to make up; to contrive; to plan; to plot.
• To mature or perfect; to ripen.
Concocter
n.
• One who concocts.
Concoction
n.
• A change in food produced by the organs of nutrition; digestion.
• The act of concocting or preparing by combining different ingredients; also, the food or compound thus prepared.
• The act of digesting in the mind; planning or devising; rumination.
(Med.) Abatement of a morbid process, as a fever and return to a normal condition.
• The act of perfecting or maturing.
Concoctive
a.
• Having the power of digesting or ripening; digestive.
Concolor
a.
• Of the same color; of uniform color.
Concolorous
a.
(Zool.) Of the same color throughout.
Concomitant
a.
• Accompanying; conjoined; attending.
n.
• One who, or that which, accompanies, or is collaterally connected with another; a companion; an associate; an accompaniment.
Concomitantly
adv.
• In company with others; unitedly; concurrently.
Concord
n.
• A state of agreement; harmony; union.
• Agreement by stipulation; compact; covenant; treaty or league.
(Gram.) Agreement of words with one another, in gender, number, person, or case.
(Old Law) An agreement between the parties to a fine of land in reference to the manner in which it should pass, being an acknowledgment that the land in question belonged to the complainant.
(Mus.) An agreeable combination of tones simultaneously heard; a consonant chord; consonance; harmony.
n.
• A variety of American grape, with large dark blue (almost black) grapes in compact clusters.
v. i.
• To agree; to act together.
Concordable
a.
• Capable of according; agreeing; harmonious.
Concordance
n.
• Agreement; accordance.
(Gram.) Concord; agreement.
• An alphabetical verbal index showing the places in the text of a book where each principal word may be found, with its immediate context in each place.
• A topical index or orderly analysis of the contents of a book.
Concordancy
n.
• Agreement.
Concordant
a.
• Agreeing; correspondent; harmonious; consonant.
Concordantly
adv.
• In a concordant manner.
Concordat
n.
• A compact, covenant, or agreement concerning anything.
• An agreement made between the pope and a sovereign or government for the regulation of ecclesiastical matters with which both are concerned; as, the concordat between Pope Pius VIL and Bonaparte in 1801.
Concordist
n.
• The compiler of a concordance.
Concorporate
v. t. & i.
• To unite in one mass or body; to incorporate.
a.
• United in one body; incorporated.
Concorporation
n.
• Union of things in one mass or body.
Concourse
n.
• A moving, flowing, or running together; confluence.
• An assembly; a gathering formed by a voluntary or spontaneous moving and meeting in one place.
• The place or point of meeting or junction of two bodies.
• An open space where several roads or paths meet; esp. an open space in a park where several roads meet.
• Concurrence; cooperation.
Concreate
v. t.
• To create at the same time.
Concremation
n.
• The act of burning different things together.
Concrement
n.
• A growing together; the collection or mass formed by concretion, or natural union.
Concrescence
n.
• Coalescence of particles; growth; increase by the addition of particles.
Concrescible
a.
• Capable of being changed from a liquid to a solid state.
Concrescive
a.
• Growing together, or into union; uniting.
Concrete
a.
• United in growth; hence, formed by coalition of separate particles into one mass; united in a solid form.
(Logic) Standing for an object as it exists in nature, invested with all its qualities, as distingushed from standing for an attribute of an object; — opposed to abstract.
• Applied to a specific object; special; particular; — opposed to general.
n.
• A compound or mass formed by concretion, spontaneous union, or coalescence of separate particles of matter in one body.
• A mixture of gravel, pebbles, or broken stone with cement or with tar, etc., used for sidewalks, roadways, foundations, etc., and esp. for submarine structures.
(Logic) A term designating both a quality and the subject in which it exists; a concrete term.
(Sugar Making) Sugar boiled down from cane juice to a solid mass.
v. i.
• To unite or coalesce, as separate particles, into a mass or solid body.
v. t.
• To form into a mass, as by the cohesion or coalescence of separate particles.
• To cover with, or form of, concrete, as a pavement.
Concretely
adv.
• In a concrete manner.
Concreteness
n.
• The quality of being concrete.
Concretion
n.
• The process of concreting; the process of uniting or of becoming united, as particles of matter into a mass; solidification.
• A mass or nodule of solid matter formed by growing together, by congelation, condensation, coagulation, induration, etc.; a clot; a lump; a calculus.
(Geol.) A rounded mass or nodule produced by an aggregation of the material around a center; as, the calcareous concretions common in beds of clay.
Concretional
a.
• Concretionary.
Concretionary
a.
• Pertaining to, or formed by, concretion or aggregation; producing or containing concretions.
Concretive
a.
• Promoting concretion.
Concretively
adv.
• In a concrete manner.
Concreture
n.
• A mass formed by concretion.
Concrew
v. i.
• To grow together.
Concrimination
n.
• A joint accusation.
Concubinacy
n.
• The practice of concubinage.
Concubinage
n.
• The cohabiting of a man and a woman who are not legally married; the state of being a concubine.
(Law) A plea, in which it is alleged that the woman suing for dower was not lawfully married to the man in whose lands she seeks to be endowed, but that she was his concubine.
Concubinal
a.
• Of or pertaining to concubinage.
Concubinarian
a. & n.
• Concubinary.
Concubinary
a.
• Relating to concubinage; living in concubinage.
n.
• One who lives in concubinage.
Concubinate
n.
• Concubinage.
Concubine
n.
• A woman who cohabits with a man without being his wife; a paramour.
• A wife of inferior condition; a lawful wife, but not united to the man by the usual ceremonies, and of inferior condition. Such were Hagar and Keturah, the concubines of Abraham; and such concubines were allowed by the Roman laws. Their children were not heirs of their father.
Conculcate
v. t.
• To tread or trample under foot.
Concupiscence
n.
• Sexual lust; morbid carnal passion.
Concupiscent
a.
• Having sexual lust; libidinous; lustful; lecherous; salacious.
Concupiscential
a.
• Relating to concupiscence.
Concupiscentious
a.
• Concupiscent.
Concupiscible
a.
• Exciting to, or liable to be affected by, concupiscence; provoking lustful desires.
• Exciting desire, good or evil.
Concupiscibleness
n.
• The state of being concupiscible.
Concupy
n.
• Concupiscence.
Concur
v. i.
• To run together; to meet.
• To meet in the same point; to combine or conjoin; to contribute or help toward a common object or effect.
• To unite or agree (in action or opinion); to join; to act jointly; to agree; to coincide; to correspond.
• To assent; to consent.
Concurrence
n.
• The act of concurring; a meeting or coming together; union; conjunction; combination.
• A meeting of minds; agreement in opinion; union in design or act; — implying joint approbation.
• Agreement or consent, implying aid or contribution of power or influence; cooperation.
• A common right; coincidence of equal powers; as, a concurrence of jurisdiction in two different courts.
Concurrency
n.
• Concurrence.
Concurrent
a.
• Acting in conjunction; agreeing in the same act or opinion; contibuting to the same event of effect; cooperating.
• Conjoined; associate; concomitant; existing or happening at the same time.
• Joint and equal in authority; taking cognizance of similar questions; operating on the same objects; as, the concurrent jurisdiction of courts.
(Geom.) Meeting in one point.
n.
• One who, or that which, concurs; a joint or contributory cause.
• One pursuing the same course, or seeking the same objects; hence, a rival; an opponent.
(Chron.) One of the supernumerary days of the year over fifty-two complete weeks; — so called because they concur with the solar cycle, the course of which they follow.
Concurrently
adv.
• With concurrence; unitedly.
Concurrentness
n.
• The state or quality of being concurrent; concurrence.
Concurring
a.
• Agreeing.
Concuss
v. t.
• To shake or agitate.
(Law) To force (a person) to do something, or give up something, by intimidation; to coerce.
Concussation
n.
• A violent shock or agitation.
Concussion
n.
• A shaking or agitation; a shock; caused by the collision of two bodies.
(Med.) A condition of lowered functional activity, without visible structural change, produced in an organ by a shock, as by fall or blow; as, a concussion of the brain.
(Civil Law) The unlawful forcing of another by threats of violence to yield up something of value.
Concussive
a.
• Having the power or quality of shaking or agitating.
Cond
v. t.
(Naut.) To con, as a ship.
Condemn
v. t.
• To pronounce to be wrong; to disapprove of; to censure.
• To declare the guilt of; to make manifest the faults or unworthiness of; to convict of guilt.
• To pronounce a judicial sentence against; to sentence to punishment, suffering, or loss; to doom; — with to before the penalty.
• To amerce or fine; — with in before the penalty.
• To adjudge or pronounce to be unfit for use or service; to adjudge or pronounce to be forfeited; as, the ship and her cargo were condemned.
(Law) To doom to be taken for public use, under the right of eminent domain.
Condemnable
• Worthy of condemnation; blamable; culpable.
Condemnation
n.
• The act of condemning or pronouncing to be wrong; censure; blame; disapprobation.
• The act of judicially condemning, or adjudging guilty, unfit for use, or forfeited; the act of dooming to punishment or forfeiture.
• The state of being condemned.
• The ground or reason of condemning.
Condemnatory
a.
• Condemning; containing or imposing condemnation or censure; as, a condemnatory sentence or decree.
Condemned
a.
• Pronounced to be wrong, guilty, worthless, or forfeited; adjudged or sentenced to punishment, destruction, or confiscation.
• Used for condemned persons.
Condemner
n.
• One who condemns or censures.
Condensability
n.
• Capability of being condensed.
Condensable
a.
• Capable of being condensed; as, vapor is condensable.
Condensate
a.
• Made dense; condensed.
v. t.
• To condense.
Condensation
n.
• The act or process of condensing or of being condensed; the state of being condensed.
(Physics) The act or process of reducing, by depression of temperature or increase of pressure, etc., to another and denser form, as gas to the condition of a liquid or steam to water.
(Chem.) A rearrangement or concentration of the different constituents of one or more substances into a distinct and definite compound of greater complexity and molecular weight, often resulting in an increase of density, as the condensation of oxygen into ozone, or of acetone into mesitylene.
Condensative
a.
• Having the property of condensing.
Condense
v. t.
• To make more close, compact, or dense; to compress or concentrate into a smaller compass; to consolidate; to abridge; to epitomize.
(Chem. & Physics) To reduce into another and denser form, as by cold or pressure; as, to condense gas into a liquid form, or steam into water.
v. i.
• To become more compact; to be reduced into a denser form.
(Chem.) To combine or unite (as two chemical substances) with or without separation of some unimportant side products.
• To undergo polymerization.
a.
• Condensed; compact; dense.
Condenser
n.
• One who, or that which, condenses.
(Physic)(Chem.) An apparatus for receiving and condensing the volatile products of distillation to a liquid or solid form, by cooling.
(Steam Engine) An apparatus, separate from the cylinder, in which the exhaust steam is condensed by the action of cold water or air.
Condensible
a.
• Capable of being condensed; as, a gas condensible to a liquid by cold.
Conder
n.
• One who watches shoals of fish; a balker.
Condescend
v. i.
• To stoop or descend; to let one's self down; to submit; to waive the privilege of rank or dignity; to accommodate one's self to an inferior.
• To consent.
Condescendingly
adv.
• In a condescending manner.
Condescension
n.
• The act of condescending; voluntary descent from one's rank or dignity in intercourse with an inferior; courtesy toward inferiors.
Condescent
n.
• An act of condescension.
Condign
a.
• Worthy; suitable; deserving; fit.
• Deserved; adequate; suitable to the fault or crime.
Condignity
n.
(Scholastic Theol.) Merit, acguired by works, which can claim reward on the score of general benevolence.
Condignly
adv.
• According to merit.
Condignness
n.
• Agreeableness to deserts; suitableness.
Condiment
n.
• Something used to give relish to food, and to gratify the taste; a pungment and appetizing substance, as pepper or mustard; seasoning.
Condisciple
n.
• A schoolfellow; a fellow-student.
Condite
a.
• Preserved; pickled.
v. t.
• To pickle; to preserve; as, to condite pears, quinces, etc.
Condition
n.
• Mode or state of being; state or situation with regard to external circumstances or influences, or to physical or mental integrity, health, strength, etc.; predicament; rank; position, estate.
• Essential quality; property; attribute.
• Temperament; disposition; character.
• That which must exist as the occasion or concomitant of something else; that which is requisite in order that something else should take effect; an essential qualification; stipulation; terms specified.
(Law) A clause in a contract, or agreement, which has for its object to suspend, to defeat, or in some way to modify, the principal obligation; or, in case of a will, to suspend, revoke, or modify a devise or bequest. It is also the case of a future uncertain event, which may or may not happen, and on the occurrence or non-occurrence of which, the accomplishment, recission, or modification of an obligation or testamentary disposition is made to depend.
v. i.
• To make terms; to stipulate.
(Metaph.) To impose upon an object those relations or conditions without which knowledge and thought are alleged to be impossible.
v. t.
• To invest with, or limit by, conditions; to burden or qualify by a condition; to impose or be imposed as the condition of.
• To contract; to stipulate; to agree.
(U. S. Colleges) To put under conditions; to require to pass a new examination or to make up a specified study, as a condition of remaining in one's class or in college; as, to condition a student who has failed in some branch of study.
• To test or assay, as silk (to ascertain the proportion of moisture it contains).
• train; acclimate.
Conditional
a.
• Containing, implying, or depending on, a condition or conditions; not absolute; made or granted on certain terms; as, a conditional promise.
(Gram. & Logic) Expressing a condition or supposition; as, a conditional word, mode, or tense.
n.
• A limitation.
• A conditional word, mode, or proposition.
Conditionality
n.
• The quality of being conditional, or limited; limitation by certain terms.
Conditionally
adv.
• In a conditional manner; subject to a condition or conditions; not absolutely or positively.
Conditionate
a.
• Conditional.
v. t.
• To qualify by conditions; to regulate.
• To put under conditions; to render conditional.
Conditioned
a.
• Surrounded; circumstanced; in a certain state or condition, as of property or health; as, a well conditioned man.
• Having, or known under or by, conditions or relations; not independent; not absolute.
Conditionly
adv.
• Conditionally.
Conditory
n.
• A repository for holding things; a hinding place.
Condog
v. i.
• To concur; to agree.
Condolatory
a.
• Expressing condolence.
Condole
v. i.
• To express sympathetic sorrow; to grieve in sympathy; — followed by with.
v. t.
• To lament or grieve over.
Condolement
n.
• Condolence.
• Sorrow; mourning; lamentation.
Condolence
n.
• Expression of sympathy with another in sorrow or grief.
Condoler
n.
• One who condoles.
Condonation
n.
• The act of condoning or pardoning.
(Law) Forgiveness, either express or implied, by a husband of his wife or by a wife of her husband, for a breach of marital duty, as adultery, with an implied condition that the offense shall not be repeated.
Condone
v. t.
• To pardon; to forgive.
(Law) To pardon; to overlook the offense of; esp., to forgive for a violation of the marriage law; — said of either the husband or the wife.
Condor
n.
(Zool.) A very large bird of the Vulture family (Sarcorhamphus gryphus), found in the most elevated parts of the Andes.
Condottiere
n.
• A military adventurer of the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, who sold his services, and those of his followers, to any party in any contest.
Conduce
v. i.
• To lead or tend, esp. with reference to a favorable or desirable result; to contribute; — usually followed by to or toward.
v. t.
• To conduct; to lead; to guide.
Conducent
a.
• Conducive; tending.
Conducibility
n.
• The state or quality of being conducible; conducibleness.
Conducible
a.
• Conducive; tending; contributing.
Conducibleness
n.
• Quality of being conducible.
Conducibly
adv.
• In a manner to promote.
Conducive
a.
• Loading or tending; helpful; contributive; tending to promote.
Conduciveness
n.
• The quality of conducing.
Conduct
n.
• The act or method of conducting; guidance; management.
• Skillful guidance or management; generalship.
• Convoy; escort; guard; guide.
• That which carries or conveys anything; a channel; a conduit; an instrument.
• The manner of guiding or carrying one's self; personal deportment; mode of action; behavior.
• Plot; action; construction; manner of development.
v. t.
• To lead, or guide; to escort; to attend.
• To lead, as a commander; to direct; to manage; to carry on; as, to conduct the affairs of a kingdom.
• To behave; — with the reflexive; as, he conducted himself well.
(Physics) To serve as a medium for conveying; to transmit, as heat, light, electricity, etc.
(Mus.) To direct, as the leader in the performance of a musical composition.
v. i.
• To act as a conductor (as of heat, electricity, etc.); to carry.
• To conduct one's self; to behave.
Conductibility
n.
• Capability of being conducted; as, the conductibility of heat or electricity.
• Conductivity; capacity for receiving and transmitting.
Conductible
a.
• Capable of being conducted.
Conduction
n.
• The act of leading or guiding.
• The act of training up.
(Physics) Transmission through, or by means of, a conductor; also, conductivity.
Conductive
a.
• Having the quality or power of conducting; as, the conductive tissue of a pistil.
Conductivity
n.
• The quality or power of conducting, or of receiving and transmitting, as, the conductivity of a nerve.
Conductor
n.
• One who, or that which, conducts; a leader; a commander; a guide; a manager; a director.
• One in charge of a public conveyance, as of a railroad train or a street car.
(Mus.) The leader or director of an orchestra or chorus.
(Physics) A substance or body capable of being a medium for the transmission of certain forces, esp. heat or electricity; specifically, a lightning rod.
(Surg.) A grooved sound or staff used for directing instruments, as lithontriptic forceps, etc.; a director.
(Arch.) Same as Leader.
Conductory
a.
• Having the property of conducting.
Conductress
n.
• A woman who leads or directs; a directress.
Conduit
n.
• A pipe, canal, channel, or passage for conveying water or fluid.
(Arch.) A structure forming a reservoir for water.
• A narrow passage for private communication.
Conduplicate
a.
(Bot.) Folded lengthwise along the midrib, the upper face being within; — said of leaves or petals in vernation or aestivation.
Conduplication
n.
• A doubling together or folding; a duplication.
Condurrite
n.
(Min.) A variety of the mineral domeykite, or copper arsenide, from the Condurra mine in Cornwall, England.
Condylar
a.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to a condyle.
Condyle
n.
(Anat.) A bony prominence; particularly, an eminence at the end of a bone bearing a rounded articular surface; — sometimes applied also to a concave articular surface.
Condyloid
a.
(Anat.) Shaped like or pertaining to a condyle.
Condyloped
n.
(Zool.) An arthropod.
Cone
n.
(Geom.) A solid of the form described by the revolution of a right-angled triangle about one of the sides adjacent to the right angle; — called also a right cone. More generally, any solid having a vertical point and bounded by a surface which is described by a straight line always passing through that vertical point; a solid having a circle for its base and tapering to a point or vertex.
• Anything shaped more or less like a mathematical cone; as, a volcanic cone, a collection of scoriae around the crater of a volcano, usually heaped up in a conical form.
(Bot.) The fruit or strobile of the Coniferae, as of the pine, fir, cedar, and cypress. It is composed of woody scales, each one of which has one or two seeds at its base.
(Zool.) A shell of the genus Conus, having a conical form.
v. t.
• To render coneshaped; to bevel like the circular segment of a cone; as, to cone the tires of car wheels.
Coney
n.
(Zool.) A rabbit.
(Zool.) A fish.
Confab
n.
• Familiar talk or conversation.
Confabulate
v. i.
• To talk familiarly together; to chat; to prattle.
Confabulation
n.
• Familiar talk; easy, unrestrained, unceremonious conversation.
Confabulatory
a.
• Of the nature of familiar talk; in the form of a dialogue.
Confalon
n.
(R. C. Ch.) One of a fraternity of seculars, also called Penitents.
Confarreation
n.
(Antiq.) A form of marriage among the Romans, in which an offering of bread was made, in presence of the high priest and at least ten witnesses.
Confated
p.a.
• Fated or decreed with something else.
Confect
v. t.
• To prepare, as sweetmeats; to make a confection of.
• To construct; to form; to mingle or mix.
n.
• A comfit; a confection.
Confection
n.
• A composition of different materials.
• A preparation of fruits or roots, etc., with sugar; a sweetmeat.
• A composition of drugs.
(Med.) A soft solid made by incorporating a medicinal substance or substances with sugar, sirup, or honey.
Confectionary
n.
• A confectioner.
a.
• Prepared as a confection.
Confectioner
n.
• A compounder.
• One whose occupation it is to make or sell confections, candies, etc.
Confectionery
n.
• Sweetmeats, in general; things prepared and sold by a confectioner; confections; candies.
• A place where candies, sweetmeats, and similar things are made or sold.
Confectory
a.
• Pertaining to the art of making sweetmeats.
Confecture
n.
• Same as Confiture.
Confeder
v. i.
• To confederate.
Confederacy
n.
• A league or compact between two or more persons, bodies of men, or states, for mutual support or common action; alliance.
• The persons, bodies, states, or nations united by a league; a confederation.
(Law) A combination of two or more persons to commit an unlawful act, or to do a lawful act by unlawful means.
Confederate
a.
• United in a league; allied by treaty; engaged in a confederacy; banded together; allied.
(Amer. Hist.) Of or pertaining to the government of the eleven Southern States of the United States which (1860-1865) attempted to establish an independent nation styled the Confederate States of America; as, the Confederate congress; Confederate money.
n.
• One who is united with others in a league; a person or a nation engaged in a confederacy; an ally; also, an accomplice in a bad sense.
(Amer. Hist.) A name designating an adherent to the cause of the States which attempted to withdraw from the Union (1860-1865).
v. t.
• To unite in a legue or confederacy; to ally.
v. i.
• To unite in a league; to join in a mutual contract or covenant; to band together.
Confederater
n.
• A confederate.
Confederation
n.
• The act of confederating; a league; a compact for mutual support; alliance, particulary of princes, nations, or states.
• The parties that are confederated, considered as a unit; a confederacy.
Confederative
a.
• Of or pertaining to a confederation.
Confederator
n.
• A confederate.
Confer
v.t.
• To bring together for comparison; to compare.
• To grant as a possession; to bestow.
• To contribute; to conduce.
v. i.
• To have discourse; to consult; to compare views; to deliberate.
Conferee
n.
• One who is conferred with, or who takes part in a conference; as, the conferees on the part of the Senate.
• One upon whom something is conferred.
Conference
n.
• The act of comparing two or more things together; comparison.
• The act of consulting together formally; serious conversation or discussion; interchange of views.
• A meeting for consultation, discussion, or an interchange of opinions.
• A meeting of the two branches of a legislature, by their committees, to adjust between them.
(Methodist Church) A stated meeting of preachers and others, invested with authority to take cognizance of ecclesiastical matters.
• A voluntary association of Congregational churches of a district; the district in which such churches are.
Conferential
a.
• Relating to conference.
Conferrable
a.
• Capable of being conferred.
Conferree
n.
• Same as Conferee.
Conferrer
n.
• One who confers; one who converses.
• One who bestows; a giver.
Conferva
n.
(Bot.) Any unbranched, slender, green plant of the fresh-water algae. The word is frequently used in a wider sense.
Confervaceous
a.
• Belonging to the confervae.
Confervoid
a.
• Like, or related to, the confervae.
Confervous
a.
• Pertaining to confervae; consisting of, or resembling, the confervae.
Confess
v. t.
• To make acknowledgment or avowal in a matter pertaining to one's self; to acknowledge, own, or admit, as a crime, a fault, a debt.
• To acknowledge faith in; to profess belief in.
• To admit as true; to assent to; to acknowledge, as after a previous doubt, denial, or concealment.
(Eccl.) To make known or acknowledge, as one's sins to a priest, in order to receive absolution; — sometimes followed by the reflexive pronoun.
• To hear or receive such confession; — said of a priest.
• To disclose or reveal, as an effect discloses its cause; to prove; to attest.
v. i.
• To make confession; to disclose sins or faults, or the state of the conscience.
• To acknowledge; to admit; to concede.
Confessant
n.
• One who confesses to a priest.
Confessary
n.
• One who makes a confession.
Confessedly
adv.
• By confession; without denial.
Confesser
n.
• One who makes a confession.
Confession
n.
• Acknowledgment; avowal, especially in a matter pertaining to one's self; the admission of a debt, obligation, or crime.
• Acknowledgment of belief; profession of one's faith.
(Eccl.) The act of disclosing sins or faults to a priest in order to obtain sacramental absolution.
• A formulary in which the articles of faith are comprised; a creed to be assented to or signed, as a preliminary to admission to membership of a church; a confession of faith.
(Law) An admission by a party to whom an act is imputed, in relation to such act. A judicial confession settles the issue to which it applies; an extrajudical confession may be explained or rebutted.
Confessional
n.
• The recess, seat, or inclosed place, where a priest sits to hear confessions; often a small structure furnished with a seat for the priest and with a window or aperture so that the penitent who is outside may whisper into the priest's ear without being seen by him or heard by others.
a.
• Pertaining to a confession of faith.
Confessionalism
n.
(Eccl.) An exaggerated estimate of the importance of giving full assent to any particular formula of the Christian faith.
Confessionalist
n.
• A priest hearing, or sitting to hear, confession.
Confessionary
n.
• A confessional.
a.
• Pertaining to auricular confession; as, a confessionary litany.
Confessionist
n.
• One professing a certain faith.
Confessor
n.
• One who confesses; one who acknowledges a fault, or the truth of a charge, at the risk of suffering; specifically, one who confesses himself a follower of Christ and endures persecution for his faith.
• A priest who hears the confessions of others and is authorized to grant them absolution.
Confessorship
n.
• The act or state of suffering persecution for religious faith.
Confide
v. i.
• To put faith (in); to repose confidence; to trust; — usually followed by in; as, the prince confides in his ministers.
v. t.
• To intrust; to give in charge; to commit to one's keeping; — followed by to.
Confidence
n.
• The act of confiding, trusting, or putting faith in; trust; reliance; belief; — formerly followed by of, now commonly by in.
• That in which faith is put or reliance had.
• The state of mind characterized by one's reliance on himself, or his circumstamces; a feeling of self-sufficiency; such assurance as leads to a feeling of security; self-reliance; — often with self prefixed.
• Private conversation; (pl.) secrets shared; as, there were confidences between them.
• Trustful; without fear or suspicion; frank; unreserved.
• Having self-reliance; bold; undaunted.
• Having an excess of assurance; bold to a fault; dogmatical; impudent; presumptuous.
• Giving occasion for confidence.
Confidential
a.
• Enjoying, or treated with, confidence; trusted in; trustworthy; as, a confidential servant or clerk.
• Communicated in confidence; secret.
Confidentially
adv.
• In confidence; in reliance on secrecy.
Confidently
adv.
• With confidence; with strong assurance; positively.
Confidentness
n.
• The quality of being confident.
Confider
n.
• One who confides.
Confiding
a.
• That confides; trustful; unsuspicious.
Configurate
v. i.
• To take form or position, as the parts of a complex structure; to agree with a pattern.
Configuration
n.
• Form, as depending on the relative disposition of the parts of a thing' shape; figure.
(Astrol.) Relative position or aspect of the planets; the face of the horoscope, according to the relative positions of the planets at any time.
Configure
v. t.
• To arrange or dispose in a certain form, figure, or shape.
Confinable
a.
• Capable of being confined, restricted, or limited.
Confine
v. t.
• To restrain within limits; to restrict; to limit; to bound; to shut up; to inclose; to keep close.
or
• (); 277), v. i. To have a common boundary; to border; to lie contiguous; to touch; — followed by on or with.
n.
• Common boundary; border; limit; — used chiefly in the plural.
• Apartment; place of restraint; prison.
Confineless
a.
• Without limitation or end; boundless.
Confinement
n.
• Restraint within limits; imprisonment; any restraint of liberty; seclusion.
• Restraint within doors by sickness, esp. that caused by childbirth; lying-in.
Confiner
n.
• One who, or that which, limits or restrains.
n.
• One who lives on confines, or near the border of a country; a borderer; a near neighbor.
Confinity
n.
• Community of limits; contiguity.
Confirm
v. t.
• To make firm or firmer; to add strength to; to establish; as, health is confirmed by exercise.
• To strengthen in judgment or purpose.
• To give new assurance of the truth of; to render certain; to verify; to corroborate; as, to confirm a rumor.
• To render valid by formal assent; to complete by a necessary sanction; to ratify; as, to confirm the appoinment of an official; the Senate confirms a treaty.
(Eccl.) To administer the rite of confirmation to.
Confirmable
a.
• That may be confirmed.
Confirmance
n.
• Confirmation.
Confirmation
n.
• The act of confirming or strengthening; the act of establishing, ratifying, or sanctioning; as, the confirmation of an appointment.
• That which confirms; that which gives new strength or assurance; as to a statement or belief; additional evidence; proof; convincing testimony.
(Eccl.) A rite supplemental to baptism, by which a person is admitted, through the laying on of the hands of a bishop, to the full privileges of the church, as in the Roman Catholic, the Episcopal Church, etc.
(Law) A conveyance by which a voidable estate is made sure and not voliable, or by which a particular estate is increased; a contract, express or implied, by which a person makes that firm and binding which was before voidable.
Confirmative
a.
• Tending confirm or establish.
Confirmator
n.
• One who, or that which, confirms; a confirmer.
Confirmatory
a. .
• Serving to confirm; corroborative.
• Pertaining to the rite of confirmation.
Confirmedly
adv.
• With confirmation.
Confirmedness
n.
• A fixed state.
Confirmee
n.
(Law) One to whom anuthing is confirmed.
Confirmer
n.
• One who, or that which, confirms, establishes, or ratifies; one who corroborates.
Confirmingly
adv.
• In a confirming manner.
Confiscable
a.
• Capable of being confiscated; liable to forfeiture.
Confiscate
a.
• Seized and appropriated by the government to the public use; forfeited.
v. t.
• To seize as forfeited to the public treasury; to appropriate to the public use.
Confiscation
n.
• The act or process of taking property or condemning it to be taken, as forfeited to the public use.
Confiscator
n.
• One who confiscates.
Confiscatory
a.
• Effecting confiscation; characterized by confiscations.
Confit
n.
• Same as Comfit.
Confitent
n.
• One who confesses his sins and faults.
Confiteor
n.
(R.C.Ch.) A form of prayer in which public confession of sins is made.
Confiture
n.
• The state or quality of being congenial; natural affinity; adaptation; suitableness.
Congenialize
v. t.
• To make congenial.
Congenially
adv.
• In a congenial manner; as, congenially married or employed.
Congenialness
n.
• Congeniality.
Congenious
a.
• Congeneric.
Congenital
a.
• Existing at, or dating from, birth; pertaining to one from birth; born with one; connate; constitutinal; natural; as, a congenital deformity.
Congenitally
dv.
• In a congenital manner.
Congenite
a.
• Congenital; connate; inborn.
Conger
n.
(Zool.) The conger eel; — called also congeree.
Congeries
n. sing & pl.
• A collection of particles or bodies into one mass; a heap; an aggregation.
Congest
v. t.
• To collect or gather into a mass or aggregate; to bring together; to accumulate.
(Med.) To cause an overfullness of the blood vessels (esp. the capillaries) of an organ or part.
Congested
a.
(Bot.) Crowded together.
(Med.) Containing an unnatural accumulation of blood; hyperaemic; — said of any part of the body.
Congestion
n.
• The act of gathering into a heap or mass; accumulation.
(Med.) Overfullness of the capillary and other blood vessels, etc., in any locality or organ (often producing other morbid symptoms); local hypermic, active or passive; as, arterial congestion; venous congestion; congestion of the lungs.
Congestive
a.
(Med.) Pertaining to, indicating, or attended with, congestion in some part of the body; as, a congestive fever.
Congiary
n.
• A present, as of corn, wine, or oil, made by a Roman emperor to the soldiers or the people; — so called because measured to each in a congius.
Congius
n.
(Roman Antiq.) A liquid measure containing about three quarts.
(Med.) A gallon, or four quarts.
Conglaciate
v. t. & i.
• To turn to ice; to freeze.
Conglaciation
n.
• The act or process of changing into ice, or the state of being converted to ice; a freezing; congelation; also, a frost.
Conglobate
a.
• Collected into, or forming, a rounded mass or ball; as, the conglobate [lymphatic] glands; conglobate flowers.
v. t.
• To collect or form into a ball or rounded mass; to gather or mass together.
Conglobation
n.
• The act or process of forming into a ball.
• A round body.
Conglobe
v. t.
• To gather into a ball; to collect into a round mass.
v. i.
• To collect, unite, or coalesce in a round mass.
Conglobulate
v. i.
• To gather into a small round mass.
Conglomerate
a.
• Gathered into a ball or a mass; collected together; concentrated; as, conglomerate rays of light.
(Bot.) Closely crowded together; densly clustered; as, conglomerate flowers.
(Geol.) Composed of stones, pebbles, or fragments of rocks, cemented together.
n.
• That which is heaped together in a mass or conpacted from various sources; a mass formed of fragments; collection; accumulation.
(Geol.) A rock, composed or rounded fragments of stone cemented together by another mineral substance, either calcareous, siliceous, or argillaceous; pudding stone; — opposed to agglomerate.
v. t.
• To gather into a ball or round body; to collect into a mass.
Conglomeration
n.
• The act or process of gathering into a mass; the state of being thus collected; collection; accumulation; that which is conglomerated; a mixed mass.
Conglutin
n.
(Chem.) A variety of vegetable casein, resembling legumin, and found in almonds, rye, wheat, etc.
Conglutinant
a.
• Cementing together; uniting closely; causing to adhere; promoting healing, as of a wound or a broken bone, by adhesion of the parts.
Conglutinate
a.
• Glued together; united, as by some adhesive substance.
v. t.
• To glue together; to unite by some glutinous or tenacious substance; to cause to adhere or to grow together.
v. i.
• To unite by the intervention of some glutinous substance; to coalesce.
Conglutination
n.
• A gluing together; a joining by means of some tenacious substance; junction; union.
Conglutinative
a.
• Conglutinant.
Congratulant
a.
• Rejoicing together; congratulatory.
Congratulate
v. t.
• To address with expressions of sympathetic pleasure on account of some happy event affecting the person addressed; to wish joy to.
v. i.
• To express of feel sympathetic joy; as, to congratulate with one's country.
Congratulation
n.
• The act of congratulating; an expression of sympathetic pleasure.
Congratulator
n.
• One who offers congratulation.
Congratulatory
a.
• Expressive of sympathetic joy; as, a congratulatory letter.
Congree
v. i.
• To agree.
Congreet
v. t.
• To salute mutually.
Congregate
a.
• Collected; compact; close.
v. t.
• To collect into an assembly or assemblage; to assemble; to bring into one place, or into a united body; to gather together; to mass; to compact.
v. i.
• To come together; to assemble; to meet.
Congregation
n.
• The act of congregating, or bringing together, or of collecting into one aggregate or mass.
• A collection or mass of separate things.
• An assembly of persons; a gathering; esp. an assembly of persons met for the worship of God, and for religious instruction; a body of people who habitually so meet.
(Anc. Jewish Hist.) The whole body of the Jewish people; — called also Congregation of the Lord.
(R. C. Ch.) A body of cardinals or other ecclesiastics to whom as intrusted some departament of the church business; as, the Congregation of the Propaganda, which has charge of the missions of the Roman Catholic Church.
• A company of religious persons forming a subdivision of a monastic order.
• The assemblage of Masters and Doctors at Oxford or Cambrige University, mainly for the granting of degrees.
(Scotch Church Hist.) the name assumed by the Protestant party under John Knox. The leaders called themselves (1557) Lords of the Congregation.
Congregational
a.
• Of or pertaining to a congregation; conducted, or participated in, by a congregation; as, congregational singing.
• Belonging to the system of Congregationalism, or to Congregationalist; holding to the faith and polity of Congregationalism; as, a Congregational church.
Congregationalism
n.
• That system of church organization which vests all ecclesiastical power in the assembled brotherhood of each local church.
• The faith and polity of the Congregational churches, taken collectively.
Congregationalist
n.
• One who belongs to a Congregational church or society; one who holds to Congregationalism.
Congress
n.
• A meeting of individuals, whether friendly or hostile; an encounter.
• A sudden encounter; a collision; a shock; — said of things.
• The coming together of a male and female in sexual commerce; the act of coition.
• A gathering or assembly; a conference.
• A formal assembly, as of princes, deputies, representatives, envoys, or commissioners; esp., a meeting of the representatives of several governments or societies to consider and determine matters of common interest.
• The collective body of senators and representatives of the people of a nation, esp. of a republic, constituting the chief legislative body of the nation.
• The lower house of the Spanish Cortes, the members of which are elected for three years.
Congression
n.
• A coming or bringing together, as in a public meeting, in a dispute, in the act of comparing, or in sexual intercourse.
Congressional
a.
• Of or pertaining to a congress, especially, to the Congress of the United States; as, congressional debates.
Congressive
a.
• Encountering, or coming together.
Congressman
n.
• A member of the Congress of the United States, esp. of the House of Representatives.
Congrue
v. i.
• To agree; to be suitable.
Congruence
n.
• Suitableness of one thing to another; agreement; consistency.
Congruency
n.
• Congruence.
Congruent
a.
• Possessing congruity; suitable; agreeing; corresponding.
Congruity
n.
• The state or quality of being congruous; the relation or agreement between things; fitness; harmony; correspondence; consistency.
(Geom.) Coincidence, as that of lines or figures laid over one another.
(Scholastic Theol.) That, in an imperfectly good persons, which renders it suitable for God to bestow on him gifts of grace.
Congruous
a.
• Suitable or concordant; accordant; fit; harmonious; correspondent; consistent.
Congruously
adv.
• In a congruous manner.
Conhydrine
n.
(Chem.) A vegetable alkaloid found with conine in the poison hemlock (Conium maculatum). It is a white crystalline substance, C8H17NO, easily convertible into conine.
Conia
n.
(Chem.) Same as Conine.
Conic
n.
(Math.) A conic section.
Conicality
n.
• Conicalness.
Conically
adv.
• In the form of a cone.
Conicalness
n.
• State or quality of being conical.
Conicoid
a.
(Math.) Same as Conoidal.
Conics
n.
• That branch of geometry which treats of the cone and the curves which arise from its sections.
• Conic sections.
Conidium
n.
(Bot.) A peculiar kind of reproductive cell found in certain fungi, and often containing zoospores.
Conifer
n.
(Bot.) A tree or shrub bearing cones; one of the order Coniferae, which includes the pine, cypress, and (according to some) the yew.
Coniferin
n.
(Chem.) A glucoside extracted from the cambium layer of coniferous trees as a white crystalline substance.
Coniferous
a.
• Bearing cones, as the pine and cypress.
• Pertaining to the order Coniferae, of which the pine tree is the type.
Coniform
a.
• Cone-shaped; conical.
Conimene
n.
(Chem.) Same as Olibene.
Conine
n.
(Chem.) A powerful and very poisonous vegetable alkaloid found in the hemlock (Conium maculatum) and extracted as a colorless oil, C8H17N, of strong repulsive odor and acrid taste. It is regarded as a derivative of piperidine and likewise of one of the collidines. It occasions a gradual paralysis of the motor nerves. Called also coniine, coneine, conia, etc.
Coniroster
n.
(Zool.) One of the Conirostres.
Conirostral
a.
(Zool.) Belonging to the Conirostres.
Conirostres
n. pl.
(Zool.) A tribe of perching birds, including those which have a strong conical bill, as the finches.
Conistra
n.
(Greek Antiq.) Originally, a part of the palestra, or gymnasium among the Greeks; either the place where sand was stored for use in sprinkling the wrestlers, or the wrestling ground itself. Hence, a part of the orchestra of the Greek theater.
Conite
n.
(Min.) A magnesian variety of dolomite.
Conium
n.
(Bot.) A genus of biennial, poisonous, white-flowered, umbelliferous plants, bearing ribbed fruit ("seeds") and decompound leaves.
(Med.) The common hemlock (Conium maculatum, poison hemlock, spotted hemlock, poison parsley), a roadside weed of Europe, Asia, and America, cultivated in the United States for medicinal purpose. It is an active poison. The leaves and fruit are used in medicine.
Conject
v. t.
• To throw together, or to throw.
v. t.
• To conjecture; also, to plan.
Conjector
n.
• One who guesses or conjectures.
Conjecturable
a.
• Capable of being conjectured or guessed.
Conjectural
a.
• Dependent on conjecture; fancied; imagined; guessed at; undetermined; doubtful.
Conjecturalist
n.
• A conjecturer.
Conjecturally
n.
• That which depends upon guess; guesswork.
adv.
• In a conjectural manner; by way of conjecture.
Conjecture
n.
• An opinion, or judgment, formed on defective or presumptive evidence; probable inference; surmise; guess; suspicion.
v. t.
• To arrive at by conjecture; to infer on slight evidence; to surmise; to guess; to form, at random, opinions concerning.
v. i.
• To make conjectures; to surmise; to guess; to infer; to form an opinion; to imagine.
Conjecturer
n.
• One who conjectures.
Conjoin
v. t.
• To join together; to unite.
v. i.
• To unite; to join; to league.
Conjoined
a.
(Her.) Joined together or touching.
Conjoint
a.
• United; connected; associated.(Mus.)
Conjointly
adv.
• In a conjoint manner; untitedly; jointly; together.
Conjointness
n.
• The qquality of being conjoint.
Conjubilant
a.
• Shouting together for joy; rejoicing together.
Conjugal
a.
• Belonging to marriage; suitable or appropriate to the marriage state or to married persons; matrimonial; connubial.
Conjugality
n.
• The conjugal state; sexual intercourse.
Conjugally
adv.
• In a conjugal manner; matrimonially; connubially.
Conjugate
a.
• United in pairs; yoked together; coupled.
(Bot.) In single pairs; coupled.
(Chem.) Containing two or more radicals supposed to act the part of a single one.
(Gram.) Agreeing in derivation and radical signification; — said of words.
(Math.) Presenting themselves simultaneously and having reciprocal properties; — frequently used in pure and applied mathematics with reference to two quantities, points, lines, axes, curves, etc.
n.
• A word agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling it in signification.
(Chem.) A complex radical supposed to act the part of a single radical.
v. t.
• To unite in marriage; to join.
(Gram.) To inflect (a verb), or give in order the forms which it assumed in its several voices, moods, tenses, numbers, and persons.
v. i.
(Biol.) To unite in a kind of sexual union, as two or more cells or individuals among the more simple plants and animals.
Conjugation
n.
• the act of uniting or combining; union; assemblage.
• Two things conjoined; a pair; a couple.
(Gram.) The act of conjugating a verb or giving in order its various parts and inflections.
• A scheme in which are arranged all the parts of a verb.
• A class of verbs conjugated in the same manner.
(Biol.) A kind of sexual union; — applied to a blending of the contents of two or more cells or individuals in some plants and lower animals, by which new spores or germs are developed.
Conjugational
a.
• relating to conjugation.
Conjugial
a.
• Conjugal.
Conjugium
n.
(Rom. Law) The marriage tie.
Conjunct
a.
• United; conjoined; concurrent.
(Her.) Same as Conjoined.
Conjunction
n.
• The act of conjoining, or the state of being conjoined, united, or associated; union; association; league.
(Astron.) The meeting of two or more stars or planets in the same degree of the zodiac; as, the conjunction of the moon with the sun, or of Jupiter and Saturn.
(Gram.) A connective or connecting word; an indeclinable word which serves to join together sentences, clauses of a sentence, or words; as, and, but, if.
Conjunctional
a.
• Relating to a conjunction.
Conjunctiva
n.
(Anat.) The mucous membrane which covers the external surface of the ball of the eye and the inner surface of the lids; the conjunctival membrance.
Conjunctival
a.
• Joining; connecting.
(Anat.) Of or pertaining to the conjunctiva.
Conjunctive
a.
• Serving to unite; connecting together.
• Closely united.
Conjunctively
adv.
• In conjunction or union; together.
Conjunctiveness
n.
• The state or quality of being conjunctive.
Conjunctivitis
n.
(Med.) Inflammation of the conjunctiva.
Conjunctly
adv.
• In union; conjointly; unitedly; together.
Conjuncture
n.
• The act of joining, or state of being joined; union; connection; combination.
• A crisis produced by a combination of circumstances; complication or combination of events or circumstances; plight resulting from various conditions.
Conjuration
n.
• The act of calling or summoning by a sacred name, or in solemn manner; the act of binding by an oath; an earnest entreaty; adjuration.
• The act or process of invoking supernatural aid by the use of a magical form of words; the practice of magic arts; incantation; enchantment.
• A league for a criminal purpose; conspiracy.
Conjurator
n.
(O. Eng. Law) One who swears or is sworn with others; one bound by oath with others; a compurgator.
Conjure
v. t.
• To call on or summon by a sacred name or in solemn manner; to implore earnestly; to adjure.
v. i.
• To combine together by an eath; to conspire; to confederate.
v. t.
• To affect or effect by conjuration; to call forth or send away by magic arts; to excite or alter, as if by magic or by the aid of supernatural powers.
v. i.
• To practice magical arts; to use the tricks of a conjurer; to juggle; to charm.
Conjurement
n.
• Serious injunction; solemn demand or entreaty.
Conjurer
n.
• One who conjures; one who calls, entreats, or charges in a solemn manner.
n.
• One who practices magic arts; one who pretends to act by the aid super natural power; also, one who performs feats of legerdemain or sleight of hand.
• One who conjectures shrewdly or judges wisely; a man of sagacity.
Conjuror
n.
(Law) One bound by a common cath with others.
Conjury
n.
• The practice of magic; enchantment.
Connascent
a.
• Born together; produced at the same time.
Connate
a.
• Born with another; being of the same birth.
• Congenital; existing from birth.
(Bot.) Congenitally united; growing from one base, or united at their bases; united into one body; as, connate leaves or athers.
Connation
n.
• Connection by birth; natural union.
Connatural
a.
• Connected by nature; united in nature; inborn; inherent; natural.
• Partaking of the same nature.
Connaturality
n.
• Participation of the same nature; natural union or connection.
Connaturalize
v. t.
• To bring to the same nature as something else; to adapt.
Connaturally
adv.
• By the act of nature; originally; from birth.
Connaturalness
n.
• Participation of the same nature; natural union.
Connature
n.
• Participation in a common nature or character.
Connect
v. t.
• To join, or fasten together, as by something intervening; to associate; to combine; to unite or link together; to establish a bond or relation between.
• To associate (a person or thing, or one's self) with another person, thing, business, or affair.
v. i.
• To join, unite, or cohere; to have a close relation; as, one line of railroad connects with another; one argument connect with another.
Connectedly
adv.
• In a connected manner.
Connection
n.
• The act of connecting, or the state of being connected; junction; union; alliance; relationship.
• That which connects or joins together; bond; tie.
• A relation; esp. a person connected with another by marriage rather than by blood; — used in a loose and indefinite, and sometimes a comprehensive, sense.
• The persons or things that are connected; as, a business connection; the Methodist connection.
Connective
a.
• Connecting, or adapted to connect; involving connection.
n.
• That which connects
(Gram.) A word that connect words or sentences; a conjunction or preposition.
(Bot.) That part of an anther which connects its thecae, lobes, or cells.
Connectively
adv.
• In connjunction; jointly.
Connector
n.
• One who, or that which, connects
• A flexible tube for connecting the ends of glass tubes in pneumatic experiments.
• A device for holding two parts of an electrical conductor in contact.
Conner
n.(Zool.)
Connex
v. t.
• To connect.
Connexion
n.
• Connection.
Connivance
n.
• Intentional failure or forbearance to discover a fault or wrongdoing; voluntary oversight; passive consent or coperation.
(Law) Corrupt or guilty assent to wrongdoing, not involving actual participation in, but knowledge of, and failure to prevent or oppose it.
Connive
v. i.
• To open and close the eyes rapidly; to wink.
• To close the eyes upon a fault; to wink (at); to fail or forbear by intention to discover an act; to permit a proceeding, as if not aware of it; — usually followed by at.
v. t.
• To shut the eyes to; to overlook; to pretend not to see.
Connivency
n.
• Connivance.
Connivent
a.
• Forbearing to see; designedly inattentive; as, connivent justice.
(Biol.) Brought close together; arched inward so that the points meet; converging; in close contact; as, the connivent petals of a flower, wings of an insect, or folds of membrane in the human system, etc.
Conniver
n.
• One who connives.
Connoisseur
n.
• One well versed in any subject; a skillful or knowing person; a critical judge of any art, particulary of one of the fine arts.
Connoisseurship
n.
• State of being a connoisseur.
Connotate
v. t.
• To connote; to suggest or designate (something) as additional; to include; to imply.
Connotation
n.
• The act of connoting; a making known or designating something additional; implication of something more than is asserted.
Connotative
a.
• Implying something additional; illative.
(Log.) Implying an attribute.
Connotatively
adv.
• In a connotative manner; expressing connotation.
Connote
v. t.
• To mark along with; to suggest or indicate as additional; to designate by implication; to include in the meaning; to imply.
(Logic) To imply as an attribute.
Connubial
a.
• Of or pertaining to marriage, or the marriage state; conjugal; nuptial.
Connubiality
n.
• The quality of being connubial; something characteristics of the conjugal state; an expression of connubial tenderness.
Connumeration
n.
• A reckoning together.
Connutritious
a.
• Nutritious by force of habit; — said of certain kinds of food.
Conny
a.
• Brave; fine; canny.
Conodont
n.
(Zool.) A peculiar toothlike fossil of many forms, found especially in carboniferous rocks. Such fossils are supposed by some to be the teeth of marsipobranch fishes, but they are probably the jaws of annelids.
Conoid
n.
• Anything that has a form resembling that of a cone.
(Geom.) A solid formed by the revolution of a conic section about its axis; as, a parabolic conoid, elliptic conoid, etc.; — more commonly called paraboloid, ellipsoid, etc.
• A surface which may be generated by a straight line moving in such a manner as always to meet a given straight line and a given curve, and continue parallel to a given plane.
• , Resembling a cone; conoidal.
Conoidal
a.
• Nearly, but not exactly, conical.
Conominee
n.
• One nominated in conjunction with another; a joint nominee.
Conquadrate
v. t.
• To bring into a square.
Conquassate
v. t.
• To shake; to agitate.
Conquer
v. t.
• To gain or acquire by force; to take possession of by violent means; to gain dominion over; to subdue by physical means; to reduce; to overcome by force of arms; to cause to yield; to vanquish.
• To subdue or overcome by mental or moral power; to surmount; as, to conquer difficulties, temptatin, etc.
• To gain or obtain, overcoming obstacles in the way; to win; as, to conquer freedom; to conquer a peace.
v. i.
• To gain the victory; to overcome; to prevail.
Conquerable
a.
• Capable of being conquered or subdued.
Conqueress
n.
• A woman who conquers.
Conqueror
n.
• One who conquers.
Conquest
n.
• The act or process of conquering, or acquiring by force; the act of overcoming or subduing opposition by force, whether physical or moral; subjection; subjugation; victory.
• That which is conquered; possession gained by force, physical or moral.
(Feudal Law) The acquiring of property by other means than by inheritance; acquisition.
• The act of gaining or regaining by successful strugle; as, the conquest of liberty or peace.
Consanguineal
a.
• Of the same blood; related by birth.
Consanguined
a.
• Of kin blood; related.
Consanguineous
a.
• Of the same blood; related by birth; descended from the same parent or ancestor.
Consanguinity
n.
• The relation of person by blood, is distinction from affinity or relation by marriage; blood relationship; as, lineal consanguinity; collateral consanguinity.
Consarcination
n.
• A patching together; patchwork.
Conscience
n.
• Knowledge of one's own thoughts or actions; consciousness.
• The faculty, power, or inward principle which decides as to the character of one's own actions, purposes, and affections, warning against and condemning that which is wrong, and approving and prompting to that which is right; the moral faculty passing judgment on one's self; the moral sense.
• The estimate or determination of conscience; conviction or right or duty.
• Tenderness of feeling; pity.
Conscienced
a.
• Having a conscience.
Conscienceless
a.
• Without conscience; indifferent to conscience; unscrupulous.
Conscient
a.
• Conscious.
Conscientious
a.
• Influenced by conscience; governed by a strict regard to the dictates of conscience, or by the known or supposed rules of right and wrong; — said of a person.
• Characterized by a regard to conscience; conformed to the dictates of conscience; — said of actions.
Conscientiously
adv.
• In a conscientious manner; as a matter of conscience; hence; faithfully; accurately; completely.
Conscientiousness
n.
• The quality of being conscientious; a scrupulous regard to the dictates of conscience.
Conscionable
a.
• Governed by, or according to, conscience; reasonable; just.
Conscionableness
n.
• The quality of being conscionable; reasonableness.
Conscionably
adv.
• Reasonably; justly.
Conscious
a.
• Possessing the faculty of knowing one's own thoughts or mental operations.
• Possessing knowledge, whether by internal, conscious experience or by external observation; cognizant; aware; sensible.
• Made the object of consciousness; known to one's self; as, conscious guilt.
Consciously
adv.
• In a conscious manner; with knowledge of one's own mental operations or actions.
Consciousness
n.
• The state of being conscious; knowledge of one's own existence, condition, sensations, mental operations, acts, etc.
• Immediate knowledge or perception of the presence of any object, state, or sensation.
• Feeling, persuasion, or expectation; esp., inward sense of guilt or innocence.
Conscribe
v. t.
• To enroll; to enlist.
Conscript
a.
• Enrolled; written; registered.
n.
• One taken by lot, or compulsorily enrolled, to serve as a soldier or sailor.
v. t.
• To enroll, by compulsion, for military service.
Conscription
n.
• An enrolling or registering.
• A compulsory enrollment of men for military or naval service; a draft.
a.
• Belonging to, or of the nature of, a conspiration.
Consecrate
a.
• Consecrated; devoted; dedicated; sacred.
v. t.
• To make, or declare to be, sacred; to appropriate to sacred uses; to set apart, dedicate, or devote, to the service or worship of God; as, to consecrate a church; to give (one's self) unreservedly, as to the service of God.
• To set apart to a sacred office; as, to consecrate a bishop.
• To canonize; to exalt to the rank of a saint; to enroll among the gods, as a Roman emperor.
• To render venerable or revered; to hallow; to dignify; as, rules or principles consecrated by time.
Consecrater
n.
• Consecrator.
Consecration
n.
• The act or ceremony of consecrating; the state of being consecrated; dedication.
Consecrator
n.
• One who consecrates; one who performs the rites by which a person or thing is devoted or dedicated to sacred purposes.
Consecratory
a.
• Of or pertaining to the act of consecration; dedicatory.
Consectaneous
a.
• Following as a matter of course.
Consectary
a.
• Following by consequence; consequent; deducible.
n.
• That which follows by consequence or is logically deducible; deduction from premises; corollary.
Consecute
v. t.
• To follow closely; to endeavor to overtake; to pursue.
Consecution
n.
• A following, or sequel; actual or logical dependence.
• A succession or series of any kind.
Consecutive
a.
• Following in a train; suceeding one another in a regular order; successive; uninterrupted in course or succession; with no interval or break; as, fifty consecutive years.
• Following as a consequence or result; actually or logically dependent; consequential; succeeding.
(Mus.) Having similarity of sequence; — said of certain parallel progressions of two parts in a piece of harmony; as, consecutive fifths, or consecutive octaves, which are forbidden.
Consecutively
adv.
• In a consecutive manner; by way of sequence; successively.
Consecutiveness
n.
• The state or quality of being consecutive.
Consension
n.
• Agreement; accord.
Consensual
a.
(Law) Existing, or made, by the mutual consent of two or more parties.
(Physiol.) Excited or caused by sensation, sympathy, or reflex action, and not by conscious volition; as, consensual motions.
Consensus
n.
• Agreement; accord; consent.
Consent
v. i.
• To agree in opinion or sentiment; to be of the same mind; to accord; to concur.
• To indicate or express a willingness; to yield to guidance, persuasion, or necessity; to give assent or approval; to comply.
v. t.
• To grant; to allow; to assent to; to admit.
n.
• Agreement in opinion or sentiment; the being of one mind; accord.
• Correspondence in parts, qualities, or operations; agreement; harmony; coherence.
• Voluntary accordance with, or concurrence in, what is done or proposed by another; acquiescence; compliance; approval; permission.
(Law) Capable, deliberate, and voluntary assent or agreement to, or concurrence in, some act or purpose, implying physical and mental power and free action.
(Physiol.) Sympathy.
Consentaneity
n.
• Mutual agreement.
Consentaneous
a.
• Consistent; agreeable; suitable; accordant to; harmonious; concurrent.
Consentant
a.
• Consenting.
Consenter
a.
• One who consents.
Consentient
a.
• Agreeing in mind; accordant.
Consentingly
adv.
• With consent; in a compliant manner.
Consequence
n.
• That which follows something on which it depends; that which is produced by a cause; a result.
(Logic) A proposition collected from the agreement of other previous propositions; any conclusion which results from reason or argument; inference.
• Chain of causes and effects; consecution.
• Importance with respect to what comes after; power to influence or produce an effect; value; moment; rank; distinction.
Consequencing
n.
• Drawing inference.
Consequent
a.
• Following as a result, inference, or natural effect.
(Logic) Following by necessary inference or rational deduction; as, a proposition consequent to other propositions.
n.
• That which follows, or results from, a cause; a result or natural effect.
(Logic) That which follows from propositions by rational deduction; that which is deduced from reasoning or argumentation; a conclusion, or inference.
(Math.) The second term of a ratio, as the term b in the ratio a:b, the first a, being the antecedent.
Consequential
a.
• Following as a consequence, result, or logical inference; consequenment.
• Assuming or exhibiting an air of consequence; pretending to importance; pompous; self-important; as, a consequential man.
Consequentially
adv.
• With just deduction of consequence; with right connection of ideas; logically.
• By remote consequence; not immediately; eventually; as, to do a thing consequentially.
• In a regular series; in the order of cause and effect; with logical concatenation; consecutively; continuously.
• With assumed importance; pompously.
Consequentialness
n.
• The quality of being consequential.
Consequently
adv.
• By consequence; by natural or logical sequence or connection.
Consertion
n.
• Junction; adaptation
Conservable
a.
• Capable of being preserved from decay or injury.
Conservancy
n.
• Conservation, as from injury, defilement, or irregular use.
Conservant
a.
• Having the power or quality of conservation.
Conservation
n.
• The act of preserving, guarding, or protecting; the keeping (of a thing) in a safe or entire state; preservation.
Conservational
a.
• Tending to conserve; preservative.
Conservatism
n.
• The disposition and tendency to preserve what is established; opposition to change; the habit of mind; or conduct, of a conservative.
Conservative
a.
• Having power to preserve in a safe of entire state, or from loss, waste, or injury; preservative.
• Tending or disposed to maintain existing institutions; opposed to change or innovation.
• Of or pertaining to a political party which favors the conservation of existing institutions and forms of government as the Conservative party in england; — contradistinguished from Liberal and Radical.
n.
• One who, or that which, preserves from ruin, injury, innovation, or radical change; a preserver; a conserver.
• One who desires to maintain existing institutions and customs; also, one who holds moderate opinions in politics; — opposed to revolutionary or radical.
(Eng. Hist.) A member of the Conservative party.
Conservativeness
a.
• The quality of being conservative.
Conservatoire
n.
• A public place of instruction in any special branch, esp. music and the arts. [See Conservatory, 3].
Conservator
n.
• One who preserves from injury or violation; a protector; a preserver.
(Law) An officer who has charge of preserving the public peace, as a justice or sheriff.
• One who has an official charge of preserving the rights and privileges of a city, corporation, community, or estate.
Conservatory
a.
• Having the quality of preserving from loss, decay, or injury.
n.
• That which preserves from injury.
• A place for preserving anything from loss, decay, waste, or injury; particulary, a greenhouse for preserving exotic or tender plants.
• A public place of instruction, designed to preserve and perfect the knowledge of some branch of science or art, esp. music.
Conservatrix
n.
• A woman who preserves from loss, injury, etc.
Conserve
v. t.
• To keep in a safe or sound state; to save; to preserve; to protect.
• To prepare with sugar, etc., for the purpose of preservation, as fruits, etc.; to make a conserve of.
n.
• Anything which is conserved; especially, a sweetmeat prepared with sugar; a confection.
(Med.) A medicinal confection made of freshly gathered vegetable substances mixed with finely powdered refined sugar.
• A conservatory.
Conserver
n.
• One who conserves.
Consider
v. t.
• To fix the mind on, with a view to a careful examination; to thank on with care; to ponder; to study; to meditate on.
• To look at attentively; to observe; to examine.
• To have regard to; to take into view or account; to pay due attention to; to respect.
• To estamate; to think; to regard; to view.
v. i.
• To think seriously; to make examination; to reflect; to deliberate.
• To hesitate.
Considerable
a.
• Worthy of consideration, borne in mind, or attended to.
• Of some distinction; noteworthy; influential; respectable; — said of persons.
• Of importance or value.
Considerableness
n.
• Worthiness of consideration; dignity; value; size; amount.
Considerably
adv.
• In a manner or to a degree not trifling or unimportant; greatly; much.
Considerance
n.
• Act of considering; consideration.
Considerate
a.
• Given to consideration or to sober reflection; regardful of consequences or circumstances; circumspect; careful; esp. careful of the rights, claims, and feelings of other.
• Having respect to; regardful.
Consideration
n.
• The act or process of considering; continuous careful thought; examination; contemplation; deliberation; attention.
• Attentive respect; appreciative regard; — used especially in diplomatic or stately correspondence.
• Thoughtful or sympathetic regard or notice.
• Claim to notice or regard; some degree of importance or consequence.
• The result of delibration, or of attention and examonation; matured opinion; a reflection; as, considerations on the choice of a profession.
• That which is, or should be, taken into account as a ground of opinion or action; motive; reason.
(Law) The cause which moves a contracting party to enter into an agreement; the material cause of a contract; the price of a stripulation; compensation; equivalent.
Considerative
a.
• Considerate; careful; thoughtful.
Considerator
n.
• One who considers.
Considerer
n.
• One who considers; a man of reflection; a thinker.
Consideringly
adv.
• With consideration or deliberation.
Consign
v. t.
• To give, transfer, or deliver, in a formal manner, as if by signing over into the possession of another, or into a different state, with the sense of fixedness in that state, or permanence of possession; as, to consign the body to the grave.
• To give in charge; to commit; to intrust.
(Com.) To send or address (by bill of lading or otherwise) to an agent or correspondent in another place, to be cared for or sold, or for the use of such correspondent; as, to cosign a cargo or a ship; to set apart.
• To assign; to devote; to set apart.
• To stamp or impress; to affect.
v. i.
• To submit; to surrender or yield one's self.
• To yield consent; to agree; to acquiesce.
Consignatary
n.
• A consignee.
Consignation
n.
• The act of consigning; the act of delivering or committing to another person, place, or state.
• The act of ratifying or establishing, as if signing; confirmation; ratuficator.
• A stamp; an indication; a sign.
Consignatory
n.
• One of several that jointly sign a written instrument, as a treaty.
Consignature
n.
• Joint signature.
Consigne
n.
(Mil.) A countersign; a watchword.
• One who is orders to keep within certain limits.
Consignee
n.
• The person to whom goods or other things are consigned; a factor; — correlative to consignor.
Consigner
n.
• One who consigns.
Consignificant
a.
• Having joint or equal signification; synonymous.
Consignification
n.
• Joint signification.
Consignificative
a.
• Consignificant; jointly significate.
Consignify
v. t.
• To signify or denote in combination with something else.
Consignment
n.
• The act of consigning; consignation.
(Com.) The act of consigning or sending property to an agent or correspondent in another place, as for care, sale, etc.
(Com.) That which is consigned; the goods or commodities sent or addressed to a consignee at one time or by one conveyance.
• The writing by which anything is consigned.
Consignor
n.
• One who consigns something to another; — opposed to consignee.
Consilience
n.
• Act of concurring; coincidence; concurrence.
Consist
v. i.
• To stand firm; to be in a fixed or permanent state, as a body composed of parts in union or connection; to hold together; to be; to exist; to subsist; to be supported and maintained.
• To be composed or made up; — followed by of.
• To have as its substance or character, or as its foundation; to be; — followed by in.
• To be cosistent or harmonious; to be in accordance; — formerly used absolutely, now followed by with.
• To insist; — followed by on.
Consistent
a.
• Possessing firmness or fixedness; firm; hard; solid.
• Having agreement with itself or with something else; having harmony among its parts; possesing unity; accordant; harmonious; congruous; compatible; uniform; not contradictory.
• Living or acting in conformity with one's belief or professions.
Consistently
adv.
• In a consistent manner.
Consistorial
a.
• Of or pertaining to a consistory.
Consistorian
a.
• Pertaining to a Presbyterian consistory; — a contemptuous term of 17th century controversy.
Consistory
n.
• Primarily, a place of standing or staying together; hence, any solemn assembly or council.
(Eng. Ch.) The spiritual court of a diocesan bishop held before his chancellor or commissioner in his cathedral church or elsewhere.
(R. C. Ch.) An assembly of prelates; a session of the college of cardinals at Rome.
• A church tribunal or governing body.
• A civil court of justice.
a.
• Of the nature of, or pertaining to, a consistory.
Consociate
n.
• An associate; an accomplice.
v. t.
• To bring into alliance, confederacy, or relationship; to bring together; to join; to unite.
• To unite in an ecclesiastical consociation.
v. i.
• To be allied, confederated, or associated; to coalescence.
• To form an ecclesiastical consociation.
Consociation
n.
• Intimate union; fellowship; alliance; companionship; confederation; association; intimacy.
• A voluntary and permanent council or union of neighboring Congregational churches, for mutual advice and coperation in ecclesiastical matters; a meeting of pasters and delegates from churches thus united.
Consociational
a.
• Of or pertaining to a consociation.
Consolable
a.
• Capable of receiving consolation.
Consolate
v. t.
• To console; to comfort.
Consolation
n.
• The act of consoling; the state of being consoled; allevation of misery or distress of mind; refreshment of spirit; comfort; that which consoles or comforts the spirit.
Consolator
n.
• One who consoles or comforts.
Consolatory
a.
• Of a consoling or comforting nature.
n.
• That which consoles; a speech or writing intended for consolation.
Console
v. t.
• To cheer in distress or depression; to alleviate the grief and raise the spirits of; to relieve; to comfort; to soothe.
n.
(Arch.) A bracket whose projection is not more than half its height.
• Any small bracket; also, a console table.
Consoler
n.
• One who gives consolation.
Consolidant
a.
• Serving to unite or consolidate; having the quality of consolidating or making firm.
Consolidate
a.
• Formed into a solid mass; made firm; consolidated.
v. t.
• To make solid; to unite or press together into a compact mass; to harden or make dense and firm.
• To unite, as various particulars, into one mass or body; to bring together in close union; to combine; as, to consolidate the armies of the republic.
(Surg.) To unite by means of applications, as the parts of a broken bone, or the lips of a wound.
v. i.
• To grow firm and hard; to unite and become solid; as, moist clay consolidates by drying.
Consolidated
p.p. & a.
• Made solid, hard, or compact; united; joined; solidified.
(Bot.) Having a small surface in proportion to bulk, as in the cactus.
Consolidation
n.
• The act or process of consolidating, making firm, or uniting; the state of being consolidated; solidification; combination.
(Bot.) To organic cohesion of different circled in a flower; adnation.
(Law) The combination of several actions into one.
Consolidative
a.
• Tending or having power to consolidate; healing.
Consoling
a.
• Adapted to console or comfort; cheering; as, this is consoling news.
Consols
n. pl.
• The leading British funded government security.
Consonant
a.
• Having agreement; congruous; consistent; according; — usually followed by with or to.
• Having like sounds.
(Mus.) harmonizing together; accordant; as, consonant tones, consonant chords.
• Of or pertaining to consonants; made up of, or containing many, consonants.
n.
• An articulate sound which in utterance is usually combined and sounded with an open sound called a vowel; a member of the spoken alphabet other than a vowel; also, a letter or character representing such a sound.
Consonantal
• , . Of the nature of a consonant; pertaining to consonants.
Consonantize
v. t.
• To change into, or use as, a consonant.
Consonantly
adv.
• In a consonant, consistent, or congruous manner; agreeably.
Consonantness
n.
• The quality or condition of being consonant, agreeable, or consistent.
Consonous
a.
• Agreeing in sound; symphonious.
Consopiation
n.
• The act of sleeping, or of lulling, to sleep.
Consopite
a.
• Lulled to sleep.
v. t.
• To lull to sleep; to quiet; to compose.
Consort
n.
• One who shares the lot of another; a companion; a partner; especially, a wife or husband.
(Naut.) A ship keeping company with another.
• Concurrence; conjunction; combination; association; union.
• An assembly or association of persons; a company; a group; a combination.
• Harmony of sounds; concert, as of musical instruments.
v. i.
• To unite or to keep company; to associate; — used with with.
v. t.
• To unite or join, as in affection, harmony, company, marriage, etc.; to associate.
• To attend; to accompany.
Consortable
a.
• Suitable for association or companionship.
Consortion
n.
• Fellowship; association; companionship.
Consortship
n.
• The condition of a consort; fellowship; partnership.
Consound
n.
(Bot.) A name applied loosely to several plants of different genera, esp. the comfrey.
Conspecific
a.
• Of the same species.
Conspectuity
n.
• The faculty of seeing; sight; eye.
Conspectus
n.
• A general sketch or outline of a subject; a synopsis; an epitome.
Conspersion
n.
• The act of sprinkling.
Conspicuity
n.
• The state or quality of being clear or bright; brightness; conspicuosness.
Conspicuous
a.
• Open to the view; obvious to the eye; easy to be seen; plainly visible; manifest; attracting the eye.
• Obvious to the mental eye; easily recognized; clearly defined; notable; prominent; eminent; distinguished; as, a conspicuous exellence, or fault.
Conspiracy
n.
• A combination of men for an evil purpose; as agreement, between two or more persons, to commit a crime in concert, as treason; a plot.
• A concurence or general tendency, as of circumstances, to one event, as if by agreement.
(Law) An agreement, manifesting itself in words or deeds, by which two or more persons confederate to do an unlawful act, or to use unlawful to do an act which is lawful; confederacy.
Conspirant
a.
• Engaging in a plot to commit a crime; conspiring.
Conspiration
n.
• Agreement or concurrence for some end or purpose; conspiracy.
Conspirator
n.
• One who engages in a conspiracy; a plotter.
Conspire
v. i.
• To make an agreement, esp. a secret agreement, to do some act, as to commit treason or a crime, or to do some unlawful deed; to plot together.
• To concur to one end; to agree.
v. t.
• To plot; to plan; to combine for.
Conspirer
n.
• One who conspires; a conspirator.
Conspiringly
adv.
• In the manner of a conspirator; by conspiracy.
Conspissation
n.
• A making thick or viscous; thickness; inspissation.
Conspurate
v. t.
• To pollute; to defile.
Conspuration
n.
• This act of defiling; defilement; pollution.
Constable
n.
• A high officer in the monarhical establishments of the Middle Ages.
(Law) An officer of the peace having power as a conservator of the public peace, and bound to exeute the warrants of judicial offiers.
Constablery
n.
• The constabulary.
• The distrit or jurisdiction of a constable.
Constableship
n.
• The office or functions of a constable.
Constabless
n.
• The wife of a constable.
Constablewick
n.
• The district to which a constable's power is limited.
Constabulary
a.
• Of or pertaining to constables; consisting of constables.
n.
• The collective body of constables in any town, district, or country.
Constabulatory
n.
• A constabulary.
Constancy
n.
• The state or quality of being constant or steadfast; freedom from hange; stability; fixedness; immutabilitu; asm the constancy of God in his nature and attributes.
• Fixedness or firmness of mind; persevering resolution; especially, firmness of mind under sufferings, steadiness in attashments, or perseverance in enterprise; stability; fidelity.
Constant
a.
• Firm; solid; fixed; immovable; — opposed to fluid.
• Not liable, or given, to change; permanent; regular; continuous; continually recurring; steadfast; faithful; not fickle.
(Math. & Physics) Remaining unchanged or invariable, as a quantity, forc, law, etc.
• Consistent; logical.
n.
• That which is not subject to change; that which is invariable.
(Math.) A quantity that does not change its value; — used in countradistinction o variable.
Constantia
n.
• A superior wine, white and red, from Constantia, in Cape Colony.
Constantly
adv.
• With constancy; steadily; continually; perseveringly; without cessation; uniformly.
Constat
n.
(Law) A certificate showing what appears upon record touching a matter in question.
Constate
v. t.
• To ascertain; to verify; to establish; to prove.
Constellate
v. i.
• To join luster; to shine with united radiance, or one general light.
v. t.
• To unite in one luster or radiane, as stars.
• To set or adorn with stars or constellations; as, constellated heavens.
Constellation
n.
• A cluster or group of fixed stars, or dvision of the heavens, designated in most cases by the name of some animal, or of some mythologial personage, within whose imaginary outline, as traced upon the heavens, the group is included.
• An assemblage of splendors or excellences.
• Fortune; fate; destiny.
Consternation
n.
• Amazement or horror that confounds the faculties, and incapacitates for refletion; terror, combined with amaxement; dismay.
Constipate
v. t.
• To crowd or cram into a narrow compass; to press together or condense.
• To stop (a channel) by filling it, and preventing passage through it; as, to constipate the capillary vessels.
(Med.) To render costive; to cause constipation in.
Constipation
n.
• Act of crowding anything into a less compass, or the state of being crowded or pressed together; condensation.
• A state of the bowels in which the evacuations are infrequent and difficult, or the intestines become filled with hardened faces; costiveness.
Constituency
n.
• A body of constituents, as the body of citizens or voters in a representative district.
Constituent
a.
• Serving to form, compose, or make up; elemental; component.
• Having the power of electing or appointing.
n.
• The person or thing which constitutes, determines, or constructs.
• That which constitutes or composes, as a part, or an essential part; a component; an element.
• One for whom another acts; especially, one who is represented by another in a legislative assembly; — correlative to representative.
(Law) A person who appoints another to act for him as attorney in fact.
Constitute
v. t.
• To cause to stand; to establish; to enact.
• To make up; to compose; to form.
• To appoint, depute, or elect to an offie; to make and empower.
n.
• An established law.
Constituter
n.
• One who constitutes or appoints.
Constitution
n.
• The act or process of constituting; the action of enacting, establishing, or appointing; enactment; establishment; formation.
• The state of being; that form of being, or structure and connection of parts, which constitutes and characterizes a system or body; natural condition; structure; texture; conformation.
• The agregate of all one's inherited physical qualities; the aggregate of the vital powers of an individual, with refernce to ability to endure hardship, resist disease, etc.; as, a robust constitution.
• The aggregate of mental qualities; temperament.
• The fundamental, organic law or principles of government of men, embodied in written documents, or implied in the institutions and usages of the country or society; also, a written instrument embodying such organic law, and laying down fundamental rules and principles for the conduct of affairs.
• An authoritative ordinance, regulation or enactment; especially, one made by a Roman emperor, or one affecting ecclesiastical doctrine or disipline; as, the constitutions of Justinian.
Constitutional
a.
• Belonging to, or inherent in, the constitution, or in the structure of body or mind; as, a constitutional infirmity; constitutional ardor or dullness.
• In accordance with, or authorized by, the constitution of a state or a society; as, constitutional reforms.
• Regulated by, dependent on, or secured by, a constitution; as, constitutional government; constitutional rights.
• Relating to a constitution, or establishment form of government; as, a constitutional risis.
• For the benefit or one's constitution or health; as, a constitutional walk.
n.
• A walk or other exercise taken for one's health or constitution.
Constitutionalism
n.
• The theory, principles, or authority of constitutional government; attachment or adherene to a constitution or constitutional government.
Constitutionalist
n.
• One who advocates a constitutional form of government; a constitutionalist.
Constitutionality
n.
• The quality or state of being constitutional, or inherent in the natural frame.
• The state of being consistent with the constitution or frame of government, or of being authorized by its provisions.
Constitutionally
adv.
• In accordance with the constitution or natural disposition of the mind or body; naturally; as, he was constitutionally timid.
• In accordance with the constitution or fundamental law; legally; as, he was not constitutionally appointed.
Constitutionist
n.
• One who adheres to the constitution of the country.
Constitutive
a.
• Tending or assisting to constitute or compose; elemental; essential.
• Having power to enact, establish, or create; instituting; determining.
Constitutively
adv.
• In a constitutive manner.
Constrain
v. t.
• To secure by bonds; to chain; to bond or con; to hold tightly; to constringe.
• To bring into a narrow compass; to compress.
• To hold back by force; to restrain; to repress.
• To compel; to force; to necessiate; to oblige.
• To violate; to ravish.
• To produce in such a manner as to give an unnatural effet; as, a constrained voice.
Constrainable
a.
• Capable of being constrained; liable to constraint, or to restraint.
Constrained
a.
• Marked by constraint; not free; not voluntary; embarrassed; as, a constrained manner; a constrained tone.
Constrainedly
adv.
• By constraint or compulsion; in a constrained manner.
Constrainer
n.
• One who constrains.
Constraint
n.
• The act of constraining, or the state of being constrained; that which compels to, or restrains from, action; compulsion; restraint; necessity.
Constraintive
a.
• Constraining; compulsory.
Constrict
v. t.
• To draw together; to render narrower or smaller; to bind; to cramp; to contract or ause to shrink.
Constricted
a.
• Drawn together; bound; contracted; cramped.
(Bot.) Contracted or compressed so as to be smaller in certain places or parts than in others.
Constriction
n.
• The act of constricting by means of some inherent power or by movement or change in the thing itself, as distinguished from compression.
• The state of being constricted; the point where a thing is constricted; a narrowing or binding.
Constrictive
a.
• Serving or tending to bind or constrict.
Constrictor
n.
• That which constricts, draws together, or contracts.
(Anat.) A muscle which contracts or closes an orifice, or which compresses an organ; a sphincter.
(Zool.) A serpent that kills its prey by inclosing and crushing it with its folds; as, the boa constrictor.
Constringe
v. t.
• To dawn together; to contract; to force to contract itself; to constrict; to cause to shrink.
Constringent
a.
• Having the quality of contracting, binding, or compressing.
Construct
v. t.
• To put together the constituent parts of (something) in their proper place and order; to build; to form; to make; as, to construct an edlifice.
• To devise; to invent; to set in order; to arrange; as, to construct a theory of ethics.
a.
• Formed by, or relating to, construction, interpretation, or inference.
Constructer
n.
• One who, or that which, constructs or frames.
Construction
n.
• The process or art of constructing; the act of building; erection; the act of devising and forming; fabrication; composition.
• The form or manner of building or putting together the parts of anything; structure; arrangement.
(Gram.) The arrangement and connection of words in a sentence; syntactical arrangement.
• The method of construing, interpreting, or explaining a declaration or fact; an attributed sense or meaning; understanding; explanation; interpretation; sense.
Constructional
a.
• Pertaining to, or deduced from, construction or interpretation.
Constructionist
n.
• One who puts a certain construction upon some writing or instrument, as the Constitutions of the United States; as, a strict constructionist; a broad constructionist.
Constructive
a.
• Having ability to construct or form; employed in construction; as, to exhibit constructive power.
• Derived from, or depending on, construction or interpretation; not directly expressed, but inferred.
Constructively
adv.
• In a constructive manner; by construction or inference.
Constructiveness
n.
• Tendency or ability to form or construct.
(Phren.) The faculty which enables one to construct, as in mechanical, artistic, or literary matters.
Constructor
n.
• A constructer.
Constructure
n.
• That which is constructed or formed; an edifice; a fabric.
Construe
v. t.
• To apply the rules of syntax to (a sentence or clause) so as to exhibit the structure, arrangement, or connection of, or to discover the sense; to explain the construction of; to interpret; to translate.
• To put a construction upon; to explain the sense or intention of; to interpret; to understand.
Constuprate
v. t.
• To ravish; to debauch.
Constupration
n.
• The act of ravishing; violation; defilement.
Consubstantial
a.
• Of the same kind or nature; having the same substance or essence; coessential.
Consubstantialism
n.
• The doctrine of consubstantiation.
Consubstantialist
n.
• One who believes in consubstantiation.
Consubstantiality
n.
• Participation of the same nature; coexistence in the same substance.
Consubstantially
adv.
• In a consubstantial manner; with identity of substance or nature.
Consubstantiate
v. t.
• To cause to unite, or to regard as united, in one common substance or nature.
v. i.
• To profess or belive the doctrine of consubstantion.
a.
• Partaking of the same substance; united; consubstantial.
Consubstantiation
n.
• An identity or union of substance.
(Theol.) The actual, substantial presence of the body of Christ with the bread and wine of the sacrament of the Lord's Supper; impanation; — opposed to transubstantiation.
Consuetude
n.
• Custom, habit; usage.
Consuetudinal
a.
• According to custom; customary; usual.
Consuetudinary
a.
• Customary.
Consul
n.
(Rom. Antiq.) One of the two chief magistrates of the republic.
• A senator; a counselor.
(Fr. Hist.) One of the three chief magistrates of France from 1799 to 1804, who were called, respectively, first, second, and third consul.
• An official comissioned to reside in some foreign country, to care for the commercial interests of the citizens of the appointing government, and to protect its seamen.
Consulage
n.
(Com.) A duty or tax paid by merchants for the protection of their connerce by means of a consul in a foreign place.
Consular
a.
• Of or pertaining to a consul; performing the duties of a consul; as, consular power; consular dignity; consular officers.
Consulary
a.
• Consular.
Consulate
n.
• The office of a consul.
• The jurisdiction or residence of a consul.
• Consular government; term of office of a consul.
Consulship
n.
• The office of a consul; consulate.
• The term of office of a consul.
Consult
v. i.
• To seek the opinion or advice of another; to take consel; to deliberate together; to confer.
v. t.
• To ask advice of; to seek the opinion of; to apply to for information or instruction; to refer to; as, to consult a physician; to consult a dictionary.
• To have reference to, in judging or acting; to have regard to; to consider; as, to consult one's wishes.
• To deliberate upon; to take for.
• To bring about by counsel or contrivance; to devise; to contrive.
n.
• The act of consulting or deliberating; consultation; also, the result of consulation; determination; decision.
• A council; a meeting for consultation.
• Agreement; concert
Consultary
a.
• Formed by consultation; resulting from conference.
Consultation
n.
• The act of consulting or conferring; deliberation of two or more persons on some matter, with a view to a decision.
• A council or conference, as of physicians, held to consider a special case, or of lawyers restained in a cause.
Consultative
a.
• Pertaining to consultation; having the privilege or right of conference.
Consultatory
a.
• Formed by, or resulting from, consultation; advisory.
Consulter
n.
• One who consults, or asks counsel or information.
Consulting
a.
• That consults.
Consultive
a.
• Determined by, or pertaining to, consultation; deliberate; consultative.
Consumable
a.
• Capable of being consumed; that may be destroyed, dissipated, wasted, or spent.
Consume
v. t.
• To destroy, as by decomposition, dissipation, waste, or fire; to use up; to expend; to waste; to burn up; to eat up; to devour.
v. i.
• To waste away slowly.
Consumedly
adv.
• Excessively.
Consumer
n.
• One who, or that which, consumes; as, the consumer of food.
Consumingly
adv.
• In a consuming manner.
Consummate
a.
• Carried to the utmost extent or degree; of the highest quality; complete; perfect.
v. t.
• To bring to completion; to raise to the highest point or degree; to complete; to finish; to perfect; to achieve.
Consummately
adv.
• In a consummate manner; completely.
Consummation
n.
• The act of consummating, or the state of being consummated; completed; completion; perfection; termination; end (as of the world or of life).
Consummative
a.
• Serving to consummate; completing.
Consumption
n.
• The act or process of consuming by use, waste, etc.; decay; destruction.
• The state or process of being consumed, wasted, or diminished; waste; diminution; loss; decay.
(Med.) A progressive wasting away of the body; esp., that form of wasting, attendant upon pulmonary phthisis and associated with cough, spitting of blood, hectic fever, etc.; pulmonary phthisis; — called also pulmonary consumption.
Consumptive
a.
• Of or pertaining to consumption; having the quality of consuming, or dissipating; destructive; wasting.
(Med.) Affected with, or inclined to, consumption.
n.
• One affected with consumption; as, a resort for consumptives.
Consumptively
adv.
• In a way tending to or indication consumption.
Consumptiveness
n.
• A state of being consumptive, or a tendency to a consumption.

Scripting is ©2021 DictionaryOfTheEnglishLanguage.com, ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. Dictionary entries are public domain.